Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

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Written Statement Indentifying Number – Every written statement in the House of Commons and House of Lords has a WSID per parliamentary session.
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WS
Home Office
Made on: 24 July 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Independent Office for Police Conduct (IOPC) Annual Report and Accounts 2018 – 2019

I am today, along with the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, the Member for Hereford and South Herefordshire (Mr Jesse Norman), publishing the 2018-19 annual report and accounts for the Independent Office for Police Conduct [HC 2501]. This will be laid before the House and published on www.gov.uk. The report will also be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1768
WS
Home Office
Made on: 23 July 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Revision of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (‘PACE’) Codes of Practice C and H

I am today laying before the House an order under section 67(7A) of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 (‘PACE’) to amend PACE Codes C and H, which govern the detention, treatment and questioning of suspects by the police. Copies of the revised Codes C and H will also be laid.

These revisions, which will come into operation on 21 August 2019, are being introduced to ensure that the menstrual needs of female and transgender detainees, and the health, hygiene and welfare needs of all individuals in police custody are protected. The new codes include the following revisions:

• Each female detainee must be asked if they require or are likely to require any menstrual products whilst they are in custody. They must be told that they will be provided free of charge and that replacement products are available.

• Custody officers must ask all detainees if they wish to speak in private with a member of custody staff about any matter concerning their personal needs relating to health, hygiene and welfare; if the detainee wishes, this member of staff may be of the same sex. These changes provide an opportunity for female detainees to raise issues about their menstrual needs and also for all detainees to raise issues relating to other health and hygiene needs such as products that may be required for incontinence. If detainees wish to take this opportunity to raise health and hygiene needs, necessary arrangements should be provided/made as soon as practicable.

• The changes highlight that the clothing and personal effects that detainees may retain include menstrual and other health, hygiene and welfare products. A decision to withhold any such products must be subject to a further specific risk assessment.

• Access to toilet and washing facilities must now also take account of the detainee’s dignity. For example, in cells subject to CCTV monitoring, privacy in the toilet area should be ensured by any appropriate means and detainees should be made aware of this when they are placed in the cell.

• The changes make it explicit that strip searches and intimate searches of detainees must take due regard of their dignity. This includes the detainee’s health, hygiene and welfare needs including menstruation.

• The above provisions around health, hygiene and welfare products take into account the possible needs of transgender individuals.

These revisions were prompted by concerns raised by the Independent Custody Visiting Association (ICVA) that in some cases women were being left without basic menstrual products in police cells.

They received overwhelming support following a public consultation last year, and we have subsequently sought and secured the agreement of my Rt Hon Friend the member for Normanton, Pontefract and Castleford, in her role as Chair of the Home Affairs Select Committee, that these straightforward revisions to the Codes can be brought into force as soon as possible, as per the commitments made by the then government during the introduction of section 67(7A) of PACE in 2003, without the approval of a resolution by each House.

I am grateful for the work and support of partners across the policing system, ICVA, and dedicated custody staff across the country. We all share a commitment to ensuring the dignity of detainees, and these changes will help ensure the needs of individuals are met across the board.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1760
WS
Home Office
Made on: 23 July 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Consultation on the introduction of statutory guidance to the police for firearms licensing

Today, I am publishing a public consultation on the introduction of statutory guidance to the police on firearms licensing. The proposed guidance aims to ensure that the highest standards of public safety are maintained in the firearms licensing process, improving consistency between police forces and in court when licensing decisions are appealed. It is being introduced following a recommendation made by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire and Rescue Services in September 2015, which found that police forces were not always following the Home Office firearms guidance, resulting in inconsistent application of the law.

We have acted on this recommendation and the Policing and Crime Act 2017 made provision for the Home Secretary to issue statutory guidance to the police on their firearms licensing functions. The police will have a duty to have regard to the guidance, which will include existing safeguards relating to firearms ownership, such as police background checks or the criteria around applicants with a history of domestic violence.

