Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 12 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Cancer: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the long-term workforce plan for the NHS will consider how many diagnostic professionals are needed to meet the ambition to diagnose three out of every four cancers in the next 10 years.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 22 July 2019

My Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care has commissioned Baroness Dido Harding to lead a number of programmes to engage with key National Health Service interests to develop a detailed workforce implementation plan.

The interim NHS People Plan, published on 3 June 2019, acknowledges that further action must be taken to increase the numbers of staff. It will undertake a detailed review of all branches of workforce in advance of the full People Plan, in order to identify steps to grow and recruit a world class cancer workforce to the NHS.

Q
(Southend West)
[N]
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Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 July 2019
Treasury
Revenue and Customs: Payments
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the adequacy of checks undertaken to guarantee the accuracy of the payment of monies greater than £10,000 by HMRC to private citizens.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 16 July 2019

HMRC take care to ensure the accuracy of their payments to all their customers. Managers also make sure standards are set before an activity takes place and then conduct checks afterwards to ensure payments processes are properly designed and operating as intended.

Finally, independent assurance over HMRC’s processes including payments is obtained from Internal Audit, the Audit & Risk Committee and the National Audit Office as part of the third line of defence.

Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 26 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Mechanical Thrombectomy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will publish a list of Medical Directors responsible for neuroscience units designed to deliver mechanical thrombectomy.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 04 July 2019

In 2017, NHS England announced the commissioning of mechanical thrombectomy for the treatment of acute stroke. Services are being developed nationally in 24 neuroscience centres, across National Health Service trusts and foundation trusts in England with 22 centres currently providing a thrombectomy service.

All NHS trusts and foundation trusts have a Medical Director on their board responsible for the management and governance of clinical services. A list of medical directors is not collected centrally but would be held at a local level in respective trusts.

Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Abortion
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women who self referred for an abortion in a (a) British Pregnancy Advisory Service and (b) Marie Stopes International clinic were certified for abortion by two doctors whilst in that clinic in the last 12 months for which information is available; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 June 2019

This information is not collected centrally.

Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Abortion
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women have been referred for an abortion by a GP in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 June 2019

This information is not collected centrally.

Grouped Questions: 263657
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Abortion
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many women have self-referred for an abortion in (a) a British Pregnancy Advisory Service clinic and (b) a Marie Stopes International clinic in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 June 2019

This information is not collected centrally.

Grouped Questions: 263656
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 10 April 2019
Home Office
Animal Experiments: Primates
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) marmosets and (b) tamarins were used in scientific procedures at (a) Porton Down and (b) other premises licenced by the Government in 2017.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 23 April 2019

The annual publication of annual statistics on the use of animals in scientific research in Great Britain is available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/724611/annual-statistics-scientific-procedures-living-animals-2017.pdf.

Data are available on the number of procedures by species of the animal and for what purpose, and also the number of animals used for the first time in procedures and by purpose. The data show that in 2017 there were 166 procedures on marmosets and tamarins, and 110 marmosets and tamarins used for the first time in procedures.

Data are not collected on the numbers of animals housed at individual establishments.

Grouped Questions: 243300
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 10 April 2019
Home Office
Animal Experiments: Primates
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many marmosets are currently housed at DSTL, Porton Down for use in scientific experiments.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 23 April 2019

The annual publication of annual statistics on the use of animals in scientific research in Great Britain is available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/724611/annual-statistics-scientific-procedures-living-animals-2017.pdf.

Data are available on the number of procedures by species of the animal and for what purpose, and also the number of animals used for the first time in procedures and by purpose. The data show that in 2017 there were 166 procedures on marmosets and tamarins, and 110 marmosets and tamarins used for the first time in procedures.

Data are not collected on the numbers of animals housed at individual establishments.

Grouped Questions: 243299
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 08 April 2019
Department for Education
Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will bring forward legislative proposals to require the provision of further information for parents on the material being used to teach sex and relationships education in schools; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 16 April 2019

The Government has no plans to bring forward further legislation relating to relationships education and relationships and sex education (RSE).

