Written statements

Government Ministers and a small number of other Members of the two Houses can make a written statement to one or both Houses.

Written statements are published below shortly after receipt in Parliament. They also reproduced in the next edition of the Daily Report and of Hansard in the relevant House.

Written statements made before 17 November 2014 were published only in Hansard:

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Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 06 September 2018
Made by: Sarah Newton (Minister of State for Disabled People, Health and Work.)
Commons

Disability Update

This Government’s vision for disabled people is to create a society that works for everyone, where all can participate fully, and be included. This vision aligns with the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (the Convention), which protects and promotes the rights of disabled people.

In the UK everyone’s rights are protected, including the rights of disabled people. The Government is always making improvements that reflect the intent of the Convention. The UK has achieved a great deal and has been at the forefront of developments in equality and disability rights. But we are clear that more needs to be done. We are delivering improvements to ensure disabled people have the same opportunities for inclusion as people who are not disabled.

Our newly created Inter-Ministerial Group on Disability and Society will drive forward co-ordinated action across Government to jointly tackle barriers to disabled people’s full participation and inclusion in society, ensuring we drive through progress against the implementation of the Convention. And we are strengthening our engagement with disabled people through constructive dialogue and collaboration.

Today I will place a copy of the report and letter that we have submitted to the UN outlining the UK’s progress on protecting the rights of disabled people in a number of areas as set out under the Convention in the House Library. Last year the UN reviewed the UK’s implementation of the Convention, and made a number of recommendations, asking us to respond to some of those within 12 months. This is a standard process for signatories. The recommendations covered independent living and being included in the community, work and employment and adequate standard of living and social protection, as well the UN’s Optional Protocol inquiry that we responded to in 2016.

The response describes positive actions that we are taking in each of these areas, including:

  • We have made available a further £9.4bn funding for social care in England between 2017/18 and 2018/19 to ensure that councils can increase the capacity of the social care system – an 8% real terms increase over the current spending review period (2016/17 to 2019/20);
  • We are supporting more people whose health affects the way they do their job through Access to Work – over 25,000 people in 2016/17, an 8% increase on 2015/16, spending £104m, up from £96m. We also introduced a new Tech Fund under Access to Work to help disabled people to benefit from the latest advances in assistive technology; and
  • We will be spending an estimated £54bn in 2018/19 on benefits to support disabled people and those with long term health conditions, up from £44.7bn in 2010/11 – the highest ever.

We have made great progress, but there is always more we can do. Disabled people still face barriers to full inclusion, and we will continue to break these down, working with disabled people, the public, private and third sectors until everyone can participate in their community and achieve their aspirations.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS910
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Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Made on: 06 September 2018
Made by: Claire Perry (Minister of State for Energy and Clean Growth)
Commons

Energy Consumers support update.

In line with the commitment we made in the Clean Growth Strategy, the Department has been working alongside the implementation of the Each Home Counts Review to develop a digitally led consumer energy efficiency advice service. I am committed to ensuring that all consumers are able to access trusted impartial energy efficiency advice in order to reduce their bills, make their homes warmer and cut their homes’ carbon emissions. A key element of this will be a call centre to assist those unable to use the website.

The Department is procuring this call centre presently. The selected supplier, Sitel UK Ltd, has indicated that they require an indemnity in respect of liabilities that they may incur if employees of a former subcontractor providing telephone based services bring employment law claims against them in light of the alleged application of the Transfer of Undertakings (Protection of Employment) Regulations 2006 (TUPE).

In relation to this, I am writing to inform you of a Departmental Minute which will be presented to Parliament today, giving notice of the Department incurring this contingent liability in the form of indemnity protection provided to Sitel UK Ltd.

We believe it is appropriate to incur this contingent liability, to ensure that trusted impartial energy efficiency advice can be provided to all consumers without further delay. We consider the provision of this liability as the best value for money option to ensure the new service is available to all.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS909
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Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 05 September 2018
Made by: James Brokenshire (Secretary of State for Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government)
Commons

Rough Sleeping

I am today announcing a provisional allocation of the further funding for the Rough Sleeping Initiative that I outlined in the recently published Rough Sleeping Strategy.

I have already allocated a targeted £30 million Rough Sleeping Initiative fund for 2018-19 to support those sleeping rough and those at risk in 83 local authorities with the highest need. Today’s announcement of provisional further funding for next year supports the good work that local authorities are already doing with the funding for this year.

Over the last few months our team of expert practitioners have worked closely with local authorities and the Greater London Authority (GLA) to identify service gaps and create tailored packages to tackle rough sleeping in their area this year. Together they have co-produced bespoke plans to tackle rough sleeping based on local government and the third sector knowledge of what works. The new Rough Sleeping Initiative team will work closely with local areas to implement the plans and to monitor their progress.

These provisional allocations represent another significant step in our plans to reduce and end rough sleeping following on from the publication of our Rough Sleeping Strategy last month.

A full list of the individual amounts provisionally allocated to the 83 local authorities and the GLA has been published on GOV.UK. Alongside the £34 million provisionally allocated today, the Government has set aside a further £11million for spending on additional areas and projects to those currently supported by the Rough Sleeping Initiative and will announce further details in due course.

This package will achieve substantial results in these areas of high need. It will also build upon the work we have already undertaken in order to meet out manifesto commitment. This work includes, piloting the internationally proven Housing First approach in three areas of England, allocating over £1.2 billion in order to prevent homelessness and rough sleeping, including more upfront funding so local authorities can proactively tackle homelessness pressures in their areas, and also the recent changes made under the Homelessness Reduction Act which means that more people will get the help they need and at an earlier stage.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS908
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Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 05 September 2018
Made by: Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Gevernment)
Lords

Rough Sleeping

My Rt Hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government (James Brokenshire), has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

I am today announcing a provisional allocation of the further funding for the Rough Sleeping Initiative that I outlined in the recently published Rough Sleeping Strategy.

I have already allocated a targeted £30 million Rough Sleeping Initiative fund for 2018-19 to support those sleeping rough and those at risk in 83 local authorities with the highest need. Today’s announcement of provisional further funding for next year supports the good work that local authorities are already doing with the funding for this year.

