Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
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Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Compulsorily Detained Mental Patients: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of whether the availability of police in south London has had an effect on the time taken to carry out sections under the Mental Health Act 1983.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 July 2018

We have made no such assessment.

The availability of police in local areas is a matter for the Home Department and for regional police and crime commissioners. Police powers under the Mental Health Act 1983 are limited to short term emergency sections under s135 and s136. For formal sections to hospital the police have no role, these are decisions made by Approved Mental Health Professionals on the advice of doctors.

The Government has asked Professor Sir Simon Wessely to lead an Independent Review of the Mental Health Act 1983, to make recommendations on legislation and practice to improve how the Act functions in a modern mental health system. The Independent review is considering how to address delays in the system. The Independent Review will report in the autumn. It published an interim report in May, which is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/703919/The_independent_Mental_Health_Act_review__interim_report_01_05_2018.pdf

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 June 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many rape complainants have been rehoused in (a) the constituency of Camberwell and Peckham, (b) the London Borough of Southwark, and (c) Greater London in each of the last seven years.
A
Answered by: Nigel Adams
Answered on: 28 June 2018
Holding answer received on 26 June 2018

We are committed to ensuring that victims get the support they need to cope with and, as far as possible, recover from the terrible and often life-changing effects of crime.

We do not centrally hold the data for the number of rape complainants that have been rehoused in the constituencies of Camberwell and Peckham, the London Borough of Southwark, and within Greater London.

Local areas are best placed to understand local needs and the Government has devolved power and responsibility to local authorities, in this case the Mayor of London, and Police and Crime Commissioners for meeting those needs accordingly. We have set out a clear blueprint for locally-driven action, including to tackle sexual violence, through our National Statement of Expectations on Violence Against Women and Girls, which is supported by a Commissioning Toolkit which provides detailed, practical advice to local commissioners. This was developed with voluntary, community sector and statutory stakeholders, and sets out for the first time what local areas need to do to ensure an effective response to meeting the needs of all victims of violence against women and girls.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 May 2018
Home Office
Emergency Calls: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the average emergency response time to 999 calls in (a) the London Borough of Southwark, and (b) London in each of the last seven years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 June 2018

The Home Office does not collect this data as the handling of 999 calls is an operational matter for the police. It is for elected Police Crime Commissioners and Chief Constables to decide how best to manage their communications and response to the public.

However, in March 2018, as part of its annual effectiveness reports on all police forces in England and Wales, HMICFRS briefly assessed calls from the public.

The report for the Metropolitan Police force can be found at:

https://www.justiceinspectorates.gov.uk/hmicfrs/wp-content/uploads/peel-police-effectiveness-2017-metropolitan.pdf

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 May 2018
Home Office
Metropolitan Police: Civilians
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many administrative and office-based support staff were employed by (a) Metropolitan Police Southwark and (b) the Metropolitan Police Service in each of the last seven years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 June 2018

The Home Office collects and publishes data annually on the roles of police officers, police staff and police community support officers (PCSOs), including the number of full time equivalents primarily employed in ‘support function’ roles. Those with multiple responsibilities or designations are recorded under their primary function. Therefore, the data does not provide a complete picture of all officers and staff assigned to support function roles.

The Home Office only collects these data at Police Force Area level. This information can be found in the data tables published alongside the annual ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin.

The latest data available, which show the picture as at 31 March 2017, can be found in Tables F1 (officers), F2 (staff) and F3 (PCSOs) of the police workforce statistics published in July 2017: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/629865/police-workforce-tabs-jul17.ods

Data as at 31 March 2015 and 31 March 2016 can be found in Tables F1-F6 of the police workforce statistics published in July 2016: https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/544954/police-workforce-tabs-jul16.ods

Previous data were collected under a different framework, with different definitions, and are therefore not directly comparable with data as at 31 March 2015 onwards. Data under the old framework have been published since 2012, and can be found in the supplementary data tables of the relevant police workforce publications via the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Police functions data are often affected by re-structuring within police forces. Therefore, comparisons over time for specific functions should be made with care.

Decisions on the size and composition of the police workforce are operational matters for Chief Officers working with their Police and Crime Commissioners and taking into account local priorities.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 May 2018
Home Office
Metropolitan Police: Police Patrolling
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many hours police officers spent on patrol in (a) the London Borough of Southwark and (b) the Metropolitan Police Service in each of the last seven years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 04 June 2018

The Home Office does not centrally hold the information requested.

The Home Office collects and publishes information on the primary roles that police officers perform, as well as the number of frontline officers, for Police Force Areas in England and Wales. Data are collected on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis, with no information available for the number of hours spent performing each role. These data are published annually as part of the 'police workforce, England and Wales' statistical bulletin, the latest of which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales-31-march-2017

Data on the primary roles officers perform, and the number of officers on the frontline, are only collected at Police Force Area level and cannot be broken down any further. Furthermore, the number of officers specifically on foot patrol cannot be separately identified. The latest available data on frontline officers, broken down by Police Force Area and going back to 2010, can be found in Table_F5 of the data tables accompanying the main release.

Data for the years 2010 to 2014 are estimated since data prior to 31 March 2015 were collected under a different framework, with different definitions.

