Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Asked on: 15 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Litter: Waste Disposal
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to make it easier for citizens to help keep land and roads clear of litter by ensuring Councils and Highways England carry out their obligations under the Environmental Protection Act 1990.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2019

Under section 91 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, any person who is aggrieved by the want of cleanliness of any relevant land or highway may bring proceedings in the magistrates’ court against the body responsible for cleaning it.

In the Litter Strategy, we made a commitment to review, by the end of this Parliament, the mechanism by which councils and other land-managers can be held to account for maintaining their land to the standards set out in the Code of Practice, considering a range of options to make it easier for citizens to hold land‑managers to account for delivering their responsibilities.

Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 19 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Fly-tipping
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many enforcement actions have been carried out by local authorities against fly-tippers in (a) Barnsley, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England in each year since 2010; and of those actions how many were fixed penalty notices.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 29 July 2019

Enforcement actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

699

10,357

568,052

2011 - 12

525

11,666

489,815

2012 - 13

503

10,555

425,235

2013 - 14

134

12,502

499,563

2014 - 15

152

19,083

514,914

2015 - 16

193

14,026

494,528

2016 - 17

299

13,783

475,784

2017 - 18

741

15,118

494,127

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Fixed penalty notice actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

In May 2016, local authorities in England were given the power to issue fixed penalty notices for small scale fly-tipping so these will be captured in the data for 2016/17 and 2017/18. Prior to this date, local authorities issued fly-tippers with fixed penalty notices in relation to littering, duty of care or anti-social behaviour.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

0

144

32,963

2011 - 12

0

134

39,314

2012 - 13

0

110

35,433

2013 - 14

0

132

36,835

2014 - 15

0

89

38,149

2015 - 16

0

81

35,888

2016 - 17

0

155

57,271

2017 - 18

9

175

68,711

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for tipper lorry load fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Note that the information can only be provided for local authorities in England and not for the UK. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£39,561

£3,007,304

2012 - 13

£22,461

£3,321,934

2013 - 14

£15,892

£4,233,056

2014 - 15

£27,435

£4,841,433

2015 - 16

£14,419

£3,969,584

2016 - 17

£14,125

£6,083,243

2017 - 18

£16,035

£6,472,430

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for significant multi-load fly-tipping reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£25,708

£1,083,106

2012 - 13

£4,189

£1,780,035

2013 - 14

£28,564

£1,982,186

2014 - 15

£8,170

£2,390,794

2015 - 16

£17,163

£1,469,067

2016 - 17

£14,808

£3,827,653

2017 - 18

£13,634

£5,745,020

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

The proportion of fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis that are categorised as tipper lorry load or larger (significant/multi-load) is summarised in the table below. The detailed breakdown is available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2011 - 12

15%

3%

2%

2012 - 13

11%

3%

2%

2013 - 14

8%

3%

3%

2014 - 15

4%

6%

3%

2015 - 16

6%

6%

3%

2016 - 17

5%

8%

3%

2017 - 18

6%

9%

3%

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Grouped Questions: 279422 | 279423 | 279424
Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 19 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Fly-tipping
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much has been spent on clearance costs for tipper lorry load fly-tipping by (a) Barnsley local authority and (b) other local authorities in the UK in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 29 July 2019

Enforcement actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

699

10,357

568,052

2011 - 12

525

11,666

489,815

2012 - 13

503

10,555

425,235

2013 - 14

134

12,502

499,563

2014 - 15

152

19,083

514,914

2015 - 16

193

14,026

494,528

2016 - 17

299

13,783

475,784

2017 - 18

741

15,118

494,127

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Fixed penalty notice actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

In May 2016, local authorities in England were given the power to issue fixed penalty notices for small scale fly-tipping so these will be captured in the data for 2016/17 and 2017/18. Prior to this date, local authorities issued fly-tippers with fixed penalty notices in relation to littering, duty of care or anti-social behaviour.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

