Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019-21 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 03 July 2020
Cabinet Office
Ethnic Groups and Females: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he took to ensure that (a) women and (b) ethnic minorities were represented in shaping the Government's covid-19 response (i) planning and (ii) decision-making.
A
Answered by: Penny Mordaunt
Answered on: 29 July 2020

The Government’s COVID-19 response has been a cross-Government effort, involving thousands of people who have worked tirelessly as the UK faces unprecedented challenges. Planning and decision making has touched almost all of Government, with women and ethnic minorities represented at all levels.

Q
(Preston)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 June 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Coronavirus: Ethnic Groups
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason prior to the publication of the 2 June 2020 Public Health England report entitled Disparities on the risk and outcomes of COVID-19 a section was removed which included evidence from more than 1,000 organisations and individuals suggesting that discrimination and poorer life chances played a part in the increased risk of covid-19 among those with BAME backgrounds; and whether he plans to publish that section.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 17 July 2020

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Edmonton (Kate Osamor MP) on 1 July 2020 to Question 59534.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 08 July 2020
Treasury
Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will extend eligibility criteria to new starters who missed the date for enrolment in the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme due to (a) the date of starting a new job and (b) their employer’s choice of timing in submitting paperwork to HMRC.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 16 July 2020

The Government has prioritised helping the greatest number of people as quickly as possible. For this reason, the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme has had to be set up to operate at significant scale and with limited manual intervention.

Extending the cut-off date beyond 19 March would significantly increase the risk of abuse and fraud, as claims could not be confidently verified against the risk of fraud using the data after 20 March, when the scheme became public.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 08 July 2020
Treasury
Self-employment Income Support Scheme
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of removing the £50,000 cap for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme to allow people with profits in excess of that cap to access financial support.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 16 July 2020

The Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) helps those adversely affected by COVID-19. Individuals can at present claim a taxable grant under the SEISS worth 80 per cent of their average monthly trading profits, paid out in a single instalment covering three months’ worth of profits, and capped at £7,500 in total.

The extension of the SEISS announced by the Chancellor of the Exchequer on 29 May 2020 means that eligible individuals whose businesses are adversely affected by COVID-19 will be able to claim a second and final grant when the scheme reopens for applications in August. This will be a taxable grant worth 70 per cent of their average monthly trading profits, paid out in a single instalment covering three months’ worth of profits, and capped at £6,570 in total.

The SEISS is designed to target help at those who most need it. Those who had more than £50,000 from trading profits in 2018-19 had an average total income of more than £200,000.

Those with average trading profits above £50,000 may still be eligible for other elements of the unprecedented financial support package made available by the Government. These measures include Bounce Back Loans, tax deferrals, rental support, increased levels of Universal Credit, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 08 July 2020
Treasury
Employment: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps the Government is taking to support freelancers and people on short-term PAYE contracts who are not entitled to support under the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme or Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 16 July 2020

The Government has prioritised helping the greatest number of people as quickly as possible, and the CJRS and SEISS have provided support to more than 11 million people across the country.

Those who are not eligible for the CJRS and SEISS may have access to other support that the Government is providing, including a package of temporary welfare measures, £3.2bn in funding for local authorities to support the most vulnerable people in society, mortgage payment holidays, and a nearly £1bn increase in support for renters through increases to the Local Housing Allowance rates for Universal Credit and Housing Benefit claimants.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 06 July 2020
Department for Work and Pensions
Victim Support Schemes: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has to allocate additional funding to support domestic abuse victims to maintain (a) employment and (b) economic independence.
A
Answered by: Will Quince
Answered on: 14 July 2020

DWP is committed to providing the best possible support for all our claimants, including the most vulnerable in society. This includes those who are, or have been, victims of domestic abuse and economic abuse.

DWP has a number of employment schemes that claimants, including victims of abuse, can access to improve their employability and skills. The Work and Health Programme gives ‘priority’ early access to victims of abuse. This programme supports people to enter and stay in work, and involves referrals to public, private and voluntary providers.

Alongside the landmark Domestic Abuse Bill, the Government is providing £35 million to combat domestic abuse. This is on top of the £2 million we have already made available since the Covid-19 crisis, to support domestic abuse charities and raise awareness of the support available. We are also providing £3 million that will go to specialist services for children who have both been directly and indirectly affected by domestic abuse.

