Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

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WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Lord Young of Cookham (Lord in Waiting (Government Whip) )
Lords

Infected Blood Inquiry

The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

On 24th September, I attended the commemoration that preceded the preliminary hearings of the Infected Blood Inquiry, and watched the moving and powerful testimony from those infected and affected by the infected blood scandal. The commemoration brought home the terrible human cost of this tragedy, and emphasised to me the importance of this Inquiry, to get to the truth of what happened, and provide the answers that the people infected and affected so desperately need.

When the public Inquiry was launched in July this year, I deferred making a decision on whether to appoint a panel to sit with Sir Brian until he was able to take the view of core participants. Sir Brian Langstaff wrote to me this week following the preliminary hearings, and has advised me that he has now done so, and there has been no demand for a panel. In the place of single experts, sitting as panellists, Sir Brian is establishing expert groups to provide openness and transparency across a range of truly expert opinion. He recommended that I should not appoint co-determining panel members. I accept his recommendation.

In his letter Sir Brian also called for action in relation to financial and psychological support for the affected and infected. The Government will consider those comments and Sir Brian’s recommendations carefully and will respond as soon as possible.

The Cabinet Office takes seriously its role as sponsor to the Infected Blood Inquiry and is determined to do all it can to support the Inquiry with its work. Regrettably, an administrative error earlier this year has come to light, which had delayed the circulation of an instruction to government departments about the retention of records. I can reassure the public that this has resulted in no actual harm, but it is an error for which I apologise to the Inquiry, and most importantly, to the people infected and affected.

The facts are these: Cabinet Office official circulated a Government-wide notice on 3rd April this year, instructing departments to preserve all information relevant to the Infected Blood Inquiry. A further, more comprehensive message was issued to departments by Cabinet Office on 11th June.

However, following a query from the Inquiry about the notice, Cabinet Office officials discovered that the 3rd April email containing the retention notice did not reach its recipients, due to the failure of the collective IT address used. My officials have provided a detailed explanation to the Inquiry which will be published on the Inquiry’s website.

Since the error was discovered, all relevant departments and relevant areas within departments have worked urgently to confirm that they have not destroyed any documents relevant to the Inquiry during the period between 3rd April and 11th June. Because of their size and the complexity of some of the records they hold, HM Courts and Tribunals Service and the Legal Aid Agency are continuing to work to provide this assurance and have committed to doing so as urgently as possible.

The Department of Health and Social Care put in place a moratorium on the destruction of historical records as soon as the Inquiry was announced in July 2017. No material damage has resulted from this administrative error, but I am very sorry it occurred, and I would like to reassure the public that the Cabinet Office will learn the lessons from this to avoid such an error occurring in future.

WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Lord Keen of Elie (The Lords Spokesperson)
Lords

Justice and Home Affairs post-Council statement

My right honourable friend the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice (David Gauke) has made the following Written Statement.

"I attended the Justice and Home Affairs Council for Justice Day on Thursday 11 October in Luxembourg.

The Council reached a General Approach on the Insolvency Restructuring and Second Chance Directive.

During the discussion on E-evidence legislation, Ministers agreed not to include real-time interception within the scope of the Regulation and asked for further work on the extent of the obligation to notify other states when data is sought direct from a service provider. I offered to share UK experience from our bilateral discussions with the US on a data access agreement, which was welcomed by the Commission.

With regard to the draft Conclusions on the application of the Charter of Fundamental Rights in 2017, 20 Member States, including the UK, supported the Netherlands proposal for the adoption of “Presidency Conclusions” given the lack of consensus for Council Conclusions.

The Director of the Fundamental Rights Agency presented his annual review of the fundamental rights situation in the European Union (EU), noting rising levels of hate crime, including anti-Semitism, and discrimination faced by immigrants and minority groups. He also referred to Roma communities living without basic amenities such as electricity and water. Member States noted these concerns.

The Commission updated Ministers on implementation of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO). The European Council will discuss the proposal to extend the EPPO to cross-border terrorism offences.

