Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Psychiatry
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether consultant psychiatrists who have assessed or treated patients with mental illnesses remain responsible for those patients when they are moved to other hospitals or discharged; and if so, for how long.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

In general, when patients are moved to other hospitals the referring consultant psychiatrist transfers responsibility to the receiving consultant. When a patient is discharged from hospital, they are either followed up by a community mental health service or by their general practitioner (GP) in primary care. When a patient is transferred to a community mental health service, responsibility generally transfers to the consultant in that service.

There are some exceptions, including:

- Patients detained under the Mental Health Act (MHA) 1983 may be given ‘leave of absence’ to another hospital as part of their discharge plan. The transferring consultant, who has ‘Responsible Clinician’ status under the MHA, remains responsible for that patient during the authorised leave period and may recall the patient if necessary; and

- When a patient is followed up under a shared care arrangement between their GP and the secondary care consultant. This is normally managed under a locally agreed protocol.

There are no time limits ascribed to these responsibilities.

Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Serbia: Kosovo
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they support the proposed agreement between the governments of Serbia and Kosovo concerning mutual frontier modifications.
A
Answered on: 20 September 2018

As we have always been clear, normalising relations between Serbia and Kosovo is crucial for the security, stability and prosperity of both countries and the wider region. The Government believes that this should be on the basis of recognition of independent sovereign nations within their current borders. We believe that calls for re-drawing national borders could be de-stabilising. We continue to support the EU-facilitated dialogue with a view to a comprehensive and sustainable solution that benefits both countries.

Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Turkey: Politics and Government
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of any influence by the government of Turkey over the expulsion from several countries of individuals allegedly linked to the Gulen Movement; whether they intend to make representations to the government of Turkey about any such influence; and whether membership of the Gulen Movement is currently a ground for expulsion from the UK.
A
Answered on: 20 September 2018

We are aware that the Turkish Government is actively seeking the extradition from third countries of alleged Gulenists. This is a matter between Turkey and the countries involved. We urge all concerned to observe international human rights obligations. The Gulen movement is not proscribed as a terrorist group in the UK so the issue of expulsion does not arise. We will consider extradition requests where there is evidence of criminal wrong-doing by an individual.

Q
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent discussions they have had with the devolved administrations regarding the supply of medicine to the devolved nations in the event of a no-deal Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

On 23 August 2018 the Department published an open letter online to all pharmaceutical companies asking them to ensure that United Kingdom stockpiles of medicines are appropriate to cope with potential delays at the border that may arise in the event of a no-deal Brexit. A copy of the letter is attached.

At the same time the Department also wrote to pharmaceutical companies that supply the UK with prescription-only-medicines and pharmacy medicines from, or via, the European Union/European Economic Area (EEA), asking them to ensure they have a minimum of six weeks’ additional supply in the UK, over and above their business as usual operational buffer stocks, by 29 March 2019. The Department also asked those suppliers to indicate how they propose to ensure continuity of supply of their products to the National Health Service as part of the Department’s contingency programme. We are unable to provide the names of these companies as this information is commercially sensitive.

General sales list (over-the-counter) medicines were not included in the Department’s request to suppliers to indicate their contingency plans to us, and therefore are not currently formally part of our contingency programme. We have, however, encouraged all medicines suppliers to the UK with a EU/EEA touchpoint to stockpile or make alternative arrangements and are confident that this is the best approach to ensure supply at pharmacies and retail outlets in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The Department also wrote to hospitals, general practitioners and community pharmacies informing them that they do not need to take any steps to stockpile additional medicines, beyond their business as usual stock levels, as this is not necessary due to our contingency plans in partnership with pharmaceutical companies.

We are not currently aware of any healthcare providers or other health care organisations acquiring medicines in volumes that would qualify as stockpiling but we will work with NHS colleagues to closely monitor and follow up any incidences of over ordering of medicines.

