Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
(South Shields)
Asked on: 03 May 2018
Ministry of Justice
Young Offender Institutions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many children in young offender institutions were locked in their cells for (a) 22 hours a day and (b) more than 22 hours a day in each of the last 5 years.
A
Corrected answer by: Edward Argar
Corrected on: 29 October 2018
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 14 May 2018.
The correct answer should have been:

The safety and welfare of young people held in custody is one of our highest priorities and is fundamental to the proper functioning of our justice system. We are committed to reforming youth custody so that it is safer for both young people and staff, as well as being better equipped to help young people turn their lives around.

There are some occasions when young people in custody are putting themselves or others at risk, during which segregation can be used as a last resort for limited periods of time when no other form of intervention is suitable. Any decision to remove a young person from association is subject to regular review and a range of safeguarding measures are in place to ensure appropriate oversight of their care. There are careful limits placed on the length of time for which young people can be removed from association without review of the decision to remove.

Please see the number of hours of segregation that young people have been placed on, broken down via each Young Offender Institute (YOI) within each of the past five years. Please note that the data collected below is classified by the number of hours young people in total have been on segregation in each current YOI establishment. We do not have a breakdown via the number of young people that have been in segregation and nor the number of hours spent per segregation.

No. of Hours young people in 'Segregation' for

Establishment

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Sub-total

HMYOI Cookham Wood

744

2009

2392

2000

2576

710

10431

HMYOI Feltham

2232

1229

1286

1139

1274

279

7439

HMYIO Parc

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

HMYOI Werrington

1003

1185

1732

2045

1765

283

8013

HMYOI Wetherby

1578

1400

1592

1589

1394

263

7816

Sub-Total

25815557

25855823

33247002

36346773

31597009

5461535

1582933699

Notes

  • This is unpublished data that is not in the public domain.
  • 2018 figures only apply to the months from January to March 2018.
  • We have not included data for HMYOI Ashfield, HMYOI Hindley and HMYOI Warren Hill. These establishments also held young people at times during the period requested but were all decommissioned.
  • The data from HMYOI Parc is not comparable as it relates to single separation data – not time on segregation.
  • This data includes some 18 year olds who remain in the under 18 secure estate.
  • These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 14 May 2018

The safety and welfare of young people held in custody is one of our highest priorities and is fundamental to the proper functioning of our justice system. We are committed to reforming youth custody so that it is safer for both young people and staff, as well as being better equipped to help young people turn their lives around.

There are some occasions when young people in custody are putting themselves or others at risk, during which segregation can be used as a last resort for limited periods of time when no other form of intervention is suitable. Any decision to remove a young person from association is subject to regular review and a range of safeguarding measures are in place to ensure appropriate oversight of their care. There are careful limits placed on the length of time for which young people can be removed from association without review of the decision to remove.

Please see the number of hours of segregation that young people have been placed on, broken down via each Young Offender Institute (YOI) within each of the past five years. Please note that the data collected below is classified by the number of hours young people in total have been on segregation in each current YOI establishment. We do not have a breakdown via the number of young people that have been in segregation and nor the number of hours spent per segregation.

No. of Hours young people in 'Segregation' for

Establishment

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Sub-total

HMYOI Cookham Wood

744

2009

2392

2000

2576

710

10431

HMYOI Feltham

2232

1229

1286

1139

1274

279

7439

HMYIO Parc

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

N/A

HMYOI Werrington

1003

1185

1732

2045

1765

283

8013

HMYOI Wetherby

1578

1400

1592

1589

1394

263

7816

Sub-Total

25815557

25855823

33247002

36346773

31597009

5461535

1582933699

Notes

  • This is unpublished data that is not in the public domain.
  • 2018 figures only apply to the months from January to March 2018.
  • We have not included data for HMYOI Ashfield, HMYOI Hindley and HMYOI Warren Hill. These establishments also held young people at times during the period requested but were all decommissioned.
  • The data from HMYOI Parc is not comparable as it relates to single separation data – not time on segregation.
  • This data includes some 18 year olds who remain in the under 18 secure estate.
  • These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.
Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 24 April 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners: Females
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the cost to the public purse has been of women serving prison sentences for non-violent crimes since 1 January 2018.
A
Corrected answer by: Dr Phillip Lee
Corrected on: 20 June 2018
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 02 May 2018.
The correct answer should have been:

At 31 March 20187, there were 2,271 sentenced females in the prison population for non-violent crimes (everything but violence against the person) and an additional 445 on remand. This information is publicly available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-to-december-2017.