Schools will be required to have regard to the statutory guidance for the subjects. The draft guidance sets out that when schools consult with parents on their relationships education and RSE policy they should provide examples of the resources that they plan to use when teaching, as this can be reassuring for parents. Schools must also ensure that lessons are appropriate to the age and religious backgrounds of pupils. The Department is supporting schools in the implementation of these subjects and expects this support to include advice on positive engagement with parents.

Ofsted reported on the quality of provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), which covers sex and relationship education, in its 2013 report. The Department is considering what further information on the provision of the new curriculum may be needed. The report can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/not-yet-good-enough-personal-social-health-and-economic-education.

In 2015, the Department published a paper highlighting the impact of the provision of PSHE. The evidence summary provided a high level overview of recent reviews of personal wellbeing education and interventions which could be applied during PSHE lessons, including sex education. The paper can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/412291/Personal_Social_Health_and_Economic__PSHE__Education_12_3.pdf.

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. The Sex and Relationship Education Guidance (2000) includes education around abortion, and it is for schools to decide at what age it is appropriate to introduce the topic. The new draft statutory guidance covers intimate and sexual relationships, including choices in relation to pregnancy, and sets out that teaching should provide accurate, impartial information on all options, including keeping the baby, adoption, abortion and where to get further help. It also sets out that secondary pupils should be made aware of legal provisions when relevant topics are being taught. Schools may address abortion in other areas of the curriculum, such as religious education.

The content of the draft guidance was subject to a public consultation from July to November 2018 which attracted 11,000 online responses from a wide range of respondents including head teachers, teachers, parents and young people. The Government response to the consultation can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/780768/Government_Response_to_RSE_Consultation.pdf.

Grouped Questions: 241972 | 241973
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 08 April 2019
Department for Education
Sex and Relationship Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what research his Department has (a) commissioned, (b) plans to commission and (c) evaluated on the effectiveness of teaching sex education in schools; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 16 April 2019

The Government has no plans to bring forward further legislation relating to relationships education and relationships and sex education (RSE).

Schools will be required to have regard to the statutory guidance for the subjects. The draft guidance sets out that when schools consult with parents on their relationships education and RSE policy they should provide examples of the resources that they plan to use when teaching, as this can be reassuring for parents. Schools must also ensure that lessons are appropriate to the age and religious backgrounds of pupils. The Department is supporting schools in the implementation of these subjects and expects this support to include advice on positive engagement with parents.

Ofsted reported on the quality of provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), which covers sex and relationship education, in its 2013 report. The Department is considering what further information on the provision of the new curriculum may be needed. The report can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/not-yet-good-enough-personal-social-health-and-economic-education.

In 2015, the Department published a paper highlighting the impact of the provision of PSHE. The evidence summary provided a high level overview of recent reviews of personal wellbeing education and interventions which could be applied during PSHE lessons, including sex education. The paper can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/412291/Personal_Social_Health_and_Economic__PSHE__Education_12_3.pdf.

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. The Sex and Relationship Education Guidance (2000) includes education around abortion, and it is for schools to decide at what age it is appropriate to introduce the topic. The new draft statutory guidance covers intimate and sexual relationships, including choices in relation to pregnancy, and sets out that teaching should provide accurate, impartial information on all options, including keeping the baby, adoption, abortion and where to get further help. It also sets out that secondary pupils should be made aware of legal provisions when relevant topics are being taught. Schools may address abortion in other areas of the curriculum, such as religious education.

The content of the draft guidance was subject to a public consultation from July to November 2018 which attracted 11,000 online responses from a wide range of respondents including head teachers, teachers, parents and young people. The Government response to the consultation can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/780768/Government_Response_to_RSE_Consultation.pdf.

