Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(New Forest East)
Asked on: 24 June 2019
Treasury
Tax Avoidance
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent assessment his Department has made of the risk of suicide among people subject to the 2019 Loan Charge.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 02 July 2019

The Government published a report on the loan charge in March 2019. The report was required by section 95 of Finance Act 2019, but goes wider than the review set out in legislation, explaining the rationale for the charge and considering its impacts. The report also provides information on how HM Revenue and Customs support those affected by the loan charge, including the introduction of a dedicated helpline. The report is available online at:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/report-on-time-limits-and-the-disguised-remuneration-loan-charge

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 June 2019
Treasury
Tax Avoidance
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what recent estimate his Department has made of the numbers of (a) people with closed tax years who have been found liable for the 2019 Loan Charge and (b) promoters of loan schemes subject to the 2019 Loan Charge that have been convicted of criminal offences related to those loan charges.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 27 June 2019

The information requested is not available. HMRC are working through the settlement process with those Disguised Remuneration users who came forward to settle their tax affairs before 5 April 2019.

The loan charge was announced in Budget 2016, and scheme users who chose not to repay the outstanding loan or agree a settlement with HMRC by 5 April 2019 are now liable for the loan charge and should report it as part of their 2018-19 tax liability.

To date, no promoters of disguised remuneration (DR) schemes have been convicted of criminal offences related to DR schemes. There are no criminal offences specific to the promotion of mass marketed tax avoidance schemes, but HMRC may conduct a criminal investigation into an individual’s actions when, for example, reliance is placed on a false or altered document, or if material facts are misrepresented. For example, last month six individuals were arrested on suspicion of promoting fraudulent loan charge arrangements.

Since the formation of HMRC’s Fraud Investigation Service on 1 April 2016, more than 20 individuals have been convicted for offences relating to arrangements which have been promoted and marketed as tax avoidance schemes, resulting in over 100 years custodial sentences. A significant number of avoidance scheme promoters are currently under criminal investigation by HMRC.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 June 2019
Treasury
Tax Avoidance
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will suspend the 2019 Loan Charge and associated settlements and launch an independent review of the effects of that charge on people subject to it; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 27 June 2019

Disguised remuneration schemes are contrived arrangements that use loan payments in place of ordinary remuneration, usually through an offshore trust, with the purpose of avoiding tax. These loans are no different to normal income in their purpose and effect, and HMRC’s position is that they are, and have always been, taxable.

In accordance with an amendment to the Finance Act 2019, the Government published a report into disguised remuneration schemes. This can be found online at: www.gov.uk/government/publications/report-on-time-limits-and-the-disguised-remuneration-loan-charge. The Government has no plans to review the policy.

HMRC offers a range of taxpayer support services, both directly and through independent organisations, and would strongly encourage anyone who is affected by the charge to contact them and discuss their situation.

Grouped Questions: 268454
Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 13 May 2019
Ministry of Defence
China: Telecommunications
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether army personnel have been issued with (a) mobile handsets and (b) other devices (i) manufactured by Huawei and (ii) manufactured by Huawei but provided by and badged with the names of other companies; and what her Department's policy is towards the use of telecommunications equipment manufactured by Chinese companies.
A
Answered by: Stuart Andrew
Answered on: 16 May 2019

The Ministry of Defence (MOD) takes the security of its Information and Communications Technology (ICT) systems and services very seriously. However, for security reasons, the MOD does not comment publicly on the specifics of its ICT systems and services.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 March 2019
Department for Education
Bristol University: Freedom of Expression
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the Daily Telegraph article entitled University cancels talk on extremist speakers, published on 26 March 2019, if he will commission an inquiry into (a) the circumstances in which the free speech society at Bristol University was prevented from hosting a meeting featuring the author of Extreme Speakers league table; (b) the nine occasions listed in that league table when allegedly extreme speakers were hosted at Bristol University; (c) the criteria applied by the University in deciding to ban meetings on security grounds; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 03 April 2019

Free speech plays a vital and important role in our society, and universities should be places where students are exposed to a range of issues, including those which may be controversial, and are encouraged to debate and challenge them.

It is right that extremist views should be exposed and challenged. That is why, under the Prevent duty, (to have due regard to prevent people being drawn into terrorism), Higher Education (HE) providers must have policies in place around the management of speakers. This means ensuring the right steps are taken to contest extremist narratives and to make sure that those wishing spread hatred do not go unchallenged.

