Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

Show
Find by:
Close

WSID

Written Statement Indentifying Number – Every written statement in the House of Commons and House of Lords has a WSID per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-20 out of 3408
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all statements
Print selected
WS
Treasury
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Lord Young of Cookham (Lords Spokesperson)
Lords

Public Service Pensions

My right honourable friend the Chief Secretary to the Treasury (Elizabeth Truss) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

The government is committed to providing public service pensions that are fair for public sector workers and for taxpayers. This is why we brought forward reforms in 2015, based on the recommendations of the Hutton report, to ensure that these pensions are sustainable in the future.

The courts have considered cases regarding the implementation of the 2015 reforms. On 27 June 2019 the Supreme Court denied the government permission to appeal the Court of Appeal’s judgment that transitional provisions introduced to the reformed judges and firefighters pension schemes in 2015 gave rise to unlawful age discrimination. The government respects the Court’s decision and will engage fully with the Employment Tribunal to agree how the discrimination will be remedied.

The ruling relates to the ‘transitional protection’ offered to some members when the reformed schemes were introduced. In order to ensure people close to retirement age were treated fairly, the government agreed to ‘transitional protection’, which broadly permitted those members who were closest to retirement at the time new pension schemes were introduced to remain members of their respective old schemes. The court has found that those too far away from retirement age to qualify for ‘transitional protection’ have been unfairly discriminated against. As ‘transitional protection’ was offered to members of all the main public service pension schemes, the government believes that the difference in treatment will need to be remedied across all those schemes. This includes schemes for the NHS, civil service, local government, teachers, police, armed forces, judiciary and fire and rescue workers. Continuing to resist the full implications of the judgment in Court would only add to the uncertainty experienced by members.

The matter will be remitted to the Employment Tribunal in respect of the litigants in the firefighters and judicial pension schemes. It will be for the Tribunal to determine a remedy. Alongside this process, government will be engaging with employer and member representatives, as well as the devolved administrations, to help inform our proposals to the Tribunal and in respect of the other public service pension schemes.

Initial estimates suggest remedying the discrimination will add around £4bn per annum to scheme liabilities from 2015.

The reasons for the 2015 reforms remain: that public service pensions are a significant cost for the taxpayer, now and in the future. The judgment does not alter the government’s commitment to ensuring that the cost of public service pensions are affordable for taxpayers and sustainable for the long term.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1725
WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Baroness Buscombe (The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions)
Lords

Government’s Consultation on Measures to Reduce Health Related Job Loss

My honourable Friend, The Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work(Justin Tomlinson MP) has made the following Written Statement.

I would like to make the following statement on behalf of myself and Jackie Doyle Price MP, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Mental Health, Inequalities and Suicide Prevention in the Department for Health and Social Care.

Today, my department, in partnership with the Department of Health and Social Care, will publish a consultation on proposals to reduce health-related job loss.

As people live and work for longer, more employees are disabled or have long term health conditions. There are significant and well evidenced benefits for employers, individuals and government if health related job-loss can be reduced.

For employers, offering flexibility, early support and occupational health advice are the key to successful retention. Employers are best placed to take the early preventative measures that are most effective. There are large variations in employers’ capability and capacity to act with large firms five times more likely to provide occupational health when compared to small firms.

Each year more than 100,000 people leave their job following a period of sickness absence lasting at least four weeks. Survey evidence shows that 44% of people who had been off sick for a year then left employment altogether.

The proposals set out in this consultation include:

  • Amending the legal framework to encourage workplace modifications and early action to support individuals on sickness absence leave;
  • Reforming Statutory Sick Pay so that it is better enforced, more flexible and covers the lowest paid and potentially, rewards effective action with a new rebate;
  • Improving access to occupational health services with additional support for small employers including a potential subsidy;
  • Government to provide best practice advice and support for employers on managing health and disability in the workplace.