Grouped Questions: 241971 | 241973
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 08 April 2019
Department for Education
Sex and Relationship Education: Abortion
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when information on obtaining abortion was first included in school sex education lessons; at what age pupils are provided with such information; who he consulted on that information; what recent representations he has received (a) in favour of and (b) against the current policy; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 16 April 2019

The Government has no plans to bring forward further legislation relating to relationships education and relationships and sex education (RSE).

Schools will be required to have regard to the statutory guidance for the subjects. The draft guidance sets out that when schools consult with parents on their relationships education and RSE policy they should provide examples of the resources that they plan to use when teaching, as this can be reassuring for parents. Schools must also ensure that lessons are appropriate to the age and religious backgrounds of pupils. The Department is supporting schools in the implementation of these subjects and expects this support to include advice on positive engagement with parents.

Ofsted reported on the quality of provision for personal, social, health and economic education (PSHE), which covers sex and relationship education, in its 2013 report. The Department is considering what further information on the provision of the new curriculum may be needed. The report can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/not-yet-good-enough-personal-social-health-and-economic-education.

In 2015, the Department published a paper highlighting the impact of the provision of PSHE. The evidence summary provided a high level overview of recent reviews of personal wellbeing education and interventions which could be applied during PSHE lessons, including sex education. The paper can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/412291/Personal_Social_Health_and_Economic__PSHE__Education_12_3.pdf.

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. The Sex and Relationship Education Guidance (2000) includes education around abortion, and it is for schools to decide at what age it is appropriate to introduce the topic. The new draft statutory guidance covers intimate and sexual relationships, including choices in relation to pregnancy, and sets out that teaching should provide accurate, impartial information on all options, including keeping the baby, adoption, abortion and where to get further help. It also sets out that secondary pupils should be made aware of legal provisions when relevant topics are being taught. Schools may address abortion in other areas of the curriculum, such as religious education.

The content of the draft guidance was subject to a public consultation from July to November 2018 which attracted 11,000 online responses from a wide range of respondents including head teachers, teachers, parents and young people. The Government response to the consultation can be accessed here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/780768/Government_Response_to_RSE_Consultation.pdf.

Grouped Questions: 241971 | 241972
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 25 March 2019
Department for Education
Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, which (a) individuals and (b) organisations were sent copies of the Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education draft statutory guidance for governing bodies, proprietors, head teachers, principals, senior leadership teams, teachers prior to its publication; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 02 April 2019

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. It is not compulsory in primary schools and will not be once the proposed new subjects of Relationships Education and Relationships and Sex Education become compulsory. The statutory sex and relationships education (SRE) guidance (2000) states that maintained schools must have an up-to-date policy that sets out the school’s approach to sex education and that they should consult their pupils’ parents on this, making the policy available to parents. It is for schools to determine what range of information they provide to parents, but they must have regard to statutory guidance.

The Government is now making Relationships Education compulsory for all primary pupils, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) compulsory for all secondary pupils and Health Education compulsory for all pupils in primary and secondary state funded schools from September 2020.

All schools will be required to have in place a written policy for Relationships Education and for RSE. Schools must consult parents in developing and reviewing their policy. Schools should ensure that the policy meets the needs of pupils and parents and reflects the community they serve. Schools should also ensure that the policy sets out the content of the subjects, how the content is taught and who is responsible for teaching it. The draft guidance is clear that schools should ensure that, when they consult parents, they provide examples of the resources they plan to use. Schools should assess each resource that they propose to use to ensure that it is appropriate for the age and maturity of pupils, and is sensitive to their needs.

The key decisions on these subjects and the drafting of the guidance were informed by a thorough engagement process. The public call for evidence was launched in December 2017 and received over 23,000 responses from parents, young people and schools. The Department engaged with 90 organisations representing a broad range of views and a broad range of evidence. These stakeholders can be found in the Government response to the Call for Evidence at: https://consult.education.gov.uk/pshe/relationships-education-rse-health-education/supporting_documents/180718%20Consultation_call%20for%20evidence%20response_policy%20statement.pdf.