The draft guidance in the consultation also contains new proposals on the arrangements for assessing the medical suitability of firearms applicants, following consideration of how the system is currently operating, and concerns raised about the variation in practice across the country. It is important that the arrangements support doctors in providing the necessary medical information to the police who have responsibility for firearms licensing, and that the police are able to require sight of the medical information before they proceed to grant the firearm certificate. I am seeking views on these arrangements from all those with an interest so that we can ensure the system operates as effectively as possible. It is vitally important to ensure that those in possession of firearms are medically fit, to safeguard the public and the firearm certificate holder themselves.

The consultation is seeking views from police forces, firearms owners and other interested parties and the wider public on the contents of the proposed statutory guidance. I am also consulting the National Police Chiefs’ Council and the Chief Constable of Police Scotland, as required by the legislation. I will consider very carefully the views which are put forward during the consultation, which will last for a period of eight weeks, following which the Home Office will publish the new statutory guidance. I am committed to efficient and effective operation of the firearms licensing system, and once the statutory guidance has been in place for a suitable period, I intend to review the operation of the new medical arrangements to ensure they are working effectively.

Copies of the consultation along with the draft guidance and Impact Assessment will be made available on Gov.uk and will be placed in both Libraries of the House.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1757
WS
Home Office
Made on: 18 July 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Security Industry Authority (SIA) Annual Report and Accounts 2018 – 2019

The 2018-19 Annual Report and Accounts for the Security Industry Authority (HC 2540) is being laid before the House today and published on www.gov.uk. Copies will be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1711
WS
Home Office
Made on: 27 June 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Annual Report of the Biometrics Commissioner

My Noble Friend the Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Williams of Trafford) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I am pleased to announce that my rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today publishing the fifth annual report of the Biometrics Commissioner, together with the Government’s response.

The Commissioner, Paul Wiles, is appointed under Section 20 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. His responsibilities are:

  • to decide applications by the police for extended retention of DNA profiles and fingerprints from persons arrested for serious offences but not charged or convicted;
  • to keep under review National Security Determinations made by Chief Officers under which DNA profiles and fingerprints may be retained for national security purposes;
  • to exercise general oversight of police use of DNA samples, DNA profiles and fingerprints.

His report is a statutory requirement of Section 21 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012.

I am grateful to Mr Wiles for this report, which we have published in full.

Copies of the report will be available from the Vote Office. The Government’s response will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1625
WS
Home Office
Made on: 18 June 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Government response to consultation on fees for Home Office firearms licences

Today, I am publishing the Government response to the consultation we launched in January 2017 on new fees for applications for firearms licences administered by the Home Office and the Scottish Government. These licences are:

• licences to possess firearms that are prohibited under Section 5 of the Firearms Act 1968. Such licences are issued to, for example, dealers or manufacturers of prohibited firearms and are distinct from police-issued certificates for civilian firearms, shotguns, and those issued to registered firearms dealers who deal in civilian firearms and shotguns;

• licences for museums that hold firearms as part of their collections; and

• licences for approved target shooting clubs.

The Government introduced measures, through the Policing and Crime Act 2017, to enable new fees for these licences to be set on a cost recovery basis, through secondary legislation. The fees will apply in England, Wales and Scotland.

I am very grateful to those who responded to the consultation. We received almost 5,000 responses.

The Home Office has reviewed the levels of fees set out in the consultation document, and we discussed our proposals with representatives of fee payers. The levels of fees now set out in the Government response are significantly lower than those originally proposed, due to both revised estimates of Home Office costs and a fresh look at the costs that it is appropriate to recover through the new fees.

An important issue raised by fee-payers’ representatives was the potential impact of the proposed fees on museums with firearms collections. Given that the museums involved are publicly funded and act in the public interest, the Government has decided to maintain the current museum firearms licence fee level of £200 for the grant and renewal of these licences. This is set out in more detail in the Impact Assessment accompanying the consultation response. The Government response and the Impact Assessment will be published on gov.uk, and I will arrange for copies to be placed in the Libraries of the House.

