Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department for Education
Higher Education: Equal Pay
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent estimate he has made of the gender pay gap in higher education (a) at Coventry University, (b) at Warwick University and (c) in the UK.
A
Answered by: Gavin Williamson
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Since April 2017, employers with more than 250 staff are required by law to annually report gender pay gap information. All of the gender pay gap data published by organisations, including Coventry University and Warwick University, is available on the government’s reporting website: https://gender-pay-gap.service.gov.uk/.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department for Education
Academies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, how many schools in (a) Coventry and (b) the UK are planning to become new academy schools within the next 12 months.
A
Answered by: Mrs Kemi Badenoch
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department for Education
Pre-school Education: Coventry
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of children accessing the free early education entitlement for under two-year-olds in Coventry.
A
Answered by: Mrs Kemi Badenoch
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The government does not offer a funded early education entitlement for under 2-year-olds.

For families with children under 2, the government provides support with up to 85% of childcare costs through Universal Credit and parents being given £2 for every £8 spent on childcare through Tax-Free Childcare.

As of January 2019, 1,102 2-year-old children benefited from funded early years education at providers within Coventry local authority.

The number of 2-year-old children benefiting from funded early years education by region and local authority is available within Table 1LA at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/education-provision-children-under-5-years-of-age-january-2019. The percentage of 2-year-old children benefiting from funded early education can be found within Table 8LA.

Q
(Coventry South)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Bahrain: Embassies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Bahraini counterpart on reports of violent incidents at the British Embassy in that country.
A
Answered by: Dr Andrew Murrison
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
(Coventry South)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Cervical Cancer: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of women with a disability have attended cervical cancer screening through the NHS in the last period for which information is available.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
General Practitioners: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the average waiting time for an appointment to see a GP in (a) England and Wales and (b) Coventry.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The most recent data on the time between booking an appointment with a general practice and having the appointment (in days) for Coventry and Rugby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) as well as for England are presented in the following table as the average over the 12 months from August 2018 to July 2019.

The data is taken from the NHS Digital publication ‘Appointments in General Practice’. This is a new experimental data collection which is still being refined and improved.

It should be noted that the ‘time from booking to appointment’ refers only to the time elapsed between the successful booking of an appointment and the appointment actually taking place. The data does not take into consideration that many patients will be appropriately booking ahead as part of the continuity of care they receive for long-term conditions.

Coventry and Rugby CCG

England

Distribution of average time elapsed between booking an appointment and the appointment taking place, August 2018 to July 2019

Same Day

47%

42%

1 Day

7%

7%

2 to 7 Days

21%

20%

8 to 14 Days

12%

14%

15 to 21 Days

6%

8%

22 or more

7%

10%

Total

100.0%

100.0%


Notes:

  1. There are several factors that drive the time from a booking to an appointment. This includes appointment availability at the practice, patient availability, the urgency of the appointment and general practitioner (GP) advice.
  2. The data does not differentiate between emergency and routine appointments in general practice.
  3. The data does not include any information about the patients or clinical information.
  4. The data in the response includes appointments with all healthcare professional types, including GPs and other practice staff.
  5. Not all practices in England are included in the appointments in general practice publication, meaning the total number of appointments is not known.
  6. Same day and next day bookings are of particular interest so are presented here separately. Further bookings are presented grouped by weeks.
  7. The number of appointments that have already happened is provided as recorded in participating practices in England. The data presented only contains information which was captured on the GP practice systems. This limits the activity reported on and does not represent all work happening within a primary care setting.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
General Practitioners: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of trends of the number of trainee GPs in each of the last ten years.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Department’s assessment is that the number of general practitioner (GP) trainees in England has been increasing over the last 10 years. Data on the number of doctors in general practice speciality training is only available for the past eight years, including 2019, and is provided in the attached table. Data on the number of doctors entering GP training for each of the previous 10 years is also provided in the attached table.

GP trainees in the last 10 years (Word Document, 24.87 KB)
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
General Practitioners: Termination of Employment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the trends of the number of GPs (a) retiring and (b) leaving the profession in each of the last ten years.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Department is unable to make an assessment on the trends in the number of general practitioners (GPs) retiring in each of the last 10 years.

The data in the following table shows the headcount and full-time equivalent for the number of GPs who joined or left the workforce between the beginning and the end of the specified period in 2015-16, 2016-17 and 2017-18, as reported by GP practices in England to NHS Digital. The numbers exclude Registrars, Locums and GPs transferring between practices. This data should be treated with caution as it is incomplete. Data on the number of GPs leaving the profession is only available from September 2015.

NHS Digital define a workforce joiner as a GP who was recorded as working in a practice at the end of the specified time period, but not at its beginning. A workforce leaver is defined as a GP who was recorded as working in a GP practice at the beginning but not at the end of the specified time period. The number of leavers includes GPs who retired as well as those who left general practice for other reasons, such as to join a National Health Service organisation (non-GP practice).