The revised draft guidance was not shared publicly between the close of the consultation and it being finalised following decisions by Ministers in light of the consultation responses. It was only shared, under embargo, immediately in advance of publication with a small number of stakeholders to allow for communications on the day of publication.

Grouped Questions: 236240 | 236242
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 25 March 2019
Department for Education
Personal, Social, Health and Economic Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whom his Department consulted before drafting the Relationships Education, Relationships and Sex Education and Health Education draft statutory guidance for governing bodies, proprietors, head teachers, principals, senior leadership teams, teachers; what research was evaluated; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 02 April 2019

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. It is not compulsory in primary schools and will not be once the proposed new subjects of Relationships Education and Relationships and Sex Education become compulsory. The statutory sex and relationships education (SRE) guidance (2000) states that maintained schools must have an up-to-date policy that sets out the school’s approach to sex education and that they should consult their pupils’ parents on this, making the policy available to parents. It is for schools to determine what range of information they provide to parents, but they must have regard to statutory guidance.

The Government is now making Relationships Education compulsory for all primary pupils, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) compulsory for all secondary pupils and Health Education compulsory for all pupils in primary and secondary state funded schools from September 2020.

All schools will be required to have in place a written policy for Relationships Education and for RSE. Schools must consult parents in developing and reviewing their policy. Schools should ensure that the policy meets the needs of pupils and parents and reflects the community they serve. Schools should also ensure that the policy sets out the content of the subjects, how the content is taught and who is responsible for teaching it. The draft guidance is clear that schools should ensure that, when they consult parents, they provide examples of the resources they plan to use. Schools should assess each resource that they propose to use to ensure that it is appropriate for the age and maturity of pupils, and is sensitive to their needs.

The key decisions on these subjects and the drafting of the guidance were informed by a thorough engagement process. The public call for evidence was launched in December 2017 and received over 23,000 responses from parents, young people and schools. The Department engaged with 90 organisations representing a broad range of views and a broad range of evidence. These stakeholders can be found in the Government response to the Call for Evidence at: https://consult.education.gov.uk/pshe/relationships-education-rse-health-education/supporting_documents/180718%20Consultation_call%20for%20evidence%20response_policy%20statement.pdf.

The revised draft guidance was not shared publicly between the close of the consultation and it being finalised following decisions by Ministers in light of the consultation responses. It was only shared, under embargo, immediately in advance of publication with a small number of stakeholders to allow for communications on the day of publication.

Grouped Questions: 236239 | 236242
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 25 March 2019
Department for Education
Sex and Relationship Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what requests for information relating to (a) abortion and (b) sex and relationships education were made to his Department and its predecessor under the provisions of the Freedom of Information Act 2000 in each year since 2010; whether each request was (i) agreed to and (ii) refused; if he will place in the Library a copy of the information provided in response to each request; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 02 April 2019

The information requested is not held centrally and could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

The new guidance for relationships, sex and health education says that teaching should cover contraception, developing intimate relationships and resisting pressure to have sex. Pupils should be taught what is acceptable and unacceptable behaviour in relationships. They should also be taught that there are many different legal provisions whose purpose is to protect young people and which ensure young people take responsibility for their actions. Pupils should be made aware of the relevant legal provisions when topics such as abortion are being taught.

Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 25 March 2019
Department for Education
Sex and Relationship Education: Primary Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what information is provided to parents on the content of sex education being taught in their child's primary school; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 02 April 2019

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. It is not compulsory in primary schools and will not be once the proposed new subjects of Relationships Education and Relationships and Sex Education become compulsory. The statutory sex and relationships education (SRE) guidance (2000) states that maintained schools must have an up-to-date policy that sets out the school’s approach to sex education and that they should consult their pupils’ parents on this, making the policy available to parents. It is for schools to determine what range of information they provide to parents, but they must have regard to statutory guidance.