Over the last few months our team of expert practitioners have worked closely with local authorities and the Greater London Authority (GLA) to identify service gaps and create tailored packages to tackle rough sleeping in their area this year. Together they have co-produced bespoke plans to tackle rough sleeping based on local government and the third sector knowledge of what works. The new Rough Sleeping Initiative team will work closely with local areas to implement the plans and to monitor their progress.

These provisional allocations represent another significant step in our plans to reduce and end rough sleeping following on from the publication of our Rough Sleeping Strategy last month.

A full list of the individual amounts provisionally allocated to the 83 local authorities and the GLA has been published on GOV.UK. Alongside the £34 million provisionally allocated today, the Government has set aside a further £11million for spending on additional areas and projects to those currently supported by the Rough Sleeping Initiative and will announce further details in due course.

This package will achieve substantial results in these areas of high need. It will also build upon the work we have already undertaken in order to meet out manifesto commitment. This work includes, piloting the internationally proven Housing First approach in three areas of England, allocating over £1.2 billion in order to prevent homelessness and rough sleeping, including more upfront funding so local authorities can proactively tackle homelessness pressures in their areas, and also the recent changes made under the Homelessness Reduction Act which means that more people will get the help they need and at an earlier stage.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS936
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Home Office
Made on: 05 September 2018
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act 2015

My hon Friend the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability (Victoria Atkins) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

On 30 July, the Home Office announced plans to launch an independent review of the Modern Slavery Act 2015. The review is being led by the rt hon. Frank Field MP, the rt hon. Maria Miller MP and the rt hon. Baroness Butler-Sloss.

The introduction of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, the first legislation of its kind in the world, has helped to transform the UK’s response to modern slavery. More victims are being identified and supported; more offenders are being prosecuted; and thousands of companies have published statements setting out the steps they have taken to tackle modern slavery in their supply chains. The UK is determined to lead global efforts to tackle this barbaric crime and as the methods used by criminals to exploit vulnerable people evolve, and our understanding of this crime evolves, it is important to consider our legislative approach.

The aim of the Review is to understand and report on how the 2015 Act is operating in practice, how effective it is, and whether the legal framework for tackling modern slavery is fit for purpose now and in the future. In doing so, the Review will need to take into account any significant economic, social and technological changes since the 2015 act was passed.

The following provisions of the Act will be considered in the Review:

  • section 3 on the meaning of exploitation
  • sections 8-10 on reparation orders
  • sections 40 to 44 on the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner
  • section 45 on the statutory defence
  • section 48 on independent child trafficking advocates
  • section 54 on transparency in supply chains

The Review will gather evidence and seek views from relevant stakeholders across a range of sectors and interest groups. The findings and recommendations of the Review will represent the views of the reviewers, who will be supported by a secretariat seconded from the Home Office.

The Review will aim to report to the Home Secretary before the end of March 2019. Following approval, the Home Secretary will lay the report in Parliament.

A copy of the Review’s terms of reference will be placed in the House Library and are available on www.gov.uk.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS935
WS
Home Office
Made on: 05 September 2018
Made by: Baroness Williams of Trafford (The Minister of State, Home Office)
Lords

Prevent Duty Toolkit for Local Authorities and Partner Agencies: Supplementary Information to the Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales

My rt hon Friend the Minister of State for Security (Ben Wallace) has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement:

The aim of the Prevent Duty, commenced as part of the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015, is to reduce the threat to the UK from terrorism by stopping people from being drawn into terrorism or supporting terrorism.

The statutory guidance which accompanied the Prevent Duty was the starting point for the implementation of Prevent across sectors and places a duty on specified authorities to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. A range of sector specific advice to supplement the statutory guidance and further support Duty implementation across Sectors has since been issued.

The Prevent Duty has made a significant positive impact in preventing people being drawn into terrorism. To further support the local government sector, the Office for Security and Counter Terrorism has worked across government and with local partners to publish practical advice in the form of a Toolkit. The Toolkit supplements information provided in statutory guidance to ensure local authorities are effectively supported in implementing the Prevent Duty. This Toolkit does not replace the statutory guidance.

The publication of the Prevent Toolkit is based on three years of productive engagement with the local government sector since the introduction of the Duty, and illustrates examples of good practice to promote continuous improvement. It will support the practical delivery of Prevent by local authorities by providing information, implementation guidance, a self-assessment framework and case study examples to support local authorities and their partners in delivering the Prevent Duty locally.

The Toolkit has been published today and I will place a copy of it in the Library of the House. It has also been made available on Gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prevent-duty-toolkit-for-local-authorities-and-partner-agencies

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS934
WS
Home Office
Made on: 05 September 2018
Made by: Victoria Atkins (The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Crime, Safeguarding and Vulnerability)
Commons

Independent Review of the Modern Slavery Act 2015

On 30 July, the Home Office announced plans to launch an independent review of the Modern Slavery Act 2015. The review is being led by the rt hon. Frank Field MP, the rt hon. Maria Miller MP and the rt hon. Baroness Butler-Sloss.

The introduction of the Modern Slavery Act 2015, the first legislation of its kind in the world, has helped to transform the UK’s response to modern slavery. More victims are being identified and supported; more offenders are being prosecuted; and thousands of companies have published statements setting out the steps they have taken to tackle modern slavery in their supply chains. The UK is determined to lead global efforts to tackle this barbaric crime and as the methods used by criminals to exploit vulnerable people evolve, and our understanding of this crime evolves, it is important to consider our legislative approach.

The aim of the Review is to understand and report on how the 2015 Act is operating in practice, how effective it is, and whether the legal framework for tackling modern slavery is fit for purpose now and in the future. In doing so, the Review will need to take into account any significant economic, social and technological changes since the 2015 act was passed.

