Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 10 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Tenants' Associations: Tribunals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases resulted in a tribunal hearing under the Tenants’ Associations (Provisions Relating to Recognition and Provision of Information) (England) Regulations 2018 in the first 12 months since that statutory instrument came into force; and in how many of those cases was a tenants' association recognised by the tribunal.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The table below shows the number of cases that resulted in a First-tier Tribunal (Property Chamber) hearing under the Tenants’ Associations Regulations 2018 in the first 12 months of it coming into force and the number of tenants’ associations recognised by the Tribunal.

Number of Tribunal hearings that took place under Tenants’ Associations Regulations 2018

Number of Tenants’ Associations recognised by the Tribunal

6

5

Data source: Operationally Sourced Case Management Data

The above data was generated on a different date to the information contained in quarterly published statistics and was produced specifically for this enquiry.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale recording system, and is the best data that is available at the time of publication.

Q
(Cambridge)
Asked on: 10 February 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Innovate UK: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of Innovate UK core funding has been awarded to (a) SMEs, (b) large companies and (c) academia in each year since 2010, by sector.
A
Answered by: Amanda Solloway
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The table below includes grants offered to organisations within the three categories requested. This does not provide an industry sector breakdown as this information is not recorded.

10/11

11/12

12/13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

Academic

21%

17%

14%

14%

13%

15%

13%

13%

13%

13%

Large

28%

24%

37%

18%

14%

15%

11%

14%

10%

7%

SME

48%

57%

46%

63%

66%

60%

68%

68%

69%

70%


Totals will not sum to 100% due to organisations outside of these categories. This also excludes funding for the Knowledge Transfer Network, Knowledge Transfer Partnerships, Catapults and other Centres, and grants provided through the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, the Newton fund, and through programmes managed by institutes.

The figures for 2019 to 2020 show funding at the time of the question rather than final year-end figures. These are subject to change as the current financial year has not yet concluded.

Q
(Cambridge)
Asked on: 10 February 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Innovate UK: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what proportion of project collaborators in Innovate UK core funding grants awarded to Higher Education Institutions were (a) SMEs and (b) large companies in each sector in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Amanda Solloway
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The table below describes the proportion of Innovate UK projects that have an academic partner with either a large business or SME. As some projects will involve both large businesses and SMEs, the percentages will not add up to 100%. This does not provide an industry sector breakdown as this information is not recorded.

The figures for 2019 to 2020 show funding at the time of the question rather than final year-end figures. These are subject to change as the current financial year has not yet concluded.

10/11

11/12

12/13

13/14

14/15

15/16

16/17

17/18

18/19

19/20

Proportion Large

46%

45%

63%

50%

47%

47%

36%

34%

22%

29%

Proportion SME

80%

76%

68%

86%

86%

83%

89%

85%

85%

79%

Q
(Mid Derbyshire)
Asked on: 10 February 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Aortic Dissection: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to ensure the adequate diagnosis of Aortic Dissection at A&E departments.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 18 February 2020

We recognise that accurate and rapid assessment of suspected acute aortic dissection is crucial. Computerised tomography plays a central role in the diagnosis to allow expedited management and all acute hospitals with emergency departments have the capacity to make the diagnosis.

NHS England and NHS Improvement are aware of the findings of the Healthcare Safety Investigation Branch’s recent investigation into delayed recognition of acute Aortic Dissection, and these recommendations have been included in the actions being taken forward with hospitals.

NHS England and NHS Improvement Specialised Commissioning is progressing the Thoracic Aortic Dissection service specification and have identified resource to support this as one of the priorities within the Specialised Vascular Clinical Group work programme.

It should also be noted that the NHS England and NHS Improvement’s Getting It Right First Time Cardiothoracic Review recommended that acute aortic syndrome patients are only operated on by rotas of acute aortic syndrome specialist teams. This is being actioned across cardiac and vascular teams. The NHS England and NHS Improvement Specialised Cardiac Improvement Programme has developed a guide and toolkit to support implementation with the first Region rolling out from April 2020.