Government Departments are working together to look at the overall support we provide for victims and to ensure that it is holistic and effectively fulfils their needs, so that victims can rebuild their lives.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 03 July 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Small Businesses: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans his Department has to provide additional funding for schemes to support business affected by covid-19 that are owned by (a) minorities and (b) women.
A
Answered by: Paul Scully
Answered on: 13 July 2020

The Government is committed to ensuring people from all backgrounds and regions benefit from the Government’s access to finance schemes. A diverse and inclusive ecosystem is good for entrepreneurs, companies, investors, and society as a whole.

The Department’s Ministerial team is also actively engaging with the Black, Asian and Minority Ethnic (BAME) business community on a regular basis to cover multiple issues, including access to finance.

The Future Fund provides government co-investment to innovative businesses. As of 5 July, 376 convertible loans worth a total of £380 million have been approved under the scheme. The British Business Bank (BBB) published diversity data for the Future Fund on 23 June 2020, which showed that companies with BAME-only and mixed ethnicity management teams accounted for over 55% of applications, valued at £118.5m, and that 79% of funding had been issued to companies with mixed gender management teams.

The Future Fund is also a signatory of the Investing in Women Code and encourages co-investors to do the same.

The British Business Bank’s Start Up Loans programme had delivered more than 73,600 loans to entrepreneurs by the end of May 2020, providing more than £609 million of funding. Of these, 40 per cent of these loans have gone to women, and 25 per cent of the total were to applicants from a BAME background.

The Government’s loan schemes to support businesses affected by Covid-19, including the Bounce Back Loan schemes, are open to all businesses which meet the eligibility criteria, including those owned by women as well as those owned by people from a BAME background. We will monitor the implementation and take up of the schemes.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 03 July 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Homelessness: Young People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans his Department had to provide additional funding to help end youth homelessness.
A
Answered by: Luke Hall
Answered on: 13 July 2020

This Government implemented the Homelessness Reduction Act, the most ambitious reform to homelessness legislation in decades, which placed new duties on local housing authorities to take reasonable steps to try to prevent and relieve a person’s homelessness. means that many more young people who may not previously have been eligible for support, are now being helped to prevent homelessness before it occurs.

The Act also places a duty on public bodies, including Children’s Services, Youth Offending Institutions and Youth Offending Teams ensuring better partnership working with local authorities to prevent youth homelessness.

We have also put in place bespoke support for local authorities through our Homelessness Advice and Support Team, which includes dedicated youth homelessness advisor roles that have a commitment to work with local authorities to proactively promote positive joint working across housing authorities and children’s services, offering training, advice and support to all local authorities. Alongside this, the department has funded St Basil’s, a specialist youth homelessness charity, to develop and disseminate best practice pathways for preventing youth homelessness, as well as running the annual Youth Homelessness Parliament, giving young people a voice on the issues that affect them.

The Youth Advisers are working closely with local authorities on the particular challenges that young people and care leavers are facing during COVID-19.

Government has also provided significant additional funding to support people sleeping rough or at risk of sleeping rough during the pandemic. At the beginning of the crisis, our priority was to urgently bring vulnerable people inside so they could self-isolate and stop the virus spreading. We backed this with £3.2 million in emergency funding for local authorities to support vulnerable rough sleepers, and a further £3.7 billion to help councils to manage the impacts of COVID-19, including supporting homeless people.

On 24 June we announced that we are providing local authorities with a further £105 million to enable them to best support the 15,000 people placed into emergency accommodation during the COVID-19 pandemic

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 03 July 2020
Treasury
Economic Situation: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what contingency plans his Department have made to support the economy in the event that a second wave of covid-19 requires a reintroduction of lockdown restrictions.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 13 July 2020

In March 2020 the Government put in place strict social distancing measures to slow the spread of the Coronavirus so that the NHS would not be overwhelmed. Alongside this, the Government introduced an unprecedented package of support for businesses and individuals, including the CJRS which has helped 1.1 million employers across the UK furlough 9.4 million jobs.

The Government has set out a phased, cautious approach to reopening our economy, so that we do not risk a second peak of the virus. The Government has produced COVID-19 secure practical guidelines to support businesses to reopen and for workers to feel confident, safe and empowered to return to work. Public Health England, the Joint Biosecurity Centre and NHS Test and Trace constantly monitor levels of infection across the country, and will work with local authorities to implement additional measures if needed.