The following provisions of the Act will be considered in the Review:

  • section 3 on the meaning of exploitation
  • sections 8-10 on reparation orders
  • sections 40 to 44 on the Independent Anti-Slavery Commissioner
  • section 45 on the statutory defence
  • section 48 on independent child trafficking advocates
  • section 54 on transparency in supply chains

The Review will gather evidence and seek views from relevant stakeholders across a range of sectors and interest groups. The findings and recommendations of the Review will represent the views of the reviewers, who will be supported by a secretariat seconded from the Home Office.

The Review will aim to report to the Home Secretary before the end of March 2019. Following approval, the Home Secretary will lay the report in Parliament.

A copy of the Review’s terms of reference will be placed in the House Library and are available on www.gov.uk.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS907
WS
Home Office
Made on: 05 September 2018
Made by: Mr Ben Wallace (The Minister of State for Security)
Commons

Prevent Duty Toolkit for Local Authorities and Partner Agencies: Supplementary Information to the Prevent Duty Guidance for England and Wales

The aim of the Prevent Duty, commenced as part of the Counter Terrorism and Security Act 2015, is to reduce the threat to the UK from terrorism by stopping people from being drawn into terrorism or supporting terrorism.

The statutory guidance which accompanied the Prevent Duty was the starting point for the implementation of Prevent across sectors and places a duty on specified authorities to have “due regard to the need to prevent people from being drawn into terrorism”. A range of sector specific advice to supplement the statutory guidance and further support Duty implementation across Sectors has since been issued.

The Prevent Duty has made a significant positive impact in preventing people being drawn into terrorism. To further support the local government sector, the Office for Security and Counter Terrorism has worked across government and with local partners to publish practical advice in the form of a Toolkit. The Toolkit supplements information provided in statutory guidance to ensure local authorities are effectively supported in implementing the Prevent Duty. This Toolkit does not replace the statutory guidance.

The publication of the Prevent Toolkit is based on three years of productive engagement with the local government sector since the introduction of the Duty, and illustrates examples of good practice to promote continuous improvement. It will support the practical delivery of Prevent by local authorities by providing information, implementation guidance, a self-assessment framework and case study examples to support local authorities and their partners in delivering the Prevent Duty locally.

The Toolkit has been published today and I will place a copy of it in the Library of the House. It has also been made available on Gov.uk at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/prevent-duty-toolkit-for-local-authorities-and-partner-agencies

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS906
WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: Baroness Buscombe (The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Department for Work and Pensions)
Lords

Pensions Update

My honourable Friend the Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Pensions & Financial Inclusion (Guy Opperman MP) has made the following Written Statement.

Throughout the last decade, government has worked closely with the pensions, financial services and consumer community to rebuild the UK’s pension savings culture.

Through automatic enrolment, 10 million people will be newly saving or saving more into a workplace pension scheme, with an estimated £20 billion extra pension saving by 2019/20.

The pension freedoms have given people much greater choice about when and how they use their pension savings.

The Government has a significant programme of work ahead to increase confidence in workplace pensions, by improving:

  • The provision of information to, and financial capability of, individuals, in order that they can make informed and more confident financial decisions.
  • The way pensions are run, making them more secure; improving transparency; and responding more quickly when things go wrong.

Improving the provision of information to, and financial capability of, individuals

The pensions dashboard will offer people the opportunity to access their pension information in a clear and simple form – bringing together an individual’s savings in a single place online.

The work that the Department for Work and Pensions has done in assessing feasibility for a pensions dashboard has made it clear that we should not underestimate the size or complexity of the challenge. An industry-led dashboard, facilitated by government, will harness the best of industry innovation. We will continue to engage with industry on this model and Government will protect pension savers and personal information by legislating where necessary. This will build on the Government’s ‘Check your State Pension’ online service for the State Pension. We will shortly report on the findings from the Feasibility Study.

To improve financial capability and understanding we have taken through Parliament the Financial Guidance and Claims Act 2018, which gives us the power to introduce the Single Financial Guidance Body. This will bring together the services currently delivered by the Money Advice Service, the Pensions Advisory Service and Pension Wise. The creation of the SFGB is a genuine opportunity to improve provision of free and impartial government sponsored money and pensions guidance and debt advice so that people - especially those who are struggling, can make informed choices about their finances.

The appointments of the Chair and Chief Executive of the new organisation have recently been announced, and we expect to establish the body as a legal entity in October when the Chair and Chief Executive take up their roles. It will then launch in January when it takes on its delivery functions of money and pension guidance, and debt advice.

Improving security and transparency

We have legislated to introduce a new Master Trust accreditation regime from 1 October 2018 for multi-employer pension providers wishing to continue to operate in the automatic enrolment market.

We will strengthen the powers of the Pensions Regulator to ensure that peoples’ pensions are protected. The Department recently consulted on proposals to improve the Regulator’s powers so that they can be more proactive, punish wrongdoing and get involved earlier when employers make changes which could affect their pension schemes. We’re currently considering the responses, and hope to publish our conclusions towards the end of this year. We’re also investigating how to facilitate consolidation of DB schemes, including looking at the establishment of ‘superfunds’, and intend to publish a consultation on this in the autumn.

Finally, collective forms of pension saving offer interesting new possibilities, and the Department is currently working through proposals for the first Collective Defined Contribution schemes in the UK. We intend to launch a formal consultation in the autumn.

This is an ambitious programme of work, which has the potential to further transform the pensions landscape and benefit consumers.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS933
WS
Department for Exiting the European Union
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: Lord Callanan (Minister of State at the Department for Exiting the European Union)
Lords

EU Exit

My Rt Hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, Dominic Raab, has made the following statement:

Technical Notices

As announced by the Prime Minister and Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union on 18 July 2018, the Government is publishing a series of technical notices during August and September. On Thursday 23 August, we published 25 of these notices and will publish more in the coming weeks. These notices are designed to inform people, businesses and stakeholders about steps they may need to take in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario.

