Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 22 January 2019
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation: Crime Prevention
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the cost to his Department of taking preventative action in relation to an at-risk individual being subjected to FGM.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 08 February 2019

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government is clear that we will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong suffering to women and girls

The Government has significantly strengthened the law in 2015 to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.


Work to tackle FGM is an integral part of our cross-Government Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy, published in March 2016. The Strategy commits to continue to challenge deep-rooted social norms, attitudes and behaviours that discriminate against and limit women and girls across all communities. As part of our commitment to tackling all forms of VAWG, we have pledged £100 million in funding, including the £17 million VAWG transformation fund. This year, we will refresh the strategy to ensure that we are doing all that we can to tackle crimes which disproportionately affect women.

The Home Office does not hold information on the cost of taking preventative action to those at risk of FGM. However, we are committed to continuing our work to protect and support victims and those at risk of this terrible crime.

Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 21 January 2019
Department for Education
National FGM Centre
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the National FGM Centre.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 29 January 2019

In July 2017, the department made over £1.6 million available from our Innovation Programme to Barnardo’s to run the National FGM (Female Genital Mutilation) Centre for three years. The proportion of the centre’s costs to be paid by the department reduces year by year, with the centre to be self-sustaining from April 2020. The University of Bedfordshire is evaluating the centre and the evaluation is due to be completed by July this year.

Grouped Questions: 210633
Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 21 January 2019
Department for Education
National FGM Centre: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has for the funding arrangements of the National FGM Centre after 2020.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 29 January 2019

In July 2017, the department made over £1.6 million available from our Innovation Programme to Barnardo’s to run the National FGM (Female Genital Mutilation) Centre for three years. The proportion of the centre’s costs to be paid by the department reduces year by year, with the centre to be self-sustaining from April 2020. The University of Bedfordshire is evaluating the centre and the evaluation is due to be completed by July this year.

Grouped Questions: 210632
Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 21 January 2019
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation: Victims
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the average cost of supporting an FGM victim in the UK, including the provision of (a) mental health support, (b) safeguarding costs, (c) medical support, and (d) other associated costs.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 29 January 2019

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government is clear that we will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong suffering to women and girls

The Government has significantly strengthened the law in 2015 to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.

Work to tackle FGM is an integral part of our cross-Government Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy, published in March 2016. The Strategy commits to continue to challenge deep-rooted social norms, attitudes and behaviours that discriminate against and limit women and girls across all communities. As part of our commitment to tackling all forms of VAWG, we have pledged £100 million in funding, including the £17 million VAWG transformation fund. This year, we will refresh the strategy to ensure that we are doing all that we can to tackle crimes which disproportionately affect women.

In July 2017, the National FGM Centre received additional funding through the Department for Education’s Social Care Innovation Programme to sup-port its work through to the end of March 2020. The intention was for this funding to be time limited, with the Centre to be self-sustaining from April 2020. Therefore, the Home Office have no plans to contribute to the funding of the Centre beyond March 2020.

The Home Office does not hold information on the average cost of supporting an FGM victim in the UK. However, we are committed to continuing our work to protect and support victims and those at risk of this terrible crime.

Grouped Questions: 210637 | 210638
Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 21 January 2019
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent steps the Government has taken to develop a cross-departmental strategy on tackling FGM.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 29 January 2019

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government is clear that we will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong suffering to women and girls

The Government has significantly strengthened the law in 2015 to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.

Work to tackle FGM is an integral part of our cross-Government Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy, published in March 2016. The Strategy commits to continue to challenge deep-rooted social norms, attitudes and behaviours that discriminate against and limit women and girls across all communities. As part of our commitment to tackling all forms of VAWG, we have pledged £100 million in funding, including the £17 million VAWG transformation fund. This year, we will refresh the strategy to ensure that we are doing all that we can to tackle crimes which disproportionately affect women.

In July 2017, the National FGM Centre received additional funding through the Department for Education’s Social Care Innovation Programme to sup-port its work through to the end of March 2020. The intention was for this funding to be time limited, with the Centre to be self-sustaining from April 2020. Therefore, the Home Office have no plans to contribute to the funding of the Centre beyond March 2020.

The Home Office does not hold information on the average cost of supporting an FGM victim in the UK. However, we are committed to continuing our work to protect and support victims and those at risk of this terrible crime.