The new fees will be introduced by statutory instrument as soon as Parliamentary time allows.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1594
WS
Home Office
Made on: 17 June 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Contingent liability for indemnifying the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel

My rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today laying before the House of Commons a Departmental Minute giving notice of a contingent liability for the issuing of an indemnity with respect to the work of the Daniel Morgan Independent Panel (DMIP).

The Panel was established by the then Home Secretary in May 2013 to shine a light on the 1987 murder of private investigator Daniel Morgan, the background to the murder and the subsequent handling of the case.

The proposed indemnity will cover current and former members of the DMIP and any individual engaged at any time to provide assistance to the Panel against any civil liability for any act done or omission made in good faith in the execution of his or her duties, or in the purported execution of his or her duties. This indemnity applies only to acts done or omissions made during the course of the Panel’s work, from its establishment on 10 May 2013 until its final report is submitted to the Home Secretary.

The indemnity is subject to the proviso that any liability which is to any extent met by insurers on the beneficiary of this indemnity, or for which reimbursement is made to any extent by such insurers, shall in that event and to that extent no longer be the subject of the indemnity and (if previously met or reimbursed by the Government) shall to that extent be refunded by the beneficiary to the Government.

Her Majesty’s Treasury has approved the contingent liability in principle. The National Audit Office has been consulted on the proposal.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1590
WS
Home Office
Made on: 25 April 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

UK opts in to EU Council Decisions allowing Switzerland and Liechtenstein third country access to Prüm

The Prüm framework lays down provisions stating that EU Member States grant each other access to their automated DNA analysis files, automated fingerprint identification systems (AFIS), and vehicle registration data. The European Commission has proposed Council Decisions that, if adopted, would extend participation in the key data-sharing elements of Prüm to Switzerland and Liechtenstein as third countries.

The UK is fully supportive of data sharing to assist the investigation, prosecution and prevention of serious crime and terrorism. It is the Government’s position that data sharing regimes between countries, with appropriate safeguards, enhance the safety and wellbeing of citizens of and visitors to those countries. The UK has opted in to the Prüm Decisions and remains committed to fully implementing Prüm in the UK.

The UK is also fully supportive of extending the law enforcement access to Prüm to Switzerland and Liechtenstein. The UK has no current biometrics data sharing agreements in place with Switzerland or Liechtenstein. These states are close partners and enabling further data sharing with them will enhance both their security and ours.

The Government has therefore decided to opt in to the EU Council Decisions authorising the signing and conclusion of agreements between the EU and Switzerland, and the EU and Liechtenstein, to enable their access as third countries to Prüm, stepping up cross border cooperation, particularly in combating terrorism and cross-border crime.

The UK Government will continue to consider the application of the UK’s opt-in to EU legislation on a case-by-case basis, with a view to maximising the UK’s efforts to collaborate with the EU on a security partnership once the UK leaves the EU. The UK is committed to fully implementing Prüm and continuing the international exchange of biometric data with the EU as part of this Future Security Partnership.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1486
WS
Home Office
Made on: 28 February 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Police Equipment

The Government is committed to giving the police the tools they need to do their job effectively and ensuring that officers’ access to specialist equipment such as conducted energy devices (CEDs), commonly known as TASERs®, can remain aligned with police assessments of threat and risk. CEDs are an important tactical option for specially trained officers, particularly in potentially violent situations where other tactics have been considered or failed.

My rt hon Friend the Home Secretary has today given his approval for chief officers of police forces in England and Wales to train selected student officers to carry CEDs where they have identified an operational need to do so. It is for chief officers to determine the number of CED devices and specially trained officers they require, based on their force’s strategic threat and risk assessment. This change allows chief officers to consider student officers for CED training and deployment, provided they have met certain selection criteria, to help ensure frontline officers can protect themselves and the public.