Her Majesty’s Prisons and Probation Service (HMPPS), does not calculate separately the average cost of prisoners by any type of offence. However, HMPPS routinely publishes average costs per prisoner, costs per prison place and overall prison unit costs for each private and public sector prison in England and Wales, including all categories of the women’s estate. This information is produced on an annual basis and is published after the end of each financial year.

The most recent published figures, for financial year 2016-17, can be accessed on the www.gov.uk website from the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-performance-statistics-2016-to-2017. Prison unit costs can be found within the Excel document Costs per prison place and cost per prisoner by individual prison establishment in the ‘Cost by Establishment’ tab.

The courts have a range of sentences at their disposal including community sentences, suspended sentences, fines and custodial sentences. Custodial sentences are reserved for the most serious offences. Women diverted from custody and into community sentences, also have an associated cost to the taxpayer.

A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 02 May 2018

At 31 March 20187, there were 2,271 sentenced females in the prison population for non-violent crimes (everything but violence against the person) and an additional 445 on remand. This information is publicly available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/offender-management-statistics-quarterly-october-to-december-2017.

Her Majesty’s Prisons and Probation Service (HMPPS), does not calculate separately the average cost of prisoners by any type of offence. However, HMPPS routinely publishes average costs per prisoner, costs per prison place and overall prison unit costs for each private and public sector prison in England and Wales, including all categories of the women’s estate. This information is produced on an annual basis and is published after the end of each financial year.

The most recent published figures, for financial year 2016-17, can be accessed on the www.gov.uk website from the following link: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/prison-performance-statistics-2016-to-2017. Prison unit costs can be found within the Excel document Costs per prison place and cost per prisoner by individual prison establishment in the ‘Cost by Establishment’ tab.

The courts have a range of sentences at their disposal including community sentences, suspended sentences, fines and custodial sentences. Custodial sentences are reserved for the most serious offences. Women diverted from custody and into community sentences, also have an associated cost to the taxpayer.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 22 May 2018
Ministry of Justice
Ministry of Justice: Procurement
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many contractors his Department employs who have worked for his Department for (a) up to one year, (b) over one and up to five years, (c) over five years and up to ten years and (d) over 10 years.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

We do not hold a complete set of information on tenure centrally. To collect this information for the whole of MoJ could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Q
(South Shields)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Young Offenders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of children that spent a night in custody in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

Owing to changes in case management systems, information is available for the last three years only: it relates to the total number of nights spent (not children) in custody by young people under 18 and is provided in the table below:

Number of nights spent by young people under 18 in custody

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

3,192

2,730

2,347

These figures include all nights spent in custody by children and young people under 18 who have been sentenced or remanded by the courts and have subsequently been released to the community: have transitioned to the over 18 secure estate, have transferred to a Mental Health Unit; or have turned 18 years old. They do not include time spent in police custody. A child or young person is counted more than once if he or she had more than one custodial episode which ended within the year.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large-scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.

Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and which of the recommendations set out in the November 2017 report into Oakhill Secure Training Centre due to be completed (a) immediately, (b) within three months and (c) within six months have been met.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The information requested is given in the table below:

Recommendation

Timescale

Status

All young people’s plans, interventions and risk assessments require urgent reviewing to ensure that they take full account of the young people’s offending histories, abuse histories, vulnerabilities, and other key events in their lives. Risk assessments should be regularly updated to ensure that they are effective and help to keep all young people and staff safe.

Immediate

Completed

All staff who work with young people should be aware of their risk and behaviour management plans. These plans should clearly set out what staff should do to maximise the safety of all young people and staff.

Immediate

Completed

Ensure that all managers at all levels are sufficiently competent and experienced to execute their roles effectively.

