Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

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Written Statement Indentifying Number – Every written statement in the House of Commons and House of Lords has a WSID per parliamentary session.
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Ministry of Defence
Made on: 03 September 2019
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (Secretary of State for Defence)
Commons

Reserve Forces and Cadets Associations External Scrutiny Team Report 2019

I have today placed in the Library of the House a copy of a report into the condition of the Reserves and delivery of the Future Reserves 2020 programme compiled by the Reserve Forces’ and Cadets’ Associations External Scrutiny Team. I am most grateful to the Team for their work. The report raises interesting points which, after a thorough examination, I will respond to later in the year.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 25 June 2019
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security )
Commons

Forensic Service Provider Cyber Incident

On 3 June, Brussels-based scientific testing company Eurofins Scientific reported that they had been victim to a global ransomware attack. In the UK, its subsidiary Eurofins Forensic Services (EFS), who are a significant private sector forensic testing provider was affected.

Ministers have been briefed on the situation by operational leads and a range of actions have been taken to mitigate the impact on our criminal justice system and the public.

The National Crime Agency (NCA) have taken the operational command of the criminal investigation in the UK, with the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) leading our cyber response. Both the NCSC and NCA have deployed specialist officers to Brussels to assist Eurofins in the international investigation. These experts continue to work closely with both the company and the Cyber Incident Response firm EFS have employed to contain the situation. The affected UK law enforcement agencies reported the incident to the Information Commissioner’s Office. There is no evidence to date that this crime was specifically targeting the UK company.

We have taken immediate steps to minimise the impact of this crime on the criminal justice system. The National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) suspended use of EFS immediately and isolated police networks from the forensic service provider to retain their integrity. The NPCC put in place the National Contingency Plan and diverted urgent and priority submission to alternative suppliers. Other forensic submissions are being managed nationally to ensure that sufficient capacity is available for all forces.

These measures are temporary but will remain in place for as long as necessary. The NPCC, the UK Accreditation Service and the Forensic Science Regulator are working closely with the company to assess when it can continue to resume accepting forensic submissions.

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) is working to ensure all hearings remain based on reliable evidence. While investigations are ongoing, prosecutors will assess the impact on a case by case basis working closely with partners across the CJS and EFS.

If prosecutors or the police believe that there may have been an impact, they will contact the victims or witnesses involved. But if any victims are concerned, national support services are also available. These include the 24-hour Victim Support Headline with details on the Ministry of Justice website. However, I want to stress that at present we have no reason to believe there has been an impact on the forensic evidence tested by EFS.

The serious nature of this incident highlights the importance of all firms being cyber aware; and we urge businesses of all types and sizes to follow the guidance on this growing threat on the NCSC’s website.

The Government continues to assess and enhance our cyber security capabilities and it is vital we build strong defences – and every person, organisation or business has a part to play.

The investigation into this serious cyber-attack remains live but we will use our understanding of this latest incident to limit future harm to the UK.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1618
WS
Home Office
Made on: 16 May 2019
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

European Union JHA Opt-In Decisions: Second Additional Protocol to the Cybercrime Convention and EU US negotiations on cross-border data access

The Government has decided not to opt into (under the UK’s JHA opt-in Protocol) either the proposed EU Council Decision to participate in the negotiations of the Second Additional Protocol to the Cybercrime (“Budapest”) Convention or the proposed EU Council Decision to authorise EU US negotiations on a cross-border data access agreement.

The first proposed Council Decision enables the EU Commission to participate in negotiations relating to the Second Additional Protocol to the Council of Europe Cybercrime (“Budapest”) Convention, on behalf of the European Union.

The second proposed Council Decision authorises the EU Commission to commence negotiations with the US on an EU US international data access agreement, with the aim of ensuring compliance by US-established Service Providers to requests from EU Member States for stored electronic content. The US’s Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (CLOUD) Act provides that only an international agreement between the US and a foreign government can allow for such compliance by US-established Service Providers.

I have decided not to opt into the EU Council Decision on participating in the Second Additional Protocol to the Council of Europe Budapest Convention to ensure that the UK is able to negotiate its own position and interests, without being limited or bound by the EU negotiation policy. This includes enabling the UK to ensure that a flexible approach is taken in negotiating the Protocol to accommodate the different systems and processes of a wide range of participant states (beyond the participating EU Member States).