I would like to assure the House that the existing high standards around CED training and operational deployment, for which the UK is renown, will be maintained. It will remain voluntary whether an individual student officer applies for special CED training, and the CED training itself will remain the same – with the same standards needing to be met for a student officer to pass the assessment.

Additional safeguards have been put into place for the extension of CED use to student officers. Only student officers who have been assessed by supervisors to be sufficiently competent and experienced in dealing with incidents involving conflict will be able to apply for CED training. The College of Policing has developed a robust application framework for student constables which sets this out, including a post-use process to support continued officer development. Details of this proposal were submitted for independent medical review by the Scientific Advisory Committee on the Medical Implications of Less-Lethal Weapons (SACMILL).

The Home Secretary’s decision to approve this measure follows stringent consideration of a number of factors including: the request for approval from the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC), the College of Policing’s application and post-use development framework and the views of SACMILL.

We are also clear that any use of force by police officers must be lawful, proportionate and reasonable in the circumstances. The Government is committed to improving transparency and accountability around use of force. This is why we initiated reforms to the way in which use of force data is recorded and published. On 13 December 2018, the Home Office published national ‘Police use of force’ statistics on GOV.UK for the first time – providing unprecedented transparency and accountability. In addition, I expect that any police forces who decide to extend CED use to student officers to monitor the impact of this change, including local consideration of injury data.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1334
WS
Home Office
Made on: 12 February 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Annual Report of the National DNA Database Strategy Board

My Noble Friend the Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Williams of Trafford) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

My rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today laying before the House the Annual Report of the National DNA Database Strategy Board for 2017/18. This report covers the National Fingerprints Database and the National DNA Database (NDNAD).

Chief Constable James Vaughan has presented the Annual Report of the National DNA Database to the Home Secretary. Publication of the Report is a statutory requirement under section 63AB(7) of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984 as inserted by 24 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012.

The Report shows the important contribution that the NDNAD and the National Fingerprint Databases (policing collections) make to supporting policing and solving crimes. I am grateful to the Strategy Board for their commitment to fulfilling their statutory functions.

A copy of the report will be made available on Gov.uk.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1289
WS
Home Office
Made on: 12 February 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Biometrics and Forensics Ethics Group

My Noble Friend the Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Williams of Trafford) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

On 20 July 2017, the Home Secretary extended the remit of the National DNA Database Ethics Group (NDNADEG) to cover the ethical issues associated with all forensic identification techniques and renamed the group as the Biometrics and Forensics Ethics Group (BFEG).

To support the Home Office’s strategic approach to data, and to build public trust, it has been agreed to extend the remit of the BFEG further. The group will now also be asked to consider strategic issues relating to the use of large and complex data sets by the Home Office. This will include providing independent oversight of the Data Ethics Governance Framework established to ensure balanced consideration of the use of data within the Home Office.

The Group will act within the legal framework of the Department on an advisory basis. It will not be in the remit of the Group to consider whether the Department has complied with the relevant laws, nor will the Department disclose personal data to the Group to enable it to discharge its responsibilities.

The BFEG will continue to consider the ethical aspects of:
• the application and operation of technologies which produce biometric and forensic data and identifiers;
• ethical issues relating to scientific services provided to the police service and other public bodies within the criminal justice system;
• applications for research involving access to biometric or forensic data; and
• matters relating to the management, operation and use of biometric or forensic data.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1291
WS
Home Office
Made on: 24 January 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services Inspection Report: ‘A joint inspection of search applications and production only processes’

The National Crime Agency (NCA) leads the fight against serious and organised crime. It has the power to task other law enforcement partners and a capability, with local to international reach, to disrupt the impact of serious and organised crime on the UK.

This is the fifth HMIC inspection of the NCA. The inspection stemmed from a recommendation in the 2015 NCA internal review of warrants and was conducted jointly with HM Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate (HMCPSI).