The Government is now making Relationships Education compulsory for all primary pupils, Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) compulsory for all secondary pupils and Health Education compulsory for all pupils in primary and secondary state funded schools from September 2020.

All schools will be required to have in place a written policy for Relationships Education and for RSE. Schools must consult parents in developing and reviewing their policy. Schools should ensure that the policy meets the needs of pupils and parents and reflects the community they serve. Schools should also ensure that the policy sets out the content of the subjects, how the content is taught and who is responsible for teaching it. The draft guidance is clear that schools should ensure that, when they consult parents, they provide examples of the resources they plan to use. Schools should assess each resource that they propose to use to ensure that it is appropriate for the age and maturity of pupils, and is sensitive to their needs.

The key decisions on these subjects and the drafting of the guidance were informed by a thorough engagement process. The public call for evidence was launched in December 2017 and received over 23,000 responses from parents, young people and schools. The Department engaged with 90 organisations representing a broad range of views and a broad range of evidence. These stakeholders can be found in the Government response to the Call for Evidence at: https://consult.education.gov.uk/pshe/relationships-education-rse-health-education/supporting_documents/180718%20Consultation_call%20for%20evidence%20response_policy%20statement.pdf.

The revised draft guidance was not shared publicly between the close of the consultation and it being finalised following decisions by Ministers in light of the consultation responses. It was only shared, under embargo, immediately in advance of publication with a small number of stakeholders to allow for communications on the day of publication.

Grouped Questions: 236239 | 236240
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 21 March 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Pupils: Contraception
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he publish the names of schools that allow emergency contraception to be distributed to children at that school without parental knowledge or consent.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 29 March 2019

Information on schools where emergency contraception is provided by healthcare professionals is not collected centrally.

Advice to healthcare professionals on the provision of emergency contraception to girls under the age of 16 is contained in recommendation 5 of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) public health guideline on sexually transmitted infections and under-18 conceptions prevention and recommendation 9 of the NICE public health guideline on contraceptive services for under 25s. The guidelines can be viewed on the NICE website at the following links:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph3/chapter/1-Recommendations

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph51/chapter/1-Recommendations

In addition, the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) has published clinical guidance for health professional on the use of emergency contraception, which is available on the FSRH website at the following link:

https://www.fsrh.org/documents/ceu-clinical-guidance-emergency-contraception-march-2017

Young people under the age of 16 are legally able to consent to medical advice and treatment, without their parents’ knowledge or consent if a doctor or other healthcare worker judges them competent to do so. Healthcare professionals providing emergency contraception to under 16s without parental consent should follow the criteria outlined in the Fraser guidelines for competence to consent.

Grouped Questions: 235222
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 21 March 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Pupils: Contraception
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to ensure that girls aged under 16 years old are properly supervised when taking emergency contraception; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 29 March 2019

Information on schools where emergency contraception is provided by healthcare professionals is not collected centrally.

Advice to healthcare professionals on the provision of emergency contraception to girls under the age of 16 is contained in recommendation 5 of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) public health guideline on sexually transmitted infections and under-18 conceptions prevention and recommendation 9 of the NICE public health guideline on contraceptive services for under 25s. The guidelines can be viewed on the NICE website at the following links:

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph3/chapter/1-Recommendations

https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ph51/chapter/1-Recommendations

In addition, the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare (FSRH) has published clinical guidance for health professional on the use of emergency contraception, which is available on the FSRH website at the following link:

https://www.fsrh.org/documents/ceu-clinical-guidance-emergency-contraception-march-2017

Young people under the age of 16 are legally able to consent to medical advice and treatment, without their parents’ knowledge or consent if a doctor or other healthcare worker judges them competent to do so. Healthcare professionals providing emergency contraception to under 16s without parental consent should follow the criteria outlined in the Fraser guidelines for competence to consent.