Q
Asked by Rosie Cooper
(West Lancashire)
Asked on: 10 February 2020
Department for International Development
Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if he will allocate an adequate level of funding to Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance, to provide for stronger health systems.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The UK is proud to be hosting the Gavi Replenishment Conference on 3-4th June, to secure Gavi the funds it needs to immunise 300 million more children and save at least 7 million lives between 2021 and 2025.

We recognise the importance of the UK’s funding to Gavi; our £1.44 billion of support to Gavi between 2016-2020 has saved 1.4 million lives from vaccine-preventable diseases in 68 of the world’s poorest countries. The UK’s commitment to Gavi is also central to our work to end preventable deaths of mothers, new-borns and children by 2030.

Gavi’s next strategic period is critically important for the UK as we work together to improve intra-country equity and coverage. Immunisation is often a child’s first point of contact with their health service. By extending routine immunisation to reach the underserved, particularly zero-dose children who have never been vaccinated, Gavi is building a foundation for stronger national health systems. The UK will also prioritise ensuring our investment in Gavi is sustainable by supporting countries to effectively transition from Gavi support to increased domestic funding.

Q
Asked by Rosie Cooper
(West Lancashire)
Asked on: 10 February 2020
Department for International Development
Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what discussions he has had with his international counterparts on ensuring that universal health coverage is central to the replenishment period and strategy review with Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 18 February 2020

Achieving universal health coverage (UHC) is a UK priority and an overarching goal for DFID’s contribution to Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance. The UK’s £1.44 billion of support to Gavi between 2016-2020 has saved 1.4 million lives from vaccine-preventable diseases in 68 of the world’s poorest countries.

The UK is proud to be hosting the Gavi Replenishment Conference on 3-4th June, to secure Gavi the funds it needs to immunise 300 million more children and save at least 7 million lives between 2021 and 2025. The UK’s commitment to Gavi is central to our work to end preventable deaths of mothers, new-borns and children by 2030.

In its next strategic period, Gavi is committed to reaching every child with essential vaccines, to improve intra-country equity and coverage. Immunisation is often a child’s first point of contact with their health service. By extending routine immunisation to reach the underserved, particularly zero-dose children who have never been vaccinated, Gavi is building a foundation for UHC.

Q
Asked by Chris Evans
(Islwyn)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Carers: Young People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate his Department has made of the number of GP practices who have adopted the care for young carers package launched by NHS England.
A
Answered by: Helen Whately
Answered on: 18 February 2020

I refer the hon. Member to the answer the then Minister of State for Care (Caroline Dinenage MP) gave to the hon. Member for Strangford (Jim Shannon MP) on 4 February 2020 to Question 8280.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Offences Against Children: Convictions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders convicted of cruelty to children in the last 12 months for which information is available were (a) men and (b) women.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on convictions and sentencing in England and Wales, up to December 2018. This information, relating to specific offences and defendant characteristics, can be found using the Home Office code principal offence data tool.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804510/HO-code-tool-principal-offence-2018.xlsx

(then filter by offence ’11 Cruelty to or Neglect of Children’. Then drag the ‘Sex’ filter into the rows field. The number of a) males, b) females and c) individuals of unknown sex convicted of this offence are shown in rows 36, 37 and 38, respectively).

The proportion of male and female convictions can be calculated by dividing the number of a) males and b) females by the total number of convictions (shown in row 156).

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Crimes of Violence: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of people convicted of violent offences did not receive an immediate custodial sentence in each of the last two years.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The Ministry of Justice publishes information on convictions and sentencing in England and Wales, up to December 2018. This information, relating to specific offences, can be found using the Outcomes by Offence data tool.

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/802314/outcomes-by-offence-tool-2018.xlsx

Filter by offence group to ’01: Violence against the person’. The number of individuals a) convicted, b) sentenced and c) received a sentence other than immediate custody are shown in rows 25, 26 and 27-35.

