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Compensation claims (2021)

Request

  1. Could you please tell me how much the Houses of Parliament has paid out in compensation claims for damage to personal items since May 2015? This includes cars damaged in the car park and items broken and items stolen.
  2. Could you please tell me how much compensation was paid out for each item or incident, the month and year of when this happened and the MP or peer to whom each item belonged?

 

 

Response

In the first instance please note that the House of Commons and the House of Lords are two separate public authorities for the purposes of the Freedom of Information Act 2000. This response covers compensation claims paid out solely by the House of Commons, as well as the House of Commons portion of those compensation claims which are paid out jointly between both Houses.

1) Could you please tell me how much the Houses of Parliament has paid out in compensation claims for damage to personal items since May 2015? This includes cars damaged in the car park and items broken and items stolen.

Some information is held by the House of Commons in relation to your request. For compensation claims relating to loss or damage to property received by the House since May 2015, the House of Commons has paid out £7,130.

Please note that the information we hold on this subject before April 2017 is recorded only by the date the claim arrived at the House of Commons Finance team. Therefore, this figure may exclude a small amount of compensation claims that, while paid out after May 2015, were received by the Finance team before that time.

2) Could you please tell me how much compensation was paid out for each item or incident, the month and year of when this happened and the MP or peer to whom each item belonged?

Some information is held by the House of Commons.

The amount of compensation paid out for each claim and the month and year both the incident and the claim took place (where this is held).
In line with our record retention policy, most information about compensation claims, including the dates of incidents, is not held for the period before April 2017.

For the incidents in which an MP or a Peer was the claimant, the House also holds information about who that person was. However, this information, as well as the information about the compensation claim if it were identified as being theirs, constitutes their personal data. Their identities have therefore been withheld by virtue of section 40(2) of the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) because disclosure of this information to the public generally, in the House’s view, would not be consistent with the data protection principle found in Article 5.1(a) of the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). This is an absolute exemption and the public interest test does not apply.