Immediate

Completed

All staff should be confident and consistent in ensuring expected standards of behaviour and that rules, incentives, rewards and sanctions are applied fairly.

Immediate

Completed

All allegations of abuse or harm should be responded to in accordance with internal policies, statutory guidance, and to the satisfaction of external safeguarding partners such as the local authority and the police service.

Immediate

Completed

Ensure that all incidents of bullying are responded to swiftly, investigations are thorough and completed, and subsequent actions are monitored to reduce bullying.

Immediate

Completed

Young people’s psychological needs, including their offending behaviour, must be addressed swiftly with appropriate interventions and young people should have access to sufficient psychiatric and psychological services.

Immediate

Completed

All force and restraint should be proportionate and subject to independent oversight.

Immediate

Completed

Suicide and self-harm assessments and plans should be fully recorded and take account of all available information when being constructed and reviewed.

Immediate

Completed

All single separations should be properly authorised and recorded. There should be a clear policy on longer term separation that provides for a full daily regime and specifies the need for concerted efforts to resolve the issues leading to the separation.

Immediate

Completed

Ensure that all searches are proportionate to risks and are fully recorded.

Immediate

Completed

Improve communication and collaboration between education staff and unit staff to ensure effective joint working to better support young people’s behaviour and attendance.

Immediate

Completed

All impediments to implementing the new curriculum should be addressed so that it can be got underway. This includes vetting new staff as swiftly as possible and refurbishing the teaching areas.

Immediate

Completed

Review the policy and procedures relating to the use of bedroom shower viewing panels to better promote young people’s safety, privacy and dignity. The use of these panels should be appropriately monitored and authorised to reduce the potential for misuse.

Immediate

Completed

Ensure that all handcuff use is properly authorised and recorded, including any times when handcuffs are removed.

Immediate

Completed

Managers should immediately and regularly assess the safety of the environment and remove or repair all hazards promptly.

Immediate

Completed

Ensure that substance misuse staff receive formal recorded supervision.

Immediate

Completed

All relevant staff should be competent in assessing risk and understanding the nature of offending.

3 months

Completed

Improve and then maintain the condition of the residential units to ensure that they provide a suitable standard of accommodation to meet young people’s needs.

3 months

Completed

The use of ICT should be resumed to improve teaching resources and enable young people to develop these skills and achieve accreditation.

3 months

Completed

Good standards of cleanliness should be maintained throughout the centre, with young people being encouraged and assisted to take responsibility for their rooms and communal areas.

3 months

Completed

Extend CCTV coverage, particularly in those areas that young people repeatedly describe as unsafe, including the education department and the stairwells.

6 months

In progress

Increase the opportunities for young people to express their views about the centre and be involved in future developments.

6 months

Completed

Update the information available to young people when first admitted to the centre to ensure that it is child-friendly and provides an accurate description of what they can expect.

6 months

In progress

Develop an effective resettlement strategy informed by a comprehensive needs analysis.

6 months

Completed

The centre should work with the Youth Custody Service to reduce the number of young people who are admitted late at night to the centre.

6 months

Completed

Ensure that all measures are in place to reduce the potential for any security intelligence reports to be mislaid.

6 months

Completed

Food provision and portion sizes should be reviewed to ensure that they are adequate and appetising.

6 months

Completed

Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours on average per day young people have spent unlocked from their rooms in Oakhill Secure Training Centre in each month of 2018 to date.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The requested information is provided below.

Average hours spent unlocked from room, by month in 2018

Jan

13.98

Feb

13.99

Mar

13.99

Apr

13.99

Information for May is not yet available.

Data on average hours per day young people have spent unlocked from their rooms are collected by the provider and submitted to the Youth Custody Service via summary level monthly returns. The data are not extracted from YCS systems.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.

Good education in and out of the classroom and purposeful activity are the key to unlocking a secure and stable future for young people and I am determined to drive forward our comprehensive reforms so that young people are equipped with the skills to live successful, crime-free lives on release.

Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many hours of taught education and vocational training on average per young person per week have been delivered in Oakhill Secure Training Centre in each month of 2018 to date.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The information requested is provided in the following table:

Hours of taught education and vocational training by month in 2018

Jan

24.8

Feb

24.5

Mar

24.2

Apr

23.4

Information for May is not yet available.

