Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

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Asked on: 21 July 2020
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish (1) the criteria that they will use to determine whether, and on what basis, they will legalise the use of e-scooters following the current trials, and (2) the specification for the data they have required local authorities to collect in association with those trials, to inform their decisions about whether and how to legalise their use.
A
Answered on: 04 August 2020

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.

Grouped Questions: HL7106 | HL7107 | HL7108
Asked on: 21 July 2020
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment was made of the equalities impacts of their decision to increase the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters involved in trials, as compared with those originally proposed in their consultation on such trials.
A
Answered on: 04 August 2020

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.

Grouped Questions: HL7105 | HL7107 | HL7108
Asked on: 21 July 2020
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will set lower regulatory limits for the maximum speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters if the current trials suggest that these are too high in relation to their impacts on (1) road safety, (2) environmental outcomes, (3) physical activity levels, or (4) other impacts.
A
Answered on: 04 August 2020

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.

Grouped Questions: HL7105 | HL7106 | HL7108
Asked on: 21 July 2020
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters: Cycleways
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish any assessment made of the legal implications of their advice to local authorities planning to hold e-scooter trials that such authorities should convert cycle tracks to cycle lanes in those areas so that e-scooters can be permitted to use them.
A
Answered on: 04 August 2020

We have no current plans to publish any criteria. We will use the evidence we gather from rental e-scooter trials, the responses to the Future of Transport regulatory review call for evidence and other research, to consider whether to legalise both rental and privately-owned e-scooters. E-scooters are a new vehicle type; evidence around the benefits and risks of these vehicles is limited and inconclusive. We know there are some risks, and we want to understand these and how to mitigate them. Running on-road trials of rental e-scooters is the best way to assess the safety and wider impacts of this type of vehicle and service. Data will be collected by e-scooter providers. The details of the data to be shared and the process for doing so are still being developed and will be set out in data sharing agreements between the Department and e-scooter providers, and with local authorities where required.

We have carried out an equality analysis for e-scooter trials under the Public Sector Equality Duty (s.149 Equalities Act 2010).

The combination of speed and power limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely, but we recognise e-scooters are likely to have a particular impact on blind and visually impaired people.

To mitigate potentially negative impacts, we have proposed:

  • That e-scooters used in trials must have a horn or bell so that users can make themselves heard to pedestrians.

  • That e-scooters should not be used on the pavement (except in shared cycle/pedestrian space). Local authorities already have powers to prohibit vehicles from specific spaces (included shared spaces) on a case by case basis using Traffic Regulation Orders.

We will also work with disability groups in monitoring and evaluating the trials and considering the implications for future policy

We increased the speed, power and weight limits of e-scooters after considering the responses to the recent consultation on e-scooter trials. We balanced these views against the equality analysis. The 15.5 mph for trial e-scooters makes the maximum speed for e-scooters the same as e-bikes and is consistent with the maximum speed for e-scooters in many other countries.

We increased the weight limit to take account of the heavier batteries of some e-scooters. We expect that most e-scooters used in trials will be well below the 55kg maximum.

We increased the power limit to 500W to ensure e-scooters are able to go up steeper inclines and carry heavier users. This was a matter raised with us during the consultation.

We have designed the trials so that e-scooters use is limited and controlled. Speed, power and weight limits constrain how an e-scooter can be used and are intended to ensure the vehicles can be used safely. Local areas are free to set limits below the maximum, but it is important that the evidence gathered in trials is representative of how e-scooters may be used in the future.

We are preparing a comprehensive monitoring and evaluation plan to gather evidence from the trials. This will assess the safety risks presented by e-scooters, the mode shift to e-scooters from other forms of transport, public perceptions around their use and identify other impacts that should be considered for any potential future legalisation of e-scooters.

It is for local traffic authorities to undertake their own risk assessment of the appropriateness of using the powers available to them to permit e-scooters to share road space with pedal cycles. This assessment will be required on a case by case basis.