The UK is already in the process of negotiating its own reciprocal UK-US data access agreement, a bilateral treaty (as required under the CLOUD Act) that enables US companies to comply with lawful orders from UK authorities for the production of electronic communications without any conflict of law. As such my rt hon Friend the Minister of State for Policing and the Fire Service has decided not to opt into the Council Decision on opening EU US negotiations on cross-border data access. This is in line with the UK’s decision not to opt into the draft EU e-evidence Regulation, which sets internal EU rules relating to the production of electronic communications.

Until the UK leaves the EU we remain a full member, and the Government will continue to consider the application of the UK’s opt-in to EU legislation on a case by case basis, with a view to maximising our ability to protect the public.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1527
WS
Home Office
Made on: 29 January 2019
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Bill

I am today placing in the Library of the House the Department’s analysis of the application of Standing Order 83L of the Standing Orders of the House in respect of the Government amendments tabled for Commons Report stage of the Crime (Overseas Production Orders) Bill scheduled for 30 January 2018. The analysis should be read alongside annex A to the Explanatory Notes to the Bill.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1248
WS
Home Office
Made on: 17 January 2019
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Bill

I am today placing in the Library of the House the Home Office’s analysis on the application of Standing Order 83O of the Standing Orders of the House of Commons relating to public business in respect of the Lords amendments to the Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Bill.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1218
WS
Home Office
Made on: 18 December 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

New Chair of the Committee for the Protection of Animals Used for Scientific Purposes

My noble Friend the Minister of State for the Home Office (Baroness Williams of Trafford) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I am pleased to announce that Professor David Main has been appointed to the Committee for the Protection of Animals Used for Scientific Purposes (commonly referred to as the ASC) as its new Chair. This appointment is for three years, beginning on 1st March 2019. Professor Main is a Professor of Production Animal Health and Welfare at the Royal Agricultural University and a veterinary surgeon.

The ASC is an independent public body sponsored by the Home Office. It provides independent advice about issues relating to the use of animals in scientific procedures within the context of the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. Professor Main will replace Dr. John Landers, whose term as Chair ends on 28 February 2019.

I would like to take this opportunity to thank Dr. Landers for his dedication to the role of Chair of the ASC for the past five years.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1163
WS
Home Office
Made on: 12 December 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

UK Anti-Corruption Strategy – Year 1 Update

Today, I am publishing the first annual Update on the UK Anti-Corruption Strategy 2017-2022. The government committed to providing an annual written update to parliament on progress. The UK Anti-Corruption Strategy provides a framework to guide Government anti-corruption policies and actions and this Update highlights the action we have taken since its launch in 2017. It details the significant progress we have made, including actions taken to meet the commitments that were due by the end of 2018.

The UK has a good track record in combatting corruption; we are ranked as jointly, the eighth least corrupt country by Transparency International and, last week, we received the highest ever ranking from the Financial Action Task Force for our efforts against money-laundering and counter terrorism. We recognise, however, that there is more to do. Corruption undermines confidence in our institutions, threatens our security and damages our business interests, making it harder for our companies to compete internationally. This is why we have committed at least £48m over the next 18 months for the Serious and Organised Crime Strategy which consists of a package of capabilities to tackle economic crime and illicit finance, including the launch of the National Economic Crime Centre. In addition, the £45m Prosperity Fund Global Anti-Corruption Programme, approved in October 2018, will work with partner governments to promote inclusive sustainable growth and increase global prosperity through tackling corruption. The Government will continue to combat corruption and to promote integrity and transparency at home and overseas, working with international allies and at international fora to raise standards and to promote collective action.

A copy of the report will be placed in the House Library and will be available on the Gov.uk website.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1139
WS
Home Office
Made on: 06 September 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Bill

I am today placing in the Libraries of both Houses the Department’s analysis of the application of Standing Order 83L of the Standing Orders of the House in respect of the Government amendments tabled for Commons Report stage of the Counter-Terrorism and Border Security Bill scheduled for 11 September 2018. The analysis should be read alongside annex C to the Explanatory Notes to the Bill.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS912
WS
Home Office
Made on: 05 September 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Prevent Duty Toolkit for Local Authorities and Partner Agencies: Supplementary Information to the Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales

The aim of the Prevent Duty, commenced as part of the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015, is to reduce the threat to the UK from terrorism by stopping people from being drawn into terrorism or supporting terrorism.

The statutory guidance which accompanied the Prevent Duty was the starting point for the implementation of Prevent across sectors and places a duty on specified authorities to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. A range of sector specific advice to supplement the statutory guidance and further support Duty implementation across Sectors has since been issued.