Notices were published on the following areas:

Overview

  • UK government's preparations for a no deal scenario

Applying for EU-funded programmes

  • The government’s guarantee for EU-funded programmes

  • Horizon 2020 funding

  • Delivering humanitarian aid programmes

Civil nuclear and nuclear research

  • Nuclear research

  • Civil nuclear regulation

Farming

  • Farm payments

  • Receiving rural development funding

Importing and exporting

  • Trade remedies

  • Trading with the EU

  • Classifying your goods in the UK Trade Tariff

  • Exporting controlled goods

Labelling products and making them safer

  • Labelling tobacco products and e-cigarettes

  • Developing genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

  • Producing and processing organic food

Money and tax

  • VAT for businesses

  • Banking, insurance and other financial services

Regulating medicines and medical equipment

  • Batch testing medicines

  • Ensuring blood and blood products are safe

  • How medicines, medical devices and clinical trials would be regulated

  • Submitting regulatory information on medical products

  • Quality and safety of organs, tissues and cells

State aid

  • State aid

Studying in the UK or EU

  • Erasmus+ in the UK

Workplace rights

  • Workplace rights



Notices were published on gov.uk during the parliamentary recess. These can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/how-to-prepare-if-the-uk-leaves-the-eu-with-no-deal

Copies of notices were also placed in the Libraries of both Houses to ensure all Members had access, and we will continue to ensure that technical notices are made available to Members.

Slides on the Framework for the UK-EU partnership

The UK negotiating team are also producing presentations for discussion with the EU, in order to inform development of the future framework.


Slides have been published in the following areas over the parliamentary recess:

  • Financial Services

  • Open and Fair Competition

These were published on gov.uk during the parliamentary recess and were also deposited in the Libraries of both Houses. Copies can also be found here:

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS929
WS
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government)
Lords

Social Housing Green Paper

My Rt Hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government (James Brokenshire), has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

On 14 August, my Department published our Social Housing Green Paper ‘A new deal for social housing’ which proposes fundamental reform to ensure social homes provide an essential, safe, well managed service for all those who need it. The Social Housing Green Paper was laid before Parliament on 14 August (CM 9671).

Everyone deserves a decent, affordable and secure place to live. It’s the most fundamental of human needs. While we have made important strides to build the homes we need in recent years, I recognise we have much further to go when it comes to making our housing market work for all parts of our society – not least for residents in social housing. Our Green Paper is an important step towards this.

It is based on conversations with almost 1,000 residents at 14 events across the country, with over 7,000 submitting their views and ideas online. We have heard what people love about social housing – stories of people’s pride in their homes and communities. But we also heard what needs to change. The Green Paper is underpinned by five principles:

  1. Ensuring that homes are safe and decent. Residents were not only concerned about safety, but also the quality and maintenance of their homes. The Government has identified opportunities to accelerate a social sector early response to recommendations in Dame Judith Hackitt’s Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety by supporting residents and landlords to engage on issues of building safety. The Green Paper will also consider whether the Decent Homes Standard is demanding enough and delivers the right outcomes.
  1. Swift and effective resolution of disputes. Residents raised issues about how complaints were dealt with when things go wrong. We want to make the process of handling and resolving complaints faster, easier and more effective. As part of this, the Green Paper asks whether the ‘democratic filter’ should be reformed or removed. In addition, we want to explore whether more could be done to strengthen mediation opportunities so landlords and residents can resolve disputes locally, and help residents to access the right advice.
  1. Empowering residents. We want to ensure residents are empowered, with more transparency about the information they receive from landlords. The Green Paper contains proposals to assess landlords against standards that matter to residents, to publish these assessments, and to strengthen the regulatory framework for social housing. We want to make sure the regulatory framework as a whole remains fit for purpose and published a Call for Evidence which seeks views on how the current regulatory framework is working, alongside the Green Paper. We are also seeking views on how to ensure residents’ voices are heard and strengthening their choice over the services they receive.
  1. Elimination of stigma. Stigma was one of the most consistent themes raised by residents. We are seeking views on a number of proposals to tackle this including ways to celebrate thriving communities, encourage greater professionalisation amongst housing management staff and promoting good social housing design. We are also exploring options for improving neighbourhood management and addressing anti-social behaviour, another key issue for residents.
  1. Boosting the supply of social housing and supporting home ownership. Residents told us that they wanted to see more affordable homes delivered. We published the Right to Buy Receipts Consultation which sets out our proposals for exploring new flexibilities around how local authorities can use their Right to Buy receipts. We will also explore how we can help people living in affordable home ownership schemes, such as Shared Ownership, progress more easily to owning outright.

After listening carefully to social housing residents, we are proposing not to implement the provisions in the Housing and Planning Act to make fixed term tenancies mandatory for local authority tenants at this time.

We recognise the benefits of fixed term tenancies in the right circumstances to help social landlords make best use of their housing stock and that flexibility will remain. But we remain keen to ensure that victims of domestic abuse do not risk losing their lifetime tenancy if they are granted a new tenancy after fleeing abuse. We will bring forward new legislation to ensure that councils honour their lifetime tenancy in these cases.

In addition, on 16 August, I launched the £200 million Voluntary Right to Buy Midlands pilot. The pilot will enable thousands of tenants across the Midlands to buy their home from their housing association, at a discount funded by the Government. The pilot builds on the small scale pilot with five housing associations in 2016/17, and will test two key aspects of the voluntary agreement with housing associations not tested in the initial pilot – the portable discount and one-for-one replacement overall of the homes sold. Eligible tenants in the Midlands will need to register their interest on the MHCLG website, with the registration open until 16 September. To give all prospective purchasers an equal chance of participating, places on the pilot will be allocated by ballot.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS932
WS
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government)
Lords

Supported Housing and Rough Sleeping

My Rt Hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government (James Brokenshire), has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

On 9 August, I announced that housing benefit will remain in place to fund supported housing, alongside publication of the Government’s response to the October 2017 consultations on possible alternative funding options. We also announced that we will not be pursuing the Sheltered Rent model. This demonstrates our commitment to protect some of the most vulnerable people in our communities, by ensuring vital services are in place.