The Department consulted on the issue of amending the Traffic Signs Regulations and General Directions 2016 to enable e-scooters to share cycle lanes with pedal cycles. The consultation responses supported this approach. The Government made the necessary regulatory changes to include e-scooters within the definition of vehicles permitted to use cycle lanes and to extend signs that apply to pedal cycles to also apply to e-scooters being used in legal trials. This will be supplemented by traffic regulation orders issued by the local areas.

As the definition of cycle tracks is contained in primary legislation, the Government has not amended this definition in advance of trials starting. Instead, where deemed necessary, local authorities can re-designate cycle tracks using the TRO process as appropriate.

Grouped Questions: HL7105 | HL7106 | HL7107
Q
Asked on: 21 July 2020
Department for Transport
Travel: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a UK resident must quarantine when arriving into the UK from Portugal yet departing back to that country on the same day.
A
Answered on: 04 August 2020

Coronavirus regulations mean that you must self-isolate for 14 days if you arrive in the UK from a country outside the common travel area.

Though the Government is satisfied that it is now safe to ease these measures in England and has introduced travel corridor exemptions for some countries and territories, Portugal is not presently part of the travel corridor exemptions. Therefore, people must self-isolate for 14 days when arriving into the UK from Portugal. However, if they wish to leave the UK within the 14-day period then they are able to do so.

Q
Asked by Lord Greaves
Asked on: 23 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport for the North
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the creation of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council, what plans they have to amend (1) the constitution, (2) the powers, and (3) the methods of operation and decision-making of Transport for the North.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2020

Matters concerning the constitution, methods of operation and decision-making of Transport for the North (TfN) are for the TfN Board to consider. The creation of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council does not impact on TfN’s powers in any way.

Q
Asked on: 23 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport: Schools
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what additional funding they intend to provide to bus and coach operators to ensure that COVID-19 (1) safety, and (2) additional capacity, requirements are in place when schools return in September; and when they plan to announce their funding decisions for such provision.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2020

The return of pupils to education settings in September will be a considerable challenge for public transport capacity while maintaining social distancing. The Department is working with the Department for Education as a matter of urgency to explore options to increase capacity to ensure students can get to school or college in September.

Solutions must be locally-led with authorities working closely with transport operators, and the Government will do what we can to support local authorities. The Government is therefore supporting local authorities with travel demand management, and we will continue to provide financial support for bus services in September in order to boost the amount of local transport capacity available.

Q
Asked by Lord Grocott
Asked on: 27 July 2020
Department for Transport
Commuters: Greater London
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what are the (1) absolute numbers, and (2) proportions of commuters, travelling into by London by (a) rail including London Underground, (b) bus, (c) car, (d) bicycle, and (e) motor cycle.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2020

To monitor the use of the transport system during the coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic, the Department for Transport provides statistics on transport use by mode, published every Wednesday. Data on usage of the different transport modes is available on GOV.UK.

This includes usage of Tube and Bus in London compared to a pre Covid-19 baseline. Specific data on the purpose of a journey (e.g. commuting) by mode is not available for the Covid-19 period yet. Historic data on this can be found in the National Travel Survey and in Transport Statistics Great Britain both available on GOV.UK.

Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 28 July 2020
Department for Transport
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Wendover
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will place (1) the external consultant review report, and (2) the Infrastructure and Projects Authority review report, on the Wendover Short-Mined Tunnel proposal, in the Library of the House.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2020

The Government will not be placing copies of the reports referred to in the Libraries of either House. These reports are internal to the Department for Transport and are not intended for publication.

Q
Asked on: 28 July 2020
Department for Transport
Bus Services: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the findings of the review by the UCL Institute of Health Equity into COVID-19 related deaths of bus workers in London, published 27 July, whether they intend to issue new guidance to bus companies to protect drivers and other front-line staff.
A
Answered on: 03 August 2020

We have been clear that the safety of transport workers is a top priority, and employers must take appropriate measures to protect all staff in line with the recommendations we have set out in the Safer Transport guidance, to ensure their workplaces are Covid-19 secure. This includes making sensible workplace adjustments, for example introducing screens, providing hand sanitiser, and reducing capacity onboard services in line with social distancing requirements.