0

144

32,963

2011 - 12

0

134

39,314

2012 - 13

0

110

35,433

2013 - 14

0

132

36,835

2014 - 15

0

89

38,149

2015 - 16

0

81

35,888

2016 - 17

0

155

57,271

2017 - 18

9

175

68,711

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for tipper lorry load fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Note that the information can only be provided for local authorities in England and not for the UK. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£39,561

£3,007,304

2012 - 13

£22,461

£3,321,934

2013 - 14

£15,892

£4,233,056

2014 - 15

£27,435

£4,841,433

2015 - 16

£14,419

£3,969,584

2016 - 17

£14,125

£6,083,243

2017 - 18

£16,035

£6,472,430

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for significant multi-load fly-tipping reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£25,708

£1,083,106

2012 - 13

£4,189

£1,780,035

2013 - 14

£28,564

£1,982,186

2014 - 15

£8,170

£2,390,794

2015 - 16

£17,163

£1,469,067

2016 - 17

£14,808

£3,827,653

2017 - 18

£13,634

£5,745,020

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

The proportion of fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis that are categorised as tipper lorry load or larger (significant/multi-load) is summarised in the table below. The detailed breakdown is available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2011 - 12

15%

3%

2%

2012 - 13

11%

3%

2%

2013 - 14

8%

3%

3%

2014 - 15

4%

6%

3%

2015 - 16

6%

6%

3%

2016 - 17

5%

8%

3%

2017 - 18

6%

9%

3%

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Grouped Questions: 279421 | 279423 | 279424
Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 19 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Fly-tipping
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how much has been spent on clearance costs for significant multi-load fly-tipping by (a) Barnsley local authority and (b) other local authorities in England in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 29 July 2019

Enforcement actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

699

10,357

568,052

2011 - 12

525

11,666

489,815

2012 - 13

503

10,555

425,235

2013 - 14

134

12,502

499,563

2014 - 15

152

19,083

514,914

2015 - 16

193

14,026

494,528

2016 - 17

299

13,783

475,784

2017 - 18

741

15,118

494,127

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Fixed penalty notice actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

In May 2016, local authorities in England were given the power to issue fixed penalty notices for small scale fly-tipping so these will be captured in the data for 2016/17 and 2017/18. Prior to this date, local authorities issued fly-tippers with fixed penalty notices in relation to littering, duty of care or anti-social behaviour.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

0

144

32,963

2011 - 12

0

134

39,314

2012 - 13

0

110

35,433

2013 - 14

0

132

36,835

2014 - 15

0

89

38,149

2015 - 16

0

81

35,888

2016 - 17

0

155

57,271

2017 - 18

9

175

68,711

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for tipper lorry load fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Note that the information can only be provided for local authorities in England and not for the UK. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£39,561

£3,007,304

2012 - 13

£22,461

£3,321,934

2013 - 14

£15,892

£4,233,056

2014 - 15

£27,435

£4,841,433

2015 - 16

£14,419

£3,969,584

2016 - 17

£14,125

£6,083,243

2017 - 18

£16,035

£6,472,430

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for significant multi-load fly-tipping reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£25,708

£1,083,106

2012 - 13

£4,189

£1,780,035

2013 - 14

£28,564

£1,982,186

2014 - 15

£8,170

£2,390,794

2015 - 16

£17,163

£1,469,067

2016 - 17

£14,808

£3,827,653

2017 - 18

£13,634

£5,745,020

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

The proportion of fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis that are categorised as tipper lorry load or larger (significant/multi-load) is summarised in the table below. The detailed breakdown is available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2011 - 12

15%

3%

2%

2012 - 13

11%

3%

2%

2013 - 14

8%

3%

3%

2014 - 15

4%

6%

3%

2015 - 16

6%

6%

3%

2016 - 17

5%

8%

3%

2017 - 18

6%

9%

3%

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Grouped Questions: 279421 | 279422 | 279424
Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 19 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Fly-tipping
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what estimate he has made of the proportion of fly-tipping incidents that were categorised as tipper lorry load size or larger in (a) Barnsley, (b) South Yorkshire and (c) England in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 29 July 2019

Enforcement actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

699

10,357

568,052

2011 - 12

525

11,666

489,815

2012 - 13

503

10,555

425,235

2013 - 14

134

12,502

499,563

2014 - 15

152

19,083

514,914

2015 - 16

193

14,026

494,528

2016 - 17

299

13,783

475,784

2017 - 18

741

15,118

494,127

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Fixed penalty notice actions reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below.