I am also keen to work with providers, local authorities, membership bodies and resident representatives to develop a robust oversight regime, to ensure quality and value for money across the sector. Alongside this enhanced oversight, my Department will undertake a review of housing related support in order to better understand how housing and support fit together.

Taken together, this gives the sector the confidence they need to continue to invest in supply.

On 13 August, I announced a cross-government Rough Sleeping Strategy setting out the first steps towards achieving our commitment to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and end it by 2027. This builds upon the work of the Rough Sleeping Initiative announced in March, and set outs the further action we will take to support those currently sleeping rough.

To develop the strategy my Department has worked across Government through the Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Reduction Taskforce, and with the homelessness sector and local areas through the Rough Sleeping Advisory Panel, to set out our long-term vision for how both local and central government will work together to build a country where no one needs to sleeps rough again.

The strategy is based around three core pillars: Prevent, Intervene and Recover, with a focus on moving to a ‘rapid rehousing’ approach. Taken together with initiatives my Department had already committed to prior to publishing this strategy, this represents over £150 million of funding dedicated to reducing rough sleeping over the next two years. In addition, we confirmed additional funding for health services for people sleeping rough. We will refresh the Strategy on an annual basis, setting out the progress we have made and ensuring that our interventions remain relevant and targeted. We are also developing a delivery plan, to be published in the autumn.

We will prevent rough sleeping by providing timely support to those at risk by, for example:

  • piloting suitable accommodation and tailored for those leaving prison so they do not end up on the streets;
  • researching the nature and scale of LGBT homelessness to determine what measures need to be put in place to prevent this;
  • ensuring that local authorities investigate rough sleeper deaths to understand and tackle the root causes; and
  • implementing the duty to refer on certain public bodies as part of the Homelessness Reduction Act, to ensure that more people get the help they need faster.

We will intervene to help people already on the street get swift, targeted support by, for example:

  • rolling out a new initiative, Somewhere Safe to Stay, to help up to 6,000 people who are new to the streets or vulnerable to rough sleeping, offering support to rapidly identify issues that led them to sleeping rough;
  • introducing ‘navigators’ – specialists who will act as trusted confidantes – who will help people sleeping rough access the appropriate services and accommodation;
  • providing up to £30 million for health services for people sleeping rough, informed by the findings of a health provision audit to be carried out this year; and
  • providing training for frontline staff on how to best help people under the influence of Spice, those who are victims of domestic abuse, modern slavery, as well as how best to support homeless LGBT people.

We will help people recover, find a new home quickly and rebuild their lives by, for example:

  • providing affordable accommodation for those leaving hostels and domestic abuse refuges, and to support them in managing this accommodation;
  • investing money from dormant bank accounts into housing for those on the streets or at risk of rough sleeping;
  • launching a new fund to help up to 5,000 former rough sleepers and those at risk to sustain their tenancies by working with them to boost financial independence and access training and employment opportunities; and
  • launching a £50 million fund for homes outside London for people ready to move on from hostels or refuges but need additional support.

We recognise that this is a challenging commitment but are confident this strategy will pave the way towards achieving our 2027 vision. We are clear, however, that this is just the first step.

The Rough Sleeping Strategy was laid before Parliament on 13 August (Cm 9685).

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS931
WS
Department for Work and Pensions
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: Guy Opperman (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Pensions & Financial Inclusion.)
Commons

Pensions Update

Throughout the last decade, government has worked closely with the pensions, financial services and consumer community to rebuild the UK’s pension savings culture.

Through automatic enrolment, 10 million people will be newly saving or saving more into a workplace pension scheme, with an estimated £20 billion extra pension saving by 2019/20.

The pension freedoms have given people much greater choice about when and how they use their pension savings.

The Government has a significant programme of work ahead to increase confidence in workplace pensions, by improving:

  • The provision of information to, and financial capability of, individuals, in order that they can make informed and more confident financial decisions.
  • The way pensions are run, making them more secure; improving transparency; and responding more quickly when things go wrong.

Improving the provision of information to, and financial capability of, individuals

The pensions dashboard will offer people the opportunity to access their pension information in a clear and simple form – bringing together an individual’s savings in a single place online.

The work that the Department for Work and Pensions has done in assessing feasibility for a pensions dashboard has made it clear that we should not underestimate the size or complexity of the challenge. An industry-led dashboard, facilitated by government, will harness the best of industry innovation. We will continue to engage with industry on this model and Government will protect pension savers and personal information by legislating where necessary. This will build on the Government’s ‘Check your State Pension’ online service for the State Pension. We will shortly report on the findings from the Feasibility Study.

To improve financial capability and understanding we have taken through Parliament the Financial Guidance and Claims Act 2018, which gives us the power to introduce the Single Financial Guidance Body. This will bring together the services currently delivered by the Money Advice Service, the Pensions Advisory Service and Pension Wise. The creation of the SFGB is a genuine opportunity to improve provision of free and impartial government sponsored money and pensions guidance and debt advice so that people - especially those who are struggling, can make informed choices about their finances.

The appointments of the Chair and Chief Executive of the new organisation have recently been announced, and we expect to establish the body as a legal entity in October when the Chair and Chief Executive take up their roles. It will then launch in January when it takes on its delivery functions of money and pension guidance, and debt advice.

Improving security and transparency

We have legislated to introduce a new Master Trust accreditation regime from 1 October 2018 for multi-employer pension providers wishing to continue to operate in the automatic enrolment market.

We will strengthen the powers of the Pensions Regulator to ensure that peoples’ pensions are protected. The Department recently consulted on proposals to improve the Regulator’s powers so that they can be more proactive, punish wrongdoing and get involved earlier when employers make changes which could affect their pension schemes. We’re currently considering the responses, and hope to publish our conclusions towards the end of this year. We’re also investigating how to facilitate consolidation of DB schemes, including looking at the establishment of ‘superfunds’, and intend to publish a consultation on this in the autumn.

Finally, collective forms of pension saving offer interesting new possibilities, and the Department is currently working through proposals for the first Collective Defined Contribution schemes in the UK. We intend to launch a formal consultation in the autumn.

