Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

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WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Baroness Evans of Bowes Park (Lord Privy Seal)
Lords

Honours update

My Rt Hon Friend the Prime Minister has made the following statement:

I would like to update Parliament on the Government’s plans for recognising the extraordinary contributions being made by so many in response to Coronavirus (COVID-19) - and the forthcoming publication of Her Majesty The Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

There is, understandably, huge appetite across the country to say thank you to all those on the frontline, within our communities and in our public services, who are supporting the nation through these unprecedented times.

The Government is clear that there will be a range of opportunities to mark the contributions of so many - but this must come at the appropriate time. Our current priority - and that of the front line services - remains tackling the current public health emergency.

I want to provide assurance today, however, that the moment to mark so many extraordinary actions will not be lost.

The honours system recognises exceptional contributions made across every part of the UK and will play a key role in demonstrating the nation’s gratitude to all those involved in the response. In this context, The Queen has graciously agreed that the Birthday Honours List, due to be published in June, should be postponed until the autumn. This step will allow us to ensure that the List, agreed before this public health emergency developed, reflects the COVID-19 effort, and comes at a time when we can properly celebrate the achievements of all those included.

We anticipate that COVID-19 recognition will happen across future honours lists, reflecting the on-going work being done by so many. To ensure we are capturing contributions from across the country I would encourage the public to put forward nominations for those they know are going above and beyond, which they can do through Gov.uk. These cases will be considered by the independent honours committees across a range of future honours lists.

Colonel Tom Moore, recently celebrating his 100th birthday, has become synonymous with the spirit of the current collective national effort. I have, exceptionally, recommended to The Queen that he be awarded a knighthood, in recognition of his extraordinary fundraising achievements, and as a signal of the kind of contributions we will want to mark in the months to come.

Further work is underway to identify the most appropriate ways and opportunities for the nation to express its gratitude and respect. The Government will make a further statement to the House in due course.

WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Baroness Goldie (Minister of State , Ministry of Defence)
Lords

Contingent Liability

My hon. Friend the Minister of State for Defence Procurement (Jeremy Quin MP) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

I am today laying a Departmental Minute to advise that the Ministry of Defence has received approval from Her Majesty’s Treasury to recognise a new contingent liability associated with the operation of satellites conducting in-orbit research by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl).

The Departmental Minute describes the contingent liability that the Ministry of Defence (MOD) will hold as part of its Space Science & Technology Programme.

Dstl has installed a ground station at its Portsdown West site, which will contribute to supporting space research activities, upskilling civilian and military personnel in satellite mission operations, and task its first research satellites for the Ministry of Defence. Through this programme, MOD will develop the skills and capability to achieve its strategic objectives in the space domain.

The contingent liability will last the duration of Dstl’s operation of the satellites and will come into effect if a satellite collision was caused via Dstl operation. Mitigations are in place against risks to minimise likelihood and impact which are deemed to be 0.001-0.01%. Her Majesty’s Treasury has approved a value of up to £500 million for the contingent liability to cover the maximum estimated damage cost resulting from a collision. The MOD will note the liability in its accounts. May 2020

Departmental Minute (PDF Document, 38.27 KB)
WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (Secretary of State for Defence)
Commons

Rebalancing of the Covid Support Force (including Reserves)

In late March, as the Government stepped up its response to the global pandemic, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) established the Covid Support Force (CSF), in anticipation of a sharp increase in requests for Military Assistance to the Civilian Authorities (MACA).

Approximately 20,000 personnel, with appropriate planning, logistical, and medical expertise, were grouped within the CSF and held at higher readiness, alongside forward-based aviation assets, to ensure Defence could respond wherever and whenever needed across the United Kingdom.

Since then the CSF has played a key role throughout the national response. On any given day approximately 4,000 are ‘deployed’ supporting other departments and organisations. Many thousands more service personnel and civil servants are contributing to the response through their routine employment within Defence Medical Services, Defence Science and Technology Laboratories, Defence Equipment & Support, and various military headquarters. Together they have answered 162 MACA requests, from patient recovery in the Orkney Islands to logistical support in the Channel Islands.

Some of this has been highly visible, such as helping to build Nightingale hospitals, delivering PPE to hospitals and Local Resilience Forums, and operating Mobile Testing Units. However, much of it has been out of sight from the public: whether supporting national-level strategy formation in DHSC and MHCLG; countering disinformation with the Cabinet Office, procuring PPE and medical equipment; or mentoring and liaising within Local Resilience Forums, and their devolved equivalents, as they react to the complex and varied situations in their local communities.