The discussion on Enhancing Mutual Trust focused on the importance of mutual recognition, whilst noting the importance of an independent judiciary and the rule of law. The UK intervened to recognise the mutual benefits of continued cooperation, and the UK’s commitment to the principle of mutual trust. The Presidency will prepare Conclusions on mutual trust for the December JHA Council.

The Commission presented their Communication on securing free and fair European elections, including protection from personal data misuse and cyber incidents.

The Home Secretary attended Interior day.

The Commission set out ambitious plans for a stronger, more effective European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) including a standing corps of 10,000 officers, which would provide substantial support to Member States in protecting the external border. Member States underlined their support for a stronger Frontex, but expressed concerns about the size of the standing corps, its impact on national authorities and the consequences for Member State competence on border protection.

The Commission briefly presented the new Return Directive recast and Member States discussed accelerated borders procedures, linking the asylum and returns processes, with asylum claims processed as close to the border as possible and, if refused, the failed asylum seeker returned fast and smoothly. Some Member States focused on the need to maximise third country cooperation on returns and readmission of own nationals. Member States were divided on the mandatory nature of the border procedures. Some Member States supported manifestly unfounded claims at the border leading to an entry refusal rather than a returns decision.

Over lunch, Ministers discussed the EU’s comprehensive “whole of route” approach to tackling illegal migration. The Home Secretary focused on strengthening the EU’s response to human traffickers and smugglers advertising online, and boosting our work with African partners on economic development, strategic communications and behavioural insights to prevent migrants from starting dangerous journeys to Europe.

Ministers also discussed the balance between solidarity and responsibility. The Presidency, supported by some Member States, proposed broadening the idea of ‘solidarity’ to avoid compulsory reallocation of refugees to Member States who reject this, but who are content to make substantial contributions to other aspects of migration management, including external partnerships with third countries.

The Council discussed the JHA funding programmes within the next Multi-Annual Financial Framework. The UK will not participate in these programmes as a Member State. The Presidency called on Member States to establish a strong steering structure to ensure the optimal use of funds. Member States supported provisions to step up cooperation with third countries on migration, but raised questions around flexibility and allocations to Member States.

The Presidency updated on progress on the files within the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) package. The Dublin IV proposal, as it links to the issue of solidarity and burden sharing, will be discussed among Leaders at the October European Council."

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1022
WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Mr David Gauke (The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice)
Commons

Justice and Home Affairs post-Council statement

I attended the Justice and Home Affairs Council for Justice Day on Thursday 11 October in Luxembourg.

The Council reached a General Approach on the Insolvency Restructuring and Second Chance Directive.

During the discussion on E-evidence legislation, Ministers agreed not to include real-time interception within the scope of the Regulation and asked for further work on the extent of the obligation to notify other states when data is sought direct from a service provider. I offered to share UK experience from our bilateral discussions with the US on a data access agreement, which was welcomed by the Commission.

With regard to the draft Conclusions on the application of the Charter of Fundamental Rights in 2017, 20 Member States, including the UK, supported the Netherlands proposal for the adoption of “Presidency Conclusions” given the lack of consensus for Council Conclusions.

The Director of the Fundamental Rights Agency presented his annual review of the fundamental rights situation in the European Union (EU), noting rising levels of hate crime, including anti-Semitism, and discrimination faced by immigrants and minority groups. He also referred to Roma communities living without basic amenities such as electricity and water. Member States noted these concerns.

The Commission updated Ministers on implementation of the European Public Prosecutor’s Office (EPPO). The European Council will discuss the proposal to extend the EPPO to cross-border terrorism offences.

The discussion on Enhancing Mutual Trust focused on the importance of mutual recognition, whilst noting the importance of an independent judiciary and the rule of law. The UK intervened to recognise the mutual benefits of continued cooperation, and the UK’s commitment to the principle of mutual trust. The Presidency will prepare Conclusions on mutual trust for the December JHA Council.

The Commission presented their Communication on securing free and fair European elections, including protection from personal data misuse and cyber incidents.