This is an ambitious programme of work, which has the potential to further transform the pensions landscape and benefit consumers.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS905
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Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: James Brokenshire (Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government)
Commons

Social Housing Green Paper

On 14 August, my Department published our Social Housing Green Paper ‘A new deal for social housing’ which proposes fundamental reform to ensure social homes provide an essential, safe, well managed service for all those who need it. The Social Housing Green Paper was laid before Parliament on 14 August (CM 9671).

Everyone deserves a decent, affordable and secure place to live. It’s the most fundamental of human needs. While we have made important strides to build the homes we need in recent years, I recognise we have much further to go when it comes to making our housing market work for all parts of our society – not least for residents in social housing. Our Green Paper is an important step towards this.

It is based on conversations with almost 1,000 residents at 14 events across the country, with over 7,000 submitting their views and ideas online. We have heard what people love about social housing – stories of people’s pride in their homes and communities. But we also heard what needs to change. The Green Paper is underpinned by five principles:

  1. Ensuring that homes are safe and decent. Residents were not only concerned about safety, but also the quality and maintenance of their homes. The Government has identified opportunities to accelerate a social sector early response to recommendations in Dame Judith Hackitt’s Independent Review of Building Regulations and Fire Safety by supporting residents and landlords to engage on issues of building safety. The Green Paper will also consider whether the Decent Homes Standard is demanding enough and delivers the right outcomes.
  1. Swift and effective resolution of disputes. Residents raised issues about how complaints were dealt with when things go wrong. We want to make the process of handling and resolving complaints faster, easier and more effective. As part of this, the Green Paper asks whether the ‘democratic filter’ should be reformed or removed. In addition, we want to explore whether more could be done to strengthen mediation opportunities so landlords and residents can resolve disputes locally, and help residents to access the right advice.
  1. Empowering residents. We want to ensure residents are empowered, with more transparency about the information they receive from landlords. The Green Paper contains proposals to assess landlords against standards that matter to residents, to publish these assessments, and to strengthen the regulatory framework for social housing. We want to make sure the regulatory framework as a whole remains fit for purpose and published a Call for Evidence which seeks views on how the current regulatory framework is working, alongside the Green Paper. We are also seeking views on how to ensure residents’ voices are heard and strengthening their choice over the services they receive.
  1. Elimination of stigma. Stigma was one of the most consistent themes raised by residents. We are seeking views on a number of proposals to tackle this including ways to celebrate thriving communities, encourage greater professionalisation amongst housing management staff and promoting good social housing design. We are also exploring options for improving neighbourhood management and addressing anti-social behaviour, another key issue for residents.
  1. Boosting the supply of social housing and supporting home ownership. Residents told us that they wanted to see more affordable homes delivered. We published the Right to Buy Receipts Consultation which sets out our proposals for exploring new flexibilities around how local authorities can use their Right to Buy receipts. We will also explore how we can help people living in affordable home ownership schemes, such as Shared Ownership, progress more easily to owning outright.

After listening carefully to social housing residents, we are proposing not to implement the provisions in the Housing and Planning Act to make fixed term tenancies mandatory for local authority tenants at this time.

We recognise the benefits of fixed term tenancies in the right circumstances to help social landlords make best use of their housing stock and that flexibility will remain. But we remain keen to ensure that victims of domestic abuse do not risk losing their lifetime tenancy if they are granted a new tenancy after fleeing abuse. We will bring forward new legislation to ensure that councils honour their lifetime tenancy in these cases.

In addition, on 16 August, I launched the £200 million Voluntary Right to Buy Midlands pilot. The pilot will enable thousands of tenants across the Midlands to buy their home from their housing association, at a discount funded by the Government. The pilot builds on the small scale pilot with five housing associations in 2016/17, and will test two key aspects of the voluntary agreement with housing associations not tested in the initial pilot – the portable discount and one-for-one replacement overall of the homes sold. Eligible tenants in the Midlands will need to register their interest on the MHCLG website, with the registration open until 16 September. To give all prospective purchasers an equal chance of participating, places on the pilot will be allocated by ballot.

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS903
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Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: James Brokenshire (Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government)
Commons

Supported Housing and Rough Sleeping

On 9 August, I announced that housing benefit will remain in place to fund supported housing, alongside publication of the Government’s response to the October 2017 consultations on possible alternative funding options. We also announced that we will not be pursuing the Sheltered Rent model. This demonstrates our commitment to protect some of the most vulnerable people in our communities, by ensuring vital services are in place.

I am also keen to work with providers, local authorities, membership bodies and resident representatives to develop a robust oversight regime, to ensure quality and value for money across the sector. Alongside this enhanced oversight, my Department will undertake a review of housing related support in order to better understand how housing and support fit together.

Taken together, this gives the sector the confidence they need to continue to invest in supply.

On 13 August, I announced a cross-government Rough Sleeping Strategy setting out the first steps towards achieving our commitment to halve rough sleeping by 2022 and end it by 2027. This builds upon the work of the Rough Sleeping Initiative announced in March, and set outs the further action we will take to support those currently sleeping rough.

To develop the strategy my Department has worked across Government through the Rough Sleeping and Homelessness Reduction Taskforce, and with the homelessness sector and local areas through the Rough Sleeping Advisory Panel, to set out our long-term vision for how both local and central government will work together to build a country where no one needs to sleeps rough again.

The strategy is based around three core pillars: Prevent, Intervene and Recover, with a focus on moving to a ‘rapid rehousing’ approach. Taken together with initiatives my Department had already committed to prior to publishing this strategy, this represents over £150 million of funding dedicated to reducing rough sleeping over the next two years. In addition, we confirmed additional funding for health services for people sleeping rough. We will refresh the Strategy on an annual basis, setting out the progress we have made and ensuring that our interventions remain relevant and targeted. We are also developing a delivery plan, to be published in the autumn.