The Department has worked collaboratively with the devolved administrations to ensure a UK-wide approach to our contingency plans which includes the supply of medicines to the devolved nations. Officials from the devolved administrations are members of a cross-Government working group and were informed of our 23 August announcements in advance.

Letter to pharmaceutical companies (PDF Document, 365.22 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL10252 | HL10253 | HL10254 | HL10255
Q
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government which pharmaceutical companies, if any, they have been working with to ensure that UK stockpiles of medicines are adequate to cope with a no-deal Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

On 23 August 2018 the Department published an open letter online to all pharmaceutical companies asking them to ensure that United Kingdom stockpiles of medicines are appropriate to cope with potential delays at the border that may arise in the event of a no-deal Brexit. A copy of the letter is attached.

At the same time the Department also wrote to pharmaceutical companies that supply the UK with prescription-only-medicines and pharmacy medicines from, or via, the European Union/European Economic Area (EEA), asking them to ensure they have a minimum of six weeks’ additional supply in the UK, over and above their business as usual operational buffer stocks, by 29 March 2019. The Department also asked those suppliers to indicate how they propose to ensure continuity of supply of their products to the National Health Service as part of the Department’s contingency programme. We are unable to provide the names of these companies as this information is commercially sensitive.

General sales list (over-the-counter) medicines were not included in the Department’s request to suppliers to indicate their contingency plans to us, and therefore are not currently formally part of our contingency programme. We have, however, encouraged all medicines suppliers to the UK with a EU/EEA touchpoint to stockpile or make alternative arrangements and are confident that this is the best approach to ensure supply at pharmacies and retail outlets in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The Department also wrote to hospitals, general practitioners and community pharmacies informing them that they do not need to take any steps to stockpile additional medicines, beyond their business as usual stock levels, as this is not necessary due to our contingency plans in partnership with pharmaceutical companies.

We are not currently aware of any healthcare providers or other health care organisations acquiring medicines in volumes that would qualify as stockpiling but we will work with NHS colleagues to closely monitor and follow up any incidences of over ordering of medicines.

The Department has worked collaboratively with the devolved administrations to ensure a UK-wide approach to our contingency plans which includes the supply of medicines to the devolved nations. Officials from the devolved administrations are members of a cross-Government working group and were informed of our 23 August announcements in advance.

Letter to pharmaceutical companies (PDF Document, 365.22 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL10251 | HL10253 | HL10254 | HL10255
Q
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any health organisations in the UK, other than pharmaceutical companies, are stockpiling medicines in preparation for a no-deal Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

On 23 August 2018 the Department published an open letter online to all pharmaceutical companies asking them to ensure that United Kingdom stockpiles of medicines are appropriate to cope with potential delays at the border that may arise in the event of a no-deal Brexit. A copy of the letter is attached.

At the same time the Department also wrote to pharmaceutical companies that supply the UK with prescription-only-medicines and pharmacy medicines from, or via, the European Union/European Economic Area (EEA), asking them to ensure they have a minimum of six weeks’ additional supply in the UK, over and above their business as usual operational buffer stocks, by 29 March 2019. The Department also asked those suppliers to indicate how they propose to ensure continuity of supply of their products to the National Health Service as part of the Department’s contingency programme. We are unable to provide the names of these companies as this information is commercially sensitive.

General sales list (over-the-counter) medicines were not included in the Department’s request to suppliers to indicate their contingency plans to us, and therefore are not currently formally part of our contingency programme. We have, however, encouraged all medicines suppliers to the UK with a EU/EEA touchpoint to stockpile or make alternative arrangements and are confident that this is the best approach to ensure supply at pharmacies and retail outlets in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The Department also wrote to hospitals, general practitioners and community pharmacies informing them that they do not need to take any steps to stockpile additional medicines, beyond their business as usual stock levels, as this is not necessary due to our contingency plans in partnership with pharmaceutical companies.