Grouped Questions: 235221
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 21 March 2019
Department for Education
Pupils: Contraception
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department has provided to schools since 2010 on the potential liability of schools governors in the event of (a) a fatality, (b) stroke and (c) other adverse reaction to a pupil aged under 16 years as a direct consequence of taking the emergency hormonal contraceptive pill where the drug has been supplied (i) on school premises with the sanction of the governors, (ii) on school premises without the sanction of the governors and (iii) off school premises but as a result of a referral by a school nurse on school premises without the sanction of the governors.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 29 March 2019

The department does not provide guidance to school governors regarding their potential liability for the welfare of pupils, under 16 years of age, who use emergency contraception supplied either on school premises, or as a result of referral made on school premises. The Governance Handbook was updated on 22nd March 2019.

Young people under the age of 16 are legally able to consent to medical advice and treatment, including the use of emergency contraception, without their parents’ knowledge or consent if a doctor or other healthcare worker judges them competent to do so. Healthcare professionals providing emergency contraception to under 16s without parental consent should follow the criteria outlined in the Fraser guidelines for competence to consent.

Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 20 March 2019
Department for Education
Sex and Relationship Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will bring forward proposals to require the headteacher of a (a) primary and (b) secondary school to show parents upon request the material used in their school to teach sex and relationships education; what recent representations he has received on that issue; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 28 March 2019

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. When teaching sex education, schools are required to have regard to the statutory sex and relationships education guidance, which was last updated in 2000. This states that maintained schools must have an up-to-date policy, that sets out the school’s approach to sex education, that they should consult their pupils’ parents and make the policy available to parents. Governors and head teachers should discuss with parents and take on board concerns, on sensitive material to be used in the classroom.

We have recently consulted on updated guidance for sex education alongside the introduction of relationships education at primary and secondary schools. On its introduction, all schools will be required to have in place a written policy for relationships education and relationships and sex education (RSE). Schools must consult parents in developing and reviewing their policy. Schools should ensure that the policy meets the needs of pupils and parents and reflects the community they serve. Schools should also ensure that the policy sets out the content of the subjects, how the content is taught and who is responsible for teaching it. The draft guidance is also clear that schools should ensure that, when they consult parents, they provide examples of the resources they plan to use, as this can be reassuring for parents, and enables them to continue the conversations started in class at home. Schools should assess each resource that they propose to use to ensure that it is appropriate for the age and maturity of pupils, and sensitive to their needs. The Department does not provide guidance to schools on what they place in school libraries as the Department believes schools are best placed to determine this.

The Department conducted a consultation on the draft regulations, statutory guidance and regulatory impact assessment for relationships education, relationships and sex education and health education between July and November 2018. The drafting of the consultation and draft statutory guidance was led by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and I, with support from a small team of policy officials and an experienced Headteacher, Ian Bauckham CBE.

The Department was contacted by over 40,000 individuals and organisations during the consultation process. Prior to the consultation, the key decisions were informed by a thorough engagement process. The public call for evidence received over 23,000 responses and the Department engaged directly with 90 organisations, including parents, young people, headteachers, teachers, governors, subject specialists, teaching unions, charities and faith groups. The Department has not made an assessment of their views on abortion specifically. These stakeholders can be found in the Government response to the Call for Evidence at: https://consult.education.gov.uk/pshe/relationships-education-rse-health-education/supporting_documents/180718%20Consultation_call%20for%20evidence%20response_policy%20statement.pdf.

From time-to-time the Department does also receive correspondence on materials used in the current delivery of sex education and this can be due to a variety of reasons. The Department encourages correspondents to contact their school to discuss this and ensure that they are aware of the current sex and relationships education guidance. The Department would take seriously any concern regarding inappropriate materials. The Department has also received a recent petition which raised concerns about RSE resources being produced by lobby groups and external organisations. The draft guidance is clear that schools should ask to see the materials visitors will use as well as a lesson plan in advance, so that they can ensure it meets the full range of pupils’ needs (e.g. special educational needs). The Department also recognises that schools use resources from representative bodies (e.g. many Catholic and other schools draw on the model curricula provided by the Catholic Education Service.) The guidance encourages schools to draw on the expertise of the main subject associations which often quality assure third party resources.