The rate for each disposal can be calculated by dividing the number of individuals sentenced to that disposal by the number sentenced.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Crimes of Violence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people received a (a) custodial and (b) non-custodial sentence for assaulting a prison officer in each of the last two years; and what the average custodial sentence was for those offences.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

These offences can be dealt with in the courts, or in many cases, through prisons themselves. Centrally held court data (including for the new offence of Assaults on Emergency Workers and broader violent offences) does not identify the location of the offence or occupation of the victim, so it would only be possible to identify these from court data with a manual search, incurring disproportionate costs.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners' Release
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders sentenced to custody have served less than half their full sentence term due to early release in the most recent 12 months period for which such information is available.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

Currently, prisoners sentenced to a standard determinate custodial sentence must be released automatically at the halfway point of their sentence and serve the second half on licence. Those sentenced to at least 12 weeks but less than four years may be released on Home Detention Curfew (HDC) up to 135 days before the halfway point, depending on sentence length. They must meet strict eligibility criteria and will be liable to recall to prison if they fail to comply with strict electronic monitoring and other conditions attached to their release.

HDC is a robust scheme which allows prisoners to work towards rehabilitation and resettlement in the community, while remaining subject to strict conditions. If they breach these, they face being returned to custody. Research on early release with electronic monitoring has shown no increase in re-offending despite the early release.

Children sentenced to a Detention and Training Order (DTO) serve the first half in custody, and the second half in the community. Most children serving a DTO of 8 months or more can be released one or two months earlier (depending on the DTO length) than the normal mid-point of sentence.

In 2018 the number of people released on HDC in England Wales was 14,769, which is 21 % of all prisoners released that year. The number of people released early from a DTO was 215, which is 0.3% of the total number of releases that year.

Prisoners may also be released early before having served half the sentence under the Early Removal Scheme (ERS). Under this scheme offenders liable to removal from the United Kingdom who have served at least a quarter of the sentence may be released before the halfway point solely in order to facilitate their deportation. Prisoners may also be released early on compassionate grounds (ERCG) before they have served half the sentence. Relevant data on releases under ERS and ERCG are not collated centrally.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Reoffenders: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many offenders had the time spent on tagged curfew deducted from their subsequent prison sentence in the most recent 12 months period for which such information is available.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

Data relating to bail conditions including tagged curfew is not held centrally on court systems.

Grouped Questions: 516
Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Reoffenders: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average amount of time deducted from an immediate prison sentence was for offenders who had been on a tagged curfew prior to their sentence being handed down in the most recent 12 months period for which such information is available.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

Data relating to bail conditions including tagged curfew is not held centrally on court systems.

Grouped Questions: 515
Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Crimes of Violence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many adjudications there were per 100 (a) male and (b) female prisoners in the last 12 months for which such information is available; and how many of those adjudications related to incidents of violence.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The prisoner discipline system upholds justice in prisons and ensures incidents of prisoner rule-breaking have consequences.

The Ministry of Justice monitors adjudication outcomes by offence, age, gender, ethnicity, religion and type of adjudication, this data is published quarterly. The information requested can be found in the table below:

Number of adjudication outcomes, by sex; per 100 prisoners (using the prison population average

for Q4 2018 to Q3 2019); Q4 2018 - Q3 2019, England and Wales

Male

Female

Adjudication outcomes

Prison population

Rate per 100 prisoners

Adjudication outcomes

Prison population

Rate per 100 prisoners

Total

202,810

79,033

257

11,423

3,806

300

Violence

35,083

79,033

44

1,715

3,807

45

Data sources and quality

The figures in this table have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing.

Source: PQ 518 (Ministry of Justice; DASD-JSAS)

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners' Release
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many prisoners were released on temporary licence in each month in the last three years.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The attached table shows the number of individuals who were released on temporary licence each month in 2016, 2017 and 2018.