The recording of leavers and joiners depends on accurate recording by the employing practice of a GP’s General Medical Council (GMC) number. Hence the data should be treated with caution, because a GP could be incorrectly recorded as joining or leaving the workforce if they move between practices and their GMC number is not correctly recorded by one or both practices.

The figures are experimental statistics and are based only on a cohort of GP practices that were open at both the beginning and end of the specified time period and supplied GMC Numbers for 100% of their relevant GP staff.

Number of GP practices supplying data

Full-Time-Equivalent

Headcount

Joiners

Leavers

Joiners

Leavers

September 2015 to September 2016

5,663 practices (74.9% of all practices)

1,708

1,793

2,393

2,473

September 2016 to September 2017

6,323 practices (86.0% of all practices)

1,441

1,535

2,103

2,080

September 2017 to September 2018

5,914 practices (82.9% of all practices)

1,397

1,521

2,120

2,111

Source: NHS Digital General Practice Workforce, Final 31 March 2019, experimental statistics

Note:

Full time equivalent (FTE) refers to the proportion of full time contracted hours that the post holder is contracted to work. 1 would indicate they work a full set of hours (37.5), 0.5 that they worked half time. In Registrars' contracts 1 FTE = 40 hours. To ensure consistency, these FTEs have been converted to the standard wMDS measure of 1 FTE = 37.5 hours in the table.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
HIV Infection
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the proportion of people diagnosed with HIV at a late stage of infection.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Public Health England routinely collects data on people newly diagnosed with HIV in the United Kingdom. In 2018, 43% (1,480/3,465) of people newly diagnosed with HIV were diagnosed at a late stage of infection. The proportion of people diagnosed late has declined steadily over the last decade, since 2009 when 52% (2,875/5,553) of people were diagnosed at a late stage of infection. This data can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hiv-annual-data-tables

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
HIV Infection: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to widen access to the drug PrEP.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is currently funded through the three-year PrEP Impact Trial. Following my Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care’s announcement on 30 January that the number of places on the trial would be doubled to 26,000, expansion of the Trial is now underway across the country. A core function of the PrEP Impact Trial Community Advisory Board (CAB) is to raise awareness and uptake of PrEP in key populations including black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities. Further information about PrEP Impact Trial CAB activities and participating community groups can be found at the following links:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/commissioning/spec-services/npc-crg/blood-and-infection-group-f/f03/prep-trial-updates/

https://www.prepimpacttrial.org.uk/faqs

In addition, Public Health England’s Innovation Fund has supported a number of community based projects aimed at increasing PrEP awareness in women, BAME groups and trans communities. Information on the projects funded in 2018 can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/innovative-hiv-prevention-projects-reached-170000-people-in-2018

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Recycling: Sri Lanka
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, pursuant to the Answer of 5 September 2019 to Question 280906 on Sri Lanka: Recycling, how many UK operators found to be illegally exporting waste were (a) fined and (b) imprisoned in each of the last five years.
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2019
Department for International Development
Bahamas: Hurricanes and Tornadoes
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps his Department is taking to support humanitarian relief efforts in the Bahamas responding to the effects of Hurricane Dorian.
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2019
Department for Exiting the European Union
Science: Equipment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what steps his Department is taking to help ensure adequate supplies of scientific equipment in the event of the UK leaving the EU without a deal.
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2019
Department for Education
GCE A-level and GCSE
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 5 September 2019 to Question 284393 on History: GCE A-level and GCSE, if he will make an estimate of the number of pupils studying specific topics at (a) GCSE and (b) A level.
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2019
Department for Education
History: GCE A-level and GCSE
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of requiring teaching on the British Empire in the curriculum for (a) GCSE and (b) A level history.
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Recycling: Sri Lanka
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to prevent the export of (a) hazardous and (b) medical UK waste to Sri Lanka as recycling.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 05 September 2019

It is prohibited to export hazardous waste from the UK to countries, such as Sri Lanka, which are not members of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The export of non-hazardous healthcare wastes for recycling to countries outside the OECD is permissible when following a prior written notification and consent procedure, and would require the consent of the competent authorities in the countries of import and export prior to shipment. No such consent has been issued in respect of exports of healthcare wastes to Sri Lanka.