Asked on: 17 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many commercial flights have (1) taken off, and (2) landed, in the UK each day from 23 March to 16 July.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

The Department for Transport does not currently hold complete official statistics on commercial flight operations for the period requested. Data on the operation of commercial flights in the UK is collected by the Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) and received from UK airports typically up to two months after the end of each month in adherence to statistical regulation (EC) 437/2003 on statistical returns in respect of the carriage of passengers, freight and mail by air. As indicated on the CAA’s website, some airports have not yet reported data, which prevents the full UK picture being established.

Monitoring of flight traffic conducted by Eurocontrol, which publicly reports on daily flight traffic levels across its member states on their website, can be used to identify the overall number of flights operated in the UK each day since 1 March 2020, and includes both commercial and non-commercial operations for international arrival, departure and domestic flights.

Asked on: 21 July 2020
Department for Transport
Northern Trains: Fares
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to allow off-peak tickets on Northern Rail services into Leeds, Sheffield, Bradford or Manchester to be used between 4.00pm and 6.30pm.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

There are no planned changes to Northern’s off-peak travel requirements. In the current COVID-19 crisis, Northern has prioritised running a service for customers that is both resilient and reliable, rather than ramping up services too quickly or introducing measures that may lead to increased passenger demand and thereby exceed restrictions on social distancing.

Q
Asked by Lord Patten
Asked on: 21 July 2020
Department for Transport
Shipping: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 20 July (HL6506), what is the median length of time that foreign national crew have spent stranded in UK ports; what is the cost of the repatriation programme; and whether they claim back the costs of repatriation from ship owners.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

We do not have median figures. The Department began work on facilitating repatriation 90 days ago (as at 29 July). At that time there were 11,374 crew in the UK. To date we have facilitated the repatriation of over 13,000 seafarers and there are currently 4,258 awaiting repatriation.

Many vessels arriving in the UK are able to repatriate large numbers of seafarers over the 2-3 days after arrival. However, for seafarers from certain countries the length of time in the UK will be longer due to restrictions in their own state.

It should also be noted that seafarers arriving in the UK may still be under their original contract and, outside the pandemic conditions, would not be due to be repatriated. The cost of repatriation is met by the shipping company and not by the Government.

Asked on: 22 July 2020
Department for Transport
Cycling: Accidents
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many accidents in England involving (1) pedestrians, (2) motor vehicles, and (3) other cyclists, have been caused by cyclists using mobile phones while cycling (a) in the past 12 months, and (b) in the past five years.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

The number of accidents involving where the contributory factor ‘Driver using mobile phone’ was allocated to a pedal cyclist, by road user involved, in England, between 2013 and 2018 can be found in the below table. 2018 is the latest year for which data is available.

Contributory factors assigned by police officers do not assign blame for the accident to any specific road user, however they do provide some insight into why and how road accidents occur. They give an indication of which factors the attending officer thought contributed to the accident. Officers do not need to carry out a full investigation of the incident before allocating contributory factors; they usually use professional judgement about what they can see at the scene. Not all accidents are included in the contributory factor data; only accidents where the police attended the scene and reported at least one contributory factor are included.

Reported road accidents where the contributory factor (CF)1 of 'driver using a mobile phone' was assigned to a pedal cyclist, by road user involved, England, 2013-2018

Accidents involving road user

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Injured pedestrian

1

0

0

1

1

1

Motor vehicle

12

13

10

13

12

8

Other pedal cyclist (not allocated with CF)

1

1

0

0

0

0

Source: DfT, STATS19

1 Includes only accidents where a police officer attended the scene and in which a contributory factor was reported.

Q
Asked by Lord Greaves
Asked on: 23 July 2020
Department for Transport
Northern Transport Acceleration Council
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the membership of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council; what powers and role that Council will possess; what is its operational budget; how often it will meet; and whether its meetings and papers will be publicly accessible.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

The membership of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council will comprise key leaders from across the North, including Mayors and council leaders and will be chaired by the Secretary of State. The Council will give leaders from the North direct access to Ministers to discuss priority transport projects and make sure they are being progressed at pace, providing a mechanism for speeding up decision making.

The Council’s first meeting is expected to take place in September when the details of its role and working arrangements will be agreed.