We will prevent rough sleeping by providing timely support to those at risk by, for example:

  • piloting suitable accommodation and tailored for those leaving prison so they do not end up on the streets;
  • researching the nature and scale of LGBT homelessness to determine what measures need to be put in place to prevent this;
  • ensuring that local authorities investigate rough sleeper deaths to understand and tackle the root causes; and
  • implementing the duty to refer on certain public bodies as part of the Homelessness Reduction Act, to ensure that more people get the help they need faster.

We will intervene to help people already on the street get swift, targeted support by, for example:

  • rolling out a new initiative, Somewhere Safe to Stay, to help up to 6,000 people who are new to the streets or vulnerable to rough sleeping, offering support to rapidly identify issues that led them to sleeping rough;
  • introducing ‘navigators’ – specialists who will act as trusted confidantes – who will help people sleeping rough access the appropriate services and accommodation;
  • providing up to £30 million for health services for people sleeping rough, informed by the findings of a health provision audit to be carried out this year; and
  • providing training for frontline staff on how to best help people under the influence of Spice, those who are victims of domestic abuse, modern slavery, as well as how best to support homeless LGBT people.

We will help people recover, find a new home quickly and rebuild their lives by, for example:

  • providing affordable accommodation for those leaving hostels and domestic abuse refuges, and to support them in managing this accommodation;
  • investing money from dormant bank accounts into housing for those on the streets or at risk of rough sleeping;
  • launching a new fund to help up to 5,000 former rough sleepers and those at risk to sustain their tenancies by working with them to boost financial independence and access training and employment opportunities; and
  • launching a £50 million fund for homes outside London for people ready to move on from hostels or refuges but need additional support.

We recognise that this is a challenging commitment but are confident this strategy will pave the way towards achieving our 2027 vision. We are clear, however, that this is just the first step.

The Rough Sleeping Strategy was laid before Parliament on 13 August (Cm 9685).

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS902
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Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: Rishi Sunak (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State, Minister for Local Government)
Commons

Tenant Fees Bill

I am today placing in the Library of the House the Department’s analysis on the application of Standing Order 83L in respect of the Government amendments tabled for Commons Report stage for the Tenant Fees Bill.

WS
Department for Exiting the European Union
Made on: 04 September 2018
Made by: Dominic Raab (Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union)
Commons

EU Exit

Technical Notices

As announced by the Prime Minister and Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union on 18 July 2018, the Government is publishing a series of technical notices during August and September. On Thursday 23 August, we published 25 of these notices and will publish more in the coming weeks. These notices are designed to inform people, businesses and stakeholders about steps they may need to take in the event of a ‘no deal’ scenario.

Notices were published on the following areas:

Overview

  • UK government's preparations for a no deal scenario

Applying for EU-funded programmes

  • The government’s guarantee for EU-funded programmes

  • Horizon 2020 funding

  • Delivering humanitarian aid programmes

Civil nuclear and nuclear research

  • Nuclear research

  • Civil nuclear regulation

Farming

  • Farm payments

  • Receiving rural development funding

Importing and exporting

  • Trade remedies

  • Trading with the EU

  • Classifying your goods in the UK Trade Tariff

  • Exporting controlled goods

Labelling products and making them safer

  • Labelling tobacco products and e-cigarettes

  • Developing genetically modified organisms (GMOs)

  • Producing and processing organic food

Money and tax

  • VAT for businesses

  • Banking, insurance and other financial services

Regulating medicines and medical equipment

  • Batch testing medicines

  • Ensuring blood and blood products are safe

  • How medicines, medical devices and clinical trials would be regulated

  • Submitting regulatory information on medical products

  • Quality and safety of organs, tissues and cells

State aid

  • State aid

Studying in the UK or EU

  • Erasmus+ in the UK

Workplace rights

  • Workplace rights



Notices were published on gov.uk during the parliamentary recess. These can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/how-to-prepare-if-the-uk-leaves-the-eu-with-no-deal

Copies of notices were also placed in the Libraries of both Houses to ensure all Members had access, and we will continue to ensure that technical notices are made available to Members.

Slides on the Framework for the UK-EU partnership

The UK negotiating team are also producing presentations for discussion with the EU, in order to inform development of the future framework.


Slides have been published in the following areas over the parliamentary recess:

  • Financial Services

  • Open and Fair Competition

These were published on gov.uk during the parliamentary recess and were also deposited in the Libraries of both Houses. Copies can also be found here:

This statement has also been made in the House of Lords: HLWS904
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Leader of the House of Lords
Made on: 24 July 2018
Made by: Baroness Evans of Bowes Park (Lord Privy Seal)
Lords

Machinery of Government Change

My Rt Hon. Friend the Prime Minister has made the following statement to the House of Commons:

I am making this statement to bring to the attention of the House a Machinery of Government change.

It is essential that in navigating the UK's exit from the European Union, the Government is organised in the most effective way. To that end I am making some changes to the division of functions between the Department for Exiting the European Union (DExEU) and the Cabinet Office.

DExEU will continue to lead on all of the Government’s preparations for Brexit: domestic preparations in both a deal and a no deal scenario, all of the necessary legislation, and preparations for the negotiations to implement the detail of the Future Framework. To support this, DExEU will recruit some new staff, and a number of Cabinet Office officials coordinating work on preparedness will move to DExEU while maintaining close ties with both departments.

I will lead the negotiations with the European Union, with the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union deputising on my behalf. Both of us will be supported by the Cabinet Office Europe Unit and with this in mind the Europe Unit will have overall responsibility for the preparation and conduct of the negotiations, drawing upon support from DExEU and other departments as required. A number of staff will transfer from DExEU to the Cabinet Office to deliver that.

There will be no net reduction in staff numbers at DExEU given the recruitment exercise described above.

WS
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Made on: 24 July 2018
Made by: Lord Bourne of Aberystwyth (Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government)
Lords

Local Government Finance

My Rt Hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government (James Brokenshire), has today made the following Written Ministerial Statement.

Today, my department has published the “2019-20 Local Government Finance Settlement: technical consultation” as well as an “Invitation to Local Authorities in England to pilot 75% Business Rates Retention in 2019/20”.

