Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

Show
Find by:
Close

WSID

Written Statement Indentifying Number – Every written statement in the House of Commons and House of Lords has a WSID per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-15 out of 15
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all statements
Print selected
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 09 September 2019
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

School Funding Update

Today I am confirming detailed aspects of schools and high needs funding arrangements for 2020-21. This follows a statement by the Secretary of State for Education on 3 September, which confirmed to Parliament that the funding for schools and high needs will, compared to 2019-20, rise by £2.6 billion for 2020-21, £4.8 billion for 2021-22, and £7.1 billion for 2022-23.

In 2020-21, this funding will be distributed using the Schools and High Needs National Funding Formulae (NFF). We will be publishing provisional NFF allocations at local authority and school level in October, including local authorities’ final primary and secondary units of funding for the Schools Block. Alongside this, in the usual way, we will publish technical documents setting out the detail underpinning the formulae. We will then publish final schools and high needs allocations for local authorities in the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG) in December.

The Schools NFF for 2020-21 will continue to have the same factors as at present, and we will continue to implement the formula to address historic underfunding and move to a system where funding is based on need. The key aspects of the formula for 2020-21 are:

  • The minimum per pupil funding levels will be set at £3,750 for primary schools and £5,000 for secondary schools. The following year, in 2021-22, the primary minimum level will rise to £4,000.
  • The funding floor will be set at 1.84% per pupil, in line with the forecast GDP deflator, to protect per pupil allocations for all schools in real terms. This minimum increase in 2020-21 allocations will be based on the individual school’s NFF allocation in 2019-20.
  • Schools that are attracting their core NFF allocations will benefit from an increase of 4% to the formula’s core factors.
  • There will be no gains cap in the NFF, unlike the previous two years, so that all schools attract their full core allocations under the formula.
  • As previously set out, we will make a technical change to the mobility factor so that it allocates this funding using a formulaic approach, rather than on the basis of historic spend.
  • Growth funding will be based on the same methodology as this year, with the same transitional protection ensuring that no authority whose growth funding is unwinding will lose more than 0.5% of its 2019-20 schools block allocation.

The Secretary of State confirmed on 3 September the government’s intention to move to a ‘hard’ NFF for schools – where budgets will be set on the basis of a single, national formula. We recognise that this will represent a significant change and we will work closely with local authorities, schools and others to make this transition as smoothly as possible.

In 2020-21 local authorities will continue to have discretion over their schools funding formulae and, in consultation with schools, will ultimately determine allocations in their area. However, as a first step towards hardening the formula, from 2020-21 the government will make the use of the national minimum per pupil funding levels, at the values in the school NFF, compulsory for local authorities to use in their own funding formulae.

In addition, two important restrictions will continue:

  • Local authorities will continue to set a Minimum Funding Guarantee in local formulae, which in 2020-21 must be between +0.5% and +1.84%. This allows them to mirror the real terms protection in the NFF, which is the Government’s expectation.
  • Local authorities can only transfer up to 0.5% of their School Block to other blocks of the DSG, with schools forum approval. To transfer more than this, or any amount without schools forum approval, they will have to make a request to the Department for Education, even if the same amount was agreed in the past two years.

The High Needs NFF for 2020-21 will also have the same factors as at present. With over £700 million of additional funding, the formula will:

  • Ensure that every local authority will receive an increase of at least 8% per head of 2 to 18 population through the funding floor. This minimum increase in 2020-21 allocations will be based on local authorities’ high needs allocations in 2019-20, including the additional £125 million announced in December 2018.
  • Above this minimum increase, the formula will allow local authorities to see increases of up to 17%, again calculated on the basis of per head of population.

The teachers’ pay grant and teachers’ pension employer contributions grant will both continue to be paid separately from the NFF in 2020-21. We will publish the rates that determine the 2020-21 allocations in due course.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1791
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 16 July 2019
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Teacher Training

In the Teacher Recruitment and Retention Strategy published in January, the Government committed to help great people to become teachers and ensure high quality teacher training.

In support of this, I am introducing a new approach for assessing the numeracy and literacy of prospective teachers, which will replace the existing skills tests.