This report is being published today and I will arrange for a copy to be placed in the House Library. I have asked HMICFRS to publish this report on my behalf and it will be available online at www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk.

The inspection found that the NCA has been working to tackle the areas of concern highlighted in the 2015 review. The inspection of search authorities, search warrants and production orders identified some deficiencies, but overall HMICFRS found the applications are completed to a good standard. HMICFRS made six recommendations which will improve procedures and update guidance and they believe these recommendations will help enhance what is already a mature process.

It is for the Director General to respond to these recommendations, in line with the requirements of the Crime and Courts Act 2013.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1243
WS
Home Office
Made on: 24 January 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Police Grant Report England and Wales 2019/20

My rt hon Friend, the Home Secretary, has today laid before the House, the Police Grant Report (England and Wales) 2019/20 (HC 1896) for the approval of the House. The Report sets out, my rt hon Friend, the Home Secretary’s determination for 2019/20 of the aggregate amount of grant that he proposes to pay under section 46(2) of the Police Act 1996.

The first role of government is to protect the public. We will always ensure that the police have the powers and resources needed to keep our citizens and communities safe. We know that the police need the right capabilities and resources to respond to the changing nature of crime. This financial year, we provided forces with a £460m increase in overall funding, including increased funding to tackle counter-terrorism and £280m for local policing through the police precept. Most Police and Crime Commissioners set out plans to use this funding to either protect or enhance frontline policing.

Last year, we indicated we would provide a similar funding settlement in 2019/20, if the police made progress in delivering further commercial savings, used mobile digital working and increased financial reserves transparency. The police have delivered on these conditions and are on track to deliver £120m in commercial and
back office savings by 2020/21 and move towards a new commercial operating model. All forces have published reserves strategies using the guidance we published in January 2018.

Before announcing the Government’s proposals, we reviewed the demand on the police again. It is clear that demand pressures on the police have risen this year as a result of changing crime. There has been a major increase in the reporting of high harm, previously hidden crimes such as child sexual exploitation and modern slavery and a growing threat from serious and organised crime (SOC). SOC affects more UK citizens, more often, than any other national security threat and costs the economy at least £37 billion each year. It is increasing in both volume and complexity.

Through the Serious Violence Strategy, we are bearing down on the worst spike in serious violence and knife crime that we have seen in a decade by combining support for more robust and targeted policing with effective long-term investment in prevention and earlier intervention. And we need to recognise the work done by the police to combat the evolving threat from terrorism. The Government is determined to support the police to meet the demand across counter-terrorism, serious and organised crime and local policing.

I have carefully considered the responses to the consultation on the provisional Police Grant Report. I am pleased with the positive response we have received with most Police and Crime Commissioners (PCCs) consulting their communities on using the new £24 precept flexibility in full and many saying that they will use the additional funding to increase or protect the frontline.

I can confirm that the allocations that have been laid before the House today are the same as those proposed in my Statement of 13 December 2018. These proposals will help forces to both meet additional demand and manage financial pressures. In total, we will enable an increase in funding for the police system of up to £970m compared to 2018/19, the biggest increase since 2010. This includes increases in Government grant funding, full use of precept flexibility, funding to support pensions costs, and increased national funding to meet the threats from counter-terrorism and serious and organised crime.

As the Chancellor announced at the Budget, funding for counter-terrorism policing will increase by £160m compared to the 2015 Spending Review settlement. This is a year on year increase in counter-terrorism police funding of £59m (8%) compared to 2018/19. This increases the counter-terrorism budget to £816m, including £24m for an uplift in armed policing from the Police Transformation Fund. This is a significant additional investment in the vital work of counter-terrorism police officers across the country. PCCs will be notified of force allocations separately. These will not be made public for security reasons.