The evidence and views gathered during this consultation will be used to develop our proposals further and understand the impact of the changes on both employers and employees.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1719
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Lord Agnew of Oulton (The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the School System)
Lords

School Sport and Activity

My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Education (Damian Hinds) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

A positive experience of sport and physical activity at a young age can build a lifetime habit of participation. It is central to meeting the Government’s ambitions for a world-class education system which promotes character, good physical health and mental wellbeing. We face a significant challenge to increase and maintain activity levels amongst children and young people, particularly given the levels of childhood obesity. Data from Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People survey show that a third of children are currently doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a day, less than half the amount recommended by the Chief Medical Officer.

The Department for Education, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, and Department of Health and Social Care are today publishing a joint School Sport and Activity Action Plan which will set out the following ambitions:

  • All children and young people take part in at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day.
  • All children and young people have the opportunity to realise developmental, character-building experiences through sport, competition and active pursuits.
  • All sport and physical activity provision for children and young people is designed around building basic skills as well as confidence, enjoyment, knowledge and understanding (known as physical literacy) with a focus on fun and enjoyment, and reaching the least active young people.

The Action Plan will set out a number of immediate actions that feed into realising these ambitions, including a strong commitment to joint working between schools and the sport sector. The plan also sets out areas of activity for the future with action to be confirmed in a further updated plan later in the year, following the spending review.

The immediate actions include a commitment to an additional £2.5m from the Department for Education in 2019/20 to support schools through further work on teacher training, more help and advice to enable schools to open up their facilities and make links with providers, as well as providing more opportunities for young people to volunteer in sport. The plan also sets out over £4m of Sport England investment in new after-school clubs, strengthening the School Games competition and building girls’ confidence through a programme linked to ‘This Girl Can’.

The Government is also committing to develop regional pilots to trial new and innovative approaches to getting young people active, jointly funded by Sport England and the Department for Education from 2020. The pilots will involve collaborative working from the school and community sector to offer a coordinated sport and physical activity experience for young people.

We will be working with sporting organisations like the Youth Sport Trust, RFU, England Netball and the Premier League to ensure that sports clubs and programmes can reach even more children, encouraging them to get active by focusing on fun, enjoyment and increasing confidence.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1724
WS
Treasury
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Elizabeth Truss (The Chief Secretary to the Treasury)
Commons

Public Service Pensions

The government is committed to providing public service pensions that are fair for public sector workers and for taxpayers. This is why we brought forward reforms in 2015, based on the recommendations of the Hutton report, to ensure that these pensions are sustainable in the future.

The courts have considered cases regarding the implementation of the 2015 reforms. On 27 June 2019 the Supreme Court denied the government permission to appeal the Court of Appeal’s judgment that transitional provisions introduced to the reformed judges and firefighters pension schemes in 2015 gave rise to unlawful age discrimination. The government respects the Court’s decision and will engage fully with the Employment Tribunal to agree how the discrimination will be remedied.

The ruling relates to the ‘transitional protection’ offered to some members when the reformed schemes were introduced. In order to ensure people close to retirement age were treated fairly, the government agreed to ‘transitional protection’, which broadly permitted those members who were closest to retirement at the time new pension schemes were introduced to remain members of their respective old schemes. The court has found that those too far away from retirement age to qualify for ‘transitional protection’ have been unfairly discriminated against. As ‘transitional protection’ was offered to members of all the main public service pension schemes, the government believes that the difference in treatment will need to be remedied across all those schemes. This includes schemes for the NHS, civil service, local government, teachers, police, armed forces, judiciary and fire and rescue workers. Continuing to resist the full implications of the judgment in Court would only add to the uncertainty experienced by members.

The matter will be remitted to the Employment Tribunal in respect of the litigants in the firefighters and judicial pension schemes. It will be for the Tribunal to determine a remedy. Alongside this process, government will be engaging with employer and member representatives, as well as the devolved administrations, to help inform our proposals to the Tribunal and in respect of the other public service pension schemes.

Initial estimates suggest remedying the discrimination will add around £4bn per annum to scheme liabilities from 2015.