From October, teacher training providers will become responsible for ensuring that prospective teachers meet the high standards of literacy and numeracy required to be a teacher. Under this new system, trainees will be benchmarked against a defined set of skills they will be expected to have by the end of their initial teacher training.

This new system of provider-led assurance will be introduced at the end of the current recruitment cycle.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1689
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 11 April 2019
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Teacher Training Skills Test

I would like to set out for the House some actions my department is taking to resolve an error we have identified in the marking scheme of one of the professional skills tests for prospective teachers.

The skills tests assess the core skills that teachers need to fulfil their professional role in schools. This is to ensure all teachers are competent in numeracy and literacy, regardless of their specialism.

All current and prospective trainee teachers must pass the skills tests in numeracy and literacy before they can be recommended for the award of qualified teacher status (QTS). Trainee teachers must pass the skills tests before they start their course of initial teacher training.

Since February 2018, candidates have been able to take unlimited test attempts, with the first three attempts offered free of charge.

The design of the skills tests is the responsibility of the Standards and Testing Agency (STA). The agency recently reviewed all marking schemes in operation for the skills tests and discovered an error in one test. This test was immediately taken out of use and the STA have confirmed that there are no errors in the remaining marking schemes that are in operation.

The error applies to a marking scheme for one of the literacy skills tests and has resulted in a small number of candidates failing their literacy test when they should have passed. The incorrect marking scheme for this test has been in operation for at least ten years. We know that just over 200 candidates were affected by the error between September 2017 and November 2018, approximately 150 of whom went on to pass their literacy test.

We will offer a payment to compensate candidates affected for any expenses they may have incurred in having to retake the test. My department will make best endeavours to contact candidates affected by the marking scheme error. Any candidates who think they may have been affected can also contact the skills test helpline by emailing support@sta.psionline.com

It is regrettable that this error has prevented some candidates from progressing their applications to teacher training. My department is taking swift action to make sure that those affected are supported to progress their applications.

The Chief Executive of the STA has assured me that there are no remaining marking scheme errors and that the schemes will be quality assured on a regular basis to prevent further errors.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1472
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 04 April 2019
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

School Condition Funding

Today, I am announcing the allocation of over £1.4 billion of capital funding in the financial year 2019–20 to maintain and improve the condition of the school estate.

This funding is provided to ensure schools have well maintained facilities to provide students with safe environments that support a high-quality education. It is part of £23 billion committed over 2016–21 to deliver new school places, rebuild or refurbish buildings in the worst condition and deliver thousands of condition projects across the school estate.

For the financial year 2019–20, the £1.4 billion of capital funding includes:

  • Almost £800 million for local authorities, voluntary aided partnerships, larger multi-academy trusts and academy sponsors, to invest in maintaining and improving the condition of their schools.
  • Over £400 million available through the Condition Improvement Fund for essential maintenance projects at small and stand-alone academy trusts and sixth-form colleges.
  • Over £200 million of Devolved Formula Capital allocated directly for schools to spend on small capital projects to meet their own priorities.

Details of successful applications to the Condition Improvement Fund have also been published today, covering 1413 projects at 1210 schools and sixth form colleges.

Details of today’s announcement will be published on the Department for Education section on the GOV.UK website. Announcement notifications are also being sent electronically to responsible bodies’ chief executive officers.

WS
Department for Education
Made on: 12 March 2019
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Sub-Lease to the New Model in Technology and Engineering (‘NMiTE’) Project

My noble friend the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the School System (Lord Agnew), has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

It is the normal practice when a government department proposes to make a gift of a value exceeding £300,000, for the department concerned to present to the House of Commons a minute giving particulars of the gift and explaining the circumstances; and to refrain from making the gift until fourteen parliamentary sitting days after the issue of the minute, except in cases of special urgency.

The Department for Education intends to provide a 50-year lease of the former-Robert Owen Academy site (Blackfriars Street, Hereford) to the New Model in Technology and Engineering (NMiTE). The lease is valued at £900,000 and will be subject to a premium of only £1,000. The sub-lease therefore represents a gift to NMiTE worth £899,000.