The Government has prioritised serious and organised crime (SOC) within our funding for national priorities in 2019/20. Criminal networks are increasingly resilient and adaptable, exploiting technology and ruthlessly targeting the most vulnerable, ruining lives and blighting communities. The new SOC Strategy, published on 1 November, sets out the Government’s new approach to prevent serious and organised crime, build our defences against it, track down the perpetrators and bring them to justice. Police forces, alongside the NCA and Regional Organised Crime Units, are an essential part of this approach, tackling complex SOC threats, including fraud, cyber crime and child sexual exploitation and abuse. We will invest £90m in much-needed SOC capabilities at national, regional and local levels, with a significant proportion allocated directly to police forces.

We are increasing the general Government grants to PCCs by £161m (including £90m additional funding from the Exchequer) to a total of £7.8bn, including a £146m increase in core grant funding. Each PCC will see their Government grant funding protected in real terms. Specific grants to the Metropolitan Police Service and City of London Police will increase by £14m; an affordable increase that will better reflect the additional costs of policing London, at a time when the Metropolitan Police Service faces specific financial pressures, and the City of London Police does not benefit from additional Council Tax precept flexibility.

Following the announcement at the Budget that the Government would allocate funding from the Reserve to pay part of the costs of increases in public sector pensions contributions in 2019/20, we are allocating a further £153m of specific grant funding to support the policing system with increases in pensions contributions (including additional funding for the counter-terrorism police network and the National Crime Agency). This funding will be distributed according to a methodology developed with police leaders.

We are also proposing to double the precept flexibility for locally accountable PCCs. Last year, we provided an additional £12 precept flexibility. This year, we propose giving PCCs the freedom to ask for an additional £2 a month in 2019/20, to increase their Band D precept by £24 in 2019/20 without the need to call a local referendum.

It is for locally accountable PCCs to take decisions on local precept and explain to their electorate how this additional investment will help deliver a better police service. If all PCCs use their flexibility in full in 2019/20, based on the latest Office for Budget Responsibility tax base forecasts, it will mean around an additional £509m public investment in our police system.

Taken together, this substantial increase in police funding will enable forces to continue recruiting, fill crucial capability gaps such as in detectives, meet their genuine financial pressures, drive through efficiency programmes, and improve their effectiveness by preventing crime and delivering better outcomes for victims of crime.

In addition to these increases in direct funding, we will also support PCCs and forces through continued investment of £175m in the Police Transformation Fund (PTF) and £495m to improve police technology, as we did last year. Our priorities in the PTF are to support sector led initiatives that will build important national capabilities delivered to forces through the major national police led programmes, which include a Single Online Home (Policing website) to engage more effectively with the public, and new ways of working through productivity and cyber-security tools supporting collaboration. The Home Office technology programmes will, for example, replace and upgrade end of life critical infrastructure such as the Airwave communication system with the 4G Emergency Services Network. The Law Enforcement Data Service will replace the existing Police National Computer and Police National Database with an integrated service to provide intelligence to law enforcement and its partners. I set out in an annex to this letter further information regarding police funding in 2019/20, namely tables illustrating how we propose to allocate the police funding settlement between the different funding streams and between Police and Crime Commissioners for 2019/20.

As I set out in my statement of 13 December, this investment will support four key pillars of police effectiveness. Firstly, increasing capacity, including investing in Police Now to attract excellent new talent, while introducing technology that saves time – so officers spend longer on the frontline. Secondly, crime prevention, including funding for innovative new techniques. Thirdly, enhancing the support we offer to hard-working frontline police officers and staff, with the new national welfare service. And finally, through ensuring system leaders provide national direction on performance, including through working more smartly, with the digitally enabled modern tools to police effectively.

As set out in December, this settlement sets out four priority areas to drive efficiency, productivity and effectiveness next year to drive improvements in services to the public.

1. On behalf of the taxpayer, the Government will expect to see continued efficiency savings in 2019/20 through collective procurement and shared services. We need to see national approaches to procuring forensics, vehicles and basic equipment such as helmets, developed over the coming year. And we will be setting an expectation that every force contributes substantially to procurement savings; we will work with the police to agree the right force level objectives for 2019/20 and 2020/21 in the coming months. All forces should also contribute to the development of a new commercial operating model over 2019/20.