The technical consultation reiterates this Government’s intention for the 2019-20 Settlement to confirm the final year of the 2016-17 multi-year settlement accepted by 97% of authorities, and to implement council tax referendum principles as announced at the final 2018-19 Settlement last year.

Looking to the longer term, the 2019 Spending Review will confirm funding from 2020-21. The Government is working towards significant reform in the local government finance system in 2020-21, including an updated, more robust and transparent distribution methodology to set baseline funding levels, and resetting business rates baselines.

This Government is committed to rewarding councils for supporting local firms and local jobs. The business rate retention system ensures that local authorities directly benefit from the proceeds of economic growth – with more funding to support local frontline services. All councils, including those which are currently less prosperous, have the opportunity to gain from this system.

The current 50% business rates retention scheme and piloting programme is yielding strong results. Local authorities estimate that in 2018-19 they will keep around £2.4 billion in business rates growth. Our continued reforms to this system will continue to give local authorities even greater control of their finances, but, to ensure a successful implementation, this Government is committed to testing aspects of the proposed new system.

This 2019-20 prospectus invites all local authorities (except for those with on-going pilots in devolution deal areas and London) to apply to pilot 75% business rates retention in 2019-20. From 2020-21 we are aiming to roll in additional grants, with a target of reaching 75% retention based on the current 2019-20 values of these grants. These pilots will help us test the retention system at this level. Given the limited time before 2020-21, when we aim to roll out increased business rates retention to all local authorities, there are fewer issues we can usefully test in pilots. It is therefore likely that this pilot programme will be smaller than in 2018-19.

Separately, the Government can confirm that local authorities in areas with a previously agreed devolution deal will continue to pilot 100% business rates retention in 2019-20. Separate conversations will happen with London authorities to decide arrangements following their 100% pilot this year.

Finally, I have noted the strength of feeling in local government around the issue of ‘Negative RSG’ and this technical consultation sets out the Government’s preferred approach to resolving the issue in 2019-20.

This preferred approach recognises the commitment made by the Government during the implementation of the business rate retention scheme in 2013-14, that tariff and top-ups would be fixed until the system was reset.

This commitment was made so that local authorities would benefit directly from supporting local business growth and the Government's preferred approach does not reverse this commitment. In practice this will mean that the Government meets the cost of Negative RSG through forgone business rates.

I am placing a copy of the “2019-20 Local Government Finance Settlement: technical consultation” and the “Invitation to Local Authorities in England to pilot 75% Business Rates Retention in 2019/20” in the House library.

This statement has also been made in the House of Commons: HCWS928
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Department for Education
Made on: 24 July 2018
Made by: Lord Agnew of Oulton (The Parliamentary Under Secretary of State for the School System)
Lords

Teachers Update

My right honourable friend the Secretary of State for Education (Damian Hinds) has made the following written ministerial statement.

We want to ensure that we can recruit and retain brilliant teachers. To ensure that teaching remains an attractive and fulfilling profession, we are delivering a fully funded pay rise for classroom teachers and those in leadership positions.

The School Teachers’ Review Body (STRB) has recommended a 3.5% uplift to the minima and maxima of all pay ranges and allowances in the national pay framework for the pay award due to be implemented from September 2018. I have decided to accept in full the STRB’s recommendation for a 3.5% uplift to the minima and maxima of the main pay range, building on last year’s 2% uplift to the main pay range. This will both raise starting salaries significantly and increase the competitiveness of the early career pay framework. We are also announcing a substantial uplift to pay ranges for leaders and higher-paid teachers: the minima and maxima of the upper pay range will be uplifted by 2% and on the leadership pay range by 1.5%.

As a result, classroom teachers will see the biggest benefit with starting salaries increasing between £803 and £1,004, and those at the top of the main pay range will be eligible for increases between £1,184 and £1,366. Schools will continue to determine how their staff are paid and thanks to the flexible performance-based pay system we have introduced schools are still able to choose to give teachers or leaders a higher pay rise where this is appropriate to their particular local context and budget.

We will be supporting schools in England to implement the award with an investment of £508 million through a new teachers’ pay grant of £187 million in 2018-19 and £321 million in 2019-20 from the existing Department for Education budget. This will cover, in full, the difference between this award and the cost of the 1% award that schools would have anticipated under the previous public sector pay cap. The grant will provide additional support to all maintained schools and academies, over and above the core funding that they receive through the national funding formula. We will publish further details on the distribution of this grant when the pay award is confirmed.

The Government is committed to world class public services and ensuring that public sector workers are fairly paid for the vitally important work that they do. It is thanks to our balanced approach to public finances – getting debt falling as a share of our economy, while investing in our vital services and keeping taxes low – that we are today able to announce this fair and deserved pay rise for teachers, their biggest increase since 2010/2011.

We ended the 1% average pay policy in September 2017, because we recognised more flexibility is now required to deliver world class public services including in return for improvements to public sector productivity.

We value the role of the independent Pay Review Bodies and thank them for their work in considering pay awards. In reaching a final position for 2018/19 public sector pay awards, we have balanced a need to recognise the value and dedication of our hard-working public servants whilst ensuring that our public services remain affordable in the long term, to contribute to our objective of reducing public sector debt. We have also sought to ensure that pay awards are fair and consistent across public sector workforces, reflect existing pay and benefit packages, in addition to recruitment and retention levels.

It is vital that we consider all pay awards in light of wider pressures on public spending. Public sector pay needs to be fair both for public sector workers and the taxpayer. Around a quarter of all public spending is spent on pay and we need to ensure that our public services remain affordable for the future.

It is also vital that our world class public services continue modernising to meet rising demand for the incredible services they provide, which improve our lives and keep us safe.

A full list of the recommendations and my proposed approach for all pay and allowance ranges is attached as an annex.

My officials will write to all of the statutory consultees of the STRB to invite them to contribute to a consultation on the Government’s response to these recommendations and on a revised School Teachers’ Pay and Conditions Document and Pay Order. The consultation will last for six weeks.

My detailed response contains further information on these matters.

STRB recommendations & Government Response (PDF Document, 441.05 KB)
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