The reasons for the 2015 reforms remain: that public service pensions are a significant cost for the taxpayer, now and in the future. The judgment does not alter the government’s commitment to ensuring that the cost of public service pensions are affordable for taxpayers and sustainable for the long term.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1687
WS
Department for Education
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Mr Damian Hinds (The Secretary of State for Education)
Commons

School Sport and Activity

A positive experience of sport and physical activity at a young age can build a lifetime habit of participation. It is central to meeting the Government’s ambitions for a world-class education system which promotes character, good physical health and mental wellbeing. We face a significant challenge to increase and maintain activity levels amongst children and young people, particularly given the levels of childhood obesity. Data from Sport England’s Active Lives Children and Young People survey show that a third of children are currently doing less than 30 minutes of physical activity a day, less than half the amount recommended by the Chief Medical Officer.

The Department for Education, Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, and Department of Health and Social Care are today publishing a joint School Sport and Activity Action Plan which will set out the following ambitions:

  • All children and young people take part in at least 60 minutes of physical activity every day.
  • All children and young people have the opportunity to realise developmental, character-building experiences through sport, competition and active pursuits.
  • All sport and physical activity provision for children and young people is designed around building basic skills as well as confidence, enjoyment, knowledge and understanding (known as physical literacy) with a focus on fun and enjoyment, and reaching the least active young people.

The Action Plan will set out a number of immediate actions that feed into realising these ambitions, including a strong commitment to joint working between schools and the sport sector. The plan also sets out areas of activity for the future with action to be confirmed in a further updated plan later in the year, following the spending review.

The immediate actions include a commitment to an additional £2.5m from the Department for Education in 2019/20 to support schools through further work on teacher training, more help and advice to enable schools to open up their facilities and make links with providers, as well as providing more opportunities for young people to volunteer in sport. The plan also sets out over £4m of Sport England investment in new after-school clubs, strengthening the School Games competition and building girls’ confidence through a programme linked to ‘This Girl Can’.

The Government is also committing to develop regional pilots to trial new and innovative approaches to getting young people active, jointly funded by Sport England and the Department for Education from 2020. The pilots will involve collaborative working from the school and community sector to offer a coordinated sport and physical activity experience for young people.

We will be working with sporting organisations like the Youth Sport Trust, RFU, England Netball and the Premier League to ensure that sports clubs and programmes can reach even more children, encouraging them to get active by focusing on fun, enjoyment and increasing confidence.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1685
WS
Home Office
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Publication of Compliance Improvement Review

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Sajid Javid) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

On 9 May 2019 I made a Written Ministerial Statement to notify Parliament of compliance risks that MI5 had identified and reported within certain technology environments used to store and analyse data. In the statement I confirmed that I had established an independent review to consider and report back to me on what lessons could be learned for the future. My statement today notifies Parliament that this review, the Compliance Improvement Review (CIR), is now complete and that the Government is publishing the summary section of the report and its recommendations, gisted where necessary for national security reasons.

The CIR was led by Sir Martin Donnelly, a former Permanent Secretary, and examined how the issue arose and considered MI5’s governance and risk management procedures in light of this. The review team had access to all relevant documentation and met key individuals from Government, MI5 and the Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office to discuss the background to the risks being identified. I would like to place on record my thanks to Sir Martin and the review team, who have worked diligently to complete a thorough and well-evidenced review.

I was provided with a copy of the review report in late June and have since had the opportunity to discuss it with Sir Martin. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner and the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament have both received copies of the full report.

The CIR identified three areas where improvements can be made. These are: improvements to support an effective compliance culture across MI5; improvements to ensure more effective sharing of information between MI5 and the Home Office to identify emerging issues; and improvements to ensure increased legal input to the MI5 Management Board and ensuring closer joint working between MI5 and Home Office legal advisors. The review makes a total of 14 recommendations to address these issues, which are set out in the document that has been published today.

I can confirm that DG MI5 and I agree with the CIR’s conclusions and my department will now work closely with MI5 to deliver the recommendations.