The New Model in Technology and Engineering (NMiTE) aims to secure university status and is supported by national and local government, the University of Warwick, and industry, to transform engineering education in Britain. They are in receipt of grant funding from the Department for Education to support their start-up and development. NMiTE will invest substantially in the site to bring it back into use and deliver specialist higher education.

We believe this lease represents good-value, supporting the development of the new organisation aiming to secure university status and avoiding the vacant site holding costs that the Department for Education would otherwise have to bear.

The Treasury has approved the proposal in principle. If, during the period of fourteen parliamentary sitting days beginning on the date on which this minute was laid, a Member signifies an objection by giving notice of a Parliamentary Question or a Motion relating to the minute, or by otherwise raising the matter in the House, final approval of the gift will be withheld pending an examination of the objection.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1367
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 24 October 2018
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Teachers' Pay Grant

Today I am confirming the allocations for the Teachers’ Pay Grant for 2018-19.

The Teachers’ Pay Grant was announced on 24th July by the Secretary of State for Education. This will be worth £508m in total and will fully fund the 2018/19 academic year pay award to the end of the Spending Review period, over and above the 1% rise schools would have expected and been planning for.

On 14 September the Department for Education published the rates and high level methodology for the Teachers’ Pay Grant.

The grant will be paid to all state funded schools and academies, including maintained nursery schools. This will be on the basis of pupil numbers in mainstream schools, and place numbers in special schools and other specialist provision. All schools will be funded for at least 100 pupils or 40 places.

Funding for mainstream schools will be allocated on the basis of pupil numbers and each school will have a specific allocation which cannot be modified by the local authority.

Local authorities will receive an allocation in respect of specialist provision in their area. This will be based on the number of places in each school, with all schools being funded for at least 40 places. The local authority will have the flexibility to allocate funding to the schools in their area, taking into account the particular circumstance of the schools and following consultation with them.

Further details and guidance will be published on .gov.uk.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS997
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 24 July 2018
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Schools Update

Today I am announcing details of school revenue funding for 2019-20, through three of the four blocks of the dedicated schools grant: the schools block, the high needs block, and the central school services block. Funding allocations for the early years block will be published later in the year, as usual.

School funding is at a record high, and schools have already benefitted from the introduction of the national funding formula in April 2018. This is an historic reform, which means that, for the first time, resources are being distributed based on the individual needs and characteristics of every school in the country. The formula allocates every local authority more money for every pupil, in every school, in both 2018-19 and 2019-20, compared to their 2017-18 baselines.

The additional investment of £1.3 billion for schools and high needs across 2018-19 and 2019-20 announced last year, on top of the schools budget set at Spending Review 2015, means that per-pupil funding is being maintained in real terms between 2017-18 and 2019-20. In 2020 per-pupil funding will be more than 50% higher than it was in 2000, in real terms.

I can confirm that we will deliver our planned updates to the formula in 2019-20. This includes:

  • increasing the minimum per-pupil funding level to £4,800 for secondary schools, and to £3,500 for primary schools;
  • increasing the funding floor so that all schools will attract at least a 1% per pupil gain against their 2017-18 baselines;
  • and enabling underfunded schools to gain a further 3% per pupil, on top of the 3% they gained in 2018-19 – this means that next year, underfunded schools will be attracting up to 6% more, per pupil, compared to 2017-18.

I am also confirming some small, technical changes to the schools block formula, which are set out in the accompanying policy document. In particular, we have introduced a new approach for allocating funding to local authorities to support schools with significant in-year growth in pupil numbers. This means that local authorities will be funded according to actual levels of pupil number growth, rather than on the basis of historic spending.

In the high needs formula, the funding floor will also increase to 1% per head and the gains cap will allow increases of up to 6% per head compared to 2017-18, up from 3% in 2018-19. The accompanying policy document sets out some further small changes to the way high needs funding is allocated, including changes to the arrangements for funding places at special free schools.

The primary and secondary units of funding for local authorities that we are publishing today will be used to set schools’ final allocations on the basis of updated pupil numbers data in the autumn. As we did alongside the launch of the national funding formula last year, in the interests of transparency and to help authorities and schools plan ahead, we are also publishing the notional school-level allocations which have been used to calculate those units of funding. Details of these arrangements have been published on GOV.UK.