Data on hours of education and training are collected by the provider and submitted to the Youth Custody Service via summary level monthly returns. The data are not extracted from YCS systems.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.

Good education in and out of the classroom and purposeful activity are the key to unlocking a secure and stable future for young people and I am determined to drive forward our comprehensive reforms so that young people are equipped with the skills to live successful, crime-free lives on release.

Q
Asked by Rachel Reeves
(Leeds West)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Ministry of Justice: Non-departmental Public Bodies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many (a) women and (b) men his Department has appointed to each of its non-Departmental Public Bodies in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The Commissioner for Public Appointments completes and publishes an annual data survey of all new appointments and reappointments made to boards of public bodies by Government including the overall gender diversity.

Data on the gender diversity of new non-executive appointees to public boards for 2012 to 2015 is published on Gov.uk https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/diversity-in-public-appointments .

Figures on gender diversity of new non-executive appointees to Non Departmental Public Bodies in MoJ in 2016 and 2017 can be found in the attached table.

Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Criminal Injuries Compensation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been refused compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority for having an unspent conviction in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme clearly sets out that payments will be refused where the applicant has an unspent conviction specifically excluded by the Scheme. This includes custodial sentences and community orders.

In 2017, CICA received over 31,000 new claims for criminal injuries compensation. Payments totalling over £142 million were paid out in the same year to victims of violent crime.

PQ150726

The number of applicants who have been refused compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) for having an unspent conviction is:

Financial year

Applications refused because of unspent convictions

2010-11

4,208

2011-12

4,322

2012-13

4,944

2013-14

4,324

2014-15

1,817

2015-16

1,662

2016-17

1,125

2017-18

2,314

PQ150727

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

PQ150728

CICA does not hold the information requested.

Grouped Questions: 150727 | 150728
Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Criminal Injuries Compensation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been refused compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority for having an unspent conviction since 2010 by category of that unspent offence.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme clearly sets out that payments will be refused where the applicant has an unspent conviction specifically excluded by the Scheme. This includes custodial sentences and community orders.

In 2017, CICA received over 31,000 new claims for criminal injuries compensation. Payments totalling over £142 million were paid out in the same year to victims of violent crime.

PQ150726

The number of applicants who have been refused compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) for having an unspent conviction is:

Financial year

Applications refused because of unspent convictions

2010-11

4,208

2011-12

4,322

2012-13

4,944

2013-14

4,324

2014-15

1,817

2015-16

1,662

2016-17

1,125

2017-18

2,314

PQ150727

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

PQ150728

CICA does not hold the information requested.

Grouped Questions: 150726 | 150728
Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Criminal Injuries Compensation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people have been refused compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority for having an unspent conviction since 2010 by category of criminal offence which caused their injury.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The Criminal Injuries Compensation Scheme clearly sets out that payments will be refused where the applicant has an unspent conviction specifically excluded by the Scheme. This includes custodial sentences and community orders.

In 2017, CICA received over 31,000 new claims for criminal injuries compensation. Payments totalling over £142 million were paid out in the same year to victims of violent crime.

PQ150726

The number of applicants who have been refused compensation by the Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority (CICA) for having an unspent conviction is:

Financial year

Applications refused because of unspent convictions

2010-11

4,208

2011-12

4,322

2012-13

4,944

2013-14

4,324

2014-15

1,817

2015-16

1,662

2016-17

1,125

2017-18

2,314

PQ150727

The information requested could only be obtained at disproportionate cost.

PQ150728

CICA does not hold the information requested.

Grouped Questions: 150726 | 150727
Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Ministry of Justice: Public Expenditure
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reason his Department's budget allocations have not been fully concluded in time for the publication of its estimates memorandum.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

Earlier this year, the new Secretary of State set out his priorities for 2018 [as set out in the recently published Single Departmental Plan]. The allocations process ensured that the activities and funding of the Department aligned to these priorities. Although this work had not been finalised at the time that the Main Supply Estimate was published, all areas were aware of budget proposals to allow them to plan sufficiently, and appropriate governance arrangements were in place for the start of the financial year.