It should be noted that the CIR found that there was no attempt by MI5 to hide the compliance risk they were managing. The CIR describes MI5 as “a consistently high-performing organisation, with a growing number of committed and professional staff working under sustained pressure to keep this country safe”, a view I share from my experience as Home Secretary. Copies of the CIR summary document will be made available on Gov.UK and will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1722
WS
Women and Equalities
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Penny Mordaunt (The Minister for Women and Equalities)
Commons

Office for Tackling Injustices

On Friday 12 July, the Prime Minister announced the creation of the Office for Tackling Injustices. This is a new organisation that will hold the Government and wider society to account for tackling key social injustices.

Despite the great progress we have made in promoting fair treatment for all in the UK, we know that too many of our citizens are still held back by the injustice of unequal treatment on the grounds of their socio-economic background, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation or disability.

The Prime Minister has spoken of her determination to tackle these ‘burning injustices’. But all Governments should work to end the injustices that continue to characterise our country for too many. The Office for Tackling Injustices (OfTI) will focus minds on how to create a fairer country in the decades to come.

By shining a light on data on injustices and monitoring change, the OfTI will provide evidence-based challenge to future Governments and wider society to tackle disparities in social and economic outcomes. Data is a hard, sometimes uncomfortable fact, but publishing it and communicating it clearly forces Government and others to hold a mirror up to their own performance and challenge themselves to do better.

The OfTI will have a remit covering social injustices relating to ethnicity, gender, disability, socio-economic background and LGBT. As well as annually delivering a data-driven report on progress to Parliament, the OfTI will also publish thematic studies into issues relevant to its mandate. It will make use of relevant published data from various public authorities, monitoring trends and considering the underlying causes and drivers for them.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Sajid Javid (The Secretary of State for the Home Department)
Commons

Publication of Compliance Improvement Review

On 9 May 2019 I made a Written Ministerial Statement to notify Parliament of compliance risks that MI5 had identified and reported within certain technology environments used to store and analyse data. In the statement I confirmed that I had established an independent review to consider and report back to me on what lessons could be learned for the future. My statement today notifies Parliament that this review, the Compliance Improvement Review (CIR), is now complete and that the Government is publishing the summary section of the report and its recommendations, gisted where necessary for national security reasons.

The CIR was led by Sir Martin Donnelly, a former Permanent Secretary, and examined how the issue arose and considered MI5’s governance and risk management procedures in light of this. The review team had access to all relevant documentation and met key individuals from Government, MI5 and the Investigatory Powers Commissioner’s Office to discuss the background to the risks being identified. I would like to place on record my thanks to Sir Martin and the review team, who have worked diligently to complete a thorough and well-evidenced review.

I was provided with a copy of the review report in late June and have since had the opportunity to discuss it with Sir Martin. The Investigatory Powers Commissioner and the Intelligence and Security Committee of Parliament have both received copies of the full report.

The CIR identified three areas where improvements can be made. These are: improvements to support an effective compliance culture across MI5; improvements to ensure more effective sharing of information between MI5 and the Home Office to identify emerging issues; and improvements to ensure increased legal input to the MI5 Management Board and ensuring closer joint working between MI5 and Home Office legal advisors. The review makes a total of 14 recommendations to address these issues, which are set out in the document that has been published today.

I can confirm that DG MI5 and I agree with the CIR’s conclusions and my department will now work closely with MI5 to deliver the recommendations.

It should be noted that the CIR found that there was no attempt by MI5 to hide the compliance risk they were managing. The CIR describes MI5 as “a consistently high-performing organisation, with a growing number of committed and professional staff working under sustained pressure to keep this country safe”, a view I share from my experience as Home Secretary. Copies of the CIR summary document will be made available on Gov.UK and will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1684
WS
Women and Equalities
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister for Equalities)
Lords

Office for Tackling Injustices

My Rt Hon. Friend the Minister for Women and Equalities (The Rt Hon Penny Mordaunt MP) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

On Friday 12 July, the Prime Minister announced the creation of the Office for Tackling Injustices. This is a new organisation that will hold the Government and wider society to account for tackling key social injustices.

