Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ashton of Hyde on 12 November (HL11086), which stated that "Complaints about charges for re-use by museums and galleries may be referred to the Information Commissioner for a binding decision”, whether this is consistent with the Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO)’s Guide to RPSI, which states that it “can issue a decision notice, unless the complaint concerns charges above marginal cost, in which case we make a non-binding recommendation”, and the ICO’s Decision Notice FS50619465 of 4 April 2017, which states that it can “only make recommendations in respect of any charges levied under the RPSI.
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government which cancers have been recommended by NICE for molecular testing; and of those cancers, for which biomarkers in relation to (1) prognostic tests, and (2) theranostic or treatment predictive tests.
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government which NHS England trusts currently carry out cancer tests in compliance with NICE guidelines; and in relation to which cancers.
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government which NHS England trusts, if any, have secured funding to test for cancers clinically beyond the NICE guidelines, including through use of theranostic tests and somatic gene panels that can report back to patients within a clinically actionable time frame; and in relation to which cancers.
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the main reasons for non-compliance with NICE guidelines for testing for cancer by NHS England trusts.
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made towards the Cancer Task Force’s recommendation for a national molecular pathology service; and when they anticipate to implement this fully in relation to adult cancer diagnosis and care.
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 29 October 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Public Sector: Information
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ashton of Hyde on 29 October (HL10726), whether they will now answer the question originally put, namely, what independent body is responsible for advising on the Criteria for exceptions to marginal cost pricing, previously administered by The National Archives, to provide assurance to the re-user of public sector information (PSI) and to demonstrate that the public sector bodies are complying with PSI policy and are trading fairly.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 12 November 2018

Up until 2015, the exceptions to marginal cost pricing process formed part of the apparatus for managing Crown copyright by The National Archives; it did not form part of the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2005. As such, it applied solely to a small proportion of Crown copyright material held by museums and galleries.

The Information Commissioner became responsible for complaints regarding the re-use of public sector information, under the Re-Use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015. These Regulations necessitated a review of Crown copyright processes and the exceptions process was discontinued.

Complaints about charges for re-use by museums and galleries may be referred to the Information Commissioner for a binding decision.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 29 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust: GE Healthcare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord O’Shaughnessy on 29 October (HL10764), whether they will publish Bradford NHS Trust’s Data Protection Impact Assessment in respect of the collaboration between the Bradford NHS Trust and GE Healthcare Providers.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 06 November 2018

Any decision around publication of the Data Protection Impact Assessment is a matter for the Trust.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 29 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust: GE Healthcare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord O'Shaughnessy on 29 October (HL10764), whether the collaboration between Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and GE Healthcare Providers is the first deal of this type between an NHS trust and GE Healthcare Providers.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 06 November 2018

We are not aware of any other deals of this type between a National Health Service trust and GE Healthcare Providers.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 16 October 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ashton of Hyde on 15 October (HL10413), whether they will encourage all museums and galleries to publish annually their net operating costs in relation to income generation from image licensing to assure the public that, “the total income for the accounting period must not exceed the cost of collection, production, reproduction, dissemination, preservation and rights clearance of the information, together with a reasonable return on investment”, as stated in the Guidance on the implementation of the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 29 October 2018

As arm’s length bodies, DCMS-sponsored museums determine their own operational matters, including the decision to charge fees for re-use of images of items in their collection. It is not appropriate for my department to intervene in these matters. It is for each accounting officer to ensure that their organisation follows what is set out in the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015 and publish information accordingly. The complaints mechanism is available in the Regulations to be used if any re-user feels that the Regulations are not being followed. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for compliance and notices are also a matter for the ICO in the context of any particular complaint considered by it.

Grouped Questions: HL10724 | HL10725 | HL10726 | HL10727
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 16 October 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ashton of Hyde on 15 October (HL10413), what advice, if any, they plan to give museums and galleries who regularly fail to monitor and apply the standard cost of capital in relation to income generation from image licensing as set out in the Guidance on the implementation of the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 29 October 2018

As arm’s length bodies, DCMS-sponsored museums determine their own operational matters, including the decision to charge fees for re-use of images of items in their collection. It is not appropriate for my department to intervene in these matters. It is for each accounting officer to ensure that their organisation follows what is set out in the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015 and publish information accordingly. The complaints mechanism is available in the Regulations to be used if any re-user feels that the Regulations are not being followed. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for compliance and notices are also a matter for the ICO in the context of any particular complaint considered by it.

Grouped Questions: HL10723 | HL10725 | HL10726 | HL10727
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 16 October 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ashton of Hyde on 15 October, what assessment they have made of whether a notice by the Information Commissioner’s Office in relation to image fees would apply to national museums and galleries.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 29 October 2018

As arm’s length bodies, DCMS-sponsored museums determine their own operational matters, including the decision to charge fees for re-use of images of items in their collection. It is not appropriate for my department to intervene in these matters. It is for each accounting officer to ensure that their organisation follows what is set out in the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015 and publish information accordingly. The complaints mechanism is available in the Regulations to be used if any re-user feels that the Regulations are not being followed. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for compliance and notices are also a matter for the ICO in the context of any particular complaint considered by it.