The Home Secretary attended Interior day.

The Commission set out ambitious plans for a stronger, more effective European Border and Coast Guard Agency (Frontex) including a standing corps of 10,000 officers, which would provide substantial support to Member States in protecting the external border. Member States underlined their support for a stronger Frontex, but expressed concerns about the size of the standing corps, its impact on national authorities and the consequences for Member State competence on border protection.

The Commission briefly presented the new Return Directive recast and Member States discussed accelerated borders procedures, linking the asylum and returns processes, with asylum claims processed as close to the border as possible and, if refused, the failed asylum seeker returned fast and smoothly. Some Member States focused on the need to maximise third country cooperation on returns and readmission of own nationals. Member States were divided on the mandatory nature of the border procedures. Some Member States supported manifestly unfounded claims at the border leading to an entry refusal rather than a returns decision.

Over lunch, Ministers discussed the EU’s comprehensive “whole of route” approach to tackling illegal migration. The Home Secretary focused on strengthening the EU’s response to human traffickers and smugglers advertising online, and boosting our work with African partners on economic development, strategic communications and behavioural insights to prevent migrants from starting dangerous journeys to Europe.

Ministers also discussed the balance between solidarity and responsibility. The Presidency, supported by some Member States, proposed broadening the idea of ‘solidarity’ to avoid compulsory reallocation of refugees to Member States who reject this, but who are content to make substantial contributions to other aspects of migration management, including external partnerships with third countries.

The Council discussed the JHA funding programmes within the next Multi-Annual Financial Framework. The UK will not participate in these programmes as a Member State. The Presidency called on Member States to establish a strong steering structure to ensure the optimal use of funds. Member States supported provisions to step up cooperation with third countries on migration, but raised questions around flexibility and allocations to Member States.

The Presidency updated on progress on the files within the Common European Asylum System (CEAS) package. The Dublin IV proposal, as it links to the issue of solidarity and burden sharing, will be discussed among Leaders at the October European Council.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS990
WS
Cabinet Office
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Mr David Lidington (The Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office )
Commons

Infected Blood Inquiry

On 24th September, I attended the commemoration that preceded the preliminary hearings of the Infected Blood Inquiry, and watched the moving and powerful testimony from those infected and affected by the infected blood scandal. The commemoration brought home the terrible human cost of this tragedy, and emphasised to me the importance of this Inquiry, to get to the truth of what happened, and provide the answers that the people infected and affected so desperately need.

When the public Inquiry was launched in July this year, I deferred making a decision on whether to appoint a panel to sit with Sir Brian until he was able to take the view of core participants. Sir Brian Langstaff wrote to me this week following the preliminary hearings, and has advised me that he has now done so, and there has been no demand for a panel. In the place of single experts, sitting as panellists, Sir Brian is establishing expert groups to provide openness and transparency across a range of truly expert opinion. He recommended that I should not appoint co-determining panel members. I accept his recommendation.

In his letter Sir Brian also called for action in relation to financial and psychological support for the affected and infected. The Government will consider those comments and Sir Brian’s recommendations carefully and will respond as soon as possible.

The Cabinet Office takes seriously its role as sponsor to the Infected Blood Inquiry and is determined to do all it can to support the Inquiry with its work. Regrettably, an administrative error earlier this year has come to light, which had delayed the circulation of an instruction to government departments about the retention of records. I can reassure the public that this has resulted in no actual harm, but it is an error for which I apologise to the Inquiry, and most importantly, to the people infected and affected.

The facts are these: Cabinet Office official circulated a Government-wide notice on 3rd April this year, instructing departments to preserve all information relevant to the Infected Blood Inquiry. A further, more comprehensive message was issued to departments by Cabinet Office on 11th June.

However, following a query from the Inquiry about the notice, Cabinet Office officials discovered that the 3rd April email containing the retention notice did not reach its recipients, due to the failure of the collective IT address used. My officials have provided a detailed explanation to the Inquiry which will be published on the Inquiry’s website.

