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Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 January 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prosecutions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many cases were cracked in (a) Crown courts and (b) Magistrates' courts in each month of 2019.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 20 January 2020

The information requested about how many cracked cases there have been in each month in 2019:

Please find attached tables providing:

- Number of cracked trials at the magistrates’ court and Crown Court in England and Wales in each month in 2019.

Table 1: Number of cracked trials in criminal courts, by court type and month, 20191,2,3,4

Magistrates' court

Crown Court

January

4,241

890

February

3,632

711

March

3,829

717

April

3,558

702

May

3,434

668

June

3,367

696

July (p)

3,996

776

August (p)

3,184

608

September (p)

3,722

763

Notes: (p) = provisionald.

1) The total number of cracked trials listed during the reporting period indicate

2) Cracked trial is a trial that does not go ahead on the day as an outcome is reached and so does not need to be re-scheduled. This occurs when an acceptable plea is offered by the defendant or the prosecution offers no evidence against the defendant.

3) Latest published data available to September 2019.

Source: Criminal Court Statistics (PQ 3718)

The Ministry of Justice publishes annual and quarterly data on cracked trials in England and Wales, available at https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-court-statistics-quarterly-july-to-september-2019.

In these statistics a cracked trial is defined as: “a trial which does not commence on the scheduled date and the trial is not rescheduled, as it is no longer required. Cracked trials are usually the result of an acceptable guilty plea being entered by the defendant on the day or the case ending as the prosecution decides not to proceed (offers no evidence) against the defendant.”

It is not possible to separately identify if the trial was cracked on the day of trial or at any prior point from the data centrally collated by the Ministry of Justice. As a result, identifying the proportion of trials that were ‘cracked on the first day of the trial’ would require a search of court records, which would be of disproportionate cost.

Grouped Questions: 3720
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