The Prevent Duty has made a significant positive impact in preventing people being drawn into terrorism. To further support the local government sector, the Office for Security and Counter Terrorism has worked across government and with local partners to publish practical advice in the form of a Toolkit. The Toolkit supplements information provided in statutory guidance to ensure local authorities are effectively supported in implementing the Prevent Duty. This Toolkit does not replace the statutory guidance.

The publication of the Prevent Toolkit is based on three years of productive engagement with the local government sector since the introduction of the Duty, and illustrates examples of good practice to promote continuous improvement. It will support the practical delivery of Prevent by local authorities by providing information, implementation guidance, a self-assessment framework and case study examples to support local authorities and their partners in delivering the Prevent Duty locally.

The Toolkit has been published today and I will place a copy of it in the Library of the House. It has also been made available on Gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prevent-duty-toolkit-for-local-authorities-and-partner-agencies

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS906
WS
Home Office
Made on: 24 July 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Proceeds of Crime Act 2002

My rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today laying before Parliament the 2016-17 annual report of the appointed person under the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002. The appointed person is an independent person who scrutinises the use of the search and seizure powers that support the measures in the Act to seize and forfeit cash used for criminal purposes and to seize and sell property in settlement of confiscation orders.

The report gives the appointed person’s opinion as to the circumstances and manner in which the search and seizure powers conferred by the Act are being exercised. I am pleased that the appointed person, Mr. Douglas Bain, has expressed satisfaction with the operation of the powers and has found that there is nothing to suggest that the procedures are not being followed in accordance with the Act. Mr. Bain has made two recommendations this year. The Government will give due consideration to Mr Bain’s recommendations.

From 1 April 2016 to the end of March 2017 over £134 million in cash was seized by law enforcement agencies in England and Wales under powers in the Act. The seizures are subject to further investigation, and the cash is subject to further judicially approved detention, before forfeiture in the magistrates’ court. These powers are a valuable tool in the fight against crime and the report shows that the way they are used has been, and will continue to be, monitored closely.

Copies of the report will be available in the Vote Office.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS890
WS
Home Office
Made on: 05 June 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Annual Report of the Biometrics Commissioner

My hon Friend the Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Williams of Trafford) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I am pleased to announce that my rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today publishing the fourth annual report of the Biometrics Commissioner, together with the Government’s response.

The Commissioner, Paul Wiles, is appointed under Section 20 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. His responsibilities are:

- to decide applications by the police for extended retention of DNA profiles and fingerprints from persons arrested for serious offences but not charged or convicted;

- to keep under review National Security Determinations made by Chief Officers under which DNA profiles and fingerprints may be retained for national security purposes;

- to exercise general oversight of police use of DNA samples, DNA profiles and fingerprints.

His report is a statutory requirement of section 21 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012.

I am grateful to Mr Wiles for this report, which we have published in full.

Copies of the report will be available from the Vote Office. The Government’s response will be placed in the House Library.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS713
WS
Home Office
Made on: 01 May 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

The six-month review of the implementation of the Exchange of Notes on Beneficial Ownership between the United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies and relevant Overseas Territories

I, along with my rt hon Friend Sir Alan Duncan, Minister of State for Europe and the Americas, wish to make a statement on the six-month review of the implementation of the Exchange of Notes on Beneficial Ownership between the United Kingdom, Crown Dependencies and Relevant Overseas Territories.

In 2016 a commitment was made between the UK, six of the Overseas Territories (OTs), and all of the Crown Dependencies (CDs), to enhance the effectiveness of long-standing law enforcement cooperation with respect to the sharing of beneficial ownership information for corporate and legal entities incorporated in the respective jurisdictions. The arrangements for this are set out in the ‘Exchange of Notes’ (EoNs) and Technical Protocol, which includes a commitment that:

“The Participants will review together the operation of these arrangements in consultation with law enforcement agencies six months after the coming into force of these arrangements, and thereafter annually.”

Officials from the Home Office and Foreign and Commonwealth Office, and representatives from Guernsey and Alderney, Jersey and The Isle of Man; and the British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Bermuda, Gibraltar, Anguilla and Turks and Caicos Islands have carried out this first review of the EoN arrangements.

During the course of this review, the CDs and OTs have reiterated to the UK authorities their commitment to the EoNs, as demonstrated by their positive and proactive approach to implementation and engagement in the review process.

The government committed to complete this review by the end of March. Sir Alan Duncan (for the Overseas Territories) and I (for the Crown Dependencies) are pleased to provide the following key findings of the review and recommendations for the future of these arrangements.

