Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-13 out of 13
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Compulsorily Detained Mental Patients: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average length of time between a referral to an Approved Mental Health Professional and a section being carried out under the Mental Health Act 1983 was in (a) the London Borough of Southwark and (b) London in each of the last three years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 July 2018

The information requested could only be provided at disproportionate cost.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Compulsorily Detained Mental Patients: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of whether the availability of inpatient beds in acute psychiatric hospitals in south London has had an effect on the time taken to carry out sections under the Mental Health Act 1983.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 July 2018

NHS England (London) has developed the Mental Health Compact which sets out the minimum expectations for mental health patients requiring an inpatient admission to an acute psychiatric bed. The Compact outlines the roles and responsibilities of individual organisations along patient pathways to admission and details principles for a London-wide approach to capacity management and escalation (when required) to prevent the sometimes, lengthy waits to inpatient beds.

In South London, in particular, work is underway with acute and mental health providers to review activity, service models and pathways to understand recent increasing demand and any system-wide capacity constraints. This is to develop a common understanding of the challenges and enable joint working to improve flow through mental health and emergency care pathways, meet the needs of people presenting with mental health problems and reduce system pressures.

The Five Year Forward View for Mental Health is clear that everyone should be able to receive the care they need in the least restrictive setting and as close to home as possible. This means a local acute inpatient bed should always be available if required. To support this aim NHS England and NHS Improvement have put in place a clinically-led national programme of support for areas experiencing high bed pressures and consequent reliance on acute mental health out of area placements. The programme supports areas to identify and address the key causes of their capacity pressures, focusing on effective pathway management and the availability of community-based alternatives to inpatient care. South London is one of 16 areas which have received support from this programme to date, and every sustainability and transformation partnership nationally now has a trajectory in place to eliminate acute out of placements due to local bed pressures by 2021.

The Care Quality Commission reported in January on the reasons for the rise in detentions under the Mental Health Act 1983. Its report, ‘The rise in the use of the MHA to detain people in England’, found that changes in mental health service provision and bed management were one reason for the rise, with “delays in admission due to a bed not being available may mean that a patient, who might have consented to be admitted informally at an earlier stage, may deteriorate and become unwilling or unable to agree to an admission, and therefore need to be detained under the MHA”. This report is available at the following link:

https://www.cqc.org.uk/sites/default/files/20180123_mhadetentions_report.pdf

The Government has asked Professor Sir Simon Wessely to lead an Independent Review of the Mental Health Act 1983, to make recommendations on legislation and practice to improve how the Act functions in a modern mental health system. The Independent Review is considering how to address delays in the system and it will report in the autumn. It published an interim report in May, ‘The Independent Review of the Mental Health Act interim reports’, which is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/703919/The_independent_Mental_Health_Act_review__interim_report_01_05_2018.pdf

Grouped Questions: 161967
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Compulsorily Detained Mental Patients: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of whether the availability of police in south London has had an effect on the time taken to carry out sections under the Mental Health Act 1983.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 July 2018

We have made no such assessment.

The availability of police in local areas is a matter for the Home Department and for regional police and crime commissioners. Police powers under the Mental Health Act 1983 are limited to short term emergency sections under s135 and s136. For formal sections to hospital the police have no role, these are decisions made by Approved Mental Health Professionals on the advice of doctors.

The Government has asked Professor Sir Simon Wessely to lead an Independent Review of the Mental Health Act 1983, to make recommendations on legislation and practice to improve how the Act functions in a modern mental health system. The Independent review is considering how to address delays in the system. The Independent Review will report in the autumn. It published an interim report in May, which is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/703919/The_independent_Mental_Health_Act_review__interim_report_01_05_2018.pdf

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Psychiatric Hospitals: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps are being taken to ensure the availability of inpatient beds in acute psychiatric hospitals in south London.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 July 2018

The Five Year Forward View for Mental Health is clear that everyone should be able to receive the care they need in the least restrictive setting and as close to home as possible. This means a local acute inpatient bed should always be available if required. To support this aim NHS England and NHS Improvement have put in place a clinically-led national programme of support for areas experiencing high bed pressures and consequent reliance on acute mental health out of area placements. The programme supports areas to identify and address the key causes of their capacity pressures, focusing on effective pathway management and the availability of community-based alternatives to inpatient care. South London is one of 16 areas which have received support from this programme to date, and every sustainability and transformation partnership nationally now has a trajectory in place to eliminate acute out of placements due to local bed pressures by 2021.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Compulsorily Detained Mental Patients: Greater London
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce the length of time between (a) a section of someone living in the community under the Mental Health Act 1983 being recommended and (b) that section carried out in south London.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 July 2018

NHS England (London) has developed the Mental Health Compact which sets out the minimum expectations for mental health patients requiring an inpatient admission to an acute psychiatric bed. The Compact outlines the roles and responsibilities of individual organisations along patient pathways to admission and details principles for a London-wide approach to capacity management and escalation (when required) to prevent the sometimes, lengthy waits to inpatient beds.

In South London, in particular, work is underway with acute and mental health providers to review activity, service models and pathways to understand recent increasing demand and any system-wide capacity constraints. This is to develop a common understanding of the challenges and enable joint working to improve flow through mental health and emergency care pathways, meet the needs of people presenting with mental health problems and reduce system pressures.

The Five Year Forward View for Mental Health is clear that everyone should be able to receive the care they need in the least restrictive setting and as close to home as possible. This means a local acute inpatient bed should always be available if required. To support this aim NHS England and NHS Improvement have put in place a clinically-led national programme of support for areas experiencing high bed pressures and consequent reliance on acute mental health out of area placements. The programme supports areas to identify and address the key causes of their capacity pressures, focusing on effective pathway management and the availability of community-based alternatives to inpatient care. South London is one of 16 areas which have received support from this programme to date, and every sustainability and transformation partnership nationally now has a trajectory in place to eliminate acute out of placements due to local bed pressures by 2021.