We recognise that the introduction of the national funding formula has represented a significant change to the way schools are funded. To provide stability for authorities and schools through the transition, we have previously confirmed that in 2018-19 and 2019-20 each local authority will continue to set a local formula, in consultation with local schools. These local formulae determine individual schools’ budgets in their areas.

We recognise that some areas use this local flexibility to tailor their local formula, for instance because of local changes in characteristics, rapid growth in pupil numbers or to invest more in pupils with additional needs. This year, however, we have seen considerable movement in local formulae towards the national funding formula. 73 local authorities have moved every one of their factor values in their local formulae closer to the national funding formula, with 41 already – in the formula’s first year of introduction – mirroring it almost exactly. 112 local authorities have brought in a minimum per pupil funding factor, following its introduction in the national funding formula.

We are pleased to see this significant progress across the system in moving towards the national funding formula in its first year. In light of this progress, and in order to continue to support a smooth transition, I am confirming that local authorities will continue to determine local formulae in 2020-21.

After too many years in which the funding system has placed our schools on an unfair playing field, this government has finally made the historic move towards fair funding. Alongside the increased investment we are making in schools, this will underpin further improvements in standards and help create a world-class education system, and build a system that allows every child to achieve their potential, no matter their background.

Today the Secretary of State has also confirmed the 2018 teachers’ pay award. To ensure that this is fully affordable to schools, we will be providing a teachers’ pay grant of £187 million in 2018-19 and £321 million to all schools in England in 2019-20. This will cover, in full, the difference between this award and the cost of the 1% award that schools would have anticipated under the previous public sector pay cap. The grant will provide additional support to all maintained schools and academies, over and above the core funding that they receive through the national funding formula.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS885
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 18 July 2018
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Schools: Response to the Resolution of the House, 25 April 2018

I would like to respond to the resolution of the House following the opposition day debate on school funding on 25 April.

School funding is at a record high and schools have benefitted from the introduction of the national funding formula, which came into force in April. The new formula is supported by our investment of an additional £1.3 billion in the core schools budget, on top of what was announced at the last spending review.

Core schools funding will rise from almost £41 billion last year, to £42.4 billion this year and £43.5 billion in 2019-20. This means that real terms per pupil funding in 2020 will be more than 50% higher than it was in 2000.

The new national funding formula is an historic reform which means that, for the first time, resources are distributed according to a formula based on the individual needs and characteristics of every school in the country.

The formula recognises the challenges of the very lowest funded schools, by introducing a minimum per pupil funding level. Under the national funding formula, in 2019-20 all secondary schools will attract at least £4,800 per pupil, and all primary schools will attract at least £3,500 per pupil.

Moreover, the formula allocates every local authority more money for every pupil in every school in 2018-19 and 2019-20. Final decisions on local distribution will be taken by local authorities, but under the national funding formula every school is attracting at least 0.5% more per pupil in 2018-19, and 1% more in 2019-20, compared to 2017-18.

We recognise that the introduction of the national funding formula represents a significant change to the way schools are funded. To provide stability for authorities and schools through the transition, we have previously confirmed that in 2018-19 and 2019-20 each local authority will continue to set a local formula, in consultation with local schools.

Many local councils feel that the right thing to do is to replicate the national funding formula locally, and we support and encourage this. However, we recognise that some areas will want to use their local flexibility to introduce a more tailored local formula, for instance because of local changes in characteristics, rapid growth in pupil numbers or the need to invest more in pupils with SEN or disabilities.

After too many years in which the funding system has placed our schools on an unfair playing field, we are finally making the historic move towards fair funding. Alongside the increased investment we are making in schools, this will underpin further improvements in standards and help create a world-class education system, and build a system that allows every child to achieve their potential, no matter their background.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS845
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 08 May 2018
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Strengthening Qualified Teacher Status and Improving Career Progression for Teachers Consultation: Government Response

On Friday 4 May 2018, the Government published its response to the recent consultation on ‘Strengthening Qualified Teacher Status and Improving Career Progression for Teachers’.

This consultation closed on 8 March, and had over 2,000 written responses. The majority of responses agreed with the case to strengthen support that teachers receive in the early stages of their career. This is in addition to finding more effective ways of enabling teachers to access high quality Continuing Professional Development throughout their careers.