We are not currently aware of any healthcare providers or other health care organisations acquiring medicines in volumes that would qualify as stockpiling but we will work with NHS colleagues to closely monitor and follow up any incidences of over ordering of medicines.

The Department has worked collaboratively with the devolved administrations to ensure a UK-wide approach to our contingency plans which includes the supply of medicines to the devolved nations. Officials from the devolved administrations are members of a cross-Government working group and were informed of our 23 August announcements in advance.

Letter to pharmaceutical companies (PDF Document, 365.22 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL10251 | HL10252 | HL10254 | HL10255
Q
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether NHS organisations, GPs, community pharmacies and other service providers have been asked to stockpile medicine in the event of a no-deal Brexit; and if not, why not.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

On 23 August 2018 the Department published an open letter online to all pharmaceutical companies asking them to ensure that United Kingdom stockpiles of medicines are appropriate to cope with potential delays at the border that may arise in the event of a no-deal Brexit. A copy of the letter is attached.

At the same time the Department also wrote to pharmaceutical companies that supply the UK with prescription-only-medicines and pharmacy medicines from, or via, the European Union/European Economic Area (EEA), asking them to ensure they have a minimum of six weeks’ additional supply in the UK, over and above their business as usual operational buffer stocks, by 29 March 2019. The Department also asked those suppliers to indicate how they propose to ensure continuity of supply of their products to the National Health Service as part of the Department’s contingency programme. We are unable to provide the names of these companies as this information is commercially sensitive.

General sales list (over-the-counter) medicines were not included in the Department’s request to suppliers to indicate their contingency plans to us, and therefore are not currently formally part of our contingency programme. We have, however, encouraged all medicines suppliers to the UK with a EU/EEA touchpoint to stockpile or make alternative arrangements and are confident that this is the best approach to ensure supply at pharmacies and retail outlets in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The Department also wrote to hospitals, general practitioners and community pharmacies informing them that they do not need to take any steps to stockpile additional medicines, beyond their business as usual stock levels, as this is not necessary due to our contingency plans in partnership with pharmaceutical companies.

We are not currently aware of any healthcare providers or other health care organisations acquiring medicines in volumes that would qualify as stockpiling but we will work with NHS colleagues to closely monitor and follow up any incidences of over ordering of medicines.

The Department has worked collaboratively with the devolved administrations to ensure a UK-wide approach to our contingency plans which includes the supply of medicines to the devolved nations. Officials from the devolved administrations are members of a cross-Government working group and were informed of our 23 August announcements in advance.

Letter to pharmaceutical companies (PDF Document, 365.22 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL10251 | HL10252 | HL10253 | HL10255
Q
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that over-the-counter medicines will be available from local pharmacies and other retail outlets in the UK in the event of a no-deal Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

On 23 August 2018 the Department published an open letter online to all pharmaceutical companies asking them to ensure that United Kingdom stockpiles of medicines are appropriate to cope with potential delays at the border that may arise in the event of a no-deal Brexit. A copy of the letter is attached.

At the same time the Department also wrote to pharmaceutical companies that supply the UK with prescription-only-medicines and pharmacy medicines from, or via, the European Union/European Economic Area (EEA), asking them to ensure they have a minimum of six weeks’ additional supply in the UK, over and above their business as usual operational buffer stocks, by 29 March 2019. The Department also asked those suppliers to indicate how they propose to ensure continuity of supply of their products to the National Health Service as part of the Department’s contingency programme. We are unable to provide the names of these companies as this information is commercially sensitive.

General sales list (over-the-counter) medicines were not included in the Department’s request to suppliers to indicate their contingency plans to us, and therefore are not currently formally part of our contingency programme. We have, however, encouraged all medicines suppliers to the UK with a EU/EEA touchpoint to stockpile or make alternative arrangements and are confident that this is the best approach to ensure supply at pharmacies and retail outlets in the event of a no-deal Brexit.