Since the error was discovered, all relevant departments and relevant areas within departments have worked urgently to confirm that they have not destroyed any documents relevant to the Inquiry during the period between 3rd April and 11th June. Because of their size and the complexity of some of the records they hold, HM Courts and Tribunals Service and the Legal Aid Agency are continuing to work to provide this assurance and have committed to doing so as urgently as possible.

The Department of Health and Social Care put in place a moratorium on the destruction of historical records as soon as the Inquiry was announced in July 2017. No material damage has resulted from this administrative error, but I am very sorry it occurred, and I would like to reassure the public that the Cabinet Office will learn the lessons from this to avoid such an error occurring in future.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Modern Slavery: 2018 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Sajid Javid) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

Today, I am publishing the 2018 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. The Report covers the whole of the UK and has been drafted in collaboration with the Northern Ireland Executive, the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government. This report sets out an assessment of the scale of modern slavery in the UK, and outlines the actions that have been taken to combat it over the last year.

A copy of the report will be placed in the House Library.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1020
WS
Leader of the House of Lords
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Baroness Evans of Bowes Park (Lord Privy Seal)
Lords

Draft Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill

Today, the Government publishes the Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill in draft, which seeks to establish the statutory bodies that will be responsible for the restoration and renewal works within the Parliamentary estate, giving effect to the resolutions passed by Parliament earlier this year. In addition to Parliament having expressed its view in those resolutions, it will also be given an opportunity to vote on the proposed design, cost and timing of the substantive building works relating to the Palace of Westminster. In developing the draft Bill, the Government has worked closely with the House Authorities.

The Bill will establish the governance structure within which those bodies will operate. The bodies will have the capacity and capability to make strategic decisions on the Restoration and Renewal Programme, so that the Palace of Westminster can be secured as the UK Parliament for future generations.

The Bill establishes a Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body which will have overall responsibility for the Programme and act as a single client on behalf of both Houses. It will also form a Delivery Authority as a company limited by guarantee. The Delivery Authority will formulate proposals in relation to the restoration works, and ensure their operational delivery. The bodies will be independent and able to operate effectively in the commercial sphere, bringing the expertise and capability needed for a project of this scale. This two-tier approach was used to successfully deliver the London Olympics.

The Bill also establishes a Parliamentary Works Estimates Commission which will lay the Sponsor Body’s estimates before Parliament, and play a role in reviewing the Sponsor Body’s expenditure.

The Government agrees with Parliament that there can be no blank cheque for this work and it must represent good value for taxpayers’ money. The Bill provides that the Sponsor Body and the Delivery Authority must have regard to value for money when exercising their functions throughout the Programme. The Treasury will be able to review and comment on the annual estimates for the funding of the Programme, and the National Audit Office will be able to undertake audits and value-for-money reviews. Furthermore, the Estimates Commission will have the power to review, comment on, and in certain circumstances reject those annual estimates.

It is important that the views of Parliamentarians on the Programme are taken into account. The Sponsor Body will have a majority of Parliamentarians on its Board, alongside external expertise. Parliamentarians will be fully consulted on the strategic direction of the Programme. The Sponsor Body will be required to return to Parliament for approval to make any significant changes to the approved proposals in respect of the Palace. Parliament will also be given an opportunity to vote on the annual expenditure of the Sponsor Body and the Delivery Authority through the estimates process.

We welcome the forthcoming scrutiny of the draft Bill, to ensure that it achieves its aims of a Restoration and Renewal Programme that is sufficiently independent, and that is transparent and accountable to Parliament.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Sajid Javid (The Secretary of State for the Home Department)
Commons

Modern Slavery: 2018 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery

Today, I am publishing the 2018 UK Annual Report on Modern Slavery. The Report covers the whole of the UK and has been drafted in collaboration with the Northern Ireland Executive, the Scottish Government and the Welsh Government. This report sets out an assessment of the scale of modern slavery in the UK, and outlines the actions that have been taken to combat it over the last year.