The Government response sets out how we will take this work forward, including:

  • Increasing the length of the induction period for teachers from one year to two years;
  • Developing an Early Career Framework of support and mentoring, which will create a better and more consistent induction experience for all new teachers;
  • Exploring the creation of new qualifications for experienced classroom teachers, alongside work to consider how we can make the existing Continuing Professional Development market easier to navigate for schools and teachers; and,
  • Piloting a sabbatical fund for experienced teachers.

As this work is developed further, we will work with teachers, school leaders, and education experts. We will also ensure that improving continuing professional development for teachers aligns closely with wider work on the recruitment and retention of teachers.

The response is available on gov.uk and I will place a copy in the House Libraries.

Government Response: Strengthening QTS (PDF Document, 644.77 KB)
This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS649
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 15 March 2018
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

School Condition Allocations

My honourable friend the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the School System (Lord Agnew) has made the following written ministerial statement.

Today, I am announcing the allocation of £1.4 billion in 2018-19 to maintain and improve the condition of the education estate. Investing in our school buildings is a key part of the Government’s plan to ensure that every child has the opportunity of a place at a good school, whatever their background.

For the financial year 2018–19, the £1.4 billion of funding includes approximately:

  • £0.7 billion for local authorities, voluntary aided partnerships, larger multi-academy trusts and academy sponsors, to invest in their own condition priorities.

  • £0.5 billion for academies and sixth-form colleges through the Condition Improvement Fund - the outcomes of bids to this fund will be announced later this year.

  • £0.2 billion of Devolved Formula Capital to be allocated directly to schools later in 2018.

To provide stability for schools while we review the approach to capital funding for 2019 - 2020, we have continued the existing capital funding approach for the financial year 2018 - 2019.

In addition, £100m of revenue generated from the Soft Drinks Industry Levy will be provided in 2018-19 for the Healthy Pupils Capital Fund. This fund is intended to improve children’s and young people’s physical and mental health - for example, by improving playgrounds and sports facilities, or kitchens, dining or medical facilities. The Healthy Pupils Capital Fund is being allocated alongside 2018-19 school condition funding.

Details of today’s announcement will be published on the GOV.UK website, and copies will be placed in the House Library.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS528
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 19 December 2017
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

School Revenue Funding Settlement: 2018 to 2019

Today I am confirming the school and early years funding allocations for 2018-19. This announcement covers the Dedicated Schools Grant (DSG), the Education Services Grant (ESG) protections for academies, and the Pupil Premium. This is supported by the additional £1.3bn for schools and high needs over the next two years that the Secretary of State for Education announced in July.

As previously announced, the distribution of the DSG to local authorities will be set out in four blocks for each authority: a schools block, a high needs block, an early years block, and the new central school services block.

On 14 September, the Secretary of State for Education announced a new national funding formula for schools and high needs from April 2018. This follows the introduction of a national funding formula for early years in April 2017. This is an historic reform. The new national funding formulae will direct resources where they are most needed, helping to ensure that every child has the high quality education that they deserve, wherever they live.

The schools block has been allocated between local authorities on the basis of the primary and secondary units of funding published in September 2017.

The allocations for the high needs block have been updated with the latest pupil numbers, following the publication of provisional allocations in September indicating how much each local authority was likely to receive. The high needs block supports provision for pupils and students with special educational needs and disabilities (SEND), up to the age of 25, and alternative provision for pupils who cannot receive their education in schools.

The new central school services block which funds local authorities for their ongoing responsibilities for both academies and maintained schools has also been allocated on the basis of the latest pupil numbers, in line with September’s announcement.

The early years block comprises funding for: the free early education entitlements for 3- and 4-year-olds and disadvantaged 2-year-olds, supplementary funding for maintained nursery schools; the early years Pupil Premium, and the Disability Access Fund. The early years national funding formula rates for 3- and 4-year-olds for 2018-19 were published on 17 November, and today we have announced initial allocations for this block.

We will maintain the ESG protections in 2018-19 at their current rates, to protect academies from excessive changes in funding as a result of the ending of the ESG.