Q
Asked by Lord Greaves
Asked on: 23 July 2020
Department for Transport
Northern Transport Acceleration Council: Transport for the North
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what consultation took place with Transport for the North about the establishment of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council; what the relationship between Transport for the North and the Northern Transport Acceleration Council will be; and whether members of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council will also sit on the board of Transport for the North.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

The Secretary of State and his Ministers consulted with the Mayors and Council Leaders in the North, who are Transport for the North members, prior to the establishment of the Northern Transport Acceleration Council.

The membership of the Northern Council will comprise key leaders from across the North, including Mayors and Council Leaders and will be chaired by the Secretary of State.

The Transport for the North Board will continue its role of bringing together Northern stakeholders and developing strategic transport advice for the Secretary of State.

Q
Asked on: 23 July 2020
Department for Transport
Bus Services and Trams: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 22 July (HL6684), what additional funding they intend to provide to support bus and tram services outside of London once the current COVID-19-related funding expires on 4 August; and when they intend to announce the arrangements for any such funding.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

Officials are engaging with HMT on the future of emergency funding for the bus and light rail sectors, as a matter of the highest priority. The department will be in contact with operators as soon as we are in a position to update them.

Q
Asked on: 23 July 2020
Department for Transport
Bus Services and Trams: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to provide long-term financial support to bus, coach and tram services outside of London whilst there is reduced capacity and demand for public transport due to the COVID-19 pandemic; and how any such funding will be dispersed.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

The Department continues to work closely with transport authorities and operators to understand the risks and ongoing issues in the bus and coach industry and how these can be addressed, so that public transport services can adapt to any ‘new normal’ that emerges from the COVID-19 outbreak and work towards a sustainable long-term recovery.

The Department is engaging with HMT on the future of emergency funding for the bus and light rail sectors as a matter of the highest priority. My department will be in contact with operators as soon as we are in a position to update them.

We are continuing to engage with the coach sector to understand what the ongoing risks and issues are, and how these could be addressed.

Q
Asked on: 23 July 2020
Department for Transport
A27: East Sussex
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 21 July (HL6569), how Highways England was able to determine three possible new routes for the A27 between Polegate and Lewes before completing consideration of (1) environmental impacts, and (2) the impact on the towns and communities at the two endpoints of these routes.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

The “A27 East of Lewes Off-line Study” represents an early stage of work to evaluate the need or otherwise for an enhancement of the A27 off the existing line of route. The study uses three different alignments for modelling purposes only. Development of specific route options and a detailed assessment of their benefits and costs, including environmental impacts, would follow at a later stage of work.

Asked on: 24 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further (1) to the statement by the Airport Operators Association that airports may have lost at least £4 billion in revenue by the end of 2020, and (2) the job losses in the aviation sector, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, what steps they are taking to assist financially the aviation industry. [T]
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

The Government recognises the challenging times facing the aviation sector as a result of COVID-19. The aviation sector is crucial to the UK’s economy and businesses across the industry will be able to draw on the unprecedented package of economic measures we have put in place during this time.

This includes a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital and the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme which facilitates access to finance for businesses affected by the outbreak. Firms are also able to access ‘Time to Pay’ scheme which eases restrictions with tax bills and VAT deferrals.

The Government is also ensuring financial support for employees through the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme covering 80% of furloughed employees’ usual monthly wage costs, up to £2,500 a month, alongside the associated Employer National Insurance contributions and pension contributions.

The Department is in close contact with the aviation sector ensuring that the Government is kept fully aware of the latest developments with all firms and to understand where additional policy measures may be useful and to address specific industry issues.

The Department has established a Restart and Recovery Unit for aviation. The unit will immediately focus on restart, in particular:

  • Examining new standards on health and wellbeing across the customer journey;

  • Measures needed to sustain and boost the sector;

  • Ensuring new standards are established at an international level; and

  • Engagement with the sector to ensure the proposals developed are fit for purpose.

The unit will also focus on establishing a clear vision and objectives for the sector looking forward to the recovery phase. We are working closely with the aviation sector to support it to ensure there is sufficient capacity to protect global travel routes, continue repatriation, freight and maintain vital connectivity.

Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 27 July 2020
Department for Transport
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Wendover
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether a full and independent engineering review has been carried out to assess the (1) construction, and (2) whole life costs, of the (a) Wendover Short Mined Tunnel proposal, and (b) current HS2 Phase One above surface route proposals at Wendover.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

I refer to my answer to Lord Berkeley’s question on 30 June. In spring 2018, the Department instructed KPMG to undertake an independent review of the presented options for the Wendover area, both from HS2 Ltd (surface route) and from mbpc Ltd (mined tunnel proposal). The Department asked the review to examine and consider both options, including a comparative assessment of their relative cost, schedule and constructability. The review did not consider whole life costs.

Q
Asked by Lord Bradshaw
Asked on: 27 July 2020
Department for Transport
Speed Limits
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any consultation took place with (1) the Health and Safety Executive, and (2) the Office for Rail and Road, before the decision was made to increase the basic speed limit at which motorists can drive through roadworks; and what assessment they have made of the ability to enforce speed limits at such sites.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2020

Whilst no specific consultation took place with the Health and Safety Executive, Highways England did engage throughout the trials with the Office for Rail and Road (ORR) to update them on the progress and outputs of the trials.

The enforcement of speed limits will be undertaken in the same way any speed limit through roadworks is enforced, by using average speed camera systems.

Q
Asked on: 16 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Licensing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to raise the maximum age at which the Civil Aviation Authority can grant a licence to a commercial pilot so that it is equivalent to the state pension age; and what assessment they have made of the financial position of commercial pilots who are no longer permitted to fly but who are not yet eligible for a state pension.
A
Answered on: 30 July 2020

The Department for Transport is aware of the difference between the maximum age for commercial pilots and the state pension age, and of the financial impact this could have on some people. The government is determined to ensure equal employment opportunities are available to all, regardless of age. The Department is working with the CAA to explore whether there is a safety case for increasing the maximum age for commercial pilots and is also considering the approach that other regulators are taking in Europe on this issue.

Q
Asked on: 16 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Crew
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions, if any, they have had with the Civil Aviation Authority about the effect of the difference between the maximum age for commercial pilots and the state pension age on the financial position of commercial pilots.
A
Answered on: 30 July 2020

The Department for Transport is aware of the difference between the maximum age for commercial pilots and the state pension age, and of the financial impact this could have on some people. The Government is determined to ensure equal employment opportunities are available to all, regardless of age. The Department is working with the CAA to explore whether there is a safety case for increasing the maximum age for commercial pilots and is also considering the approach that other regulators are taking in Europe on this issue.

Asked on: 16 July 2020
Department for Transport
A55: Road Traffic
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many extra (1) trucks, and (2) other vehicles, they estimate will be using the A55 from Holyhead after 31 December.
A
Answered on: 30 July 2020

The Department has not made such estimates, and in any case, roads are a devolved matter. Changes in traffic volumes on the road network in Wales (including on the A55) is a matter for the Welsh Government.

Asked on: 16 July 2020
Department for Transport
Public Transport: Greater London
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to reimburse local authorities in London for any additional costs incurred as a result of the loss of free public transport for people under the age of 18 living in that city.
A
Answered on: 30 July 2020

The £1.6 billion Extraordinary Funding and Financing Agreement to enable Transport for London (TfL) to continue operating services contained a series of conditions to facilitate safe travel on public transport in London, including the temporary suspension of free travel for under 18s.

The Department is working closely with TfL, the Department for Education and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government on how the temporary suspension can be operationalised.

Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 29 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 28 July (HL6830), whether in their response to this question they will now provide figures for the amount of funding by way of loans or guarantees they have provided under COVID-19 assistance schemes (1) to international airline operators, (2) to international rail operators, and (3) to international shipping operators.
Asked on: 29 July 2020
Department for Transport
USA: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether those arriving into England from the United States must self-isolate for 14 days upon arrival; and if not, why not.
Asked on: 29 July 2020
Department for Transport
Travel: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what countries and territories are currently under consideration for removal from their list of travel corridor exemptions in England.
Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much funding by way of loans or guarantees they have provided under COVID-19 assistance schemes (1) to international airline operators, (2) to international rail operators, and (3) to international shipping operators.
A
Answered on: 28 July 2020

Her Majesty’s Treasury has been releasing weekly figures since 12 May for the three Covid-19 business lending schemes which show continued support for thousands of businesses. The Government is considering what further data can be made available in the future, while balancing the sensitive commercial nature of this information for lenders.

Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Heathrow Airport
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what discussions he has had with representatives of Heathrow Airport on the use of mixed mode operations on the northern runway.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 28 July 2020

London Heathrow Airport sought the views of the department on its proposal to move temporarily all of its operations to the northern runway before this took place on 13 July 2020. In view of the current air traffic demand and its reduced environmental impacts, and the long-term benefits to the airport from repairing its southern runway, the government endorsed the airport’s decision to operate solely for a limited period from the northern runway.

The Government expects London Heathrow Airport to assess the potential operational, safety and environmental consequences of any change to its operations before implementation. The specific format of any such assessment, and the level of detail to be included within it, are the responsibility of London Heathrow Airport and will need to be undertaken in compliance with its legal and regulatory obligations.

The government’s longstanding policy is that mixed mode operations at London Heathrow Airport on its two runways should not be undertaken other than in agreed circumstances such as when the airport operates in Tactically Enhanced Arrivals Mode (TEAM). Any proposal by London Heathrow Airport to operate both runways on a permanent mixed mode basis would need the government’s consent as well as satisfying all legal requirements.

Grouped Questions: 76748 | 76749
Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Heathrow Airport
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the Government's policy is on the use of mixed mode operations at Heathrow Airport.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 28 July 2020

London Heathrow Airport sought the views of the department on its proposal to move temporarily all of its operations to the northern runway before this took place on 13 July 2020. In view of the current air traffic demand and its reduced environmental impacts, and the long-term benefits to the airport from repairing its southern runway, the government endorsed the airport’s decision to operate solely for a limited period from the northern runway.

The Government expects London Heathrow Airport to assess the potential operational, safety and environmental consequences of any change to its operations before implementation. The specific format of any such assessment, and the level of detail to be included within it, are the responsibility of London Heathrow Airport and will need to be undertaken in compliance with its legal and regulatory obligations.

The government’s longstanding policy is that mixed mode operations at London Heathrow Airport on its two runways should not be undertaken other than in agreed circumstances such as when the airport operates in Tactically Enhanced Arrivals Mode (TEAM). Any proposal by London Heathrow Airport to operate both runways on a permanent mixed mode basis would need the government’s consent as well as satisfying all legal requirements.

Grouped Questions: 76747 | 76749
Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Heathrow Airport
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what impact assessment Heathrow Airport is required to undertake when changing its runway operations.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 28 July 2020

London Heathrow Airport sought the views of the department on its proposal to move temporarily all of its operations to the northern runway before this took place on 13 July 2020. In view of the current air traffic demand and its reduced environmental impacts, and the long-term benefits to the airport from repairing its southern runway, the government endorsed the airport’s decision to operate solely for a limited period from the northern runway.

The Government expects London Heathrow Airport to assess the potential operational, safety and environmental consequences of any change to its operations before implementation. The specific format of any such assessment, and the level of detail to be included within it, are the responsibility of London Heathrow Airport and will need to be undertaken in compliance with its legal and regulatory obligations.

The government’s longstanding policy is that mixed mode operations at London Heathrow Airport on its two runways should not be undertaken other than in agreed circumstances such as when the airport operates in Tactically Enhanced Arrivals Mode (TEAM). Any proposal by London Heathrow Airport to operate both runways on a permanent mixed mode basis would need the government’s consent as well as satisfying all legal requirements.

Grouped Questions: 76747 | 76748
Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Heathrow Airport: Night Flying
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the economic value of flights arriving at Heathrow before 6 am.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 28 July 2020

The Government’s recognises that night flights have material value to the economy, and that the aviation industry connects people and UK businesses with the world. In particular, we recognised the importance of early morning arrivals from long-haul routes such as the Far East and America, volume of onward connections supported in this early morning period, and the contribution flights in the shoulder periods make to delivery of essential freight, both dedicated and belly-hold.