In May 2016, local authorities in England were given the power to issue fixed penalty notices for small scale fly-tipping so these will be captured in the data for 2016/17 and 2017/18. Prior to this date, local authorities issued fly-tippers with fixed penalty notices in relation to littering, duty of care or anti-social behaviour.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2010 - 11

0

144

32,963

2011 - 12

0

134

39,314

2012 - 13

0

110

35,433

2013 - 14

0

132

36,835

2014 - 15

0

89

38,149

2015 - 16

0

81

35,888

2016 - 17

0

155

57,271

2017 - 18

9

175

68,711

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for tipper lorry load fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Note that the information can only be provided for local authorities in England and not for the UK. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£39,561

£3,007,304

2012 - 13

£22,461

£3,321,934

2013 - 14

£15,892

£4,233,056

2014 - 15

£27,435

£4,841,433

2015 - 16

£14,419

£3,969,584

2016 - 17

£14,125

£6,083,243

2017 - 18

£16,035

£6,472,430

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Clearance costs for significant multi-load fly-tipping reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis are summarised in the table below. Details for individual local authorities are within the published datasets. Clearance costs are available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

England (excluding Barnsley)

2011 - 12

£25,708

£1,083,106

2012 - 13

£4,189

£1,780,035

2013 - 14

£28,564

£1,982,186

2014 - 15

£8,170

£2,390,794

2015 - 16

£17,163

£1,469,067

2016 - 17

£14,808

£3,827,653

2017 - 18

£13,634

£5,745,020

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

The proportion of fly-tipping incidents reported by local authorities and published in annual statistics on a financial year basis that are categorised as tipper lorry load or larger (significant/multi-load) is summarised in the table below. The detailed breakdown is available from 2011/12.

Barnsley

South Yorkshire*

All England

2011 - 12

15%

3%

2%

2012 - 13

11%

3%

2%

2013 - 14

8%

3%

3%

2014 - 15

4%

6%

3%

2015 - 16

6%

6%

3%

2016 - 17

5%

8%

3%

2017 - 18

6%

9%

3%

*Barnsley, Doncaster, Rotherham and Sheffield

Source: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistical-data-sets/env24-fly-tipping-incidents-and-actions-taken-in-england

Grouped Questions: 279421 | 279422 | 279423
Q
Asked by Ross Thomson
(Aberdeen South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Seas and Oceans: Pollution
Commons
What steps he is taking to tackle marine pollution.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 25 July 2019

Our Resources and Waste Strategy sets out actions we are taking, including a ban on the sale and/or supply of plastic straws, stirrers and cotton buds by April 2020. We are leading global efforts through the Commonwealth Clean Ocean Alliance, which we support with a package worth up to £70m. We also work with the International Maritime Organisation to tackle litter from ships and are helping shape a new international action plan on shipping litter.

Q
Asked by Andrew Percy
(Brigg and Goole)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Litter: Fines
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if she will make an assessment of the potential merits of increasing the maximum fine for littering.
Q
Asked by Andrew Percy
(Brigg and Goole)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Litter
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps she is taking to tackle littering in the UK.
Asked on: 15 July 2019
Department for Transport
Roads: Litter
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a litter cleaning key performance indicator has been developed for inclusion in the next Road Investment Strategy for Highways England.
A
Answered on: 24 July 2019

The Performance Framework for the second Road Investment Strategy (RIS2) covering the period 2020-21 to 2024-25 is being finalised.