The pupil premium per pupil amounts will be protected at the current rates, with the exception of the pupil premium plus, which will increase from £1,900 per pupil to £2,300, as previously announced. The amounts for 2018-19 will be:

Pupils

Per pupil rate

Disadvantaged pupils: Primary

£1,320

Disadvantaged pupils: Secondary

£935

Pupil Premium Plus: Looked After Children (LAC) and those adopted from care or who leave care under a Special Guardianship Order or Child Arrangements Order (formally known as a residence order).

£2,300

Service children

£300

A looked after child is defined in the Children Act 1989 as one who is in the care of, or provided with accommodation by, an English or Welsh local authority.

Pupil Premium allocations for financial year 2018-19 will be published in June 2018 following the receipt of pupil number data from the spring 2018 schools and alternative provision censuses.

Details of these arrangements will be published on GOV.UK.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS368
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 27 November 2017
Made by: Nick Gibb (Minister of State for School Standards)
Commons

Correction

Information supplied by the Data Modernisation Division of the Department for Education has been identified as containing incorrect facts in the response provided to three Parliamentary Questions from the Honourable Member for Brighton Pavilion concerning the volume of children’s records passed onto the police and the Home Office (PQ48634, PQ48635 and PQ52645) and in figures quoted during a House of Lords Debate on the 31 of October 2016 on the Education (Pupil Information) (England) (Miscellaneous Amendments) Regulations 2016.

Following the identification of this issue, the accuracy of all previously supplied figures relating to these uses of National Pupil Database have also been checked. Rigorous new processes have now been put in place to ensure the robustness of all current and future figures.

In response to PQ48634 and PQ48635, the correct figures are that 33 access requests of the NPD data were made by the Police during the period in question and 16 of these resulted in data being shared. Information about 62 pupils was shared.

In response to PQ48634 and PQ48635, the correct figures are that during the period in question, requests relating to a total of 2,461 individuals had been made by the Home Office to DfE and 531 records had been identified within DfE data and returned.

In response to PQ 52645 the correct figures are that 531 records sent to the Home Office were related to pupils and 1,930 of 2,461 requests were not returned due to DfE not being able to find a match within the NPD for those records.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS270
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 14 November 2017
Made by: Nick Gibb (Minister of State for School Standards )
Commons

Teacher recruitment, leadership and development

Today I am confirming that the Government has decided to transfer the functions of the National College for Teaching and Leadership (NCTL) relating to the recruitment of teachers, teacher development, and leadership into the core of the Department for Education. This will enable better delivery of the overall co-ordinated strategy to support and develop a strong high-quality teaching profession with continuous professional development at its heart.

The agency’s remaining functions and responsibilities will focus on the regulation of the teaching profession, including misconduct hearings, and acting as the Competent Authority for teaching in England. Its role will also include the recognition of the professional status of teachers from outside England. It will remain an Executive Agency of the Department for Education and will be known in future as the Teaching Regulation Agency. The repurposed agency will be operational from 1 April 2018.

The Department will work with staff, unions, stakeholders and the education sector to finalise and deliver our plans.

Details of today’s statement will be published on GOV.UK.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS241
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 20 July 2017
Made by: Nick Gibb (Minister of State for School Standards and Minister for Equalities)
Commons

Post 16 Education

Today the Government is publishing Professor Sir Adrian Smith’s authoritative and wide-ranging review of 16-18 mathematics education in England.

The government is determined to give all young people the world-class education they need to fulfil their potential. This includes providing opportunities to develop the mathematical and quantitative knowledge and skills appropriate to their chosen careers. In an increasingly technological world this will be vital to ensuring that our future workforce will be productive and competitive in the global marketplace.

Sir Adrian Smith’s review identifies a strong economic and social mobility case for raising participation in post-16 mathematics and improving knowledge and skills at all levels. He presents clear evidence for the value of mathematical and quantitative skills to students, whichever route they take.

The report includes recommendations and challenges that are wide-ranging – for example, the need to address negative cultural perceptions of mathematics. Thesel issues will require detailed engagement and action between government, industry, universities, schools and colleges.