The Care Quality Commission reported in January on the reasons for the rise in detentions under the Mental Health Act 1983. Its report, ‘The rise in the use of the MHA to detain people in England’, found that changes in mental health service provision and bed management were one reason for the rise, with “delays in admission due to a bed not being available may mean that a patient, who might have consented to be admitted informally at an earlier stage, may deteriorate and become unwilling or unable to agree to an admission, and therefore need to be detained under the MHA”. This report is available at the following link:

https://www.cqc.org.uk/sites/default/files/20180123_mhadetentions_report.pdf

The Government has asked Professor Sir Simon Wessely to lead an Independent Review of the Mental Health Act 1983, to make recommendations on legislation and practice to improve how the Act functions in a modern mental health system. The Independent Review is considering how to address delays in the system and it will report in the autumn. It published an interim report in May, ‘The Independent Review of the Mental Health Act interim reports’, which is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/703919/The_independent_Mental_Health_Act_review__interim_report_01_05_2018.pdf

Grouped Questions: 161964
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 26 March 2018
Home Office
Police Custody: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many children living in the London Borough of Southwark spent time in a police station as a place of safety as a result of a mental health condition, in each of the last 7 years.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 29 March 2018

The information requested is not held by the Home Office.

Data published by the Home Office in relation to section 135 and 136 detentions by the police in 2016/17 is collated by police force area (Police Powers and Procedures England and Wales year ending 31 March 2017 https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2017).

This indicates that one person under the age of 18 was taken to a police station as a place of safety in the Metropolitan Police area in 2016/17. Figures published by the National Police Chiefs Council indicate that one person under the age of 18 was detained in a police station as a place of safety in the Metropolitan Police area in each of 2014/15 and 2015/16.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 March 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the average waiting time was from diagnosis to referral for treatment for mental health illnesses in each of the last seven years in (a) the London Borough of Southwark and (b) in England.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 27 March 2018

The information requested is not collected in the format requested.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 March 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Postnatal Depression
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what specialist treatment is available for mothers suffering post-natal depression in (a) the London Borough of Southwark and (b) England.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 27 March 2018

This Government is committed to improving perinatal mental health services for women during pregnancy and in the first postnatal year, so that women are able to access the right care at the right time and close to home.

The Department is investing £365 million from 2015/16 to 2020/21 in perinatal mental health services, and NHS England is leading a transformation programme to ensure that by 2020/21 at least 30,000 more women each year are able to access evidence-based specialist mental health care during the perinatal period. This includes access to psychological therapies and specialist community or inpatient care.

As part of this programme, NHS England is expanding the capacity of inpatient Mother and Baby units (MBUs): Four new, eight-bedded MBUs have been commissioned to provide specialist care and support to mothers who experience severe mental ill health during and after pregnancy in areas of the country with particular access issues. Additionally, the number of beds is increasing in existing units, expanding the current capacity by 49% by the end of 2018/19.

In addition, the programme includes implementation of a specialist perinatal mental health Community Services Development Fund, which is providing £60 million between 2016/17 and 2018/19 to support development and expansion of specialist community services across the country.

In the London Borough of Southwark, South London and Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust provides a Southwark community perinatal service which identifies, assesses and treats women with moderate to severe psychiatric disorders during pregnancy and the postnatal period (from preconception up to a maximum of one year postpartum), funded by the clinical commissioning group.

Southwark residents can also access a specialist mother and baby Inpatient unit on South London and Maudsley’s Bethlem site in the London Borough of Bromley which is funded by NHS England and is available nationally to patients meeting the admission criteria.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 March 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Postnatal Depression
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much money has been spent on post-natal mental health services in (a) the London Borough of Southwark and (b) England in each of the last 7 years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 27 March 2018

This information is not available in the format requested.

Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 December 2017
Department of Health
Mental Health Services: Out of Area Treatment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many out-of-borough placements for non-specialised services for acute adult psychiatric care were made for Southwark residents in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 December 2017

The data requested is not collected centrally.

Grouped Questions: 118272 | 118273
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 December 2017
Department of Health
Mental Health Services: Out of Area Treatment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many out-of-borough placements for non-specialised services for acute children’s psychiatric care were made from the London Borough of Southwark for Southwark residents in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 December 2017

The data requested is not collected centrally.

Grouped Questions: 118268 | 118273
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 December 2017
Department of Health
Mental Health Services: Southwark
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many children resident in the London Borough of Southwark in need of psychiatric care have been unable to access a bed in a mental health hospital in Southwark in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 12 December 2017

The data requested is not collected centrally.

Grouped Questions: 118268 | 118272
Q
(Camberwell and Peckham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 September 2017
Department for Work and Pensions
Personal Independence Payment: Southwark
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many claims for personal independence payment in the London Borough of Southwark have been due to a mental health illness in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 11 September 2017

The requested information for Personal Independence Payment (PIP) applications is not available as information on PIP claimants’ disabling conditions is not collected at the initial claim application stage. Only those who have a disability assessment determination decision will have a primary disabling condition recorded for them. The Department does not therefore hold data on the number of individuals with a particular condition who make a claim for PIP.

The latest available data on PIP claims in payment, including by main disabling condition and geography (e.g. local authority), are published on Stat-Xplore: https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk. Guidance on how to use Stat-Xplore can be found here: https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/index.html.

These data relate to the claimant’s main disabling condition. Claimants may often have multiple disabling conditions, but these cannot be identified from the data the department holds. Therefore there may be other claimants in receipt of PIP who have been diagnosed with a mental health illness who are not captured in the above data.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-13 out of 13
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100