Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-13 out of 13
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Paul Flynn
(Newport West)
Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Climate Change Convention: Paris
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what form of transport she used to travel to the COP21 conference in Paris in December 2015; and for what reasons she used that form of transport.
A
Answered by: Justine Greening
Answered on: 17 December 2015

I flew to the COP 21 once which was the most cost effective and efficient means of travel. DFID offsets all its air and train travel.

Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 11 December 2015
Department for International Development
Syria: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much funding her Department has provided to (a) Turkey, (b) Lebanon and (c) assist with the effect of the refugee crisis in Syria in those countries in each year since 2011-12.
A
Answered by: Mr Desmond Swayne
Answered on: 16 December 2015

The UK has been at the forefront of the response to the crisis in Syria and the region. We have pledged over £1.12 billion to date, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis. In total, we have allocated £304 million to projects in Lebanon and £34 million to projects in Turkey since the start of our response in February 2012. These figures include funding spent by partners since financial year 2011/2012 and allocations made for financial year 2015/2016 and beyond.


The UK prioritises its assistance according to where needs are greatest and most unmet, and the capacity of the host country to absorb refugees. The UK, like other donors, has therefore prioritised support to Lebanon and Jordan, where the number of refugees is much higher as a percentage of the population than in Turkey and Egypt. For example, Syrian refugees in Lebanon constitute a quarter of the pre-crisis population.


By the end of June 2015, UK support in the region (Jordan, Lebanon, Turkey, Iraq and Egypt) had provided over 4.8 million food rations, each of which feeds one person for one month; access to clean water for over 980,000 people (peak month); medical consultations for over 471,000 people; and support to over 127,000 people through agriculture and livelihoods interventions.


The table below provides a breakdown of the funding spent by partners as part of projects in Lebanon and Turkey since 2011/2012.


DFID Funding for Humanitarian/Development Activities in Lebanon and Turkey (Excluding funding to the Conflict Security and Stabilisation Fund)

Financial Year

Lebanon

Turkey

2011/2012

£0

£0

2012/2013

£11,667,000

£3,252,000

2013/2014

£72,127,000

£11,051,000

2014/2015

£61,992,000

£9,800,000


In financial year 2015/16, DFID has an operational plan budget of £94 million for projects in Lebanon and £10 million for projects in Turkey (excluding funding to the Conflict, Security and Stabilisation Fund).

Q
Asked by Stephen Timms
(East Ham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Syria: Overseas Aid
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment she has made of the potential contribution of aid to Syria to strengthening the moderate opposition's capacity to provide governance and basic services.
A
Answered by: Mr Desmond Swayne
Answered on: 15 December 2015

The UK has been at the forefront of the response to the crisis in Syria and the region. We have pledged over £1.1 billion to date, our largest ever response to a single humanitarian crisis. This makes us the second largest bilateral donor. Of this total, the UK has allocated £561 million to support vulnerable people inside Syria to date.

By the end of June 2015, UK support inside Syria had provided over 15.1 million food rations; access to clean water for over 1.6 million people (peak month); 2 million medical consultations; more than 4 million relief packages; and there have been over 6.9 million instances when people benefited from sanitation and hygiene activities. We are also helping those who feel safe to do so to stay in Syria by building their ability to cope, helping the moderate opposition to provide governance and essential services, and supporting the provision of education and jobs.


The UK will continue to punch above its weight in supporting the reconstruction of Syria. That is why, on 26 November, the Prime Minister signalled that the UK will commit at least £1 billion to Syria’s reconstruction in the longer term.

Q
Asked by Keir Starmer
(Holborn and St Pancras)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Eritrea: Droughts
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment her Department has made of (a) the effect of the drought in the Horn of Africa on Eritrea and (b) the response of the Eritrean government and the international community to that drought.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 15 December 2015

Official food security and nutrition data for Eritrea for this year has not yet been released, but the late onset of rains, relatively low volume of rainfall, and significant soil moisture deficits are likely to have had a negative impact on both farming and pastoral communities. The country and regional offices of the World Food Programme and UNICEF are monitoring the situation closely.


DFID is funding nutrition support activities in areas affected by El Nino in the Horn of Africa through UNICEF’s regional programme, which covers Eritrea

Q
(Poplar and Limehouse)
Asked on: 03 December 2015
Department for International Development
Roads: Safety
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, whether her Department plans to take account of the conclusions of the United Nations/World Health Organisation Second Global High-Level Conference on Road Safety when preparing the UK's response to the next set of Sustainable Development Goals.
A
Answered by: Mr Desmond Swayne
Answered on: 10 December 2015

Road traffic injuries cost developing countries an estimated 1-2% of their gross national product, equivalent to over US$100 billion annually, with a widening of the disparity between advanced and developing countries. Road accidents kill an estimated 1.3 million people and injure up to 78 million people each year.


We are pleased that the burden of road crashes has been recognised in the Sustainable Development Goals and we are committed to supporting the international community to achieve the target of halving the number of global deaths and injuries from road traffic accidents by 2020.