Despite the great progress we have made in promoting fair treatment for all in the UK, we know that too many of our citizens are still held back by the injustice of unequal treatment on the grounds of their socio-economic background, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation or disability.

The Prime Minister has spoken of her determination to tackle these ‘burning injustices’. But all Governments should work to end the injustices that continue to characterise our country for too many. The Office for Tackling Injustices (OfTI) will focus minds on how to create a fairer country in the decades to come.

By shining a light on data on injustices and monitoring change, the OfTI will provide evidence-based challenge to future Governments and wider society to tackle disparities in social and economic outcomes. Data is a hard, sometimes uncomfortable fact, but publishing it and communicating it clearly forces Government and others to hold a mirror up to their own performance and challenge themselves to do better.

The OfTI will have a remit covering social injustices relating to ethnicity, gender, disability, socio-economic background and LGBT. As well as annually delivering a data-driven report on progress to Parliament, the OfTI will also publish thematic studies into issues relevant to its mandate. It will make use of relevant published data from various public authorities, monitoring trends and considering the underlying causes and drivers for them.

WS
Home Office
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Serious Violence

My rt hon Friend the Secretary of State for the Home Department (Sajid Javid) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

On 1 April 2019 the Government published a consultation paper on a new legal duty to support a multi-agency approach to preventing and tackling serious violence.

The consultation sought views on three options to support a multi-agency approach to preventing and tackling serious violence including: a new duty on specific organisations to have due regard to the prevention and tackling of serious violence; a new duty through legislating to revise Community Safety Partnerships; and, a voluntary non-legislative approach.

The consultation closed on 28 May and I am today publishing the Government response to the consultation which includes a summary of the responses that the consultation received. A copy of the government response and related impact assessment will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses and will be available on the Gov.uk website.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1721
WS
Home Office
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Sajid Javid (The Secretary of State for the Home Department)
Commons

Serious Violence

On 1 April 2019 the Government published a consultation paper on a new legal duty to support a multi-agency approach to preventing and tackling serious violence.

The consultation sought views on three options to support a multi-agency approach to preventing and tackling serious violence including: a new duty on specific organisations to have due regard to the prevention and tackling of serious violence; a new duty through legislating to revise Community Safety Partnerships; and, a voluntary non-legislative approach.

The consultation closed on 28 May and I am today publishing the Government response to the consultation which includes a summary of the responses that the consultation received. A copy of the government response and related impact assessment will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses and will be available on the Gov.uk website.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1682
WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Penny Mordaunt (Secretary of State for Defence)
Commons

Review of Inappropriate Behaviour in the Armed Forces

In April of this year a report was commissioned to look into inappropriate behaviour in the Armed Forces. Our Armed Forces are the pride of our nation, and have a hard-won reputation here, and across the world.

The report which was undertaken by Air Chief Marshal Mike Wigston, concluded that while the vast majority of military personnel serve with great honour and distinction, some unacceptable behaviour does occur. I am publishing the report today.

I am accepting the recommendations of the report in full, including creating a Defence Authority to provide centralised oversight of their implementation. Detailed work on the design of this body and its responsibilities is now under way.

We are examining the recommendations and ascertaining how we can prevent inappropriate behaviour in the first place, and where it does occur, deal with the perpetrators more effectively. Leadership is key to this approach at all levels of the Services from the most senior to the most junior. Everyone has a role to play in setting and maintaining standards. Non-Commissioned Officers in particular are key in holding people to these standards and the values of their service. I am therefore, in addition to the findings of this report, looking to ensure all Non-Commissioned Officers have what they need to address poor behaviour when they see it.

This will clearly take time, and I see today as the start of this work, not the end.

WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Earl Howe (Minister of State, Ministry of Defence)
Lords

Chemical Weapons Convention - Declaration of Protective Programme for 2018

The UK's chemical protection programme is designed to protect against the use of chemical weapons. Such a programme is permitted by the Chemical Weapons Convention, with which the United Kingdom is fully compliant. Under the terms of the Convention, we are required to provide information annually to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. In accordance with the Government's commitment to openness, I am placing in the Library of the House a copy of the summary that has been provided to the Organisation outlining the UK's chemical protection programme in 2018.

WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Earl Howe (Minister of State, Ministry of Defence)
Lords

Review of Inappropriate Behaviour in the Armed Forces

My right hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Defence (The Right Hon Penny Mordaunt MP) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

In April of this year a report was commissioned to look into inappropriate behaviour in the Armed Forces. Our Armed Forces are the pride of our nation, and have a hard-won reputation here, and across the world.

The report which was undertaken by Air Chief Marshal Mike Wigston, concluded that while the vast majority of military personnel serve with great honour and distinction, some unacceptable behaviour does occur. I am publishing the report today.

I am accepting the recommendations of the report in full, including creating a Defence Authority to provide centralised oversight of their implementation. Detailed work on the design of this body and its responsibilities is now under way.

We are examining the recommendations and ascertaining how we can prevent inappropriate behaviour in the first place, and where it does occur, deal with the perpetrators more effectively. Leadership is key to this approach at all levels of the Services from the most senior to the most junior. Everyone has a role to play in setting and maintaining standards. Non-Commissioned Officers in particular are key in holding people to these standards and the values of their service. I am therefore, in addition to the findings of this report, looking to ensure all Non-Commissioned Officers have what they need to address poor behaviour when they see it.

This will clearly take time, and I see today as the start of this work, not the end.

WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Justin Tomlinson (Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work)
Commons

Government’s Consultation on Measures to Reduce Health Related Job Loss

I would like to make the following statement on behalf of myself and Jackie Doyle Price MP, the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Mental Health, Inequalities and Suicide Prevention in the Department for Health and Social Care.

Today, my department, in partnership with the Department of Health and Social Care, will publish a consultation on proposals to reduce health-related job loss.

As people live and work for longer, more employees are disabled or have long term health conditions. There are significant and well evidenced benefits for employers, individuals and government if health related job-loss can be reduced.

For employers, offering flexibility, early support and occupational health advice are the key to successful retention. Employers are best placed to take the early preventative measures that are most effective. There are large variations in employers’ capability and capacity to act with large firms five times more likely to provide occupational health when compared to small firms.

Each year more than 100,000 people leave their job following a period of sickness absence lasting at least four weeks. Survey evidence shows that 44% of people who had been off sick for a year then left employment altogether.

The proposals set out in this consultation include:

  • Amending the legal framework to encourage workplace modifications and early action to support individuals on sickness absence leave;
  • Reforming Statutory Sick Pay so that it is better enforced, more flexible and covers the lowest paid and potentially, rewards effective action with a new rebate;
  • Improving access to occupational health services with additional support for small employers including a potential subsidy;
  • Government to provide best practice advice and support for employers on managing health and disability in the workplace.

The evidence and views gathered during this consultation will be used to develop our proposals further and understand the impact of the changes on both employers and employees.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1686
WS
Treasury
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Lord Young of Cookham (Lords Spokesperson)
Lords

Supply and Appropriation (Main Estimates) (No.3) Bill

I have made a statement under Section 19(1)(a) of the Human Rights Act 1998 that, in my view, the provisions of the Supply and Appropriation (Main Estimates) (No.3) Bill are compatible with the convention rights. A copy of the statement has been placed in the Library of the House.

WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Lord Keen of Elie (The Lords Spokesperson)
Lords

Justice update

My Right Honourable friend the Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice (David Gauke MP) has made the following Written Statement:

"Earlier today, I notified the market via the London Stock Exchange group that I would today lay a Statutory Instrument to change the discount rate applicable to personal injury lump sum compensation payments in England and Wales, to minus 0.25%. The new rate will come into force on 5 August 2019, in line with the statutory timetable set out by the Civil Liability Act 2018 (“the Act”).

Under the Damages Act 1996, I, as Lord Chancellor, have the power to set a discount rate which courts must consider when awarding compensation for future financial losses in the form of a lump sum in personal injury cases. The legal framework was changed by the Civil Liability Act 2018.