The UK environmental regulators take a proactive, intelligence led approach to checking compliance with the legislation, targeting exports which pose a high risk and intervening to stop illegal exports. In 2017/18, the Environment Agency issued 158 stop notices, prohibiting the export of unsuitable waste. It stopped 367 containers of waste destined for illegal export at ports and intervened further upstream to prevent 8,974 tonnes of waste from reaching our ports. Any UK operators found to be illegally exporting waste can be fined and/or imprisoned for up to two years.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for Education
History: GCE A-level and GCSE
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate he has made of the number of pupils learning about the British Empire at (a) GCSE and (b) A level.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The history curriculum gives teachers and schools the freedom and flexibility to use specific examples from history to teach pupils about the history of Britain and the wider world. This can include the topic of the British Empire. Schools and teachers are able to determine which examples, topics and resources to use to stimulate and challenge pupils, as well as reflect key points in history. A high quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past, and that of the wider world.

The Department does not estimate the numbers of pupils being taught specific topics within the curriculum. Entries to history GCSE have increased by 7% from 2018, and there has been a 5% increase to A level history this year, meaning that history A level entries are now at a higher level than in 2010.

The Department sets out the subject content for GCSE and A level history. Within this framework, exam boards have the flexibility to offer a greater focus on particular knowledge areas within the scope of the subject content, including, if they choose, the British Empire. Exam boards can only award GCSEs and A levels once the Office for Qualifications and Examinations regulation (Ofqual) accredits them. Ofqual accredits qualifications when it is confident that the exam board can comply with the requirements for the qualification on an ongoing basis.

Although the subject content does not specifically require teaching on the British Empire, both GCSE and A level history must include a substantial element of British history and/or the history of England, Scotland, Ireland or Wales. The new GCSE subject content requires a minimum of 40% British history, and the new A level subject content requires a minimum of 20% British history.

Grouped Questions: 284400
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for Education
History: GCE A-level and GCSE
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the (a) quality and (b) quantity of British Empire history modules offered by exam boards at (a) GCSE and (b) A level.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The history curriculum gives teachers and schools the freedom and flexibility to use specific examples from history to teach pupils about the history of Britain and the wider world. This can include the topic of the British Empire. Schools and teachers are able to determine which examples, topics and resources to use to stimulate and challenge pupils, as well as reflect key points in history. A high quality history education will help pupils gain a coherent knowledge and understanding of Britain’s past, and that of the wider world.

The Department does not estimate the numbers of pupils being taught specific topics within the curriculum. Entries to history GCSE have increased by 7% from 2018, and there has been a 5% increase to A level history this year, meaning that history A level entries are now at a higher level than in 2010.

The Department sets out the subject content for GCSE and A level history. Within this framework, exam boards have the flexibility to offer a greater focus on particular knowledge areas within the scope of the subject content, including, if they choose, the British Empire. Exam boards can only award GCSEs and A levels once the Office for Qualifications and Examinations regulation (Ofqual) accredits them. Ofqual accredits qualifications when it is confident that the exam board can comply with the requirements for the qualification on an ongoing basis.

Although the subject content does not specifically require teaching on the British Empire, both GCSE and A level history must include a substantial element of British history and/or the history of England, Scotland, Ireland or Wales. The new GCSE subject content requires a minimum of 40% British history, and the new A level subject content requires a minimum of 20% British history.

Grouped Questions: 284393
Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Alzheimer's Disease: Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the quality of care provided to people with Alzheimer's in NHS hospitals.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 05 September 2019

We remain committed to delivering the Challenge on Dementia 2020 in full to make England the best country in the world for dementia care.

The National Audit of Dementia Care in General Hospitals 2018–2019 published in July 2019 and undertaken on behalf of NHS England and NHS Improvement and the Welsh Government, shows that improvements have continued in the care of people with dementia in hospitals across England and Wales since the previous audit of 2017. For example, 96% of hospitals in England and Wales now have a system in place for more flexible family visiting and a large number (88%) of carers (and/or patients) receive a copy of the discharge plan.

The report is available at the following link:

https://www.rcpsych.ac.uk/docs/default-source/improving-care/ccqi/national-clinical-audits/national-audit-of-dementia/r4-resources/national-audit-of-dementia-round-4-report-online.pdf?sfvrsn=f75c5b75_6

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Hearing Aids: Research
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support research and development of new hearing aid technology.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Department funds research mainly through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The usual practice of the NIHR and other research funders is not to ring-fence funds for expenditure on particular topics. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including hearing aid technology.

In 2017-18 the NIHR was supporting four studies related to hearing aid technology and improving the use of hearing aids through its research infrastructure in the National Health Service. Between 2017 and 2019, the NIHR Clinical Research Network supported eight clinical studies related to hearing aid technology.

The NIHR funds three Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) which have research themes related to hearing loss, deafness and hearing health. The total NIHR investment in these three BRC research themes over the five years from 1 April 2017 is £10.9 million. This includes the Manchester BRC that has established the United Kingdom’s only Hearing Device Research Centre to drive innovation in interventions for hearing loss and to accelerate the translation of new hearing technologies into the NHS.

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