Those situations are currently improving, due to the public’s adherence to lockdown measures and the ability of other government departments to maintain essential services. As a result, the demand for CSF support has stabilised and it has not been necessary to deploy most of those personnel currently held at higher readiness.

It is appropriate that the MOD’s contribution and force posture are tailored to the evolving situation, so it can both respond to Covid-19 and continue fulfilling other critical defence outputs.

This rebalancing is conditions-based and conducted in consultation with other government departments; assessing how many personnel are required to fulfil current CSF tasks and respond to all future requests, including those requiring uplifts in personnel.

That total is currently determined to be 7,500 personnel and it is now prudent to release the remainder of the CSF – otherwise held indefinitely at higher readiness – so they can return to other tasks and preparations for future operations.

Additionally, 2,000 of the reservists who volunteered for mobilisation but are no longer required to fulfil MACA tasks, are now being engaged about the processes for demobilisation with a view to mitigating the impact both to them and their employers. They are testament to the nation’s resolve in this crisis and we are grateful for their enduring commitment.

The crisis is not over, so the CSF will continue assisting civilian authorities wherever required and no personnel – regular or reserve – will be withdrawn from tasks while the demand remains. Likewise, Defence’s wider contributions to the Covid-19 response, to the routine functioning of Government, and to the prosperity and wellbeing of society, all remain unaltered.

Defence is much more than its equipment and uniformed personnel. It is a community of public servants committing brains, brawn, and heart to ensure the nation’s defence and resilience. That community will continue to support our colleagues in health and social care, providing however many people are required, for as long it takes, to help them defeat this virus.

WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Baroness Goldie (Minister in the House of Lords, Ministry of Defence)
Lords

Rebalancing of the Covid Support Force (Including Reserves)

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Defence (Ben Wallace MP) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

In late March, as the Government stepped up its response to the global pandemic, the Ministry of Defence (MOD) established the Covid Support Force (CSF), in anticipation of a sharp increase in requests for Military Assistance to the Civilian Authorities (MACA).

Approximately 20,000 personnel, with appropriate planning, logistical, and medical expertise, were grouped within the CSF and held at higher readiness, alongside forward-based aviation assets, to ensure Defence could respond wherever and whenever needed across the United Kingdom.

Since then the CSF has played a key role throughout the national response. On any given day approximately 4,000 are ‘deployed’ supporting other departments and organisations. Many thousands more service personnel and civil servants are contributing to the response through their routine employment within Defence Medical Services, Defence Science and Technology Laboratories, Defence Equipment & Support, and various military headquarters. Together they have answered 162 MACA requests, from patient recovery in the Orkney Islands to logistical support in the Channel Islands.

Some of this has been highly visible, such as helping to build Nightingale hospitals, delivering PPE to hospitals and Local Resilience Forums, and operating Mobile Testing Units. However, much of it has been out of sight from the public: whether supporting national-level strategy formation in DHSC and MHCLG; countering disinformation with the Cabinet Office, procuring PPE and medical equipment; or mentoring and liaising within Local Resilience Forums, and their devolved equivalents, as they react to the complex and varied situations in their local communities.

Those situations are currently improving, due to the public’s adherence to lockdown measures and the ability of other government departments to maintain essential services. As a result, the demand for CSF support has stabilised and it has not been necessary to deploy most of those personnel currently held at higher readiness.

It is appropriate that the MOD’s contribution and force posture are tailored to the evolving situation, so it can both respond to Covid-19 and continue fulfilling other critical defence outputs.

This rebalancing is conditions-based and conducted in consultation with other government departments; assessing how many personnel are required to fulfil current CSF tasks and respond to all future requests, including those requiring uplifts in personnel.

That total is currently determined to be 7,500 personnel and it is now prudent to release the remainder of the CSF – otherwise held indefinitely at higher readiness – so they can return to other tasks and preparations for future operations.

Additionally, 2,000 of the reservists who volunteered for mobilisation but are no longer required to fulfil MACA tasks, are now being engaged about the processes for demobilisation with a view to mitigating the impact both to them and their employers. They are testament to the nation’s resolve in this crisis and we are grateful for their enduring commitment.

The crisis is not over, so the CSF will continue assisting civilian authorities wherever required and no personnel – regular or reserve – will be withdrawn from tasks while the demand remains. Likewise, Defence’s wider contributions to the Covid-19 response, to the routine functioning of Government, and to the prosperity and wellbeing of society, all remain unaltered.

Defence is much more than its equipment and uniformed personnel. It is a community of public servants committing brains, brawn, and heart to ensure the nation’s defence and resilience. That community will continue to support our colleagues in health and social care, providing however many people are required, for as long it takes, to help them defeat this virus.

WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Lord True (Minister of State)
Lords

The European (Withdrawal) Act and Common Frameworks

My Hon. Friend, the Minister of State for the Cabinet Office (Chloe Smith) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I am today laying before Parliament a report, ‘The European Union (Withdrawal) Act and Common Frameworks: 26 December 2019 to 25 March 2020'. I am laying this report because it is a legal requirement under the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 for quarterly reports to be made to Parliament on the progress of the work to develop common frameworks. The report is available on Gov.uk and details the progress made between the UK Government and devolved administrations regarding the development of common frameworks. This report details progress made during the seventh 3-month reporting period, and sets out that no ‘freezing’ regulations have been brought forward under section 12 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act. A copy of the ‘The European Union (Withdrawal) Act and Common Frameworks: 26 December 2019 to 25 March 2020’ report has been placed in the library of both Houses. The publication of the report reflects the Government’s continued commitment to transparency.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS250
WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Baroness Goldie (Minister in the House of Lords, Ministry of Defence)
Lords

Chemical Weapons Convention - Declaration of Protective Programme for 2019

The UK's chemical protection programme is designed to protect against the use of chemical weapons. Such a programme is permitted by the Chemical Weapons Convention, with which the United Kingdom is fully compliant. Under the terms of the Convention, we are required to provide information annually to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. In accordance with the Government's commitment to openness, I am placing in the Library of the House a copy of the summary that has been provided to the Organisation outlining the UK's chemical protection programme in 2019.

WS
Department for Transport
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Baroness Vere of Norbiton (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Transport)
Lords

Transport update

My Honourable Friend, the Minister of State for Transport (Andrew Stephenson), has made the following Ministerial Statement.

I have been asked by my Right Honourable Friend, the Secretary of State, to make this Written Ministerial Statement. This statement concerns the application of 17 July 2018 made by RiverOak Strategic Partners Ltd (“the Applicant”) under the Planning Act 2008 for the proposed reopening and development of Manston Airport in Kent.

Under sub-section 107(1) of the Planning Act 2008, the Secretary of State must make his decision within 3 months of receipt of the Examining Authority’s report unless exercising the power under sub-section 107(3) to extend the deadline and make a Statement to the House of Parliament announcing the new deadline.

The Secretary of State received the Examining Authority’s report on the Manston Airport Development Consent Order application on 18 October 2019 and, following an earlier extension of 4 months, the current deadline for a decision is 18 May 2020.

The deadline for the decision is now to be extended to 10 July 2020 to enable further work to be carried out before determination of the application.

The decision to set a new deadline is without prejudice to the decision on whether to grant development consent.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS247
WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Chloe Smith (Minister of State)
Commons

The European (Withdrawal) Act and Common Frameworks

I am today laying before Parliament a report, ‘The European Union (Withdrawal) Act and Common Frameworks: 26 December 2019 to 25 March 2020'. I am laying this report because it is a legal requirement under the EU (Withdrawal) Act 2018 for quarterly reports to be made to Parliament on the progress of the work to develop common frameworks. The report is available on Gov.uk and details the progress made between the UK Government and devolved administrations regarding the development of common frameworks. This report details progress made during the seventh 3-month reporting period, and sets out that no ‘freezing’ regulations have been brought forward under section 12 of the European Union (Withdrawal) Act. A copy of the ‘The European Union (Withdrawal) Act and Common Frameworks: 26 December 2019 to 25 March 2020’ report has been placed in the library of both Houses. The publication of the report reflects the Government’s continued commitment to transparency.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS244
WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Jeremy Quin (The Minister of State for Defence Procurement )
Commons

Contingent Liability

I am today laying a Departmental Minute to advise that the Ministry of Defence has received approval from Her Majesty’s Treasury to recognise a new contingent liability associated with the operation of satellites conducting in-orbit research by the Defence Science and Technology Laboratory (Dstl).

The Departmental Minute describes the contingent liability that the Ministry of Defence (MOD) will hold as part of its Space Science & Technology Programme.

Dstl has installed a ground station at its Portsdown West site, which will contribute to supporting space research activities, upskilling civilian and military personnel in satellite mission operations, and task its first research satellites for the Ministry of Defence. Through this programme, MOD will develop the skills and capability to achieve its strategic objectives in the space domain.

