Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Surgical Mesh Implants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to collect data on the number of women who have had vaginal mesh surgery who experienced (a) pain, (b) a reduction in the quality of sex life, (c) constant urinary infections and (d) a reduction in the quality of life.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 08 March 2018

On 21 February, my Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State announced the establishment of a prospective registry covering urogynaecological pathways for stress urinary incontinence and prolapse, including procedures using mesh implants. Registry data will support the understanding of comparable benefits, risks and patient outcomes over time.

NHS Digital is in the process of undertaking a retrospective audit (secondary analysis of existing data) of surgery for stress urinary incontinence and vaginal prolapse, which will help the National Health Service to better understand complications related to surgery using vaginal mesh. Analysis will include the number of patients who have undergone an operation and will investigate in part their subsequent interactions with the NHS through hospital outpatient appointments.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency’s (MHRA’s) Yellow Card Scheme allows patients to report any adverse outcomes experienced from the use of a medical device, no matter how long ago the surgery took place. The MHRA is continuing to enhance awareness of the Yellow Card reporting system for adverse outcomes to increase reporting rates among both clinicians and patients.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Surgical Mesh Implants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of banning vaginal mesh for (a) pelvic organ prolapse and (b) stress urinary incontinence; what steps his Department is taking to improve surgical training those procedures; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 08 March 2018

The Government keeps the evidence under review and at this point in time takes the view that the evidence does not support a ban of the use of vaginal mesh devices. While the Government understands that some women have experienced serious complications, for many women the use of mesh has had positive outcomes.

The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) has considered all evidence available, in the United Kingdom and worldwide. The MHRA’s view is that both the evidence and the greater proportion of the clinical community support the use of these devices as part of an appropriate treatment pathway where the associated benefits and risks are considered when treating the conditions of stress urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse. As with all medical devices, the MHRA continues to monitor relevant evidence as it becomes available.

The NHS England Mesh Working Group Interim Report (2015) recommended that the established hospital doctors’ appraisal systems in each hospital trust should be used to ensure surgeons undertaking mesh procedures are appropriately trained and current in their practice; adhere to clinical guidance; comply with national data submission requirements; and report complications. NHS Improvement has written to all trust Responsible Officers asking them to ensure this is implemented.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Surgical Mesh Implants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many and what proportion of surgical mesh implants have shrunk after being inserted.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 08 March 2018

Between 2013 and 2017, the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) received 18 adverse incident reports including the terms “shrunk” or “shrink” (or similar) relating to surgical mesh to treat stress urinary incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse.

It should be noted that these figures include a range of recognised complications related to this type of surgical procedure and do not necessarily indicate a fault with any particular device.

These figures include reports from manufacturers, healthcare professionals and members of the public and therefore may not necessarily represent an individual patient. As there is no limiting time on reporting, people can make multiple reports at any time after the mesh has been implanted and on the same issue.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 November 2017
Department of Health
Surgical Mesh Implants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to audit the use of surgical mesh for (a) pelvic organ prolapse and (b) stress urinary incontinence; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 November 2017

There has been extensive work completed by the NHS England Mesh Working Group to investigate the concerns raised in relation to surgical meshes which included exploring if a one-off information gathering exercise on patient outcomes should be conducted. They concluded that this would not be the best allocation of resources to respond to this issue.

Following further discussion with the Parliamentary Under Secretary for Health (Lord O’Shaughnessy) and members of the Surgical Mesh All Party Parliamentary Group on 14 November, NHS England and the Medicines and Health products Regulatory Agency are looking again at this issue and will advise ministers accordingly.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 November 2017
Department of Health
Surgical Mesh Implants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what the cost to the public purse would be of an inquiry into the use of surgical mesh.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 November 2017

It would not be possible to estimate the cost of any inquiry until the form of such an inquiry and its terms of reference were to be established.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 November 2017
Department of Health
Surgical Mesh Implants
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, what plans he has to allocate funding to provide compensation to people affected by injuries caused by surgical mesh; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 20 November 2017

We recognise that a small but significant number of people have suffered from some very severe complications as a result of procedures using surgical mesh. Surgical procedures using mesh devices have provided an effective form of treatment in many cases it can be far less invasive than alternative surgical procedures and, unfortunately, there are risks associated with most medical interventions.

Compensation is normally provided on the basis of clinical negligence. There are no plans to allocate funding for further compensation.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Asked on: 06 October 2017
Department of Health
Surgical Mesh Implants: Kingston Upon Hull West and Hessle
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people in Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle constituency who have received trans vaginal mesh implants as part of their treatment for (a) pelvic organ prolapse repair or (b) stress urinary incontinence attend clinics for pain caused by that treatment; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 16 October 2017

This information is not held centrally.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Asked on: 06 October 2017
Department of Health
Surgical Mesh Implants: Kingston Upon Hull West and Hessle
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many people in Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle constituency have received trans vaginal mesh implants as part of their treatment for (a) pelvic organ prolapse repair and (b) stress urinary incontinence; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 16 October 2017

This information is not held centrally.

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