Decisions on the size and deployment of the police workforce are operational matters for Chief Officers working with their Police and Crime Commissioners and taking into account local priorities.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 March 2018
Home Office
Knives: Crime
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how much her Department has spent on tackling knife crime in each of the last seven years.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 16 April 2018

It is not possible to disaggregate all funding for tackling knife crime as it is provided through a number of routes. This includes funding for police forces in England and Wales and our overall investment in policing will grow from £11.9 billion in 2015/16 to around £13 billion in 2018/19. Our work to tackle knife crime has been taken forward through the Ending Gang and Youth Violence programme and the subsequent Ending Gang Violence and Exploitation programme.

In October 2017, we launched our anti-knife crime Community Fund through which we awarded £765,000 to 47 successful projects to support local communities tackle knife crime, and we announced in March up to a £1million for a new round of the Community Fund in 2018/19 and this will be launched later this Spring. We have also just launched a new £1.3 million national media campaign under the banner of #knifefree which is aimed at 10 -21 years old and is aimed at bringing home the consequences of carrying a knife and to inspire young people to take up more positive activities.

On 9 April, we published the Serious Violence Strategy to take action to address serious violence and in particular the recent increases in knife crime, gun crime and homicide. The strategy represents a step change in the way we think and respond to serious violence. Our approach is not solely focused on law enforcement, very important as that is, but depends also on partnerships across a number of sectors such as education, health, social services, housing, youth services, victim services and others.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 26 March 2018
Home Office
Police Custody: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children living in the London Borough of Southwark spent time in a police station as a place of safety as a result of a mental health condition, in each of the last 7 years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 29 March 2018

The information requested is not held by the Home Office.

Data published by the Home Office in relation to section 135 and 136 detentions by the police in 2016/17 is collated by police force area (Police Powers and Procedures England and Wales year ending 31 March 2017 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2017).

This indicates that one person under the age of 18 was taken to a police station as a place of safety in the Metropolitan Police area in 2016/17. Figures published by the National Police Chiefs Council indicate that one person under the age of 18 was detained in a police station as a place of safety in the Metropolitan Police area in each of 2014/15 and 2015/16.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 October 2017
Home Office
Missing Persons: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children and young people under the age of 18 from (a) Camberwell and Peckham constituency and (b) the London Borough of Southwark are classified as missing persons.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 17 October 2017

The Home Office does not hold these data centrally.

Police-force level missing people statistics are published by the National Crime Agency’s Missing Person’s Bureau (http://missingpersons.police.uk/en/resources/downloads).

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Home Office
Rape
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many allegations of rape were reported to the police in each of the last five years in England and Wales.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 05 September 2017

The Home Office publishes information on the number of rapes recorded by the police by the police forces in England and Wales. These figures are published in Table A4 in the Office for National Statistics publication Crime in England and Wales: Year ending March 2017, available here:https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

The Home Office does not hold information on the number of people charged with offences of rape. Information on the number of people charged with rape offences is the responsibility of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS). The CPS publish data on rape in their annual Violence against Women and Girls crime report. The latest publication, for 2015-2016, is available here: http://www.cps.gov.uk/data/violence_against_women/vawg_2015_16_report.html

Grouped Questions: 6847
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Home Office
Rape
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were charged with the offence of rape in each of the last five years in England and Wales.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 05 September 2017

The Home Office publishes information on the number of rapes recorded by the police by the police forces in England and Wales. These figures are published in Table A4 in the Office for National Statistics publication Crime in England and Wales: Year ending March 2017, available here:https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/crimeinenglandandwalesappendixtables

The Home Office does not hold information on the number of people charged with offences of rape. Information on the number of people charged with rape offences is the responsibility of the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS). The CPS publish data on rape in their annual Violence against Women and Girls crime report. The latest publication, for 2015-2016, is available here: http://www.cps.gov.uk/data/violence_against_women/vawg_2015_16_report.html

Grouped Questions: 6849
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 July 2017
Ministry of Justice
Rape: Convictions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people convicted of rape in each of the last five years in England and Wales pleaded (a) guilty and (b) not guilty.
A
Answered by: Dominic Raab
Answered on: 05 September 2017

The number of offenders found guilty of rape at the Crown Court, by plea, England & Wales, 2012 - 2016 is shown in the following table:

Offenders found guilty of rape at the Crown Court, by plea, England & Wales, 2012 - 2016 (1)(2)

Plea

Year

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

Guilty

447

408

403

386

414

Not guilty

671

683

723

834

830

Total

1,118

1,091

1,126

1,220

1,244

(1) The figures given in the table relate to persons for whom these offences were the principal offences for which they were dealt with. When a defendant has been found guilty of two or more offences it is the offence for which the heaviest penalty is imposed. Where the same disposal is imposed for two or more offences, the offence selected is the offence for which the statutory maximum penalty is the most severe.

(2) Every effort is made to ensure that the figures presented are accurate and complete. However, it is important to note that these data have been extracted from large administrative data systems generated by the courts and police forces. As a consequence, care should be taken to ensure data collection processes and their inevitable limitations are taken into account when those data are used.

Source: Justice Statistics Analytical Services - Ministry of Justice.

Ref: PQ 6850

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