The contingent liability will last the duration of Dstl’s operation of the satellites and will come into effect if a satellite collision was caused via Dstl operation. Mitigations are in place against risks to minimise likelihood and impact which are deemed to be 0.001-0.01%. Her Majesty’s Treasury has approved a value of up to £500 million for the contingent liability to cover the maximum estimated damage cost resulting from a collision. The MOD will note the liability in its accounts. May 2020

Departmental Minute (PDF Document, 38.27 KB)
WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: James Heappey (Minister for the Armed Forces)
Commons

Chemical Weapons Convention - Declaration of Protective Programme for 2019

My noble Friend the Minister in the House of Lords (The Rt Hon Baroness Goldie DL) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

The UK's chemical protection programme is designed to protect against the use of chemical weapons. Such a programme is permitted by the Chemical Weapons Convention, with which the United Kingdom is fully compliant. Under the terms of the Convention, we are required to provide information annually to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. In accordance with the Government's commitment to openness, I am placing in the Library of the House a copy of the summary that has been provided to the Organisation outlining the UK's chemical protection programme in 2019.

WS
Department for Transport
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Andrew Stephenson (Minister of State for Transport)
Commons

Transport update

I have been asked by my Right Honourable Friend, the Secretary of State, to make this Written Ministerial Statement. This statement concerns the application of 17 July 2018 made by RiverOak Strategic Partners Ltd (“the Applicant”) under the Planning Act 2008 for the proposed reopening and development of Manston Airport in Kent.

Under sub-section 107(1) of the Planning Act 2008, the Secretary of State must make his decision within 3 months of receipt of the Examining Authority’s report unless exercising the power under sub-section 107(3) to extend the deadline and make a Statement to the House of Parliament announcing the new deadline.

The Secretary of State received the Examining Authority’s report on the Manston Airport Development Consent Order application on 18 October 2019 and, following an earlier extension of 4 months, the current deadline for a decision is 18 May 2020.

The deadline for the decision is now to be extended to 10 July 2020 to enable further work to be carried out before determination of the application.

The decision to set a new deadline is without prejudice to the decision on whether to grant development consent.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS242
WS
Prime Minister
Made on: 20 May 2020
Made by: Boris Johnson (Prime Minister)
Commons

Honours Update

I would like to update Parliament on the Government’s plans for recognising the extraordinary contributions being made by so many in response to Coronavirus (COVID-19) - and the forthcoming publication of Her Majesty The Queen’s Birthday Honours List.

There is, understandably, huge appetite across the country to say thank you to all those on the frontline, within our communities and in our public services, who are supporting the nation through these unprecedented times.

The Government is clear that there will be a range of opportunities to mark the contributions of so many - but this must come at the appropriate time. Our current priority - and that of the front line services - remains tackling the current public health emergency.

I want to provide assurance today, however, that the moment to mark so many extraordinary actions will not be lost.

The honours system recognises exceptional contributions made across every part of the UK and will play a key role in demonstrating the nation’s gratitude to all those involved in the response. In this context, The Queen has graciously agreed that the Birthday Honours List, due to be published in June, should be postponed until the autumn. This step will allow us to ensure that the List, agreed before this public health emergency developed, reflects the COVID-19 effort, and comes at a time when we can properly celebrate the achievements of all those included.

We anticipate that COVID-19 recognition will happen across future honours lists, reflecting the on-going work being done by so many. To ensure we are capturing contributions from across the country I would encourage the public to put forward nominations for those they know are going above and beyond, which they can do through Gov.uk. These cases will be considered by the independent honours committees across a range of future honours lists.

Colonel Tom Moore, recently celebrating his 100th birthday, has become synonymous with the spirit of the current collective national effort. I have, exceptionally, recommended to The Queen that he be awarded a knighthood, in recognition of his extraordinary fundraising achievements, and as a signal of the kind of contributions we will want to mark in the months to come.

Further work is underway to identify the most appropriate ways and opportunities for the nation to express its gratitude and respect. The Government will make a further statement to the House in due course.

WS
Treasury
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: Lord Agnew of Oulton (Minister of State)
Lords

Operation of the UK's Counter-Terrorist Asset Freezing Regime: 1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019

My honourable friend the Economic Secretary to the Treasury (John Glen) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

Under the Terrorist Asset-Freezing etc. Act 2010 (TAFA 2010), the Treasury is required to prepare a quarterly report regarding its exercise of the powers conferred on it by Part 1 of TAFA 2010. This written statement satisfies that requirement for the period 1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019.

This report also covers the UK’s implementation of the UN’s ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida asset freezing regime (ISIL-AQ), and the operation of the EU’s asset freezing regime under EU Regulation (EC) 2580/2001 concerning external terrorist threats to the EU (also referred to as the CP 931 regime).

Under the ISIL-AQ asset freezing regime, the UN has responsibility for designations and the Treasury, through the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI), has responsibility for licensing and compliance with the regime in the UK under the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida (Asset-Freezing) Regulations 2011.