2. We will expect major progress to resolve the challenges in investigative resource identified by Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary and Fire & Rescue Services, including recruiting more detectives to tackle the shortfall. We will work with the College of Policing and the National Police Chiefs’ Council to support forces to make this change by accelerating their action plan on investigations, making full use of the innovation offered by Police Now.

3. Forces will have to continue improving productivity, including through smarter use of data, and digital capabilities including mobile working, with an ambition to deliver £50m of productivity gains in 2019/20.

4. Furthermore, we expect forces to maintain a SOC response that spans the identification and management of local threats as well as support for national and regional priorities. This response should be built around the disruption of local SOC threats alongside SOC prevention, safeguarding, partnerships and community engagement.

We will be engaging with police leaders in due course to discuss how these improvements will be delivered.

This settlement is the last before the next Spending Review, which will set long term police budgets and look at how resources are allocated fairly across police forces. The Home Office is grateful to the police for the good work they are doing to build the evidence base to support that work, and we will also want to see evidence that this year’s investment is being well spent. In addition to working together to understand demand, we will be working with the police to present an ambitious plan to drive improved efficiency, productivity and effectiveness through the next Spending Review period.

I have made clear that the Government’s priorities are an increasing emphasis on crime prevention, while maintaining a focus on catching the perpetrators of crime; improved outcomes for victims of crime; better support for front line officers; and a
step change in the effectiveness of how data and digital technology are used to build a smarter police system and support a more effective service to the public.

The Government pays tribute to our police forces and police staff around the country for their exceptional attitude, hard work and bravery.

I have set out in a separate document the tables illustrating how we propose to allocate the police funding settlement between the different funding streams and between Police & Crime Commissioners for 2019/20. These documents are intended to be read together.

Police Grant allocation tables 2019/20 (PDF Document, 216.5 KB)
This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1242
WS
Home Office
Made on: 22 January 2019
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Surveillance Camera Commissioner – Annual Report

My rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today laying a copy of the 2017/18 Annual Report of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner before the House, as required by section 35 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012.

The Surveillance Camera Commissioner is an independent role appointed under section 34 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012.

The Annual Report covers the exercise of the Surveillance Camera Commissioner’s statutory functions over the year to 31 March 2018 and provides a comprehensive update on the progress made against the National Surveillance Camera Strategy for England and Wales, which the Commissioner published in March 2017.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1226
WS
Home Office
Made on: 19 December 2018
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service )
Commons

College of Policing Annual Report and Accounts 2017 – 2018

The 2017-18 Annual Report and Accounts for the College of Policing (HC 1767) is being laid before the House today and published on www.gov.uk. Copies will be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1178
WS
Home Office
Made on: 12 December 2018
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

European Union JHA Opt-in Decision: Regulation setting up the Internal Security Fund 2021-2027

The Government has decided not to opt in (under the UK’s JHA opt-in Protocol) to a proposal establishing an Internal Security Fund (2021-27). The intended fund would not come into operation until the start of the next Multiannual Financial Framework (2021), after the UK has exited the European Union and after the currently envisaged end of the proposed Implementation Period. As such, the UK would not be able to benefit from the fund as a Member State.

In addition, the UK did not opt into the previous iteration of the ISF as it provided no benefits to the UK beyond our own domestic capabilities. There is no evidence that this situation has changed, and that the ISF would remain a poor fit for UK policing needs. The benefits are unlikely to outweigh the cost of UK participation, and there was therefore no practical reason to opt in.