However, challenging extremism does not mean banning lawful speech, and the Prevent duty also explicitly requires further and higher education institutions have regard to their duty to secure freedom of speech. It is up to individual institutions to determine who they deem appropriate to invite to speak on their campuses on a case-by-case basis; government does not dictate who should and should not be invited to speak in higher education providers, providing their speech is within the law.

We do not routinely comment on individual cases. However, monitoring of the Prevent duty by the Office for Students shows us that HE providers are navigating the balance between freedom of speech and challenging extremism pragmatically and effectively. We recognise that these are complex issues, which is why the government supports the sector on Prevent implementation through our network of Further and HE Regional Prevent Co-ordinators on the ground. We have also worked alongside the Equalities and Human Rights Commission and wider stakeholders to produce the recently published Freedom of Expression guidance. This will enable universities and student unions to understand their obligations for protecting and supporting free speech, and sets out where speech may be unlawful, alongside relevant case studies to support providers in balancing their duties.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 27 March 2019
Home Office
Demonstrations: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 14 January 2019 to Question 205783, what discussions his Department has had with the Metropolitan Police Service the (a) advantages and (b) disadvantages of police estimates being made of crowd numbers at large demonstrations; and what explanation has been given for discontinuing that practice.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 01 April 2019

The Home Office routinely discusses matters relating to demonstrations with the Metropolitan Police Service.

The management of demonstrations and whether to collect information on the number of individuals that attend demonstrations is an operational matter for the police.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 March 2019
Northern Ireland Office
Northern Ireland (Sentences) Act 1998
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether the provision in the Northern Ireland (Sentences) Act 1998 capping time spent in prison for Troubles-related offences at two years applies to members of the (a) armed forces, (b) police and (c) security services and (b) paramilitaries; and if she will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Karen Bradley
Answered on: 11 March 2019

Under the early release scheme that formed part of the 1998 Belfast Agreement and was given legislative effect by the Northern Ireland (Sentences) Act 1998, qualifying prisoners may apply for early release (subject to certain conditions) after they have served two years in prison. Currently anyone convicted of Troubles-related scheduled offences and serving their sentence in Northern Ireland would be eligible to apply to the scheme. Release is on licence, such licence being subject to revocation for noncompliance with certain conditions - as has happened in a number of cases. When a licence is revoked an individual is liable to be returned to prison to serve out their original sentence.

The provisions set out in the draft Northern Ireland (Stormont House Agreement) Bill on which we recently consulted would amend the Northern Ireland (Sentences) Act 1998 to extend this two year accelerated release scheme for Troubles-related offences to those serving sentences in Great Britain. The Sentences Act does not cover offences committed before August 1973, so the draft Bill proposes to extend the early release scheme to cover the start of the Troubles (January 1968-August 1973). The Government has no intention to extend early release to offences committed after the date of the Belfast Agreement in April 1998. There is no proposal in the consultation to do this and the Government is not contemplating it.

The legacy consultation concluded in October and we expect to finish our analysis of the 17,000 plus responses shortly. It is right we take the time to consider each response fully and I will set out the next steps in this process as soon as I can.

Q
(New Forest East)
Asked on: 20 December 2018
Ministry of Defence
Armed Forces: Counter-terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in how many countries the UK military is conducting counterterrorism operations; and in how many of those countries the UK is (a) conducting air and drone strikes, (b) deploying combat troops, (c) constructing or retaining military bases and (d) building the capacity of partners to conduct counterterrorism and other actions.
A
Answered by: Mark Lancaster
Answered on: 14 January 2019

Air and Unmanned Aerial Systems strikes are being conducted in Iraq and Syria. The UK is conducting military counterterrorism operations or capacity building in 17 countries. Military personnel have been deployed on the ground but none of those personnel are employed in combat roles. The Ministry of Defence has not constructed nor is it retaining any military bases for the sole purpose of counterterrorism operations; UK forces use shared military establishments at the invitation of host governments or allies at a number of locations globally.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 January 2019
Home Office
Demonstrations: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason the Metropolitan Police Service discontinued its practice of estimating and publishing objective assessments of the number of people attending large demonstrations in London; when that practice was discontinued; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 14 January 2019