Q
(Christchurch)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Post-mortems
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the Government's policy is on the employment by Her Majesty's coroners of independent forensic pathologists; and what guidelines apply to the timeline for completion of post-mortems when carried out by such pathologists.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

Where it is suspected that a death is as a result of homicide the coroner must consult with a chief of police on who should undertake the post-mortem. The Home Office maintains a register of suitably experienced and qualified forensic pathologists to conduct forensic post mortem examinations. The coroner will engage a pathologist from the register.

Coroners have powers under the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 to ask a registered medical practitioner to undertake a post-mortem examination. The Coroners (Investigations) Regulations 2013 provide that the report must be made to the coroner as soon as practicable after the examination. I will raise the question of timeliness with the Department of Health and Social Care and will write to my honourable Friend.

Grouped Questions: 150552
Q
(Christchurch)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 06 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Post-mortems
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to ensure that when a coroner instructs a pathologist to carry out a post mortem examination to establish the cause of a person's death that examination is concluded within a reasonable time.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 11 June 2018

Where it is suspected that a death is as a result of homicide the coroner must consult with a chief of police on who should undertake the post-mortem. The Home Office maintains a register of suitably experienced and qualified forensic pathologists to conduct forensic post mortem examinations. The coroner will engage a pathologist from the register.

Coroners have powers under the Coroners and Justice Act 2009 to ask a registered medical practitioner to undertake a post-mortem examination. The Coroners (Investigations) Regulations 2013 provide that the report must be made to the coroner as soon as practicable after the examination. I will raise the question of timeliness with the Department of Health and Social Care and will write to my honourable Friend.

Grouped Questions: 150551
Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of its contractual obligations in relation to Oakhill Secure Training Centre G4S has met in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 06 June 2018

We have been clear that performance at Oakhill needs to improve and we are robustly monitoring performance against the contract and are clear that all options remain on the table.

The Contract for Oakhill STC is between the Secretary of State for Justice and STC Milton Keynes Ltd (the Contractor), of which G4S is their Operating Sub-Contractor. We therefore do not have information on the proportion of contractual obligations that G4S has met.

The Contract does not include Improvement Notices as a contractual remedy. Other mechanisms are in place to manage the contractual performance.

The contract requires the Secretary of State for Justice’s approval to a change in Operating Sub-Contractor. To date this approval process has not been triggered.

There is no intention to publish any of the YCS Monitoring Team’s findings.

Grouped Questions: 148956 | 148957 | 148958
Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Oral Answer of 23 January 2018 on Oakhill Secure Training Centre, Official Report, column 117, if he will publish the findings of his Department's Monitoring team into Oakhill Secure Training Centre.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 06 June 2018

We have been clear that performance at Oakhill needs to improve and we are robustly monitoring performance against the contract and are clear that all options remain on the table.

The Contract for Oakhill STC is between the Secretary of State for Justice and STC Milton Keynes Ltd (the Contractor), of which G4S is their Operating Sub-Contractor. We therefore do not have information on the proportion of contractual obligations that G4S has met.

The Contract does not include Improvement Notices as a contractual remedy. Other mechanisms are in place to manage the contractual performance.

The contract requires the Secretary of State for Justice’s approval to a change in Operating Sub-Contractor. To date this approval process has not been triggered.

There is no intention to publish any of the YCS Monitoring Team’s findings.

Grouped Questions: 148955 | 148957 | 148958
Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether any improvement notices have been issued by his Department to Oakhill Secure Training Centre; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 06 June 2018

We have been clear that performance at Oakhill needs to improve and we are robustly monitoring performance against the contract and are clear that all options remain on the table.

The Contract for Oakhill STC is between the Secretary of State for Justice and STC Milton Keynes Ltd (the Contractor), of which G4S is their Operating Sub-Contractor. We therefore do not have information on the proportion of contractual obligations that G4S has met.

The Contract does not include Improvement Notices as a contractual remedy. Other mechanisms are in place to manage the contractual performance.

The contract requires the Secretary of State for Justice’s approval to a change in Operating Sub-Contractor. To date this approval process has not been triggered.