I have today written to Sir Adrian thanking him for the review and confirming that the Government will set out our plans across the range of Sir Adrian’s recommendations in due course. The letter confirms that work is already underway to address a number of the challenges highlighted in the report, and there are a number of recommendations where we have been able to take immediate action.

We agree with Sir Adrian that we must be ambitious and take greater action to encourage and support more young people to choose mathematics post-16, particularly in areas where take-up is low. That is why one of the immediate actions we are taking today is to announce a new £16m Level 3 Maths Support Programme. It will build on the momentum created by the Further Mathematics and Core Maths Support Programmes, and will work with schools and colleges to improve mathematics education by sharing best practice, and delivering knowledge-rich curriculum materials, as well as working to increase participation and attainment in 16-18 mathematics. The programme will work to deliver focused intervention targeted to those who need it most.

The other immediate actions we have taken in response to Sir Adrian’s recommendations are set out in my letter. For example, taking forward work on the new T level qualifications to ensure they include mathematics where employers identify this as a requirement for employment; working with the newly constituted Royal Society Advisory Committee on Mathematics Education to ensure appropriate expert advice. We are alsoworking with institutions such as the Royal Society and British Academy to encourage universities and employers to signal the value of level 3 mathematics qualifications for entry to undergraduate courses with a significant quantitative element and for a wide range of job roles.

We have placed a copy of Sir Adrian’s report and our letter in the libraries of the House and on the government’s website.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS99
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 19 July 2017
Made by: Nick Gibb (The Minister of State for School Standards and Minister for Equalities)
Commons

School Curriculum

In order to ensure our education system drives social mobility, it is imperative that the vast majority of pupils – whatever their background – have the opportunity to study the suite of academic subjects that make up the EBacc. These subjects - English, maths, science, history or geography, and a language – are the core of a rounded and well balanced education that should be the entitlement of the vast majority of pupils. According to the Russell Group, studying these subjects at A level opens more doors to more degrees.

A recent study found that pupils in a set of 300 schools that increased their EBacc entry, from 8% to 48%, were more likely to achieve good English and maths GCSEs, more likely to take an A level, or an equivalent level 3 qualification, and more likely to stay in post-16 education.

Since 2010, we have increased the opportunity for pupils to study this combination of GCSEs, with 40% of pupils now being entered for this combination of subjects at GCSE, up from 22% in 2010. However, there are still too few pupils studying these subjects, with pupils from disadvantaged backgrounds disproportionately less likely to be studying these subjects.

Research suggests that lower participation from disadvantaged pupils in these core academic subjects can negatively affect social mobility. Yet overall, disadvantaged pupils remain half as likely to be entered for the EBacc subjects as their non-disadvantaged peers, and the gap in EBacc subject entry persists even among the most academically able disadvantaged pupils.

There is no doubt that studying the EBacc subjects up to the age of 16 is right for the vast majority of pupils. As a Government we are committed to unlocking the potential of all pupils regardless of their background and this is why, as set out in our manifesto, we would like to see 90% of year 10 pupils starting to study GCSEs in the EBacc combination of subjects by 2025.

Through our consultation on implementing the EBacc, we sought to understand the barriers schools face in increasing EBacc entry. Having carefully considered the consultation responses, it is my view that we need an approach that is both pragmatic, stretching, and one that takes into account the challenge involved in meeting this ambition.

While some schools are already responding to this challenge by significantly increasing the number of pupils studying the EBacc suite of GCSEs, some schools have more to do to reach our ambition. It will take time to build the right capacity across the whole school system and ensure that schools have access to high quality staff in EBacc subjects, so that all pupils have the best chance of success in their studies.

Taking this all into account it is our ambition that 75% of year 10 pupils in state-funded mainstream schools will start to study GCSEs in the EBacc combination of subjects by September 2022. This will mark an important milestone in driving towards the government’s ambition that the vast majority of pupils – irrespective of background – have access to this core academic suite of GCSEs, which is central to a broad and balanced curriculum.

The government response being published today considers and responds to the issues raised in consultation responses, and outlines the steps we will take to support schools to deliver the EBacc subjects to the vast majority of pupils.

Copies of the government’s response document will be placed in both House libraries.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS77
Expand all statements
Print selected
Showing 1-15 out of 15
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100