The Chancellor has announced further support for those sectors hardest hit, with a £1.57 billion package for the arts, and a cut in VAT to 5% for accommodation, attractions and the hospitality sector, and on 8th July set out a package of measures to support jobs across the UK, including a Job Retention Bonus to help firms keep furloughed workers and a new £2 billion Kickstart Scheme to create hundreds of thousands of new, fully subsidised jobs for young people.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 03 July 2020
Ministry of Justice
Legal Profession: Equality
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his Department is doing to tackle the diversity gap in the upper levels of the legal profession.
A
Answered by: Alex Chalk
Answered on: 13 July 2020

The legal profession in England and Wales is independent of Government. Statutory responsibility for encouraging an independent, strong, diverse and effective legal profession sits with the approved regulators, overseen by the oversight regulator, the Legal Services Board (LSB). Ministry of Justice Ministers encourage the sector to ensure it more closely represents the diverse society it serves through ongoing engagement with the regulators and the legal profession.

In 2017 the LSB published revised guidance for legal services regulators for encouraging a diverse workforce, and introduced new transparency duties at firm and chambers level to monitor and publish diversity statistics. In 2019 the LSB published a summary of the progress of regulators against four diversity outcomes, which showed positive examples of a new approach to diversity, but also areas where further action is required.

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 06 July 2020
Treasury
Finance: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the number of people in financial difficulty who are not eligible for any of the Government's support schemes during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 13 July 2020

The Government has provided a comprehensive economic response that is one of the most generous of its kind in the world, taking unprecedented steps to support families, businesses and the most vulnerable. As well as the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) and Self-Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS), this package includes Government-backed loans and grants to businesses, tax deferrals, rental support and mortgage and consumer credit holidays.

This package also includes extra funding for the welfare safety net to help those through this outbreak who are unable to access other forms of support. The temporary welfare measures include increases to Universal Credit and Local Housing Allowance, a relaxation of the Universal Credit minimum income floor, and making Statutory Sick Pay easier to access.

Now, the Government’s new Plan for Jobs will support, protect and create jobs. This plan will make available up to £30 billion to help kickstart the nation’s economic recovery ahead of a fuller package of medium-term recovery measures in the forthcoming Autumn Budget and Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 70537 | 71071
Q
(Preston)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 July 2020
Department for Work and Pensions
Zero Hours Contracts: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she will take to support workers on zero-hour contracts who are not working as a result of the covid-19 outbreak and are unable to qualify for universal credit because they are considered to have employment.
A
Answered by: Will Quince
Answered on: 13 July 2020

It is wrong to say that workers on zero-hour contracts, who are not working as a result of the covid-19 outbreak, are unable to qualify for Universal Credit because they are considered to have employment.

Universal Credit is payable in and out of work including for those working zero-hour contracts, part-time or temporary jobs.

The amount of Universal Credit paid to claimants reflects, as closely as possible, the actual circumstances of a household during each monthly assessment period. Monthly assessment periods align to the way the majority of employees are paid and also allows Universal Credit to be adjusted each month. This means that if a claimant’s income falls, they will not have to wait several months for a rise in their Universal Credit.

The Chancellor has also confirmed that, depending on their status, workers on zero hour contracts may be eligible for the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme and we would urge people to explore this avenue too.

Q
(Preston)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 July 2020
Treasury
Unemployment: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to tackle potential increases in unemployment once the Government’s furlough scheme ends.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 13 July 2020

The Government has a broad set of policies in place to support businesses and individuals during COVID-19. The Government has designed the next stage of the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (CJRS) by balancing the need to protect jobs against the need to restart the economy as the Covid-19 backdrop improves. The CJRS scheme must be temporary and the Government must ensure people can get back to work when it is safe to do so and get the UK economy up and running again.

The Government has recently announced its Plan for Jobs. In it, in order to protect workers and encourage employers to minimise redundancies, the Government introduced a Jobs Retention Bonus. This will ensure that UK employers will receive a one-off bonus of £1,000 for each furloughed employee who is still employed as of 31 January 2021.