The Department also wrote to hospitals, general practitioners and community pharmacies informing them that they do not need to take any steps to stockpile additional medicines, beyond their business as usual stock levels, as this is not necessary due to our contingency plans in partnership with pharmaceutical companies.

We are not currently aware of any healthcare providers or other health care organisations acquiring medicines in volumes that would qualify as stockpiling but we will work with NHS colleagues to closely monitor and follow up any incidences of over ordering of medicines.

The Department has worked collaboratively with the devolved administrations to ensure a UK-wide approach to our contingency plans which includes the supply of medicines to the devolved nations. Officials from the devolved administrations are members of a cross-Government working group and were informed of our 23 August announcements in advance.

Letter to pharmaceutical companies (PDF Document, 365.22 KB)
Grouped Questions: HL10251 | HL10252 | HL10253 | HL10254
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Councillors: Wales
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what was the total number of elected local councillors, at all levels of local government, in Wales in (1) 1988, (2) 1998, (3) 2008, and (4) 2018.
Answered on: 20 September 2018

This information is not held centrally.

Q
Asked by Lord Bradshaw
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Buses: Exhaust Emissions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, and to what extent, bus emissions of pollutants have reduced in the last five years; and what reduction in bus emissions they anticipate in the next five years.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

Figures for buses alone are unavailable. Figures for actual and projected combined bus and coach pollutant emissions are shown in the table, where available.

Year

CO

NOx

PM10

PM2.5

Benzene

1,3-butadine

Lead

SO2

2011

6.52

30.76

0.39

0.39

0.00

0.02

0.00

0.02

2012

6.32

27.69

0.35

0.35

0.00

0.02

0.00

0.02

2013

6.37

26.23

0.32

0.32

0.00

0.02

0.00

0.02

2014

5.89

23.38

0.28

0.28

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.02

2015

5.08

19.44

0.23

0.23

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.02

2016

4.26

14.95

0.18

0.18

0.00

0.01

0.00

0.02

2020

n/a

8.27

n/a

0.10

n/a

n/a

n/a

0.02

Source: Ricardo – AEA/DEFRA (NAEI)

Units: Thousand tonnes

n/a: projections not available

Q
Asked by Lord Lucas
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Gender Recognition: Young People
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether the NHS document A guide for young trans people in the UK stereotypes gender characteristics and advises young people to go abroad for puberty blocking treatment which is not permitted in the UK.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

No assessment has been made of the content of the document A guide for young trans people in the UK as it is no longer current.

This document was published in 2007, before NHS England’s inception in 2013, when it became the direct commissioner of specialised gender dysphoria services for the population of England.

In 2016, NHS England published a clinical commissioning policy that sets out strict guidelines regarding the prescription of puberty-blocking and cross-sex hormones in youngsters. These drugs may only be prescribed with the agreement of a specialist multidisciplinary team and after a diagnosis of gender dysphoria has been made following a careful assessment of the individual, and generally once the patient is around 15 years old for hormone blockers and 16 years old for cross sex hormones.

A copy of NHS England’s commissioning policy NHS Standard Contract for Gender Identity Development Service For Children And Adolescents is attached.

NHS England commissioning policy (PDF Document, 1.08 MB)
Q
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
East Coast Railway Line: Trains
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government which organisation made the decision to order the new Azuma trains; what is the extent of any technical problems with the Azuma trains; what plans are in place to deal with those problems; and when they anticipate the new trains will be fully operational as part of the regular timetable.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Intercity Express Programme (IEP) to deliver the new Great Western and East Coast Mainline Intercity Express Trains (IETs) is a government-led investment which was initiated by the Department for Transport when the Invitation to Tender was published in 2007. It is not uncommon when introducing new trains on an existing network for there to be some teething problems. This is why time is set aside to identify any issues as far as possible before the launch of passenger service and Hitachi and Network Rail are working together to resolve these issues with the aim of getting these trains ready for passenger service. The introduction of the new trains will deliver more seats and faster journeys for decades to come. The full benefits of these IETs will be delivered once the full fleet is in service alongside introduction alongside introduction of a new timetable.