Under EU Regulation 2580/2001, the EU has responsibility for designations and OFSI has responsibility for licensing and compliance with the regime in the UK under Part 1 of TAFA 2010.

EU Regulation (2016/1686) was implemented on 22 September 2016. This permits the EU to make autonomous Al-Qaida and ISIL (Da’esh) listings.

The tables attached set out the key asset-freezing activity in the UK during the quarter.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS244
WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: Michael Gove (Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office )
Commons

Negotiations on the UK's future relationship with the EU: update

The Government has made a commitment to update Parliament on the progress of our future relationship negotiations with the EU. This statement provides an update on the third round of negotiations. It also notes that the UK’s draft legal texts are being made public today.

Negotiators from the UK and the EU held discussions through video conferencing on 11 – 15 May 2020 for the third round of negotiations on the UK-EU future relationship. This was a full and constructive negotiating round, covering the full range of issues with both sides discussing full legal texts. The round was opened by the UK’s Chief Negotiator, David Frost, and by the European Commission’s Chief Negotiator, Michel Barnier, in a plenary session on 11 May. There were then discussions across all the issues and the session closed with a further plenary on 15 May.

Discussions covered all workstreams including:

  • Trade in Goods – Market access and rules of origin, trade remedies, customs, technical barriers to trade and SPS.

  • Trade in Services –Investment, temporary entry for business purposes, professional qualifications, professional and business services, financial services and digital.

  • Fisheries – Discussion on control and enforcement, conservation and sustainable exploitation, and scientific evidence, all principally on the basis of the draft Fisheries Framework Agreement provided to the EU the previous week.

  • Transport – Aviation and aviation safety, road haulage and passenger transport.

  • Energy – Civil nuclear cooperation, gas and electricity trading, climate change and carbon pricing.

  • Mobility and Social Security Coordination – Including the UK’s legal text on social security coordination.

  • Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice – UK presentation of the UK Law Enforcement Treaty with detailed discussions on operational capabilities.

  • Thematic cooperation – Covering health security; asylum and illegal migration; unaccompanied asylum-seeking children; cyber security; and security of information.

  • Participation in Union Programmes - General terms for UK participation in programmes, including provisions for financial contribution.

  • “Level Playing Field” - Including subsidies, competition policy, and trade and sustainable development.

  • Horizontal Issues - Governance arrangements, territorial scope.

Discussions showed that a standard Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement, with other key agreements on issues like law enforcement, civil nuclear, and aviation alongside, all in line with the Political Declaration, could be agreed without major difficulties in the time available.

However, there remain some areas where we have significant differences of principle – notably fisheries, governance arrangements, and the so-called “level playing field”. It remains difficult to reach a mutually beneficial agreement while the EU maintains an ideological approach.

In order to facilitate discussions in the fourth Round and beyond, the Government is today making publicly available the draft legal texts we have shared with the Commission and which have formed the basis of our discussions, together of course with the EU’s draft Agreement. The UK texts are fully in line with the Government’s document “The Approach to the Future Negotiations” published on 27 February. Copies of the legal texts have been placed in the House Library and they are also available on GOV.UK.

This Government remains committed to a deal with a Free Trade Agreement at its core. We look forward to the fourth Round beginning on 1 June.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS239
WS
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: Lord Greenhalgh (Minister of State for Building Safety and Communities)
Lords

Energy Performance of Buildings: A consultation on changes to The Energy Performance of Buildings Regulations 2012, No. 3118

My Rt. Hon. Friend, the Minister of State for Housing (Christhoper Pincher) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I wish to update the House on the publication of a consultation on changes to the Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012 (SI2012/3118).

The United Kingdom has set in law a target to bring its greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050 to help tackle climate change. Heating and powering buildings currently accounts for 40% of the UK’s total energy usage. We must ensure that buildings are constructed to high standards of energy efficiency and that the regime for regulating the energy performance of buildings is robust.

This consultation seeks views on proposals to amend existing requirements for inspecting heating and air conditioning systems in order to improve the regime and contribute to carbon emission reductions and energy efficiency savings. The new requirements aim to strengthen the effectiveness of the regime by increasing the threshold for inspection to focus on larger systems. It further aims to improve the regime’s impact by broadening the scope of inspection to include combined heating and ventilation systems and combined air conditioning and ventilation systems.