The management of demonstrations is an operational matter for the police, as is the decision on whether to publish estimated numbers attending protests.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 December 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to (a) investigate claims about patient safety in the Eye Department of University Hospital Southampton NHS Foundation Trust (UHS); (b) protect patients treated in that Department from harm; (c) assure whistle-blowers that they will not suffer reprisals for speaking out; (d) inquire into above average sight loss amongst patients operated on by a particular surgeon in the Department; (e) investigate the alleged use of NHS lists by the same individual for use by a private practice; (f) establish why external experts were not invited to inspect the clinical records of patients who had lost their sight; (g) protect patients from further risk by conducting an independent inquiry; (h) draw lessons for the future from this situation and the treatment by UHS of a senior consultant who attempted to blow the whistle three years ago; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 07 January 2019

As the independent regulator of health and adult social care in England the Care Quality Commission (CQC) make sure health and social care services provide people with safe, effective, compassionate, high-quality care and encourage care services to improve.

The CQC is regularly meeting with Southampton NHS Foundation Trust, including holding regular monthly detailed updates and a quarterly engagement meeting. The CQC are also in regular contact with Southampton City Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) at the Wessex Quality Surveillance Group, who have been looking into the trust performance and raised the matter of issues with ophthalmology at the trust.

Speaking up and raising concerns should be routine in the National Health Service and is a key part of ensuring patient safety and improving the quality of services. The Government is clear no one should suffer detriment from speaking up in the NHS. The CQC are assured that the Trust has: demonstrated their awareness and application of protected disclosure in relation to the Public Interest Disclosure Act 1998 and updated their whistleblowing policy. The CQC will follow up the Trust’s management of whistleblowers at the planned ‘well-led’ inspection of the Trust in January 2019. The CQC met with a whistleblower who raised concerns about patient safety in the Southampton eye unit in early 2017. The CQC closed the whistleblowing inquiry following investigation by the Trust.

The Trust and key stakeholders have informed the CQC of concerns regarding patient waiting times for ophthalmology, including incidences where harm has happened to patients as a result. The CQC are unable to currently make an assessment regarding the levels of sight loss, however the Trust have told the CQC that they have reviewed how harm is assessed. The CQC is monitoring the concerns regarding the ophthalmology department.

During an ophthalmology consultants meeting in August 2016, the CQC highlighted that individuals at the Trust should not conduct private work on NHS lists or when on call, and that private lists should be clearly distinguished from NHS operations.

The CQC are aware of two ‘never events’ within ophthalmology in 2017 and July 2018. It was, however, concluded patients did not sustain harm to the incorrect eye. A serious incident also occurred on 7 December 2018, which the CQC understands the Trust plans to investigate. The CQC have requested a copy of the full investigation following the ‘serious incident’ on 7 December 2018, and depending on the outcome, they may take regulatory action.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 December 2018
Ministry of Defence
Military Aid: Counter-terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, in how many countries the UK is conducting military counterterrorism operations, and in how many of those countries the UK is (a) conducting air and drone strikes, (b) deploying combat troops, (c) constructing or retaining military bases and (d) building the capacity of partners to conduct counterterrorism and other operations.
A
Answered by: Mark Lancaster
Answered on: 07 January 2019

The information required to answer this question is taking time to collate. I will write to the hon. Member when it is available.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 December 2018
Ministry of Defence
Defence: Procurement
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department plans to publish the Maximising Competition in Defence Procurement Strategy.
A
Answered by: Stuart Andrew
Answered on: 17 December 2018

The Ministry of Defence plans to publish the strategy for Maximising Competition in Defence Procurement in 2019, on completion of the acquisition review elements of the Modernising Defence Programme.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 November 2018
Ministry of Defence
NATO
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what contribution the Government is (a) making and (b) has plans to make to NATO's (i) new Command in Norfolk, (ii) new Command in Ulm, (iii) Counter Hybrid Support Teams, (iv) Cyber Operations Centre, (v) Hub for the South in Naples and (vi) capacity building programmes in (A) Iraq, (B) Jordan and (C) Tunisia.
A
Answered by: Mark Lancaster
Answered on: 11 December 2018

The UK remains committed to NATO and to Euro-Atlantic security. We were a leading proponent of the decision made at the Warsaw Summit in 2016 to recognise cyberspace as a domain of operations and will continue to support its full implementation, and play an active role in supporting the development of NATO's Cyber Operations centre. The UK is also engaged with NATO's efforts to project stability across the Middle East and North Africa region through our southern partnerships and the Defence and Related Security Capacity Building initiative. Discussions within NATO regarding the exact nature of individual Allies' contributions to its new Commands in Norfolk and Ulm, and to the Counter Hybrid Support Teams, are still ongoing. Once this information becomes available, I will write to my right hon. Friend with further detail.