A copy of the report will be placed in the House Library.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS989
WS
Leader of the House
Made on: 18 October 2018
Made by: Andrea Leadsom (Leader of the House of Commons )
Commons

Draft Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill

Today, the Government publishes the Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill in draft, which seeks to establish the statutory bodies that will be responsible for the restoration and renewal works within the Parliamentary estate, giving effect to the resolutions passed by Parliament earlier this year. In addition to Parliament having expressed its view in those resolutions, it will also be given an opportunity to vote on the proposed design, cost and timing of the substantive building works relating to the Palace of Westminster. In developing the draft Bill, the Government has worked closely with the House Authorities.

The Bill will establish the governance structure within which those bodies will operate. The bodies will have the capacity and capability to make strategic decisions on the Restoration and Renewal Programme, so that the Palace of Westminster can be secured as the UK Parliament for future generations.

The Bill establishes a Parliamentary Works Sponsor Body which will have overall responsibility for the Programme and act as a single client on behalf of both Houses. It will also form a Delivery Authority as a company limited by guarantee. The Delivery Authority will formulate proposals in relation to the restoration works, and ensure their operational delivery. The bodies will be independent and able to operate effectively in the commercial sphere, bringing the expertise and capability needed for a project of this scale. This two-tier approach was used to successfully deliver the London Olympics.

The Bill also establishes a Parliamentary Works Estimates Commission which will lay the Sponsor Body’s estimates before Parliament, and play a role in reviewing the Sponsor Body’s expenditure.

The Government agrees with Parliament that there can be no blank cheque for this work and it must represent good value for taxpayers’ money. The Bill provides that the Sponsor Body and the Delivery Authority must have regard to value for money when exercising their functions throughout the Programme. The Treasury will be able to review and comment on the annual estimates for the funding of the Programme, and the National Audit Office will be able to undertake audits and value-for-money reviews. Furthermore, the Estimates Commission will have the power to review, comment on, and in certain circumstances reject those annual estimates.

It is important that the views of Parliamentarians on the Programme are taken into account. The Sponsor Body will have a majority of Parliamentarians on its Board, alongside external expertise. Parliamentarians will be fully consulted on the strategic direction of the Programme. The Sponsor Body will be required to return to Parliament for approval to make any significant changes to the approved proposals in respect of the Palace. Parliament will also be given an opportunity to vote on the annual expenditure of the Sponsor Body and the Delivery Authority through the estimates process.

We welcome the forthcoming scrutiny of the draft Bill, to ensure that it achieves its aims of a Restoration and Renewal Programme that is sufficiently independent, and that is transparent and accountable to Parliament.

WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 17 October 2018
Made by: Lord Keen of Elie (The Lords Spokesperson)
Lords

Civil Liability Bill

My honourable friend the Minister of State for Justice (Rory Stewart OBE) has made the following Written Statement.

"I have today published a written submission outlining the Government’s analysis of how the English Votes for English Laws principle in accordance with the application of Standing Order 83L, relates to the Government amendment tabled for Commons Report Stage of the Civil Liability Bill.

The department’s assessment is that the amendment does not change the territorial application of the Bill. The analysis holds if the Government amendment be accepted.

I have deposited a copy of the submission in the libraries of the House."

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1018
WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 17 October 2018
Made by: Rory Stewart (The Minister of State for Justice)
Commons

Civil Liability Bill

I have today published a written submission outlining the Government’s analysis of how the English Votes for English Laws principle in accordance with the application of Standing Order 83L, relates to the Government amendment tabled for Commons Report Stage of the Civil Liability Bill.

The department’s assessment is that the amendment does not change the territorial application of the Bill. The analysis holds if the Government amendment be accepted.

I have deposited a copy of the submission in the libraries of the House.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS986
WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 17 October 2018
Made by: Baroness Buscombe (The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions)
Lords

Employment and Support Allowance

My honourable Friend the Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work (Sarah Newton MP) has made the following Written Statement.

This Written Statement is a further update to the House on progress in correcting historic ESA underpayments and paying arrears.