Grouped Questions: HL10723 | HL10724 | HL10726 | HL10727
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 16 October 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Public Sector: Information
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what independent body is responsible for advising on the exception to marginal cost pricing procedure to provide assurance to the re-user of public sector information (PSI) and to demonstrate that the public sector bodies are complying with PSI Policy and trading fairly.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 29 October 2018

As arm’s length bodies, DCMS-sponsored museums determine their own operational matters, including the decision to charge fees for re-use of images of items in their collection. It is not appropriate for my department to intervene in these matters. It is for each accounting officer to ensure that their organisation follows what is set out in the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015 and publish information accordingly. The complaints mechanism is available in the Regulations to be used if any re-user feels that the Regulations are not being followed. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for compliance and notices are also a matter for the ICO in the context of any particular complaint considered by it.

Grouped Questions: HL10723 | HL10724 | HL10725 | HL10727
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 16 October 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Museums and Galleries: Copyright
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ashton of Hyde on 15 October (HL10413), what assessment they have made of whether the sum of money that a museum charges for image fees should be calculated in relation to their costs for complying with that particular image request, and not based on the proposed re-use.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 29 October 2018

As arm’s length bodies, DCMS-sponsored museums determine their own operational matters, including the decision to charge fees for re-use of images of items in their collection. It is not appropriate for my department to intervene in these matters. It is for each accounting officer to ensure that their organisation follows what is set out in the Re-use of Public Sector Information Regulations 2015 and publish information accordingly. The complaints mechanism is available in the Regulations to be used if any re-user feels that the Regulations are not being followed. The Information Commissioner’s Office (ICO) is responsible for compliance and notices are also a matter for the ICO in the context of any particular complaint considered by it.

Grouped Questions: HL10723 | HL10724 | HL10725 | HL10726
Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 17 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust: GE Healthcare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government who owns the rights to use the real-time data used in the collaboration between the Bradford NHS Trust and GE Healthcare Providers; and whether Bradford NHS Trust will retain a fair share in the intellectual property derived from that partnership in line with the guidance produced by the Department of Health and Social Care, Code of Conduct for Data Driven Health and Care Technology, published on 5 September.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 29 October 2018

NHS England co-wrote the Code to be used as guidance for best practice for those developing data driven technologies. The ‘rights’ to the real-time data will fall under the ownership of whoever was deemed data controller (defined by article 4 of the General Data Protection Regulation) in the collaboration between Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and GE Healthcare Providers.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 09 October 2018
Treasury
Government Departments: Databases
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any Government controlled data sets are cited as capital assets on the Whole of Government Accounts; and if so, which ones.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 23 October 2018

The UK follows standards as set by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). Data sets are an intangible asset and would therefore be covered by IAS 38 Intangible Assets. The UK government follows IAS 38 as adapted for the public sector. The Government Financial Reporting Manual 2018-19 sets out these interpretations and adaptations. The latest available publication of Whole of Government Accounts 2016-17 reports government’s intangible assets as totalling £34.5 billion at 31 March 2017. HM Treasury does not collect information on the value of data sets within this total or where they are held. The accounting policy used by the Whole of Government Accounts in recognising intangible assets is as follows (per page 82 of the 2016-17 accounts): “Intangible assets are recognised if it is probable that they will result in future economic benefits to the government and if their cost can be measured reliably. Intangible assets are initially recognised at cost and subsequently valued based on current value in existing use. Where no active market exists, intangible assets are revalued using indices or another suitable model.”

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 09 October 2018
Treasury
Public Sector: Assets
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the UK’s intangible assets are accounted for using an internationally recognised methodology.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 23 October 2018

The UK follows standards as set by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), which is an internationally recognised standard setter. The UK Government applies International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adapted and interpreted for the public sector. The relevant financial standard for intangible assets is IAS 38. The Government Financial Reporting Manual 2018-19 sets out these interpretations and adaptations.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 09 October 2018
Treasury
Public Bodies: Intellectual Property
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether for accounting purposes they treat intellectual property generated by public bodies in the same way as other EU Member States.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 23 October 2018

The UK follows standards as set by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB). The UK Government applies International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adapted and interpreted for the public sector. EU Member States may also apply IFRS, International Public Sector Accounting Standards (IPSAS) or prepare their accounts on a cash basis. There are no material differences in the standards issued by IASB (IAS 38) and IPSASB (IPSAS 31) on the accounting treatment of intellectual property.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 09 October 2018
Treasury
Government Departments: Databases
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is an internationally accepted methodology for valuing raw data assets on government balance sheets; and if not, what consideration they have given to developing one with international partners.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 23 October 2018

The UK follows standards as set by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), which is an internationally recognised standard setter. The UK Government applies International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) as adapted and interpreted for the public sector. Data sets are an intangible asset and would therefore be covered by IAS 38 Intangible Assets. The UK government follows IAS 38 as adapted for the public sector.

Under this standard, raw data would be unlikely to meet the definition of a recognisable asset. The government is unlikely to diverge from IFRS accounting standards in the Whole of Government Accounts

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 10 October 2018
Treasury
Government Departments: Databases
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the extent to which their methodology for valuing raw data assets on government balance sheets differs from private sector practices.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 23 October 2018

The UK Government follows standards as set by the International Accounting Standards Board (IASB), which are the same standards used by the majority of private sector bodies (for more information please see the Companies Act 2006). Raw data is an intangible asset and would therefore be covered by IAS 38 Intangible Assets. The UK government follows IAS 38 as adapted for the public sector. The Government Financial Reporting Manual 2018-19 sets out these interpretations and adaptations.

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