The Government has also announced unprecedented support to help unemployed people in Great Britain find a job. The Government is providing £1.2bn to significantly expand and enhance work search support, including doubling the number of work coaches, additional investment into the Flexible Support Fund to provide direct support at a local level, and using externally contracted provision to expand support even further.

Recognising that young people are particularly at risk, the Government has also launched a new £2bn Kickstart Scheme, creating hundreds of thousands of new, fully subsidised jobs for young people across Great Britain, as well as a guaranteed foundation of support to all 18-24 year olds on Universal Credit in the Intensive Worksearch group, through its new youth offer.

In England, the Government will also support people to build the skills they need to get into work, including by providing funding to triple the number of traineeships and sector-based work academy placements, new payments to employers to hire apprentices, and new funding to expand the National Career Service.

In addition to what is outlined in the Plan for Jobs, those who struggle to find work for a longer period will also benefit from a new, large-scale employment support offer. Further details will be announced shortly.

Q
(Preston)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 July 2020
Treasury
Self-employed: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, if he will create a dedicated covid-19 hardship fund for sole traders and other self-employed people ineligible for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 13 July 2020

Self-employed individuals, including members of partnerships, are eligible for the Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) if they have submitted their Income Tax Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018-19, continued to trade, and have been adversely affected by COVID-19. To qualify, their self-employed trading profits must be no more than £50,000 and at least equal to their non-trading income.

Individuals who are not eligible for the SEISS may benefit from other elements of the unprecedented financial support provided by the Government. This package includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants. On 8 July, the Government introduced the new Plan for Jobs which will make available up to £30 billion to assist in creating, supporting and protecting jobs.

Grouped Questions: 70988 | 70991
Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 08 July 2020
Treasury
Self-employed: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to support people who are newly self-employed who started a business after April 2019 and do not qualify for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 13 July 2020

Self-employed individuals, including members of partnerships, are eligible for the Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) if they have submitted their Income Tax Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018-19, continued to trade, and have been adversely affected by COVID-19. To qualify, their self-employed trading profits must be no more than £50,000 and at least equal to their non-trading income.

Individuals who are not eligible for the SEISS may benefit from other elements of the unprecedented financial support provided by the Government. This package includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants. On 8 July, the Government introduced the new Plan for Jobs which will make available up to £30 billion to assist in creating, supporting and protecting jobs.

Grouped Questions: 70986 | 70991
Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 08 July 2020
Treasury
Self-employment Income Support Scheme: Directors
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to support limited company directors who take a large part of their income in dividends and do not qualify for the Self-Employment Income Support Scheme.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 13 July 2020

Self-employed individuals, including members of partnerships, are eligible for the Self Employment Income Support Scheme (SEISS) if they have submitted their Income Tax Self Assessment tax return for the tax year 2018-19, continued to trade, and have been adversely affected by COVID-19. To qualify, their self-employed trading profits must be no more than £50,000 and at least equal to their non-trading income.

Individuals who are not eligible for the SEISS may benefit from other elements of the unprecedented financial support provided by the Government. This package includes Bounce Back loans, tax deferrals, rental support, mortgage holidays, and other business support grants. On 8 July, the Government introduced the new Plan for Jobs which will make available up to £30 billion to assist in creating, supporting and protecting jobs.

Grouped Questions: 70986 | 70988
Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 01 July 2020
Department for Education
Children: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what recent assessment his Department has made of the potential long-term effects of the covid-19 lockdown of the social development of children between the ages of 0 and eighteen.
A
Answered by: Vicky Ford
Answered on: 10 July 2020

The department is working closely with educational institutions, sector organisations, the Department for Health and Social Care, NHS England and Public Health England to understand the effects of the measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 on the mental health and wellbeing of children and identify the children and young people that need help and will continue to do so as more pupils return to school.

We have been working closely with partners to provide resources and to update guidance to support and promote children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing during the COVID-19 outbreak. This includes signposting to resources on supporting and promoting mental wellbeing among the list of resources to help children to learn at home, which are available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-online-education-resources.

The return to school is a key part of supporting the mental health and wellbeing of pupils. In addition to providing more opportunities for physical activity, attendance at school allows for social interaction with peers, carers and teachers, which benefits wellbeing. To support this, we have encouraged schools to focus on mental wellbeing as pupils return. The department has now published detailed plans for all children and young people to return to full-time education from September. The guidance for schools is available here:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/actions-for-schools-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak/guidance-for-full-opening-schools.

