Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Leader of the House
Privy Council
Commons
To ask the Leader of the House, when the Privy Council will next meet.
A
Answered by: Mr Jacob Rees-Mogg
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The next scheduled Privy Council meeting will be held on Wednesday 9 October 2019.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 16 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Green Belt: Planning Permission
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many planning applications on Green Belt land in (a) Walsall South constituency and (b) England have been referred to the National Planning Unit in each of the last 10 years.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 22 July 2019

I refer the Hon. Member to the answer to question UIN 277187 on 18 July.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Green Belt: Walsall South
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many planning applications on Green Belt land in (a) Walsall South constituency and (b) England were called in by the Secretary of State in each of the last 10 years.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 18 July 2019
Holding answer received on 18 July 2019

Over the last 10 years, the Secretary of State has not called-in any planning applications on Green Belt land in Walsall MBC.

We do not hold information on the number of planning applications on Green Belt land approved after referral to the Secretary of State.

Over the last 10 years, the following number of planning applications on Green Belt land in Walsall MBC were referred to the Secretary of State:

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

4

4

4

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

To obtain accurate data for Green Belt applications in England over each of the last 10 years would involve a disproportionate amount of resource and would not be possible within a reasonable timescale.

Grouped Questions: 277187
Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 15 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Green Belt
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many planning applications on the Green Belt in (a) Walsall South constituency and (b) England were approved after referral to the National Planning Unit in each of the last 10 years.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 18 July 2019
Holding answer received on 18 July 2019

Over the last 10 years, the Secretary of State has not called-in any planning applications on Green Belt land in Walsall MBC.

We do not hold information on the number of planning applications on Green Belt land approved after referral to the Secretary of State.

Over the last 10 years, the following number of planning applications on Green Belt land in Walsall MBC were referred to the Secretary of State:

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

4

4

4

1

0

0

0

0

0

1

To obtain accurate data for Green Belt applications in England over each of the last 10 years would involve a disproportionate amount of resource and would not be possible within a reasonable timescale.

Grouped Questions: 277186
Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 April 2019
Northern Ireland Office
Northern Ireland Office: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Northern Ireland, whether her Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments on the UK leaving the EU; and if she will publish the criteria her Department used to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: John Penrose
Answered on: 29 April 2019

Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point. This objective was achieved, so the question of reprioritisation has not arisen.

The Northern Ireland Office had one SI required to correct a deficiency for EU Exit, the Flags (Northern Ireland) (Amendment) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, which were approved by Parliament on 3 April 2019. The Regulations will be made post-Exit day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 April 2019
Ministry of Defence
Ministry of Defence: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments on UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department used to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Mark Lancaster
Answered on: 29 April 2019

The Ministry of Defence has not deprioritised any European Union (EU) exit Statutory Instruments (SIs). Given the extension to Article 50, the Department will consider whether any further EU exit SIs will need to be brought forward to amend any EU Regulations, which have come into force since the original EU Exit SI programme was finalised. The Department will keep this under careful review.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 April 2019
Department for International Trade
Department for International Trade: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: George Hollingbery
Answered on: 25 April 2019

Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

Each SI was carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.

The considerations and assessments made have meant that the Government has been able to lay the critical secondary legislation required before we exit the EU.

The laying of EU Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependent on the type of SI. The Government remains confident of passing the necessary legislation required to ensure a functioning statute book by exit day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 April 2019
Department for Exiting the European Union
Department for Exiting the European Union: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: James Cleverly
Answered on: 25 April 2019

The Government’s objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

Each SI was carefully considered on a case-by-case basis, which has meant that the Government has been able to prioritise the secondary legislation required.

The Department for Exiting the European Union has not deprioritised any of its statutory instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 April 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Jake Berry
Answered on: 25 April 2019

Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

My Department successfully made all of its intended EU exit SIs before April 12. My Department will continue to assess the implications of our departure from the EU on our legislation, and will continue to make the necessary amendments to ensure the a fully functioning statute book.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 April 2019
Department for Education
Department for Education: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 25 April 2019

The government’s objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

All of the Department for Education’s essential ‘no deal’ Exit Statutory Instruments (SIs) were made prior to 29 March 2019. Each Exit SI in the department was carefully considered on a case-by-case basis. Exit SIs which were deprioritised were done so because they made very minor technical changes which were not considered essential to be in force for the original Exit Day, and where there would be very little or no material impact from them not being in place for ‘day 1’.

These considerations and assessments made have meant that the government has been able to lay the critical secondary legislation required before we exit the EU. The department does expect to lay its remaining ‘no deal’ SIs, which were deprioritised ahead of 29 March, shortly. Given the extension to Article 50, the department will consider whether any further Exit SIs will need to be brought forward to amend any EU Regulations which have come into force since the original Exit SI programme was finalised, to ensure a functioning statute book ahead of a potential ‘no deal’ exit. The department will keep this under careful review.

The laying of Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependent on the type of SI. The government remains confident of passing the necessary legislation required to ensure a functioning statute book by Exit Day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 April 2019
Cabinet Office
Cabinet Office: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Kevin Foster
Answered on: 25 April 2019

Cabinet Office did not deprioritise any SIs and they were all laid in time for Exit Day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 April 2019
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 23 April 2019

Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

Each SI was carefully considered on a case-by-case basis to assess the impact of it not being in force on exit day, which informed scheduling decisions. These considerations and assessments have meant that the Government has been able to lay the critical secondary legislation required before we exit the EU.