In Draft Road Investment Strategy 2 - Government objectives published in October 2018, the Department recognised the contribution the Government’s 25 Year Environment Plan (A Green Future: Our 25 Year Plan to Improve the Environment) will make to framing the final RIS. The Plan seeks to improve the management of litter as part of a wider goal to make positive environmental enhancements from the investment we make.

Q
Asked on: 03 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Roads: Litter
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they take when a local authority does not perform roadside litter collection responsibly; and whether any action has been taken against a local authority since January 2018.
A
Answered on: 17 July 2019

It is for local authorities to fulfil their duties to clear roadside litter.

Section 91 of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 allows for proceedings in the magistrates’ court to be brought against the body responsible for clearing litter.

Q
(Lanark and Hamilton East)
Asked on: 08 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Litter: Coastal Areas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to tackle coastal littering.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 16 July 2019

This is a devolved matter and the information provided therefore relates to England only.

The Government published the Litter Strategy for England in April 2017, setting out our aim to clean up the country and deliver a substantial reduction in litter and littering within a generation. The common aim of all the actions set out in the Strategy is to change the behaviour of people who currently feel that it is acceptable to drop litter, whether at the coast or anywhere else. Evidence shows that people drop less litter in a clean environment, and we therefore particularly support efforts to remove litter from coastal environments.

Last year saw the largest ever Great British Beach Clean, organised by the Marine Conservation Society (MCS), during which nearly 15,000 volunteers removed 8,550kg of litter from their local beaches. The Government funds the MCS to carry out regular beach litter monitoring studies and cleans. This data helps inform future policies, such as our commitment to a ban on plastic straws, drinks stirrers, and plastic stemmed cotton buds in England from April next year.

Earlier this year the Prime Minister also recognised three “points of light” for their outstanding voluntary efforts to tackle marine litter:

  • Jason Alexander, who set up the organisation Rubbish Walks, highlighting the impact that plastic and cigarette butts are having on coastal environments, and inspiring people in his local community to take action.
  • Emily Stevenson, a marine biology graduate, who has set up an industry partnership with Nissan to provide her 'Beach Guardian’ volunteers with transport to litter pick on remote beaches.
  • Dhruv Boruah, organiser of The Thames Project, who uses a specially adapted bike to provide clean ups on the Thames and across the UK, as well as in the Netherlands and the USA, inspiring people worldwide to consider the damaging impact litter and plastics are having on our waterways.

Q
(East Yorkshire)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Motor Vehicles: Litter
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will monitor the number of (a) prosecutions and (b) fixed penalty notices for dropping litter from a vehicle in England and Wales annually, what plans he has to help reduce the incidence of such offences; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 16 July 2019

The Government does not collect or monitor any data on the number of prosecutions or fixed penalty notices for littering from vehicles and has no plans to do so. The Government has given powers to local authorities that they requested and it is now for them to use.

On 30 November last year we launched our new campaign, “Keep it, Bin it”, with support from the environmental charity Keep Britain Tidy. The campaign imagery is being displayed in all seven Extra Motorway Service Areas (MSA) across England.

This year saw the fourth year that Highways England has supported Keep Britain Tidy’s Great British Spring Clean; 19,450 bags of litter were collected in this year’s spring clean, more than doubling last year’s collection of 8,000 bags.

We continue to work with Highways England to investigate new ways of reducing littering on our major roads. This includes introducing behavioural interventions such as trialling car and lorry-height funnel bins at the Roadchef MSA in Maidstone on 21 June last year, along the M20, to test whether they reduce littering. The number of bags of litter collected on the on-slips reduced by 47.1%.

The first round of the Litter Innovation Fund awarded grants to two projects trialling interventions to tackle roadside litter. The results will be published shortly.