Until the UK leaves the EU it remains a full member, and the Government will continue to consider the application of the UK’s opt-in to EU legislation in the area of Justice and Home Affairs on a case by case basis, with a view to maximising our country’s security, protecting our civil liberties and enhancing our ability to control immigration.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1141
WS
Home Office
Made on: 12 December 2018
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Independent Review of Deaths and Serious Incidents in Police Custody: One year on

On 30 October 2017, the rt hon Dame Elish Angiolini DBE QC’s Independent Review of Deaths and Serious Incidents in Police Custody was published, alongside the Government’s substantive response.

As part of its response, the Government commissioned the Ministerial Council on Deaths in Custody to play a leading role in considering Dame Elish’s most complex recommendations. Today, as co-chair of the Ministerial Board on Deaths in Custody – alongside Jackie Doyle-Price MP and Rory Stewart OBE MP - I report on the progress made in delivering this work programme.

We have made good progress in addressing Dame Elish’s recommendations, although, of course, there remains more to do. First, we have focused on support for families, which includes work on the provision of legal aid for bereaved families, making inquests more sympathetic to their needs and improving the information available immediately after an incident. Second, we have worked to ensure that organisations are held to account when a death in police custody occurs. We have reformed the Independent Office for Police Conduct to strengthen its independence and improve the timeliness of its investigations, and we have introduced reforms to strengthen the police discipline regime. Third, and above all, we are committed to preventing deaths in police custody. We have significantly restricted the use of police stations as places of safety, the National Police Chiefs’ Council are driving progress in national training and assessing the health of detainees, and the Government is investing record levels in mental health, among other measures.

Every death in police custody is a tragedy. The impact is devastating on their loved ones. Dame Elish’s report has been a catalyst for change, and in my role as co-chair of the Ministerial Board on Deaths in Custody, I am determined that we sustain momentum in addressing the difficult issues at hand.

We will deliver a Year 2 work programme which will continue to prioritise preventing deaths in police custody and in the tragic instances that they do occur, holding organisations to account and improving support for families.

I would like to thank Dame Elish again for her far-reaching contribution to this important issue, and Deborah Coles, who advised Dame Elish’s review, for her continued passion to enact change. Most importantly, I would like to thank the families who contributed to Dame Elish’s review and who continue to share their experiences so that we can learn from them.

I am placing a copy of our progress update in the House Library and on Gov.uk.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1140
WS
Home Office
Made on: 22 October 2018
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Opt-in Decision on the Proposal of the European Parliament and the Council on European Production Orders and European Preservation Orders for cross-border access to electronic evidence in criminal matters

Until the UK leaves it remains a full member of the European Union with all the rights and responsibilities this entails. The Government will continue to consider the application of the UK’s right to opt in to, or opt out of, forthcoming EU legislation in the area of Justice and Home Affairs on a case by case basis, with a view to maximising our country’s security, protecting our civil liberties and enhancing our ability to control immigration.

The Government has decided not to opt in to the Proposal of the European Parliament and the Council on European Production Orders and European Preservation Orders for cross-border access to electronic evidence in criminal matters.

Law enforcement access to data held by service providers is an important issue and we support the underlying objective of improving cross-border access to electronic evidence. However, from the start of discussions on this issue, we have not supported the need for new EU legislation. That is because it is not clear that new EU legislation will be a practical and effective way to address the global issue of providing lawful access to data held anywhere in the world.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS993
WS
Home Office
Made on: 16 October 2018
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Security Industry Authority (SIA) Annual Report and Accounts 2017 – 2018

The 2017-18 Annual Report and Accounts for the Security Industry Authority (HC 1643) is being laid before the House today and will published on www.gov.uk. Copies will be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS982
WS
Home Office
Made on: 19 July 2018
Made by: Mr Nick Hurd (The Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service)
Commons

Independent Office for Police Conduct Annual Report

I am today, along with my rt hon Friend the Financial Secretary to the Treasury, publishing the 2017-2018 Annual Report and Accounts for the Independent Office for Police Conduct [HC 1331]. This will be laid before the House and published on www.gov.uk . The report will also be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS855
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