The Department began work to assess cases in December 2017. For that stage of the exercise we expect to review around 320,000 cases, of which around 105,000 are likely to be due arrears. We now have a team of over 400 staff working through these cases and have paid around £120m in arrears. We expect to complete the vast majority of this part of the exercise by April 2019, and have to date completed all cases where an individual is terminally ill and responded to the review, thereby ensuring they receive due priority.

The announcement in July, to pay cases back to the point of conversion requires us to review an additional 250,000 cases, of which we estimate around 75,000 could be due arrears. We will undertake this work through the course of 2019. We now have a team of over 400 staff working through these cases, with a further 400 due to join the team through October and November, and will be assigning more staff to review the additional 250,000 cases. This will enable us to complete this important activity at pace.

The Department is publishing an ad hoc statistical publication today setting out further detail on the progress it has made in processing cases and revised estimates of the impacts of this exercise, including details of the number of claimants due arrears and the amounts likely to be paid. This will be published on Gov.uk.

There are currently around 2.3million working-age people on Employment and Support Allowance. In 2018/19 £54 billion will be been spent on benefits to support disabled people and people with health conditions this year which is over 6% of all Government spending and a record high.

A Frequently Asked Question guide will also be will be deposited in the House library for further information.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1017
WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 17 October 2018
Made by: Sarah Newton (Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work)
Commons

Employment and Support Allowance

This Written Statement is a further update to the House on progress in correcting historic ESA underpayments and paying arrears.

The Department began work to assess cases in December 2017. For that stage of the exercise we expect to review around 320,000 cases, of which around 105,000 are likely to be due arrears. We now have a team of over 400 staff working through these cases and have paid around £120m in arrears. We expect to complete the vast majority of this part of the exercise by April 2019, and have to date completed all cases where an individual is terminally ill and responded to the review, thereby ensuring they receive due priority.

The announcement in July, to pay cases back to the point of conversion requires us to review an additional 250,000 cases, of which we estimate around 75,000 could be due arrears. We will undertake this work through the course of 2019. We now have a team of over 400 staff working through these cases, with a further 400 due to join the team through October and November, and will be assigning more staff to review the additional 250,000 cases. This will enable us to complete this important activity at pace.

The Department is publishing an ad hoc statistical publication today setting out further detail on the progress it has made in processing cases and revised estimates of the impacts of this exercise, including details of the number of claimants due arrears and the amounts likely to be paid. This will be published on Gov.uk.

There are currently around 2.3million working-age people on Employment and Support Allowance. In 2018/19 £54 billion will be been spent on benefits to support disabled people and people with health conditions this year which is over 6% of all Government spending and a record high.

A Frequently Asked Question guide will also be will be deposited in the House library for further information.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS985
WS
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Lord Gardiner of Kimble (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Rural Affairs and Biosecurity)
Lords

Domestic farm support funding: a review of distribution across the UK from 2020 to the end of the Parliament

My Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State for Agriculture, Fisheries and Food (Michael Gove) has today made the following statement.

Today I am announcing that the Government is launching an independent review into the allocation of domestic farm support from 2020 to the end of this Parliament. The review will make sure that fair funding is delivered to all four parts of the UK, when we leave the EU.

The review will provide recommendations to the Government on factors to take into account in the split of agricultural funding between the four countries of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, once the UK has left the Common Agricultural Policy.

In forming its recommendations, the review will look at what factors should influence the distribution of agricultural funding, while ensuring the effective use of public funds. Each country’s unique circumstances will be considered, including its environmental, agricultural and socio-economic make-up. Both the number of farms and the size of farms in each country could also be considered, to make sure that each part of the UK gets a fair deal. The review will be informed by historic CAP decisions but will not revisit these, or redistribute money that has already been committed.

We have already confirmed that we will continue to commit the same cash total in funds for UK farm support until the end of the Parliament, expected in 2022, providing British farmers with more certainty than farmers across the EU, where funding is only guaranteed until 2020.