Q
Asked on: 03 July 2019
Department for Transport
Roads: Accidents
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what statistics they have on accidents caused by litter or debris on roads in the UK.
A
Answered on: 15 July 2019

The department does not collect data specifically on litter and debris causing road accidents. The department collects data on personal injury road accidents reported to the police, including contributory factors which the police select when they attend the scene. This does not assign blame for the accident but gives an indication of factors the attending officer thought contributed to the accident. This includes the contributory factors of ‘Deposit on road’ and ‘Animal or object in carriageway’, which might be used to record litter and debris.

‘Deposit on road’ includes any deposit arising from human (or animal) activity which has made sections of the road surface slippery or which has caused traction control problems for a vehicle. ‘Animal or object in carriageway’ includes any object which the driver would not expect to find in the carriageway (e.g. dislodged vehicle load, fallen tree) and which caused or contributed to the accident.

There were 1,058 road accidents with a contributory factor of ‘Deposit on road’ and 802 road accidents with a contributory factor of ‘Animal or object in carriageway’ in Great Britain in 2017.

Statistics on the number and proportion of accidents by contributory factor reported are available online in table RAS50001. All published tables on contributory factors are available in the RAS50 series on gov.uk.

The data we hold only covers reported personal injury road accidents in Great Britain, we do not have data for Northern Ireland.

Q
(Feltham and Heston)
Asked on: 05 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Plastics: Rivers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the report entitled, Upstream: Microplastics in UK Rivers, published by Greenpeace UK on 18 June 2019, what assessment he has made of the level plastic pollution in UK rivers; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 15 July 2019

Defra is working with the Environment Agency (EA), academics and the UK water industry to understand the scale of the microplastic pollution problem and to establish detection methods to identify, characterise and quantify the types of microplastics entering our rivers. Although there has been substantive research reporting the presence and impacts of microplastics in the marine environment, little is known about their sources, release and impact on freshwaters and their ultimate transport to the marine environment. Defra has commissioned evidence reviews to further understand these issues and will use the outcomes from these and other research to develop policy options/measures/interventions for removing plastic pollution from rivers.

There are currently no consistent sampling, collection or assessment methodologies for measuring micro-plastics in various environmental media (sediments, water column or biota), which means that routine monitoring is not practicable. Defra is also working with the EA, academics and water companies to develop methodologies to enable future monitoring of micro-plastics in wastewater, sludge and the water environment.

The EA takes steps to stop pollution causing harm where they can clearly attribute the source of the substance, as without this information it is not possible for them to take action. One of the sources of plastic pollution comes from small beads used in industrial processes and EA are working proactively to reduce the release of these small plastics pellets from the industries they regulate.

Plastic waste can also provide a source of micro-sized plastics once in the environment. To address this, the Government has set a target to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste within the lifetime of the 25 Year Environment Plan (by 2042) and set aside £20 million for research and development managed through the Plastics Innovation Fund in March 2018. A further £10 million was committed in the 2018 Autumn Budget for continued/additional plastics research and development along with £10 million to pioneer innovative approaches to boosting recycling and reducing litter.

Grouped Questions: 273796
Q
(Feltham and Heston)
Asked on: 05 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Plastics: Rivers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps he is taking to (a) prevent plastic entering rivers and (b) remove plastic pollution from rivers.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 15 July 2019

Defra is working with the Environment Agency (EA), academics and the UK water industry to understand the scale of the microplastic pollution problem and to establish detection methods to identify, characterise and quantify the types of microplastics entering our rivers. Although there has been substantive research reporting the presence and impacts of microplastics in the marine environment, little is known about their sources, release and impact on freshwaters and their ultimate transport to the marine environment. Defra has commissioned evidence reviews to further understand these issues and will use the outcomes from these and other research to develop policy options/measures/interventions for removing plastic pollution from rivers.

There are currently no consistent sampling, collection or assessment methodologies for measuring micro-plastics in various environmental media (sediments, water column or biota), which means that routine monitoring is not practicable. Defra is also working with the EA, academics and water companies to develop methodologies to enable future monitoring of micro-plastics in wastewater, sludge and the water environment.

