Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019-21 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-17 out of 17
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Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 May 2020
Treasury
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to make an announcement on the next stage of the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.
Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 April 2020
Department for Transport
Motor Vehicles: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what provisions he is putting in place for key workers not able to secure an annual MOT test for their vehicle before 30 March 2020.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 27 April 2020

Drivers, including key workers, whose vehicles were due an MOT up to and including 29 March 2020 will need to get their vehicle tested if they need to use it.

MOT centres and garages are allowed to stay open to carry out MOTs, and retests, of vehicles that had an MOT due before 30 March 2020. Garages can also stay open to carry out essential repairs or services.

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency has provided advice to MOT garages on what they can do to limit the spread of the coronavirus by:

  • following social distancing advice and keeping at least 2 metres between customers and members of staff at all times;

  • reminding employees and customers to wash their hands for 20 seconds more frequently than normal;

  • frequently clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are touched regularly;

  • using seat covers and new disposable gloves for every test;

  • avoiding handling cash and instead use mobile or contactless card payments where possible (the contactless payment limit in the UK increased from £30 to £45 on 1 April 2020); and

  • the MOT centre not issuing a paper copy of the MOT certificate (a copy of the certificate can be downloaded after the test).

A vehicle cannot be driven on the road if the MOT has run out. The only exceptions to this are driving to a pre-arranged MOT test, and driving to or from somewhere for repairs to be carried out.

MOT due dates for cars, motorcycles and light vans will be extended by six months if the MOT test was due on or after 30 March 2020, but it is essential that vehicles are kept in a roadworthy condition and safe to drive.

The introduction of MOT exemptions for cars, motorcycles and light vans required new legislation. It was not possible for this legislation to come into effect before 30 March, or for it to be applied retrospectively.

The Department for Transport is working with insurers and the police to make sure people are not unfairly penalised for not being able to get an MOT whilst they are unable to do so.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 March 2020
Ministry of Defence
Veterans: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what plans he has for mobilisation of retired Armed Forces personnel to assist with the response to the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: James Heappey
Answered on: 23 March 2020

Where retired Armed Forces personnel are members of the ex-Regular Reserve, they have a legal liability for service if so required. Whilst the option to call on them for support exists and may be used to support the UK Government's response to the outbreak, there are currently no plans for any large-scale deployments of ex-Regular Reservists.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 March 2020
Ministry of Defence
Veterans: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether retired Armed Forces personnel can volunteer to assist with the Government's response to the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: James Heappey
Answered on: 23 March 2020

Where retired Armed Forces personnel are members of the ex-Regular Reserve, they have a legal liability for service if so required. Such personnel may volunteer to assist with the response to the outbreak, in the same way that they may volunteer to assist with any other military activity; however, there are currently no plans for any large-scale deployments of ex-Regular Reservists.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 March 2020
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Tourism: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, with reference to the situation relating to covid-19, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of providing emergency financial support for the tourism sector.
A
Answered by: Nigel Huddleston
Answered on: 16 March 2020

We are aware that the COVID-19 outbreak is impacting businesses across many sectors and that the tourism sector has been significantly impacted.

I regularly engage with stakeholders in the tourism sector and across Government on this developing issue. My Department and VisitBritain have organised two meetings between the industry and the Deputy Chief Medical Officer and VisitBritain are organising weekly meetings with industry. I will continue to monitor its impact on the sector and would urge tourism businesses to share information with VisitBritain.

The Government announced a range of measures in the Budget to provide economic support for affected businesses, including SMEs in the tourism and hospitality sector. I also discussed this matter in detail with my counterparts from the Devolved Administrations last week.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 March 2020
Treasury
Revenue and Customs: Proof of Identity
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of including the Post Office Document Certification service in the list of approved document certifiers for HMRC services.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 12 March 2020

HMRC currently have no plans to ask the Post Office to provide document verification services.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 March 2020
Ministry of Defence
Nuclear Weapons: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, for what reason veterans who were present at British nuclear testing have experienced a 12-month delay before receiving a decision from Veterans UK on their War Disablement Pension applications.
A
Answered by: Johnny Mercer
Answered on: 12 March 2020

Decisions on war pension claims are evidence based. In line with all claims made under the War Pension Scheme, claims relating to service during British nuclear testing are considered on their individual merits and specific facts. Decisions are made in accordance with legislation, namely the Naval, Military and Air Forces etc. (Disablement and Death) Service Pensions Order, revised April 2006 and are made based on the medical and service evidence available at the time, for this reason the length of time taken to consider individual claims may vary.

As of the end of February 2020, the Department's rolling 12 month Average Clearance time for War Pension Scheme claims was at a figure of 137.60 working days.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 05 March 2020
Ministry of Defence
Nuclear Weapons: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, with reference to the Answer of 23 May 2019 to Question 256301, for what reasons F Med 12 and F Med 29 forms were not included in the medical records of some veterans present at the UK's nuclear testing programme.
A
Answered by: Johnny Mercer
Answered on: 10 March 2020

To identify any such reasons would necessitate a review of individual veterans' Service medical records. This could only be achieved at disproportionate cost.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 March 2020
Ministry of Defence
Nuclear Weapons: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what assessment he has made of the medical conditions of descendants of veterans who were present at the British nuclear testing programme.
A
Answered by: Johnny Mercer
Answered on: 09 March 2020

There is no published peer-reviewed evidence of excess illness or mortality among nuclear test veterans as a group that could be linked to their participation in the tests or to exposure to radiation because of that participation. The Ministry of Defence has also seen no evidence of excessive ill-health or mortality among the descendants of nuclear test veterans.