This review will be led and overseen by an independent external reviewer. I am delighted that Lord Bew of Donegore has agreed to chair the review. Lord Bew has been the Chair of the Committee on Standards in Public Life for five years, held esteemed positions in Government and contributed to a number of Bills, reviews and reports during his time as a non-party-political peer.

Lord Bew will be joined on the panel by representatives from each devolved administration to ensure that their voices are heard. Membership of this group will be confirmed in due course.

The terms of reference for the review have been published on the GOV.UK website today. The review will report in March 2019 and the findings of the review will be published on GOV.UK in due course.

WS
Department for International Trade
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Baroness Fairhead (Minister of State for Trade and Export Promotion)
Lords

Post - Council Written Ministerial Statement: Informal Trade Foreign Affairs Council 5 October 2018

My hon Friend the Minister of State for Trade Policy (George Hollinbery MP) has today made the following statement.

The Informal EU Foreign Affairs Council (Trade) took place in Innsbruck on 5 October 2018. The agenda covered the WTO, EU-US trade and EU trade agreements. I represented the UK at the meeting. A summary of the discussions follows:

On WTO modernisation, the discussion confirmed that the most urgent issue was unblocking appointments to the WTO Appellate Body. Many WTO members were looking to the EU for leadership on this matter. I reaffirmed the UK’s support for the rules-based trading system, commended the Commission’s concept paper on WTO modernisation, and called for engagement with the wider WTO membership.

On EU-US trade, discussion was on the agreement set out in the EU-US Joint Statement following President Juncker’s visit to the White House and progress since July, noting that the near-term focus was on voluntary regulatory cooperation with full respect for domestic legislation. A limited tariff liberalisation was on offer from the EU, provided it focused only on industrial goods. I expressed opposition to US measures on steel, aluminium and threatened measures on autos, offered support to the Commission's approach of prioritising regulatory cooperation, and agreed with others that there should be no lowering of standards.

On ongoing FTA negotiations, the priority for the Japan EPA to be approved by the European Parliament was highlighted. Attendees also expressed continued support for the range of other EU trade agreements.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1012
WS
Home Office
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Security Industry Authority (SIA) Annual Report and Accounts 2017 – 2018

My rt hon Friend the Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service (Nick Hurd) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

The 2017-18 Annual Report and Accounts for the Security Industry Authority (HC 1643) is being laid before the House today and will published on www.gov.uk. Copies will be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1015
WS
Home Office
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

G6 Lyon

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Sajid Javid) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

The informal G6 group of Interior Ministers held its most recent meeting in Lyon on 8 and 9 October 2017. Representatives from the USA, Morocco and the European Commission also attended the meeting.

The summit was chaired by the French Prime Minister and Interim Interior Minister, Édouard Philippe. I represented the United Kingdom. The other participating States were represented by Dr Joachim Brudzinski (Minister of the Interior, Poland), Dr Stephan Mayer (State Secretary, Germany), Matteo Salvini (Minister of the Interior, Italy) and Fernando Grande-Marlaska (Minister of the Interior, Spain).

Morocco was represented by Interior Minister Abdelouafi Laftit. The European Commission was represented by Dimitris Avramopoulos (Commissioner for Migration, Home Affairs and Citizenship) and Sir Julian King (Commissioner for the Security Union). The United States was represented by Jeff Sessions (Attorney General USA) and Claire Grady (Acting Deputy Secretary, Department of Homeland Security). Gilles de Kerchove, the EU’s Counter-Terrorism Coordinator also attended.

The G6 commenced with a working dinner focused on managing illegal migration flows. During the discussion I promoted the UK’s efforts to tackle people smuggling and human trafficking, and highlighted the UK’s work upstream and our commitment to work with EU partners on this after we leave the EU. I also stressed the importance of recognising that organised crime is a key threat we need to address.

The second plenary session was on combatting the threat of returning foreign terrorist fighters. During this session I referred to the UK’s cross-governmental approach to managing returnees and the need for an end-to-end holistic approach to the issue.