The findings and recommendations of this review are based on material supplied by, and discussions with, all of the jurisdictions involved in the review process. The position varies across these different jurisdictions, and not all of the findings and recommendations of this review apply to all jurisdictions. Of course, where a jurisdiction already complies with the points covered by a particular finding or recommendation, it should continue to do so.

Key findings

  • The EoN arrangements have, since their coming into effect in July 2017, provided law enforcement officers with enhanced access to company beneficial ownership information, as originally envisaged in 2016, and are supporting ongoing criminal investigations.
  • Under the terms of the arrangements, this information is available to UK law enforcement within 24 hours, one hour if the request for information is notified as ‘urgent’, or such other time period as may be agreed. Information is available on a 24/7 basis.
  • As of 9 February 2018, the EoN arrangements have been used over 70 times to provide enhanced law enforcement access to beneficial ownership data. This information has been used to enhance intelligence leads and investigations on illicit finance.
  • The CDs, Bermuda, Gibraltar and the Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) all have central registers to hold the required information. Jersey’s is already fully populated (it has had a private register since 1989), as are the Guernsey and Alderney registers. The Isle of Man’s register is nearing completion (81%), in accordance with the agreed timeframe for full population by 30th June 2018. Bermuda has had a central register for over 70 years, and its new database is nearly 100% populated. Gibraltar expects its register to be fully populated by 30 June 2018, following a transition period. TCI, which was severely affected by hurricanes Maria and Irma, brought its enabling legislation into force on 1 February 2018. It anticipates that its register will be fully populated by December 2018, following a transition period.
  • “Similarly effective arrangements” (as permitted by the EoNs) are in place in British Virgin Islands (BVI) and the Cayman Islands. BVI, which was also severely affected by the hurricanes, has now attained around 80% population of its system. The Cayman Islands expect their beneficial ownership system to be fully populated by 30 June 2018, following a transition period provided for by their legislation. The UK is finalising with Anguilla a Memorandum of Understanding on the terms for provision of UK support for the establishment of Anguilla’s beneficial ownership system. This was delayed due to the impact of Hurricane Irma. The UK has already provided drafting assistance for underpinning legislation, which will be introduced at the Anguilla House of Assembly in due course.
  • The majority of requests thus far have been made by the National Crime Agency (NCA) and Serious Fraud Office (SFO). Other UK law enforcement authorities have also used the EoNs.
  • As could be expected of new arrangements and systems, teething issues arose initially. This review makes a number of recommendations, building upon efforts already made to address these issues, which will be taken forward where appropriate and reported on at the next review.

Recommendations

This review has made a number of recommendations that have been agreed by all parties concerned, including that:

  • All participants should continue to participate in these reviews, maintaining a focus on enhancing law enforcement cooperation.

  • Jurisdictions should continue to monitor their systems with a view to enhancing the accuracy of the data they hold.

  • All participants to the EoNs should update their contact details as soon as practically possible, including out of hours contact details when these change, so that these can be disseminated appropriately.

  • All jurisdictions should consider whether they may be able to adopt best practice on intelligence sharing e.g. request form templates.

  • The standardised request form should be amended to include a tick box to indicate 1 hour or 24 hour timeframes.

  • Participants should ensure that their registers are fully populated by the agreed timeframes, where this is not already the case.

Next Steps

Participants to the EoNs will take forward the recommendations of this six-month review, and will take responsibility for tracking progress. The Home Offie and Foreign and Commonwealth Office will produce a report on their implementation for the next review.

It should be noted that this review is in addition to ongoing monitoring of the practical application of the commitment by all participants, and a UK Statutory Review required by the Criminal Finances Act to take place before 1 July 2019 covering the period to the end of 2018.

This summary is also available on Gov.UK

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS641
WS
Home Office
Made on: 18 January 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Criminal Finances: EU directive on combating fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment

The Government has decided that the UK will not opt in to the Directive on combating fraud and counterfeiting of non-cash means of payment.

The UK’s domestic legislation is already compliant with the majority of the Directive’s measures, and in relation to the offences and sentences set out in the Directive, the UK goes further than the standards set within the Directive for:

  • The effective cooperation for the fraudulent use of payment instruments, and;
  • The preparatory offences, the use of information systems and other tools to support fraudulent use.

Following careful consideration we have concluded that there would be no benefit to the UK opting in to this measure.