The Government proposes to retain its domestic arrangements (i.e. take the option of Alternative Measures). This means continuing to provide consumers with the advice necessary to make informed decisions on the energy efficiency of their heating systems and widening the scope to include combined heating and ventilation systems. The United Kingdom boiler market is the biggest in the world and has some of the most experienced manufacturers and installers. The United Kingdom’s equivalence reports, which are required to demonstrate that the domestic policy achieves the aims intended by the changes to the regulations, have demonstrated that the carbon savings attributable to the UK’s Alternative Measures were greater than those that would have been achieved through inspection. One of the key elements of the domestic regime is Boiler Plus whose standards are expected to help reduce carbon emissions by up to 2 MtCO2e[1] in Carbon Budget 4 (2023-2027)[2] and 3.2 MtCO2e in Carbon Budget 5 (2028-2032)[3], whilst enabling consumers to heat homes at a lower cost.

The consultation also proposes to amend the inspection regime for air conditioning systems increasing the threshold and widening the scope to include combined air conditioning and ventilation systems, bringing with it the benefits of a stronger regime set out above.

These measures are only part of our journey towards a cleaner, greener built environment. The Government is determined that we will be the first generation to leave the environment in a better state than we found it and improving the energy performance of our buildings will be a key factor in tackling climate change, achieving clean growth and safeguarding our planet for the future.

This Written Ministerial Statement covers England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland in relation to the inspection of heating systems. It covers England and Wales in respect of the proposed changes to air conditioning inspections. The devolved administrations are considering similar changes.

The consultation document can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/energy-performance-of-buildings-changes-to-the-energy-performance-of-buildings-regulations-2012-no-3118

I am depositing a copy of the consultation in libraries of both the House of Commons and House of Lords.

[1] A metric measure used to compare the emissions from different greenhouse gases based upon their global warming potential (GWP).

[2] 4th carbon budget (2023 to 2027) 1,950 MtCO2e

[3] 5th carbon budget (2028 to 2032)1,725 MtCO2e

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS243
WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: Lord True (Minister of State)
Lords

Negotiations on the UK's future relationship with the EU: update

My Rt Hon. Friend, the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster (Michael Gove) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

The Government has made a commitment to update Parliament on the progress of our future relationship negotiations with the EU. This statement provides an update on the third round of negotiations. It also notes that the UK’s draft legal texts are being made public today.

Negotiators from the UK and the EU held discussions through video conferencing on 11 – 15 May 2020 for the third round of negotiations on the UK-EU future relationship. This was a full and constructive negotiating round, covering the full range of issues with both sides discussing full legal texts. The round was opened by the UK’s Chief Negotiator, David Frost, and by the European Commission’s Chief Negotiator, Michel Barnier, in a plenary session on 11 May. There were then discussions across all the issues and the session closed with a further plenary on 15 May.

Discussions covered all workstreams including:

  • Trade in Goods – Market access and rules of origin, trade remedies, customs, technical barriers to trade and SPS.

  • Trade in Services –Investment, temporary entry for business purposes, professional qualifications, professional and business services, financial services and digital.

  • Fisheries – Discussion on control and enforcement, conservation and sustainable exploitation, and scientific evidence, all principally on the basis of the draft Fisheries Framework Agreement provided to the EU the previous week.

  • Transport – Aviation and aviation safety, road haulage and passenger transport.

  • Energy – Civil nuclear cooperation, gas and electricity trading, climate change and carbon pricing.

  • Mobility and Social Security Coordination – Including the UK’s legal text on social security coordination.

  • Law Enforcement and Criminal Justice – UK presentation of the UK Law Enforcement Treaty with detailed discussions on operational capabilities.

  • Thematic cooperation – Covering health security; asylum and illegal migration; unaccompanied asylum-seeking children; cyber security; and security of information.

  • Participation in Union Programmes - General terms for UK participation in programmes, including provisions for financial contribution.

  • “Level Playing Field” - Including subsidies, competition policy, and trade and sustainable development.

  • Horizontal Issues - Governance arrangements, territorial scope.

Discussions showed that a standard Comprehensive Free Trade Agreement, with other key agreements on issues like law enforcement, civil nuclear, and aviation alongside, all in line with the Political Declaration, could be agreed without major difficulties in the time available.

However, there remain some areas where we have significant differences of principle – notably fisheries, governance arrangements, and the so-called “level playing field”. It remains difficult to reach a mutually beneficial agreement while the EU maintains an ideological approach.

In order to facilitate discussions in the fourth Round and beyond, the Government is today making publicly available the draft legal texts we have shared with the Commission and which have formed the basis of our discussions, together of course with the EU’s draft Agreement. The UK texts are fully in line with the Government’s document “The Approach to the Future Negotiations” published on 27 February. Copies of the legal texts have been placed in the House Library and they are also available on GOV.UK.