There is no intention to publish any of the YCS Monitoring Team’s findings.

Grouped Questions: 148955 | 148956 | 148958
Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether G4S has asked for his Department's approval to sell Oakhill Secure Training Centre.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 06 June 2018

We have been clear that performance at Oakhill needs to improve and we are robustly monitoring performance against the contract and are clear that all options remain on the table.

The Contract for Oakhill STC is between the Secretary of State for Justice and STC Milton Keynes Ltd (the Contractor), of which G4S is their Operating Sub-Contractor. We therefore do not have information on the proportion of contractual obligations that G4S has met.

The Contract does not include Improvement Notices as a contractual remedy. Other mechanisms are in place to manage the contractual performance.

The contract requires the Secretary of State for Justice’s approval to a change in Operating Sub-Contractor. To date this approval process has not been triggered.

There is no intention to publish any of the YCS Monitoring Team’s findings.

Grouped Questions: 148955 | 148956 | 148957
Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Oakhill Secure Training Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, on how many occasions assaults requiring hospital treatment have occurred at Oakhill Secure Training Centre in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 06 June 2018

The safety of young people in our care is our priority.

The table below provides a breakdown of the number of the number of serious injuries (requiring hospital treatment) to young people placed at Oakhill STC, as the result of an assault from 2010 to 2017.

These figures are a further breakdown of published data.

Table 1: The number of serious injuries (requiring hospital treatment) to young people placed at Oakhill STC, as the result of an assault, 2010 to 2017(1)(2)(3)(4)(5)

Year Ending December

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017(4)

Total

Serious injury (requiring hospital treatment)

1

2

1

0

8

3

7

6

28

(1) Data is presented by calendar year.

(2) This data includes all serious injuries to children and young people requiring hospital treatment and may therefore include the perpetrator as well as the victim.

(3) In April 2016 there were some small changes to the counting rules for proven assault incidents requiring medical treatment. The full impact of these counting rules changes is not known, but it is likely to be small. However care should be taken when comparing the number of incidents requiring medical treatment figures since 2016/17 with those from 2015/16 or before. See A Guide to Youth Justice Statistics for more information.

(4) Data for 2017 includes January to March 2017 only.

(5) This data is a count of serious injury (requiring hospital treatment) to young people only and does not include staff or to others.

Please note that this is not the distinct number of children and young people as a single child or young person may be involved in more than one incident which involved an injury. Due to the way the data are collected we are unable to identify the number of distinct children and young people who are injured as a result of an assault. If more than one injury occurs during an incident, the most serious injury will be recorded.

This data includes any 18 year olds who remain in the under 18 secure estate.

Data on assaults are collected via summary level monthly returns. The data provided in this response has been derived from bespoke returns submitted to the Youth Justice Board by establishments. Data received from the establishments through monthly returns is validated through a reconciliation process on an annual basis.

These figures have been drawn from administrative IT systems, which, as with any large scale recording system, are subject to possible errors with data entry and processing and can be subject to change over time.

Q
Asked by Sandy Martin
(Ipswich)
Asked on: 24 May 2018
Ministry of Justice
Rape: Victim Support Schemes
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will review funding for rape crisis centres and make an assessment implications for (a) the perceived independence and (b) the advocacy role of those centres of financial dependence on police and crime commissioners.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 05 June 2018

The Government is committed to ensuring that victims of crime get the support they need to cope with and, as far as possible, recover from the effects of crime. Under the 2016-2020 Violence Against Women and Girls strategy, the Government made a commitment to maintain funding for rape support services at 2016/17 levels for the remainder of the spending review period and we continue to meet that commitment.

In 2017/18 we allocated around £7.2m to 99 independent Rape Support services across England and Wales to provide specialist support to female and male victims of sexual violence, including victims of child sexual abuse.

In 2017/18 we allocated Police and Crime Commissioners around £68m funding to commission or provide support services to meet the needs of victims of crime in their local areas, including victims of sexual violence.

Rape Support Centres receive funding from a range of sources, including the government, Police and Crime Commissioners, charitable trusts and foundations, and the National Health Service.

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