The Department is committed to supporting schools through training, further advice to improve practice and sharing of best practice, including examples of successful parental engagement. This will include advice on using quality assured, age-appropriate resources.

Grouped Questions: 234639 | 234640 | 234641
Q
(Southend West)
Asked on: 20 March 2019
Department for Education
Sex and Relationship Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what guidance his Department issues to schools on the type of (a) material and (b) publications relating to sex and relationships education in school libraries; what recent representations he has received from parents about the type of material placed in school libraries on those matters; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 28 March 2019

Sex education has been compulsory in all maintained secondary schools since 1993. When teaching sex education, schools are required to have regard to the statutory sex and relationships education guidance, which was last updated in 2000. This states that maintained schools must have an up-to-date policy, that sets out the school’s approach to sex education, that they should consult their pupils’ parents and make the policy available to parents. Governors and head teachers should discuss with parents and take on board concerns, on sensitive material to be used in the classroom.

We have recently consulted on updated guidance for sex education alongside the introduction of relationships education at primary and secondary schools. On its introduction, all schools will be required to have in place a written policy for relationships education and relationships and sex education (RSE). Schools must consult parents in developing and reviewing their policy. Schools should ensure that the policy meets the needs of pupils and parents and reflects the community they serve. Schools should also ensure that the policy sets out the content of the subjects, how the content is taught and who is responsible for teaching it. The draft guidance is also clear that schools should ensure that, when they consult parents, they provide examples of the resources they plan to use, as this can be reassuring for parents, and enables them to continue the conversations started in class at home. Schools should assess each resource that they propose to use to ensure that it is appropriate for the age and maturity of pupils, and sensitive to their needs. The Department does not provide guidance to schools on what they place in school libraries as the Department believes schools are best placed to determine this.

The Department conducted a consultation on the draft regulations, statutory guidance and regulatory impact assessment for relationships education, relationships and sex education and health education between July and November 2018. The drafting of the consultation and draft statutory guidance was led by my right hon. Friend, the Secretary of State for Education and I, with support from a small team of policy officials and an experienced Headteacher, Ian Bauckham CBE.

The Department was contacted by over 40,000 individuals and organisations during the consultation process. Prior to the consultation, the key decisions were informed by a thorough engagement process. The public call for evidence received over 23,000 responses and the Department engaged directly with 90 organisations, including parents, young people, headteachers, teachers, governors, subject specialists, teaching unions, charities and faith groups. The Department has not made an assessment of their views on abortion specifically. These stakeholders can be found in the Government response to the Call for Evidence at: https://consult.education.gov.uk/pshe/relationships-education-rse-health-education/supporting_documents/180718%20Consultation_call%20for%20evidence%20response_policy%20statement.pdf.

From time-to-time the Department does also receive correspondence on materials used in the current delivery of sex education and this can be due to a variety of reasons. The Department encourages correspondents to contact their school to discuss this and ensure that they are aware of the current sex and relationships education guidance. The Department would take seriously any concern regarding inappropriate materials. The Department has also received a recent petition which raised concerns about RSE resources being produced by lobby groups and external organisations. The draft guidance is clear that schools should ask to see the materials visitors will use as well as a lesson plan in advance, so that they can ensure it meets the full range of pupils’ needs (e.g. special educational needs). The Department also recognises that schools use resources from representative bodies (e.g. many Catholic and other schools draw on the model curricula provided by the Catholic Education Service.) The guidance encourages schools to draw on the expertise of the main subject associations which often quality assure third party resources.

The Department is committed to supporting schools through training, further advice to improve practice and sharing of best practice, including examples of successful parental engagement. This will include advice on using quality assured, age-appropriate resources.

Grouped Questions: 234638 | 234640 | 234641
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