This Government remains committed to a deal with a Free Trade Agreement at its core. We look forward to the fourth Round beginning on 1 June.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS245
WS
Treasury
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: John Glen (The Economic Secretary to the Treasury)
Commons

Operation of the UK's Counter-Terrorist Asset Freezing Regime: 1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019

Under the Terrorist Asset-Freezing etc. Act 2010 (TAFA 2010), the Treasury is required to prepare a quarterly report regarding its exercise of the powers conferred on it by Part 1 of TAFA 2010. This written statement satisfies that requirement for the period 1 October 2019 to 31 December 2019.

This report also covers the UK’s implementation of the UN’s ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida asset freezing regime (ISIL-AQ), and the operation of the EU’s asset freezing regime under EU Regulation (EC) 2580/2001 concerning external terrorist threats to the EU (also referred to as the CP 931 regime).

Under the ISIL-AQ asset freezing regime, the UN has responsibility for designations and the Treasury, through the Office of Financial Sanctions Implementation (OFSI), has responsibility for licensing and compliance with the regime in the UK under the ISIL (Da’esh) and Al-Qaida (Asset-Freezing) Regulations 2011.

Under EU Regulation 2580/2001, the EU has responsibility for designations and OFSI has responsibility for licensing and compliance with the regime in the UK under Part 1 of TAFA 2010.

EU Regulation (2016/1686) was implemented on 22 September 2016. This permits the EU to make autonomous Al-Qaida and ISIL (Da’esh) listings.

The tables attached set out the key asset-freezing activity in the UK during the quarter.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS241
WS
Home Office
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Government Response to the Anthony Grainger Inquiry Report

My hon Friend the Minister of State for Crime, Policing and the Fire Service (Kit Malthouse) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

Today the Government has published its formal response to the Anthony Grainger Public Inquiry and a copy will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Anthony Grainger was shot dead on 3 March 2012 by an armed firearms officer of Greater Manchester Police as part of the covert investigation named Operation Shire. A public inquiry was announced by the then Home Secretary, Theresa May, in March 2016 to ascertain the circumstances surrounding Mr Grainger’s death.

I would like to thank His Honour Judge Teague for publishing his report and for leading this important work, from which we have learnt valuable lessons for the future. The previous Home Secretary Sajid Javid committed to provide a formal response, once the Government had fully considered the report, and any recommendations therein and we are now in a position to do so.

The Government accepts the Inquiry’s recommendation to the Home Office concerning the authorisation of new weapon systems. A revised Code of Practice for Armed Policing and Less Lethal Weapons was published by the College of Policing on 14 January 2020 making clear that all new less lethal weapons and specialist munitions for use by police forces in England and Wales, and all significant changes to these weapons, must be approved by the Home Secretary.

The majority of the AGI’s recommendations related to operational policing and these are matters on which Chief Officers are independent of Government. Nonetheless my officials engaged with the National Police Chiefs Council and Greater Manchester Police to ensure that they have responded to the concerns raised by the Inquiry and understand their plans to improve the safety of armed policing operations. Their responses have reassured me that lessons have been learnt to improve the safety of armed policing operations in the seven years since the death of Anthony Grainger.

These included developing and maintaining a national register of recommendations and lessons from inquests, investigations and inquiries; reviewing and improving the collection, analysis and dissemination of intelligence; and reviewing and improving the arrangements for the deployment of armed officers. I would like to thank the National Chiefs Police Council, Greater Manchester Police, HMICFRS and the College of Policing for their co-operation in responding to the Inquiry and the work that they have done to implement learning.

The police use of firearms, as with any use of force, must be necessary, proportionate and reasonable in the circumstances. It is essential that decisions by the police to use force of any kind are subject to proper scrutiny.

Our sympathy remains with Anthony Grainger’s family who have lost a loved one.

The Response to the Anthony Grainger Inquiry will be available to view on Gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/response-to-the-anthony-grainger-public-inquiry

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS242
WS
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: Christopher Pincher (Minister of State for Housing )
Commons

Energy Performance of Buildings: A consultation on changes to The Energy Performance of Buildings Regulations 2012, No. 3118

I wish to update the House on the publication of a consultation on changes to the Energy Performance of Buildings (England and Wales) Regulations 2012 (SI2012/3118).

The United Kingdom has set in law a target to bring its greenhouse gas emissions to net zero by 2050 to help tackle climate change. Heating and powering buildings currently accounts for 40% of the UK’s total energy usage. We must ensure that buildings are constructed to high standards of energy efficiency and that the regime for regulating the energy performance of buildings is robust.