Q
(New Forest East)
Asked on: 26 November 2018
Ministry of Defence
Defence Medical Services: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, pursuant to the Answer of 5 November 2018 to Question 184831 on Armed Forces: Mental Health Services, when he plans to provide verified figures of the number of non-permanent staff employed by Defence Medical Services in mental health care roles at the end of each financial year since 2011; and what the shortfall in FTE in the number of permanent staff employed by Defence Medical Services against total posts in the roles of (a) psychiatrists, (b) psychologists, (c) mental health nurses and (d) social workers was at the end of each financial year since 2011.
A
Answered by: Mr Tobias Ellwood
Answered on: 04 December 2018

The attached table shows the number of Temporary Healthcare Workers (non-permanent staff) employed by the Defence Medical Services (DMS) in Mental Healthcare (MH) roles at the end of each Financial Year (FY) since 2011.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 October 2018
Ministry of Defence
Armed Forces: Mental Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, how many (a) permanent and (b) non-permanent staff were employed in (i) Departments of Community Mental Health and (ii) other secondary mental health care services in the Armed Forces at the end of each financial year since 2009-10; and what the ratio of military staff to civilians in those services was in each of those years.
A
Answered by: Mr Tobias Ellwood
Answered on: 05 November 2018

The table below shows the numbers of Regular, Reserve and Civilian permanent staff employed in the Defence Medical Services since 2011. We do not hold the data requested for 2009 and 2010. It is not possible to break down the figures into those employed in Departments of Community Mental Health (DCMHs) and elsewhere within the Defence Medical Services.

Non-permanent staff such as locums may have been employed during this period to fill temporary vacancies and staff absences, such as operational deployments. It has not been possible to obtain verified figures for these within the timescale available.

Regular

Reserve

Civilian

2011

Psychiatrist

10

~

Not available

Psychologist

0

0

Not available

Mental Health Nurse

120

50

Not available

Social Worker

0

0

Not available

130

50

0

2012

Psychiatrist

20

~

Not available

Psychologist

0

0

Not available

Mental Health Nurse

120

30

Not available

Social Worker

0

0

Not available

140

30

0

2013

Psychiatrist

10

10

5

Psychologist

~

0

10

Mental Health Nurse

120

50

10

Social Worker

0

0

10

130

60

35

2014

Psychiatrist

10

~

5

Psychologist

~

0

10

Mental Health Nurse

120

40

10

Social Worker

0

0

10

130

40

35

2015

Psychiatrist

10

~

5

Psychologist

~

0

20

Mental Health Nurse

110

40

20

Social Worker

0

0

10

120

40

55

2016

Psychiatrist

15

~

5

Psychologist

~

0

25

Mental Health Nurse

105

50

15

Social Worker

0

0

40

120

50

85

2017

Psychiatrist

15

~

Not available

Psychologist

0

0

Not available

Mental Health Nurse

90

45

Not available

Social Worker

0

0

Not available

105

45

2018

Psychiatrist

15

~

5

Psychologist

0

0

25

Mental Health Nurse

85

50

40

Social Worker

0

0

45

100

50

115

The tilde (~) denotes a number less than five.

Figures are rounded to the nearest five.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2018
Northern Ireland Office
Prosecutions: Northern Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, how many legacy cases from the Troubles in Northern Ireland are (a) currently being and (b) are due to be brought to court in the next 12 months; and how many of those cases involve the prosecution of present or former (i) service personnel, (ii) police or other security forces, (iii) republican terrorists and (iv) loyalist terrorists.
A
Answered by: Mr Shailesh Vara
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The Government does not hold figures on prosecutorial decisions as this is a matter for the prosecuting authorities, in this case the Public Prosecution Service for Northern Ireland who act independently of Government.