The EA takes steps to stop pollution causing harm where they can clearly attribute the source of the substance, as without this information it is not possible for them to take action. One of the sources of plastic pollution comes from small beads used in industrial processes and EA are working proactively to reduce the release of these small plastics pellets from the industries they regulate.

Plastic waste can also provide a source of micro-sized plastics once in the environment. To address this, the Government has set a target to eliminate all avoidable plastic waste within the lifetime of the 25 Year Environment Plan (by 2042) and set aside £20 million for research and development managed through the Plastics Innovation Fund in March 2018. A further £10 million was committed in the 2018 Autumn Budget for continued/additional plastics research and development along with £10 million to pioneer innovative approaches to boosting recycling and reducing litter.

Grouped Questions: 273795
Q
Asked by Andrew Percy
(Brigg and Goole)
Asked on: 05 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Litter: Tobacco
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of discarded cigarettes on ocean plastic pollution.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 15 July 2019

The Government has made no specific assessment of the effects of discarded cigarettes on ocean plastic pollution. However, there is some evidence that in marine environments cigarette butts contribute to microplastics. The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science is working to look at the impact of cigarette butts in the marine environment. This project is due to be completed next year.

The Litter Strategy for England was published in April 2017.

We are considering how we can ensure that manufacturers are held responsible for covering the costs of clearing up litter from cigarette butts.

Grouped Questions: 273777
Q
Asked by Andrew Percy
(Brigg and Goole)
Asked on: 05 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Litter: Tobacco
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to reduce cigarette end littering.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 15 July 2019

The Government has made no specific assessment of the effects of discarded cigarettes on ocean plastic pollution. However, there is some evidence that in marine environments cigarette butts contribute to microplastics. The Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science is working to look at the impact of cigarette butts in the marine environment. This project is due to be completed next year.

The Litter Strategy for England was published in April 2017.

We are considering how we can ensure that manufacturers are held responsible for covering the costs of clearing up litter from cigarette butts.

Grouped Questions: 273776
Q
Asked on: 03 July 2019
Department for Transport
Roads: Repairs and Maintenance
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to transfer maintenance and litter collection on all-purpose trunk roads to the Highways Agency.
A
Answered on: 12 July 2019

As outlined in the Government’s Litter Strategy published in 2017, we proposed to consider, if needed, additional powers for the Secretary of State to make this transfer of responsibility and funding to Highways England, and consider how to provide a mechanism to recover the cost of these activities from local authorities.

Q
Asked on: 03 July 2019
Department for Transport
Roads: Litter
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what sanctions have been applied to service providers by Highways England for failure to collect litter in 2018.
A
Answered on: 12 July 2019

The performance of Highways England service providers in relation to litter is measured against the grades of cleanliness defined within the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) Code of Practice on Litter and Refuse.

Each Highways England region manages its own maintenance contract and any failure to meet contractual obligations would trigger sanctions under the contract.

In 2018 there have been no reported incidents of sanctions being applied in relation to litter, apart from the East Midlands, where payments to a service provider were withheld until evidence was provided that cleanliness had been brought up to standard.

Q
(East Yorkshire)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 08 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Litter
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if he will (a) undertake a review of the Government's litter strategy to ensure greater effectiveness at tackling littering and (b) encourage the prosecution of owners that discard litter from a motor vehicle; and if he will make statement.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 11 July 2019

The Government published the Litter Strategy for England in April 2017, and while there are no plans to review the Litter Strategy itself, the second annual report will be published shortly.

From April last year, we have given district councils in England (outside London) new powers to hold the keeper of a vehicle responsible for littering offences committed from it by issuing a civil (financial) penalty which is set at the same level as the local fixed penalty for littering. It is up to councils to determine their approach to enforcement, including whether to make use of these powers. Implementation advice was provided to councils to assist them in making use of these powers. London councils already had these powers.

We have also consulted on improved guidance to councils and others on the use of their fixed penalty powers for tackling littering (including littering from vehicles) and related offences. We are currently considering the responses to the consultation and the improved guidance will be published shortly.

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