In the case of the Electronic Communications (Amendment etc.) (EU Exit) Regulations 2019, the department accepted the recommendation of the European Statutory Instruments Committee that the SI should use the affirmative procedure, notwithstanding that this would mean the SI would be unlikely to come into force on exit day (as defined, at that time, as 29 March 2019). This was because it was not essential that the provision made by the SI be in force from exit day, principally because it made very minor technical changes or revoked EU law which would be redundant if retained on the UK's statute book.

The laying of EU Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependent on the type of SI. The Government remains confident of passing the necessary legislation required to ensure a functioning statute book by exit day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 April 2019
Home Office
Home Office: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 23 April 2019

The Government’s objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

Each SI was considered carefully, on a case-by-case basis; the Government’s objective was met. Public impact was the prime consideration, and so if an instrument was needed only to make minor technical changes that were deemed inessential for exit day, then those fell later in the plan than others.

These considerations and assessments made have meant that the Government has been able to lay the critical secondary legislation required before we exit the EU.
The laying of EU Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependant on the type of SI. The Government remains confident of passing the necessary legislation required to ensure a functioning statute book by exit day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 April 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Department of Health and Social Care: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Stephen Hammond
Answered on: 16 April 2019
Holding answer received on 15 April 2019

The Department has not deprioritised any European Union exit Statutory Instruments (SIs).

Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by ‘exit day’ and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point. Each SI was carefully considered on a case-by-case basis, enabling the Department to lay the critical secondary legislation required before we exit the EU.

Given the extension to Article 50, the Department will consider whether any further EU exit SIs will need to be brought forward to amend any EU Regulations which have come into force since the original EU Exit SI programme was finalised, to ensure a functioning statute book ahead of a potential ‘no deal’ exit. The Department will keep this under careful review.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 April 2019
Department for Work and Pensions
Department for Work and Pensions: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if she will publish the criteria her Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 16 April 2019
Holding answer received on 15 April 2019

The Department has not deprioritised any statutory instruments as part of the UK preparations to leave the EU. The Department for Work and Pension continues to work closely with the Department for Exiting the European Union and other Government Departments and preparations have been undertaken by staff as part of their regular duties.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 April 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Sir Alan Duncan
Answered on: 15 April 2019

​In preparation for no deal, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) has laid Statutory Instruments (SIs) relating to sanctions, the Kimberley Process and the Overseas Territories, under the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act (2018) and EU Withdrawal Act (2018). On sanctions, the FCO decided to lay Regulations before exit for those regimes with particular UK interests and where the EU's designations might change after exit. It was decided that it was not necessary to have a full domestic SI in place for other regimes for exit day, because it was possible to rely on retained EU law for a period.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 April 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: David Rutley
Answered on: 11 April 2019

Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

Defra requires 125 SIs to be in force for Exit day of which 122 have been laid and the other 3 SIs will be laid before Exit.

Each SI that is planned to be laid after 12 April has been carefully considered to ensure that this would not have legal or other consequences that cannot be addressed by temporary non legislative arrangements. In most cases the SIs would apply only very minor technical corrections to current legislation which would not impact operability or transfer functions from the EU which would not be required in the immediate period after Exit. We have also consulted the Devolved Administrations in reaching these conclusions.

As a consequence of this due diligence, Defra will have laid all critical secondary legislation immediately required for EU Exit. The laying of EU Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependent on the type of SI and determined under the relevant primary powers.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 April 2019
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Chris Grayling
Answered on: 11 April 2019

Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

The laying date for each SI was carefully considered on a case-by-case basis. SIs which we deprioritised were done so because they made very minor technical changes which we did not consider essential to be in force for exit day, and where there would be very little or no material impact from them not being in place for ‘day 1’.

These considerations and assessments have meant that the Department has been able to lay the critical secondary legislation required before we exit the EU.

The laying of EU Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependent on the type of SI.

The Government remains confident of passing the necessary legislation required to ensure a functioning statute book by exit day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 April 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 11 April 2019

The Government’s objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit Day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

Each SI in the Department was carefully considered on a case-by-case basis.

As part of this analysis, BEIS officials considered the material impact of each SI and whether the changes required were minor and technical in nature, and therefore not deemed essential to be in force from day one.

These considerations and assessments have meant that my Department has been able to lay the critical secondary legislation required before we exit the EU.

The laying of EU Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependent on the type of SI. The Government remains confident of passing the necessary legislation required to ensure a functioning statute book by Exit Day.

Q
Asked by Valerie Vaz
(Walsall South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 April 2019
Treasury
Treasury: Brexit
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether his Department has deprioritised any Statutory Instruments in relation to the UK leaving the EU; and if he will publish the criteria his Department uses to deprioritise those Instruments.
A
Answered by: Robert Jenrick
Answered on: 11 April 2019

To date HM Treasury and HMRC have laid 54 and 48 EU Exit Statutory Instruments (SIs), and both departments are confident of delivering essential legislation in time for Exit day. Our objective has always been to have a functioning statute book in place by Exit day and to ensure that the most critical secondary legislation was made by this point.

Across the two departments, a small number of SIs will come into force after Exit day; this was planned due to the fact that these SIs make minor technical amendments to earlier EU Exit legislation and were therefore not required to be in place by Exit day.

The laying of EU Exit SIs allows Parliament to fulfil its essential scrutiny role. The exact nature of this scrutiny, and the steps required before an SI completes its passage, is dependent on the type of SI.

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