Q
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Roads: Accidents
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received the road casualty data for London for 2017; and if not, when they expect to receive that data.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Department for Transport announced on Thursday 17 May 2018 that the publication of Reported road casualties Great Britain, main results: 2017, which had been scheduled for end June 2018, would be delayed until September. This was due to the non-availability of complete 2017 road casualty data for London, as a result of technical and data quality issues following the implementation of the Case Overview and Preparation Application (COPA) reporting system by the Metropolitan Police Service in November 2016.

The full statement is available on the Road accidents and safety statistics collections page on gov.uk. The Department announced a revised publication date of Thursday 27 September 2018 in the release calendar for Official Statistics. Officials have received the road casualty data for London as planned to meet this revised publication date.

Grouped Questions: HL10315
Q
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Roads: Accidents
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, and if so why, there is a delay in receiving full and timely data on road casualties in London, following talks between the Department for Transport, the Metropolitan Police and Transport for London.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Department for Transport announced on Thursday 17 May 2018 that the publication of Reported road casualties Great Britain, main results: 2017, which had been scheduled for end June 2018, would be delayed until September. This was due to the non-availability of complete 2017 road casualty data for London, as a result of technical and data quality issues following the implementation of the Case Overview and Preparation Application (COPA) reporting system by the Metropolitan Police Service in November 2016.

The full statement is available on the Road accidents and safety statistics collections page on gov.uk. The Department announced a revised publication date of Thursday 27 September 2018 in the release calendar for Official Statistics. Officials have received the road casualty data for London as planned to meet this revised publication date.

Grouped Questions: HL10314
Q
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Thameslink Industry Readiness Board
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the composition of the Industry Readiness Board which examined plans for the new rail timetables; and on what dates that Board has met in the last year.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The membership of the Thameslink Industry Readiness Board is composed of representatives of Network Rail, Southeastern, Govia Thameslink Railway, Stagecoach Group (representing East Midlands Trains), Arriva Rail London, Office of Rail and Road, Department for Transport, Siemens, Chris Gibb as independent chair and Chris Green representing the Independent Assurance Panel.

During 2018 the Panel has met on the following dates:

12 January

8 February

9 March

6 April

4 May

1 June

29 June

27 July

24 August

Q
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
South West Railway Line
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans exist to upgrade the power supply on the South West Main Line; what is the estimated cost of the upgrade; who will fund it; and when those plans are expected to be implemented.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

Network Rail is working on an Outline Business Case examining options to expand the capability of the traction power system to allow delivery of increased capacity through more services and longer trains, in the inner area of the Wessex and South East Routes in CP6 and beyond.

This will examine the potential costs and timescales for implementation, as well as funding options.

Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Speech and Language Disorders: Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the recommendation in the report by I CAN and the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists, Bercow: Ten Years On, published 20 March, that local authorities should include the evidence in the report in their Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategy and in their contribution to Integrated Care Systems.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

As set out in the statutory guidance on Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and Joint Health and Wellbeing Strategies, local authorities and clinical commissioning groups should draw on a range of quantitative and qualitative evidence of local need and of health inequalities, in undertaking their assessments and agreeing their strategies. The report Bercow: Ten Years On provides valuable evidence of the importance of commissioners understanding local communication needs, and working together with providers and patients to ensure needs are met.

Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Speech and Language Disorders: Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that NHS England, NHS Improvement, Public Health England and Health Education England use the evidence and findings in the report by I CAN and the Royal College of Speech and Language Therapists, Bercow: Ten Years On, published 20 March, to inform their work in developing leadership in the Allied Health Professions.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

Speech, language and communication skills are fundamental in helping people flourish in life, and the Government is firmly committed to ensuring that those with speech, language and communication needs receive the support they need to reach their full potential. We therefore welcome the Bercow Ten Years On report and it raises some important issues. The Government is currently considering the report and will respond in due course.