We are working with the Department of Health and Social Care to put in place further specific support for school staff to understand the issues that pupils will face with their mental wellbeing. This includes training for teachers, such as a new module developed with clinical experts on how to teach about mental health in health education:
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/teaching-about-mental-wellbeing.

Access to mental health support is more important than ever during the COVID-19 outbreak. NHS services remain open, and leading mental health charities are being supported to deliver additional services through the £5 million Coronavirus Mental Health Response Fund. During Mental Health Awareness Week, the government also announced that a further £4.2 million will be awarded to mental health charities. including the Samaritans, Young Minds and Bipolar UK.

All NHS mental health trusts have been asked to ensure that there are 24/7 open access telephone lines to support people of all ages. Public Health England and Health Education England have also developed advice and guidance for parents and professionals on supporting children and young people’s mental health and wellbeing:
https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/covid-19-guidance-on-supporting-children-and-young-peoples-mental-health-and-wellbeing.

In addition, children and young people can access free confidential support any time from government-backed voluntary and community sector organisations either by texting SHOUT to 85258, or by calling Childline on 0800 1111 or The Mix on 0808 808 4994. Children and young people can also find online information on COVID-19 and mental health on the Young Minds website, which is available here:
https://youngminds.org.uk/about-us/reports/coronavirus-impact-on-young-people-with-mental-health-needs/.

Q
(Preston)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 June 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Coronavirus: Ethnic Groups
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to protect people from BAME backgrounds who have been identified as being in an at-risk group during the covid-19 outbreak; whether lockdown restrictions will be amended for those at-risk groups of people; and what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on amending lockdown restrictions for those at-risk groups of the Public Health England report, Disparities on the risk and outcomes of covid-19, published on 2 June 2020.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 July 2020
Holding answer received on 11 June 2020

We have all been struck by the conclusions of Public Health England’s report and will continue to help protect those most vulnerable to COVID-19 based on the best possible analysis available to us.

We are determined to get to the bottom of the report’s findings in a proper and scientific way and have already asked the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Equalities, (Kemi Badenoch MP), to take forward work to fill the gaps in our understanding, review existing policies and guidance and amend or develop new policies where needed and where the evidence supports us doing so. The Terms of Reference for that work can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/news/next-steps-for-work-on-covid-19-disparities-announced

Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 01 July 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what safeguarding measures are in place for potential home-buyers of new build properties to ensure that Building Control Regulation Completion Certificates have been issued prior to the sale of that property.
A
Answered by: Christopher Pincher
Answered on: 09 July 2020

The Building Regulations 2010 set standards for the design and construction of building work. The building owner will have usually received a completion certificate (from local authority building control) or a final certificate (from an approved inspector) before the building is occupied. These certificates are issued when the work is complete by a local authority for the sale of a new build property. In some circumstances a building may be occupied before the building owner has received the completion certificate or the final certificate. Part 3, Regulation 17(4) of the Building Regulations 2010 states that: ‘A certificate given in accordance with this regulation shall be evidence (but not conclusive evidence) that the requirements specified in the certificate have been complied with’.

There is no statutory link between the Building Regulations and the conveyancing process. The prospective buyer and their professional advisers should satisfy themselves that they have all material facts relating to the property before they commit to buying.

Grouped Questions: 67554
Q
(Preston)
Asked on: 01 July 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what legal requirements are in place to ensure that Building Regulation Completion Certificates have been issued before the release of funds by financial providers in the sale of a new build property.
A
Answered by: Christopher Pincher
Answered on: 09 July 2020

The Building Regulations 2010 set standards for the design and construction of building work. The building owner will have usually received a completion certificate (from local authority building control) or a final certificate (from an approved inspector) before the building is occupied. These certificates are issued when the work is complete by a local authority for the sale of a new build property. In some circumstances a building may be occupied before the building owner has received the completion certificate or the final certificate. Part 3, Regulation 17(4) of the Building Regulations 2010 states that: ‘A certificate given in accordance with this regulation shall be evidence (but not conclusive evidence) that the requirements specified in the certificate have been complied with’.

There is no statutory link between the Building Regulations and the conveyancing process. The prospective buyer and their professional advisers should satisfy themselves that they have all material facts relating to the property before they commit to buying.

Grouped Questions: 67553
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