DFID recently increased its funding to the Global Road Safety Facility (GRSF) hosted at the World Bank and will contribute £4.5 million between 2013 and 2017. The GRSF provides funding, knowledge, and technical assistance that lever road safety investments into transport sector programmes.


We also focus on road safety through our research and evidence portfolio. For example our programme on High Volume Transport and the programme “Research for Community Access Partnership” (ReCAP) both have strong road safety research components. DFID also supports a programme in Nepal working to improve road infrastructure for road safety on a critical section of Nepal’s national network.


Q
(Clacton)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 December 2015
Department for International Development
Pakistan: Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to the Answer of 17 September 2015 to Question 9945, who conducted the independent evaluations of 2007 and 2013; against what criteria the evaluations concluded that the curriculum promoted values of democracy, pluralism and peace; and what sources of information other than those independent evaluations her Department used to assess the quality of the curriculum in Khyber, Pakhtunkwa and Punjab.
A
Answered by: Mr Desmond Swayne
Answered on: 10 December 2015

The independent evaluations were conducted by Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ), the delivery agency of the German Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, as part of their regular reporting to the National Education Development Partners Group (NEDPG) in Pakistan.

The NEDPG, which consists of both bilateral and multilateral donors, including the UK, UNESCO, UNICEF, The World Bank, the US, Germany and Australia, has prioritised scrutiny of the curriculum in its dialogue with the government of Pakistan. There is an implicit set of internationally agreed professional norms and standards for all aspects of education, set through the UNESCO Annual Global Monitoring Reports against which conclusions can be drawn.

While GIZ has led evaluation on behalf of the Partners Group, other members carry out reviews of the education sector, including curriculum quality, and these are pooled and used by all. In addition, DFID staff scrutinise the curriculum and its implementation as part of regular monitoring of the Punjab and Khyber Pakhtunkhwa education programmes.

Q
Asked by Scott Mann
(North Cornwall)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Syria: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what funding and other resources her Department has provided for Syrian refugee camps.
A
Answered by: Mr Desmond Swayne
Answered on: 16 December 2015

The UK has pledged over £1.1 billion in response to the Syria crisis, of which £559 million has been allocated to support refugees in the region and vulnerable host communities. The vast majority of refugees in the region live in host communities rather than camps.

Q
Asked by Byron Davies
(Gower)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Syria: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, how much her Department has spent on humanitarian assistance in (a) Syria and (b) neighbouring countries receiving Syrian refugees in the last two years.
A
Answered by: Justine Greening
Answered on: 16 December 2015

In the financial year 2014/15, the UK spent just under £150 million in humanitarian assistance inside Syria and around £125 million in the surrounding region. This has provided lifesaving support and helped ensure Syrian children can remain in education.

Q
Asked by Ian Lavery
(Wansbeck)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what proportion of Overseas Development Aid her Department used to tackle the refugee crisis in the last 12 months; and how much her Department plans to allocate in future years to tackling that situation.
A
Answered by: Justine Greening
Answered on: 16 December 2015

My department has contributed nearly £16 million for the refugee crisis in Europe this year to date. In the long term we are focussed on using the UK’s aid budget to support refugees to have a viable option to stay where they are by tackling the root causes of migration.

Q
Asked by Will Quince
(Colchester)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Syria: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what funding her Department has allocated to support resettlement of Syrian refugees.
A
Answered by: Mr Desmond Swayne
Answered on: 16 December 2015

DFID has agreed to fund the ODA-eligible costs of the Syria refugee resettlement scheme for this financial year - discussions are ongoing to determine the precise amount necessary. From next year ODA funding for the scheme will be transferred directly from Treasury to the Home Office.

Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if she will make it her policy to continue to invest in the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 16 December 2015

The UK is currently reviewing all core contributions through the Multilateral Aid Review. We are committed to remaining a world leader in tackling global diseases like HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. We will continue to invest in the Global Fund, which has saved 17 million lives.

Q
Asked by Callum McCaig
(Aberdeen South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Climate Change
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what proportion of the international aid budget she plans to allocate to support communities managing the consequences of climate change in each of the next five years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 16 December 2015

The Prime Minister has announced that the government will provide £5.8 billion from the official development assistance budget over the next five years. This will support the Paris Climate Summit outcome and help the most vulnerable countries protect themselves from the effects of climate change and drive clean economic growth.

Q
(Edinburgh East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 December 2015
Department for International Development
Occupied Territories
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent assessment she has made of the humanitarian situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.
A
Answered by: Mr Desmond Swayne
Answered on: 16 December 2015

The UN assesses that the situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territories (OPTs) is a protracted protection crisis with humanitarian consequences. According to the UN, Palestinians in the OPTs face a range of serious threats including threats to life, liberty and security, destruction of homes and other property, forced displacement, and restrictions on freedom of movement and access to livelihoods.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-13 out of 13
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100