Grouped Questions: 210636 | 210638
Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 21 January 2019
Home Office
National FGM Centre: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether his Department has plans to allocate future funding to the National FGM Centre.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 29 January 2019

Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) is a crime and it is child abuse. The Government is clear that we will not tolerate a practice that can cause extreme and lifelong suffering to women and girls

The Government has significantly strengthened the law in 2015 to improve protection for victims and those at risk, and to break down the barriers to prosecution.

Work to tackle FGM is an integral part of our cross-Government Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy, published in March 2016. The Strategy commits to continue to challenge deep-rooted social norms, attitudes and behaviours that discriminate against and limit women and girls across all communities. As part of our commitment to tackling all forms of VAWG, we have pledged £100 million in funding, including the £17 million VAWG transformation fund. This year, we will refresh the strategy to ensure that we are doing all that we can to tackle crimes which disproportionately affect women.

In July 2017, the National FGM Centre received additional funding through the Department for Education’s Social Care Innovation Programme to sup-port its work through to the end of March 2020. The intention was for this funding to be time limited, with the Centre to be self-sustaining from April 2020. Therefore, the Home Office have no plans to contribute to the funding of the Centre beyond March 2020.

The Home Office does not hold information on the average cost of supporting an FGM victim in the UK. However, we are committed to continuing our work to protect and support victims and those at risk of this terrible crime.

Grouped Questions: 210636 | 210637
Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 21 January 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
National FGM Centre: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department plans to allocate future funding to the National FGM Centre.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 28 January 2019

The Department has no plans to allocate future funding to the National FGM Centre.

Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 08 January 2018
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation and Forced Marriage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps have been taken by the female genital mutilation unit and Forced Marriage Units to conduct outreach work among communities to highlight issues of female genital mutilation and forced marriages since 2016.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 12 January 2018

So called 'honour-based' violence, including female genital mutilation (FGM) and forced marriage, is a terrible form of abuse, and this Government is clear that we will not allow political or cultural sensitivities to get in the way of tackling it. No-one should suffer because of who they are or what community they are born into.

Work to tackle these crimes is an integral part of our cross-Government Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy, published in 2016, and we are clear that we will not end FGM and forced marriage until we change attitudes. Our dedicated FGM and Forced Marriage Units are delivering ongoing programmes of nationwide outreach, comprising more than 100 events every year, with communities and professionals to raise awareness of the warning signs and significant harms caused by these practices and how to access support.

The Home Office FGM Unit regularly engages with community based organisations and survivors, including through local forums, to ensure the views and insights of affected communities are considered in current and future policy development. This is done through a quarterly FGM stakeholders meeting, ongoing outreach events and engagement with community based organisations funded through the Building a Stronger Britain Together programme. It is important that any engagement with victims and families is done in a constructive and secure environment so that individuals are provided with the support they need.

Grouped Questions: 121588
Q
(Rotherham)
Asked on: 08 January 2018
Home Office
Female Genital Mutilation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will bring forward proposals to hold collaborative discussions with victims and families affected by female genital mutilation in order to (a) gain insight into their perspectives on current female genital mutilation policies and efforts and (b) include victims' narratives in existing and future female genital mutilation policies and efforts.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 12 January 2018

So called 'honour-based' violence, including female genital mutilation (FGM) and forced marriage, is a terrible form of abuse, and this Government is clear that we will not allow political or cultural sensitivities to get in the way of tackling it. No-one should suffer because of who they are or what community they are born into.

Work to tackle these crimes is an integral part of our cross-Government Violence Against Women and Girls (VAWG) strategy, published in 2016, and we are clear that we will not end FGM and forced marriage until we change attitudes. Our dedicated FGM and Forced Marriage Units are delivering ongoing programmes of nationwide outreach, comprising more than 100 events every year, with communities and professionals to raise awareness of the warning signs and significant harms caused by these practices and how to access support.

The Home Office FGM Unit regularly engages with community based organisations and survivors, including through local forums, to ensure the views and insights of affected communities are considered in current and future policy development. This is done through a quarterly FGM stakeholders meeting, ongoing outreach events and engagement with community based organisations funded through the Building a Stronger Britain Together programme. It is important that any engagement with victims and families is done in a constructive and secure environment so that individuals are provided with the support they need.

Grouped Questions: 121587
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