Nuclear test veterans who believe they have suffered ill-health due to service have the right to apply for no-fault compensation under the War Pension Scheme. War Pensions are payable in respect of illness or injury as a result of service in the Armed Forces before 6 April 2005, with the benefit of reasonable doubt always given to the claimant. Decisions are medically certified and follow consideration of available service and medical evidence and carry full rights of appeal to an independent tribunal.

The Ministry of Defence has no plans to provide compensation to the descendants of nuclear test veterans.

Grouped Questions: 25153
Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 March 2020
Ministry of Defence
Nuclear Weapons: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, for which medical disorders veterans who were present at British nuclear tests can claim a war disablement pension.
A
Answered by: Johnny Mercer
Answered on: 09 March 2020

All ex-service personnel, including Nuclear Test Veterans, can claim a War Pension in respect of their service before 6 April 2005.

Nuclear Test Veterans can claim for any condition which they consider may have been caused, or made worse, by their service. Each claim is considered on its own merits.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 March 2020
Ministry of Defence
Nuclear Weapons: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether he plans to provide compensation for (a) veterans who were present at British nuclear tests and (b) their descendants.
A
Answered by: Johnny Mercer
Answered on: 09 March 2020

There is no published peer-reviewed evidence of excess illness or mortality among nuclear test veterans as a group that could be linked to their participation in the tests or to exposure to radiation because of that participation. The Ministry of Defence has also seen no evidence of excessive ill-health or mortality among the descendants of nuclear test veterans.

Nuclear test veterans who believe they have suffered ill-health due to service have the right to apply for no-fault compensation under the War Pension Scheme. War Pensions are payable in respect of illness or injury as a result of service in the Armed Forces before 6 April 2005, with the benefit of reasonable doubt always given to the claimant. Decisions are medically certified and follow consideration of available service and medical evidence and carry full rights of appeal to an independent tribunal.

The Ministry of Defence has no plans to provide compensation to the descendants of nuclear test veterans.

Grouped Questions: 25151
Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 March 2020
Cabinet Office
Veterans: Medals
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether the Advisory Military Sub-Committee has heard representation on the case for service medals for veterans who were present at British nuclear tests.
A
Answered by: Chloe Smith
Answered on: 09 March 2020

The assessment of historic medals claims is a matter for the independent Advisory Military Sub-Committee (AMSC). Campaigners can be assured their case is under review and recommendations will be made as soon as possible.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 February 2020
Department for Work and Pensions
Jobcentres: Food Banks
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether it is her Department’s policy for Jobcentre staff not to refer individuals to Trussell Trust foodbanks.
A
Answered by: Will Quince
Answered on: 27 February 2020

Under long-standing national guidance issued to all Jobcentres, staff can signpost benefit claimants to a local food bank provided all sources of formal support have been considered.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 February 2020
Treasury
Treasury Select Committee: Select Committee Reports
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the Third Report of the Treasury Committee, Session 2019, published on 1 November 2019.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 24 February 2020

The government responded to the report on 5th February 2020 and the Committee will publish our response in the usual way in due course.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 February 2020
Treasury
Electronic Funds Transfer: Fraud
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to place the Contingent Reimbursement Model Code for Authorised Push Payment on a statutory footing.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 24 February 2020

In March 2018, the Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) established a steering group of financial institutions and consumer representatives to develop a voluntary code of good practice to help protect consumers against authorized push payment (APP) scams.

At the end of February 2019, the steering group published the Contingent Reimbursement Model Code for Authorised Push Payments (the Code), which sets out the agreed principles for greater protection of consumers and the circumstances in which they will be reimbursed, making a significant step in delivering improved protections for consumers. The Code became effective on 28 May 2019 and customers of those payment service providers that are signatories (which includes all of the 6 largest banks and building societies) are protected under the Code from this date.

The Code is still in its infancy and the Government believes it should be given time to embed and take full effect before its effectiveness can properly be assessed. The Lending Standards Board (LSB), which is responsible for the Code, has committed to a first annual review of its operation in Summer 2020 and will shortly publish more information about its planned approach, including its intention to consult widely with consumer representatives and the industry. The Government looks forward to reviewing these findings when they become available.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 February 2020
Treasury
Electronic Funds Transfer: Fraud
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making the Contingent Reimbursement Model Code for Authorised Push Payment Fraud retrospective.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 24 February 2020

The Payment Systems Regulator (PSR) established a non-governmental steering group of financial institutions and consumer representatives in March 2018 to develop a voluntary code of good practice to help protect consumers against Authorised Push Payment (APP) scams. At the end of February 2019, the steering group published the Contingent Reimbursement Model Code for Authorised Push Payments (the Code). The Code became effective on 28 May 2019 and customers of those payment service providers that are signatories are protected under the Code from this date. The Government recognises this may be disappointing for victims of APP scams that occurred before this date.

If a victim of an APP scam is not satisfied with how their payment service provider has handled their specific case, they may wish to contact the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS). The FOS was established by Government to provide a proportionate, prompt and informal resolution of disputes between a consumer and financial service firm.

Q
(Glasgow North West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 16 January 2020
Attorney General
Asylum: Children
Commons
What discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the legal implications of Clause 37 of the European Union (Withdrawal Agreement) Bill.
A
Answered by: Mr Geoffrey Cox
Answered on: 16 January 2020

I cannot comment on Cabinet discussions, or on whether or not I have given legal advice.

What I can say is that the Government remains fully committed to the principle of family reunion and supporting the most vulnerable children. Clause 37 of the Withdrawal Agreement Bill does not represent a change of government policy in that regard. It simply removes the statutory requirement to negotiate.

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