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Catering outlets - performance (2015)

Request

Any reports, files or documents breaking down the performance of different bars and catering outlet, including the Members and Strangers restaurants, over the last two years including total profit or loss per outlet and number of covers if appropriate.

 

 

Response

Our answer only covers catering venues of the House of Commons.  The House of Lords are a separate public authority for the purposes of the Freedom of Information Act, therefore you may wish to consider forwarding your request to them.

The House of Commons holds a number of relevant performance reports which we have listed in the table below:

Name of Report Comment
F&B Control Final Reports Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
End of Period Summary Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Data Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Year to Date Report Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Finance System (Agresso) Monthly Reports Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Notionals Document Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Income Generation Events Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Production Planning Sheets Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Potential v Actual Reports Withheld under s.43 of the FOIA
Wastage Reports

Three documents: Report 1, Report 2, Report 3

Some details have been redacted under s.43 of the FOIA

Monthly System (Micros) Report One document: Report.  Some details have been redacted under s.43 of the FOIA
Cost Allocation Report by Venue Information for the last 4 financial years (2011/12 to 2014/15) is already published.
    
As indicated, some of the documents listed above are partially or fully withheld from disclosure by virtue of section 43 (2) of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 (FOIA), in that the release of this information would prejudice the House’s commercial interests.  This is not an absolute exemption and the public interest test applies.

There is undoubtedly a valid public interest in the effective performance of bars and catering venues of the House of Commons and in the transparency of the public authority getting value for money from these services.  Costs are met by public funds and the public has a right to know that these funds are being managed effectively.  However, the release of specific information pertaining to costs and profitability would also prejudice the House’s commercial interests by impacting our ability to procure cost-effective goods and services within the Catering Services department.  In addition, the disclosure of profitability data would have a negative impact on the House’s ability to actively generate income by undermining our ability to negotiate fees for goods and services sold externally.  Lastly, as these services may be outsourced in the future, there is an argument that the disclosure of this information would prejudice the House’s commercial interests by providing valuable performance information to external companies who wish to tender to supply these services.
In these circumstances it is our view that the public interest in maintaining the exemption outweighs the public interest in disclosing the information.