The NHS Leadership Academy’s leadership development programmes are aimed at all levels of leadership and disciplines including allied health professionals. NHS England colleagues already work closely with us on the Clinical Executive Fast Track Scheme and we have commenced conversations regarding allied health professionals leadership development. To date, over 4,000 allied health professionals have enrolled on NHS Leadership Academy National Programmes.

The role that allied health professionals and other clinicians play in National Health Service leadership is of utmost importance and we engage with a range of professions to understand how best to support clinical leaders.

Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services: Children and Young People
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the publication of their response to the Consultation on Transforming Children and Young People's Mental Health Provision: a Green Paper and Next Steps (Cm 9626) published in July, which health practitioners they envisage being part of the composition of (1) Mental Health Support Teams, and (2) specialist NHS children and young people's mental health services.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

New Mental Health Support Teams will provide support in and near schools and colleges for children and young people with mild to moderate mental health conditions. They will work closely with schools and colleges on establishing a whole-school approach to supporting mental health. We are creating a new role of Education Mental Health Practitioners to staff the teams. They will provide face to face, evidence-based interventions, and work as part of an integrated referral system with existing National Health Service mental health services to ensure that children in need of more specialist support are appropriately referred.

There will be new courses starting in seven universities in January 2019 to train this new workforce of Education Mental Health Practitioners to form the Mental Health Support Teams. Working with Health Education England and NHS England, together with leading clinical experts, we have developed an evidence-based curriculum for these courses. It builds on the existing Children’s Wellbeing Practitioner programme which is already being provided in the universities.

Specialist NHS children and young people’s mental health services are multidisciplinary teams that consist of, but are not limited to psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, nurses, support workers, occupational therapists, psychological therapists, primary mental health link workers and specialist substance misuse workers.

Q
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for International Trade
Trade Promotion
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government where each of Her Majesty's Trade Commissioners are based; for which countries each has responsibility; what are the priority countries within each region; and what is the annual budget being applied to each region.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Department for International Trade (DIT) has organised its overseas teams into nine regions, which are led by the nine HM Trade Commissioners (HMTCs). This provides a highly engaged overseas leadership team to drive forward DIT’s future trade strategy and priorities overseas. The responsibilities of the HMTCs are:

  • To work with partners in DIT headquarters and overseas to develop a Regional Trade Plan encompassing export promotion, investment and trade policy.

  • To set a clear vision and provide direction to the Department’s operations in the region.

  • To take responsibility for the UK’s commercial relationship with all the markets in their region, working closely with Heads of Mission, DIT Heads of Trade, and a wide range of stakeholders.

HM Trade Commissioners are based in cities across the nine regions as follows:

  • New York (HMTC for North America)

  • Sao Paulo (HMTC for Latin America and Caribbean)

  • Johannesburg (HMTC for Africa)

  • Dubai (HMTC for Middle East)

  • Istanbul (HMTC for Eastern Europe and Central Asia Network)

  • Mumbai (HMTC for South Asia)

  • Beijing (HMTC for China & Hong Kong)

  • Singapore (HMTC for Asia Pacific)

  • Milan (HMTC for Europe)

The budgets delegated at the start of 2018-19 to each HMTC are set below. Wider DIT budgets also support the delivery of HMTC objectives but are not set at a regional level:

HMTC region

Delegated budget

Africa

£3,685,152

Asia-Pacific

£9,780,451

China

£9,592,448

EECAN

£2,939,163

Europe

£16,050,951

Latin America & Caribbean

£7,438,225

Middle East

£5,126,912

North America

£10,009,920

South Asia

£4,073,335

The priorities and objectives for each HMTC are outlined in Regional Trade Plans (RTPs). These RTPs are currently in development.

Grouped Questions: HL10342 | HL10343
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