The new framework makes clear that claimants must be treated as ‘low risk’ investors. Under the Act I, as Lord Chancellor, must conduct a review and determine whether the rate should be changed or kept unchanged within 140 days of beginning the review and including the day on which the review starts. I started the review on 19 March 2019, and in conducting this review, I consulted the Government Actuary and HM Treasury.

The Government Actuary provided an analysis of dual rates – this would involve a lower short term rate and then a higher long term rate after a ‘switchover’ period. Although I consider their analysis interesting with some promising indications, I do not consider it appropriate, noting the lack of quantity and depth of evidence required, to adopt a dual rate for this review. The potential of the dual rate to be appropriate for future reviews is one that I will consider in more detail.

A full statement of reasons, explaining how I have decided upon this rate, will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses."

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1717
WS
Ministry of Defence
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Mark Lancaster (Minister of State, Ministry of Defence)
Commons

Chemical Weapons Convention - Declaration of Protective Programme for 2018

My right hon. Friend the Minister of State for Defence in the House of Lords (The Earl Howe) has made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

The Minister of State for Defence in the House of Lords, The Earl Howe: The UK's chemical protection programme is designed to protect against the use of chemical weapons. Such a programme is permitted by the Chemical Weapons Convention, with which the United Kingdom is fully compliant. Under the terms of the Convention, we are required to provide information annually to the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons. In accordance with the Government's commitment to openness, I am placing in the Library of the House a copy of the summary that has been provided to the Organisation outlining the UK's chemical protection programme in 2018.

WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Baroness Buscombe (The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions)
Lords

Employment, Social Policy, Health and Consumer Affairs Council (EPSCO) 8th July 2019, Brussels

My honourable Friend The Minister of State for Employment (Alok Sharma MP) has made the following Written Statement.

The Employment, Social Policy, Health and Consumer Affairs Council took place on 8th July 2019 in Brussels. The Deputy Permanent Representative to the European Union, Katrina Williams, represented the UK.

The Council approved the non-binding 2019 Country Specific Recommendations (CSRs) to Member States, and endorsed the joint opinion of the Employment and Social Protection Committees, assessing the 2019 CSRs and the implementation of those from 2018. The Council also adopted Guidelines for the Employment Policies of the Member States 2019.

The Council debated the “economy of wellbeing” and “employment aspects of the strategic long-term vision for a climate neutral economy”.

The Council closed with employment and social policy updates by the Commission on the International Labour Organisation, G7 and G20.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS1716
WS
Ministry of Justice
Made on: 15 July 2019
Made by: Mr David Gauke (The Lord Chancellor and Secretary of State for Justice)
Commons

Justice update

Earlier today, I notified the market via the London Stock Exchange group that I would today lay a Statutory Instrument to change the discount rate applicable to personal injury lump sum compensation payments in England and Wales, to minus 0.25%. The new rate will come into force on 5 August 2019, in line with the statutory timetable set out by the Civil Liability Act 2018 (“the Act”).

Under the Damages Act 1996, I, as Lord Chancellor, have the power to set a discount rate which courts must consider when awarding compensation for future financial losses in the form of a lump sum in personal injury cases. The legal framework was changed by the Civil Liability Act 2018.

The new framework makes clear that claimants must be treated as ‘low risk’ investors. Under the Act I, as Lord Chancellor, must conduct a review and determine whether the rate should be changed or kept unchanged within 140 days of beginning the review and including the day on which the review starts. I started the review on 19 March 2019, and in conducting this review, I consulted the Government Actuary and HM Treasury.

The Government Actuary provided an analysis of dual rates – this would involve a lower short term rate and then a higher long term rate after a ‘switchover’ period. Although I consider their analysis interesting with some promising indications, I do not consider it appropriate, noting the lack of quantity and depth of evidence required, to adopt a dual rate for this review. The potential of the dual rate to be appropriate for future reviews is one that I will consider in more detail.

A full statement of reasons, explaining how I have decided upon this rate, will be placed in the Libraries of both Houses.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS1678
Expand all statements
Print selected
Showing 1-20 out of 3408
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100