The UK strongly supports international efforts to tackle fraud. The UK works closely with other EU Member States and will continue to do so despite the decision not to opt in. The UK has consistently advocated that international cooperation is required to tackle fraud, and we are committed to supporting Member States, and other countries, in this regard.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS402
WS
Home Office
Made on: 16 November 2017
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000: Consultation on revised Codes of Practice

I am today publishing three revised codes of practice for consultation under the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000

The consultation is in relation to the following codes:

1. The Covert Surveillance and Property Interference Code of Practice.

2. The Covert Human Intelligence Sources Code of Practice

These codes provide guidance on the authorisation of directed surveillance, intrusive surveillance and covert human intelligence sources under Part 2 of RIPA, as well as property interference under the Police Act 1997 and Intelligence Services Act 1994. These powers are available to law enforcement and intelligence agencies as well as a number of other public authorities specified under RIPA, for use where necessary and proportionate for purposes such as the prevention or detection of crime, and the protection of national security. The codes reinforce the safeguards provided by the Acts, for the careful and lawful deployment, management and oversight of the powers.

3. The Investigation of Protected Information Code of Practice

This code sets out guidance on the use of powers under Part 3 of RIPA governing the investigation of protected electronic information, usually in pursuance of a criminal investigation.

The three codes are being updated to reflect changes in the Investigatory Powers Act 2016 which will impact on the use of the powers covered by the codes. In particular the codes reflect the creation of the new Investigatory Powers Commissioner, who has replaced the three existing oversight bodies, the requirement for public authorities to report errors to the Commissioner, and the new arrangements for authorisation of equipment interference which will apply in future to some techniques currently authorised under property interference provisions, and be relevant for use of the power under Part 3 of RIPA. At the same time the guidance in the codes under Part 2 of RIPA are being updated to reflect best practice in authorisation and management of the powers, to strengthen the safeguards relating to handling of confidential or legally privileged material, and to clarify the application of the RIPA framework to online investigation and research.

The consultation will last for six weeks. Copies of the consultation document and draft codes will be placed in the House Library. Online versions will be available on the www.gov.uk website.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS254
WS
Home Office
Made on: 13 September 2017
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Annual Report of the Biometrics Commissioner

My hon Friend the Minister of State, Home Office (Baroness Williams of Trafford) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

I am pleased to announce that my rt hon Friend the Home Secretary is today publishing the third annual report of the Biometrics Commissioner, together with the government’s response.

The Biometrics Commissioner, Paul Wiles, is appointed under Section 20 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012. His responsibilities are:

  • to decide applications by the police for extended retention of DNA profiles and fingerprints from persons arrested for serious offences but not charged or convicted;
  • to keep under review National Security Determinations made by Chief Officers under which DNA profiles and fingerprints may be retained for national security purposes;
  • to exercise general oversight of police use of DNA samples, DNA profiles and fingerprints.

His report is a statutory requirement of section 21 of the Protection of Freedoms Act 2012.

I am grateful to Mr Wiles for this report. No redactions to it have been made on the grounds of national security. The Government has considered it and produced a response.

Copies of the report will be available from the Vote Office. The Government’s response will be placed in the House Library.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS131
WS
Home Office
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Proposed Regulation of the European Parliament and of the Council on the Mutual Recognition of Freezing & Confiscation Orders COM (2016) 819 final

The Government has decided that the UK will opt in to the Regulation on the Mutual Recognition of Freezing and Confiscation Orders.

The proposed Regulation would replace and build upon the existing mutual recognition framework which is currently in two existing instruments – the Council Framework Decision on the execution in the European Union of orders of freezing property of evidence (2003/577/JHA) and the Council Framework Decision (2006/783/JHA) on the application of the principle of mutual recognition to confiscation orders. These Framework Decisions were transposed into UK law in 2014.

Through our Serious Organised Crime Strategy and Action Plan for anti-money laundering and counter terrorist finance, we have made it clear that being able to recover criminal monies is a priority. The proposed Regulation will bring benefits to the UK through strengthening the ability of our operational agencies to have our orders recognised and executed, particularly in countries which have traditionally been slower to assist in cross border asset recovery cases.

The UK’s experience of the existing Framework Decisions has been positive, although numbers of mutual recognition requests are limited due to the short time (since 2014) that the Decisions have been fully transposed in UK law. Asset recovery in some EU states has traditionally been difficult through mutual legal assistance routes, which are lengthy and cumbersome.

Opting into this measure is also consistent with the UK’s approach to participating in EU mutual recognition measures to improve practical cooperation between Member States. Opting in at this point shows our continued positive engagement with this measure, and demonstrates our commitment to work together with our European partners to fight crime and prevent terrorism now and after we leave the European Union.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS100
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