The third session was a working lunch which focused on security cooperation with Sahel countries. During this session I highlighted the UK’s commitment to the region and discussed our support on security and stabilisation. I also encouraged partners to share information to develop shared understanding of local issues and highlighted the problem of the use of kidnap for ransom as a source of terrorist funding.

The final session considered terrorist use of the internet. I highlighted the fact that UK is leading the way on preventing terrorist use of the internet, encouraged the G6 to support the UK’s strategic approach of engaging directly with content service providers and sought their support for action to combat Child Sexual Exploitation online.

The next G6 will take place in Germany in 2019.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1014
WS
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Michael Gove (The Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs )
Commons

Domestic farm support funding: a review of distribution across the UK from 2020 to the end of the Parliament

Today I am announcing that the Government is launching an independent review into the allocation of domestic farm support from 2020 to the end of this Parliament. The review will make sure that fair funding is delivered to all four parts of the UK, when we leave the EU.

The review will provide recommendations to the Government on factors to take into account in the split of agricultural funding between the four countries of England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, once the UK has left the Common Agricultural Policy.

In forming its recommendations, the review will look at what factors should influence the distribution of agricultural funding, while ensuring the effective use of public funds. Each country’s unique circumstances will be considered, including its environmental, agricultural and socio-economic make-up. Both the number of farms and the size of farms in each country could also be considered, to make sure that each part of the UK gets a fair deal. The review will be informed by historic CAP decisions but will not revisit these, or redistribute money that has already been committed.

We have already confirmed that we will continue to commit the same cash total in funds for UK farm support until the end of the Parliament, expected in 2022, providing British farmers with more certainty than farmers across the EU, where funding is only guaranteed until 2020.

This review will be led and overseen by an independent external reviewer. I am delighted that Lord Bew of Donegore has agreed to chair the review. Lord Bew has been the Chair of the Committee on Standards in Public Life for five years, held esteemed positions in Government and contributed to a number of Bills, reviews and reports during his time as a non-party-political peer.

Lord Bew will be joined on the panel by representatives from each devolved administration to ensure that their voices are heard. Membership of this group will be confirmed in due course.

The terms of reference for the review have been published on the GOV.UK website today. The review will report in March 2019 and the findings of the review will be published on GOV.UK in due course.

WS
Department for International Trade
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Baroness Fairhead (Minister of State for Trade and Export Promotion)
Lords

Export Control Policy

My hon Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary (Graham Stuart) has today made the following statement:

This statement is guidance given under Section 9 of the Export Control Act 2002.

I would like to inform the House of the introduction of a new policy relating to strategic export controls.

The Government takes breaches of export controls and trade sanctions very seriously, by investigating, disrupting and taking the appropriate enforcement action against companies and individuals who breach our controls. As part of the continuous improvement of export control policy, we have considered what other means could be used to disrupt illicit activities without increasing the regulatory burden on organisations that operate legitimately.

The Government wishes to strengthen its powers in order to mitigate any potential risk that those engaged in activities in breach of export control and sanctions legislation could still separately apply for and receive export or trade control licences in respect of legitimate business activities in which they are simultaneously engaged.

Therefore, when assessing licence applications, the Government may take into account the risk that the proposed legitimate activity will directly or indirectly facilitate other activities that violate UK export control or sanctions legislation. In doing so, the Government will consider, inter alia, the conduct of the licence applicant.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS957
WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Earl Howe (Minister of State, Ministry of Defence )
Lords

Armed Forces Pay Review Body - Re-Appointment

My right hon. Friend the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State and Minister for Defence People and Veterans (Mr Tobias Ellwood) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

I am pleased to announce that I have invited Lesley Mercer to continue to serve as a Member of the Armed Forces’ Pay Review Body for a further three-year term of office, commencing on 1 March 2019. This appointment has been conducted in accordance with the guidance of the Office of the Commissioner for Public Appointments.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Security Industry Authority (SIA) Annual Report and Accounts 2017 – 2018

The 2017-18 Annual Report and Accounts for the Security Industry Authority (HC 1643) is being laid before the House today and will published on www.gov.uk. Copies will be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS982
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