This consultation seeks views on proposals to amend existing requirements for inspecting heating and air conditioning systems in order to improve the regime and contribute to carbon emission reductions and energy efficiency savings. The new requirements aim to strengthen the effectiveness of the regime by increasing the threshold for inspection to focus on larger systems. It further aims to improve the regime’s impact by broadening the scope of inspection to include combined heating and ventilation systems and combined air conditioning and ventilation systems.

The Government proposes to retain its domestic arrangements (i.e. take the option of Alternative Measures). This means continuing to provide consumers with the advice necessary to make informed decisions on the energy efficiency of their heating systems and widening the scope to include combined heating and ventilation systems. The United Kingdom boiler market is the biggest in the world and has some of the most experienced manufacturers and installers. The United Kingdom’s equivalence reports, which are required to demonstrate that the domestic policy achieves the aims intended by the changes to the regulations, have demonstrated that the carbon savings attributable to the UK’s Alternative Measures were greater than those that would have been achieved through inspection. One of the key elements of the domestic regime is Boiler Plus whose standards are expected to help reduce carbon emissions by up to 2 MtCO2e[1] in Carbon Budget 4 (2023-2027)[2] and 3.2 MtCO2e in Carbon Budget 5 (2028-2032)[3], whilst enabling consumers to heat homes at a lower cost.

The consultation also proposes to amend the inspection regime for air conditioning systems increasing the threshold and widening the scope to include combined air conditioning and ventilation systems, bringing with it the benefits of a stronger regime set out above.

These measures are only part of our journey towards a cleaner, greener built environment. The Government is determined that we will be the first generation to leave the environment in a better state than we found it and improving the energy performance of our buildings will be a key factor in tackling climate change, achieving clean growth and safeguarding our planet for the future.

This Written Ministerial Statement covers England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland in relation to the inspection of heating systems. It covers England and Wales in respect of the proposed changes to air conditioning inspections. The devolved administrations are considering similar changes.

The consultation document can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/energy-performance-of-buildings-changes-to-the-energy-performance-of-buildings-regulations-2012-no-3118

I am depositing a copy of the consultation in libraries of both the House of Commons and House of Lords.

[1] A metric measure used to compare the emissions from different greenhouse gases based upon their global warming potential (GWP).

[2] 4th carbon budget (2023 to 2027) 1,950 MtCO2e

[3] 5th carbon budget (2028 to 2032)1,725 MtCO2e

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS240
WS
Home Office
Made on: 19 May 2020
Made by: Kit Malthouse (The Minister of State for Crime, Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Government Response to the Anthony Grainger Inquiry Report

Today the Government has published its formal response to the Anthony Grainger Public Inquiry and a copy will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

Anthony Grainger was shot dead on 3 March 2012 by an armed firearms officer of Greater Manchester Police as part of the covert investigation named Operation Shire. A public inquiry was announced by the then Home Secretary, Theresa May, in March 2016 to ascertain the circumstances surrounding Mr Grainger’s death.

I would like to thank His Honour Judge Teague for publishing his report and for leading this important work, from which we have learnt valuable lessons for the future. The previous Home Secretary Sajid Javid committed to provide a formal response, once the Government had fully considered the report, and any recommendations therein and we are now in a position to do so.

The Government accepts the Inquiry’s recommendation to the Home Office concerning the authorisation of new weapon systems. A revised Code of Practice for Armed Policing and Less Lethal Weapons was published by the College of Policing on 14 January 2020 making clear that all new less lethal weapons and specialist munitions for use by police forces in England and Wales, and all significant changes to these weapons, must be approved by the Home Secretary.

The majority of the AGI’s recommendations related to operational policing and these are matters on which Chief Officers are independent of Government. Nonetheless my officials engaged with the National Police Chiefs Council and Greater Manchester Police to ensure that they have responded to the concerns raised by the Inquiry and understand their plans to improve the safety of armed policing operations. Their responses have reassured me that lessons have been learnt to improve the safety of armed policing operations in the seven years since the death of Anthony Grainger.

These included developing and maintaining a national register of recommendations and lessons from inquests, investigations and inquiries; reviewing and improving the collection, analysis and dissemination of intelligence; and reviewing and improving the arrangements for the deployment of armed officers. I would like to thank the National Chiefs Police Council, Greater Manchester Police, HMICFRS and the College of Policing for their co-operation in responding to the Inquiry and the work that they have done to implement learning.

The police use of firearms, as with any use of force, must be necessary, proportionate and reasonable in the circumstances. It is essential that decisions by the police to use force of any kind are subject to proper scrutiny.

Our sympathy remains with Anthony Grainger’s family who have lost a loved one.

The Response to the Anthony Grainger Inquiry will be available to view on Gov.uk at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/response-to-the-anthony-grainger-public-inquiry

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS238
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