Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-4 out of 4
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Lord Trees
Asked on: 20 February 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Statutory Instruments
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many statutory instruments in total the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (1) has laid before Parliament, and (2) is planning to lay, in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and how many such instruments have been approved by Parliament to date.
A
Answered on: 05 March 2019

Defra has already laid a substantial number of the statutory instruments necessary in order to maintain a fully functioning statute book for our departure from the EU.

As of 4 March, in relation to the UK leaving the EU, we have laid a total of 114 statutory instruments (23 of which were on behalf of Northern Ireland) before Parliament, and plan to lay a further 11 (3 on behalf of Northern Ireland). We have made a total of 63 SIs.

Q
Asked by Lord Trees
Asked on: 07 February 2019
Department for Education
Veterinary Medicine: Training
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to build capacity in the Higher Education system to address the shortage of veterinary surgeons in England.
Answered on: 15 February 2019

The government recognises the importance of ensuring there are sufficient skilled graduates to meet industry demand. We are working with different veterinary sector stakeholders, to look at ways of increasing veterinary school capacity and the number of graduates in all UK vet schools going forward.

The government also subsidises the costs of teaching high-cost subjects such as veterinary medicine, where tuition fee income does not meet the costs of teaching. This is supported through the teaching grant allocated annually to providers via the Office for Students.

In 2018/19, the recurrent teaching grant provided by the government totals £1,290 million, of which £681 million is specifically targeted at supporting high-cost subjects, including veterinary science. This is currently around £10,000 per veterinary science student.

English higher education providers are autonomous institutions. Their institutional autonomy, which includes decisions as to what they teach, is protected by the Higher Education and Research Act 2017.

However, the lifting of student number controls in 2015/16 means that there is no longer an artificial cap on the numbers of students that higher education providers are able to recruit, including for veterinary science courses.

There has been progress in the sector in increasing places for veterinary students. The first cohort of students to graduate with the University of Surrey's new veterinary degree is scheduled for July 2019, thereby bringing more domestically trained vets in to the profession. Alongside this, the new Harper and Keele Veterinary School will be commencing its new 5 year degree course in 2020.

Q
Asked by Lord Trees
Asked on: 01 February 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Strength in Places Fund
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to expedite (1) the decision-making process, and (2) the processing of applications for the UK Research and Innovation Strength in Places initiative.
A
Answered by: Lord Henley
Answered on: 14 February 2019

During 2018, UK Research and Innovation (UKRI) invited ‘expression of interest’ bids into Wave 1 of the Strength in Places Fund. All eligible bids were considered by an independent assessment panel, which made recommendations to UKRI. UKRI is currently in the process of finalising the assessment process, and will notify those bids proceeding to the full stage in due course.

Q
Asked by Lord Trees
Asked on: 22 May 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Professions: Qualifications
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made on the mutual recognition of professional qualifications in the Brexit negotiations.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 04 June 2018

As part of the Withdrawal Agreement, we have agreed the continued recognition of qualifications for residents and frontier workers, where recognition decisions were received or where recognition procedures were ongoing, before the end of the implementation period. This will cover qualifications recognised under the MRPQ directive, lawyers practising under host title and approved statutory auditors.

There are a number of issues which the Commission deemed to be outside the scope of withdrawal negotiations, including important rights such as home title practise for lawyers and the status of licenses and certificates. We will seek to reach an agreement with the EU that will cover these outstanding issues in the negotiations on the future economic partnership.

The Prime Minister has been clear that we want UK professional qualifications to continue to be recognised across the EU in the future, and vice versa. This makes sense, given that they are already recognised. The March European Council agreed guidelines for negotiations on our future relationship, which reference the desire of the EU27 to include ambitious provisions on the recognition of qualifications. This is a useful starting point for our negotiations on the future economic partnership.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-4 out of 4
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100