All offenders must meet strict criteria and pass a thorough risk assessment before being considered for release on temporary licence (ROTL). Research published in 2018 indicates that ROTL helps to reduce re-offending. It helps offenders to build and maintain family ties and find work, which are a critical aspect of reducing the £18 billion annual cost to the taxpayer of reoffending.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 20.14 KB)
Q
(North West Durham)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the joint-venture approach to housing development and regeneration; and if he will visit the Genesis Project in North West Durham constituency.
A
Answered by: Christopher Pincher
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The Government’s estate regeneration national strategy published in 2016 outlined the various ways in which the public and private sectors might work together to implement property development and regeneration projects.

It is important that each of the options, and any variations, are properly considered and tested for a given opportunity. Each route will have implications for financing, procurement and project management. In many cases, the challenge of how to structure delivery is likely to be addressed by a combination of different approaches.

Q
Asked by Rosie Cooper
(West Lancashire)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment he has made of the effect of funding replenishment for (a) Gavi, (b) the Vaccine Alliance and (c) Nutrition for Growth on ending preventable child deaths by 2030.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The UK’s ambition to end the preventable deaths of mothers, new-borns and children by 2030 is supported by our commitment to Gavi, the Vaccine Alliance and addressing malnutrition through Nutrition for Growth.

The UK’s £1.44 billion of support to Gavi between 2016-2020 has saved 1.4 million lives from vaccine-preventable diseases in 68 of the world’s poorest countries. The UK-hosted pledging conference for Gavi on 3-4th June 2020 is an opportunity for the UK to use its global leadership to secure Gavi the funds it needs to immunise 300 million more children and save at least 7 million lives between 2021 and 2025.

The 2020 Nutrition for Growth Summit will be an important opportunity to secure new commitments to nutrition, to set the world on a better track to achieve the Global Goals and to help achieve our ambition of ending preventable deaths by 2030.

Q
Asked by Darren Jones
(Bristol North West)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Grandparents: Access
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans the Government has to bring forward legislative proposals to introduce statutory access rights for grandparents to their grandchildren.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

The Government understands the difficulties that some grandparents face in continuing relationships with their grandchildren following disputes arising from parental separation. We also recognise the importance of ensuring that the child’s welfare is paramount in court decisions regarding future arrangements for them following parental separation.

We wish to understand the outcome of the President of the Family Division’s consultation – which concluded last year - on recommendations for reforming how child arrangements cases are dealt with by the family court before deciding whether any specific proposals are needed in respect of child arrangements and grandparents.

Q
Asked by Ian Byrne
(Liverpool, West Derby)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Private Rented Housing: Liverpool
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, for what reason his Department did not extend the landlord licensing scheme in Liverpool; and what steps his Department is taking to ensure the protection of tenants in the private rental sector in (a) Liverpool West Derby constituency and (b) Liverpool.
A
Answered by: Christopher Pincher
Answered on: 18 February 2020

Liverpool City Council made an application for selective licensing under the condition of low housing demand across the whole city.

The evidence provided by the local authority was carefully considered against all the relevant statutory conditions, including those contained within section 80(4) of the Housing Act 2004. The application did not meet the statutory tests because it did not sufficiently evidence the existence of low housing demand in every ward in the city, nor that every ward in the city would become an area of low housing demand. Selective licensing is part of wider robust enforcement powers available to councils to protect vulnerable tenants, tackle rogue landlords and support responsible landlords in the private rented sector, including civil penalties and banning orders for the most serious offences.

Q
Asked by Ian Lavery
(Wansbeck)
Asked on: 11 February 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prison Service: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of staffing levels in prisons.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 February 2020

We recognise the need to recruit and retain staff to keep our prisons secure. We have invested significantly in increasing staff numbers, recruiting an additional 4,581 (full time equivalent) prison officers between October 2016 and September 2019, surpassing our original target of 2,500.

Since April 2017, governors have been empowered to manage workforce planning locally, and set their own staffing arrangements, including the number and grade of operational prison officers and other staff to be employed within their financial resource envelope. A ‘detached duty’ scheme is also in place to ensure that those prisons with urgent staffing needs can be prioritised.

We will continue to recruit officers and we are investing £100 million to bolster security, to ensure prisons are safe and decent for both staff and prisoners.

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