We are aware, however, that since 2011 the following decisions have been taken in relation to offences connected to the security situation in Northern Ireland that took place prior to the signing of the Belfast Agreement on 10 April 1998:

  • There have been seven prosecutions of republican paramilitaries. Of the five concluded cases there have been two convictions, one acquittal and two cases in which proceedings were discontinued (one following the death of the defendant). Two cases are currently active;

  • There have been four prosecutions related to alleged loyalist paramilitary activity. Convictions have been secured in two cases and two cases are currently active;

  • There have been three prosecutions of soldiers with one ‘no prosecution’ decision currently under review. All of these cases are currently active.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2018
Ministry of Defence
Defence: UK Relations with EU
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, when his Department plans to respond to the Defence Committee's 6th Report of Session 2017-19 entitled The Government's Proposals for Future Security Partnership with the European Union, which was published on 8 June 2018.
A
Answered by: Gavin Williamson
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The Government Response was sent to the Defence Committee on 6 September 2018.

Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 July 2018
Department for Transport
Bicycles: Safety Measures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will conduct a public consultation on the (a) advantages and (b) disadvantages of making compulsory the equipping of bicycles with an effective auditory warning device whenever ridden on public roads or paths.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010 require a bell to be fitted to an assembled bicycle at the point of sale, but there is currently no legal requirement for bicycles to be fitted with bells when in use on public roads or paths. Rule 66 of the Highway Code recommends that a bell should be fitted to all bicycles, and advises cyclists to be considerate of other road users, particularly blind and partially sighted pedestrians, and to use the bell where appropriate to signal to others that they are nearby.

The Department has received representations from various stakeholders on this matter as part of the recent wide-ranging Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy Safety Review call for evidence. Some respondents have suggested changing the current legislation to require all bikes to be fitted with bells when in use. The Department is currently analysing the 13,000 or so responses to the call for evidence, and will announce next steps later this year. In considering the case for any change to the current legislation on bike bells, the Department will consider matters such as how effectively any new requirement could be enforced.

The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010 are primarily designed to ensure consumer protection at the point of sale, and they do not cover the use of bicycles. They were introduced following a consultation in 2009.

Grouped Questions: 160657 | 160658 | 160659 | 160660
Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 July 2018
Department for Transport
Bicycles: Safety Measures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the reasons were for the policy decisions that led to it being illegal for a new bicycle to be sold without an auditory warning device but not illegal for the purchaser of a new bicycle to remove such a device after purchase.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010 require a bell to be fitted to an assembled bicycle at the point of sale, but there is currently no legal requirement for bicycles to be fitted with bells when in use on public roads or paths. Rule 66 of the Highway Code recommends that a bell should be fitted to all bicycles, and advises cyclists to be considerate of other road users, particularly blind and partially sighted pedestrians, and to use the bell where appropriate to signal to others that they are nearby.

The Department has received representations from various stakeholders on this matter as part of the recent wide-ranging Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy Safety Review call for evidence. Some respondents have suggested changing the current legislation to require all bikes to be fitted with bells when in use. The Department is currently analysing the 13,000 or so responses to the call for evidence, and will announce next steps later this year. In considering the case for any change to the current legislation on bike bells, the Department will consider matters such as how effectively any new requirement could be enforced.

The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010 are primarily designed to ensure consumer protection at the point of sale, and they do not cover the use of bicycles. They were introduced following a consultation in 2009.

Grouped Questions: 160656 | 160658 | 160659 | 160660
Q
(New Forest East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 July 2018
Department for Transport
Bicycles: Safety Measures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of (a) bells and (b) alternative auditory warning devices on bicycles as an aid to the avoidance of collisions with pedestrians.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010 require a bell to be fitted to an assembled bicycle at the point of sale, but there is currently no legal requirement for bicycles to be fitted with bells when in use on public roads or paths. Rule 66 of the Highway Code recommends that a bell should be fitted to all bicycles, and advises cyclists to be considerate of other road users, particularly blind and partially sighted pedestrians, and to use the bell where appropriate to signal to others that they are nearby.

The Department has received representations from various stakeholders on this matter as part of the recent wide-ranging Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy Safety Review call for evidence. Some respondents have suggested changing the current legislation to require all bikes to be fitted with bells when in use. The Department is currently analysing the 13,000 or so responses to the call for evidence, and will announce next steps later this year. In considering the case for any change to the current legislation on bike bells, the Department will consider matters such as how effectively any new requirement could be enforced.

The Pedal Bicycles (Safety) Regulations 2010 are primarily designed to ensure consumer protection at the point of sale, and they do not cover the use of bicycles. They were introduced following a consultation in 2009.

Grouped Questions: 160656 | 160657 | 160659 | 160660
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