The economic value of night flights at Heathrow is considered in the Department's decisions relating to night flight restrictions at the airport. The last impact assessment was published in July 2017 to inform the current night flight restrictions, which run until October 2022.

Q
(Kingston and Surbiton)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make it his policy for all UK internal flights to be sustainably powered by 2030; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 28 July 2020

It is critical that aviation plays its part in delivering the UK’s net zero ambitions.

The Transport and Business Secretaries co-chaired the new Jet Zero Council on 22 July which brought together senior leaders in aviation, aerospace and academia to drive high ambition in the delivery of new technologies and innovative ways to cut aviation emissions.

We will also consult on our position on aviation and climate change later this year.

Q
Asked by Neale Hanvey
(Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has in place to ensure that UK-based pilots with an EASA licence can continue to work unrestricted in the EU from 1 January 2021 without incurring the costs of converting their licence to maintain those licence privileges in EASA member states.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 28 July 2020

In the event that mutual recognition of EU Member State/UK pilot licences ceases at the end of the transition period, pilots with UK-issued licences who wish to fly EU-registered aircraft would need to transfer their licence to a European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) member state before the transition period ended, or subsequently seek a second licence from an EASA member state. The UK has no control over the charges that may be applied by an EASA Member State for this process.

Pilots currently holding a commercial licence from an EASA member state would need to seek a time-limited validation from the UK’s CAA to operate UK-registered aircraft outside the UK. The CAA has developed processes to make this as seamless as possible and with no associated cost.

Q
Asked by Neale Hanvey
(Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Regional Airports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to protect regional connectivity in the UK following the collapse of Flybe.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 28 July 2020

The Government recognises the impact Flybe’s collapse and the subsequent COVID-19 constraints on services, regional airports, regional economies and connectivity across the UK. We are working with industry to identify where key routes are being re-established and we remain committed to supporting regional connectivity, recognising the importance of maintaining a thriving competitive aviation sector in the UK to deliver this. In May the Government announced a £5.7million funding package of measures, temporarily supporting two airlinks, from Belfast and Londonderry to London, and associated airport services at City of Derry Airport and Belfast City Airport. The funding package ensured that lifeline connectivity services continued to both Belfast and Londonderry during the height of the Covid-19 pandemic.

The Government has provided an unprecedented package of measures to support the UK economy. These measures are open to businesses across the aviation sector and include a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital, Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees and VAT deferrals. In exceptional circumstances, where a viable company has exhausted all options and its failure would disproportionately harm the economy, the Government is prepared to enter discussions with individual companies seeking bespoke support as a last resort. Any intervention would need to represent value for money for taxpayers. We will continue to engage with stakeholders across the sector, including regional airports, to understand the situations they face.

The Chancellor has announced that there will be a consultation on aviation tax reform. As part of this consultation, the Government will consider the case for changing the APD treatment of domestic flights, such as reintroducing a return leg exemption, and for increasing the number of international distance bands

The Government remains committed to supporting regional connectivity across all transport modes, as well as the importance of maintaining a thriving competitive aviation sector in the UK to deliver connectivity. The Department is currently working on a recovery plan for the sector out to 2025. The plan will have a strong focus on regional connectivity and will be developed in consultation with industry for an Autumn publication.

Q
Asked by Ian Paisley
(North Antrim)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Buses: Exhaust Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Prime Minister's statement of 11 February 2020, Transport Infrastructure, Official Report, column 712, what discussions he has had with the Prime Minister on the timeline for the deployment of the funding committed to the purchase of more than 4,000 zero-carbon buses.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 28 July 2020

The Secretary of State has not had any specific conversations with the Prime Minister regarding the timeline for allocating the buses portion of the £5 billion funding package, that was announced in February this year.

Details of the 4,000 zero-emission buses from the funding package, including how the funding will be distributed, will be announced in due course.

Q
Asked by Lord Greaves
Asked on: 28 July 2020
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters: Safety Measures
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether people riding electric and unpowered scooters on the highway are required to display front and rear lights on the same basis as cyclists; and if not, what consideration they are giving to introducing such a requirement.
Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 13 July 2020
Department for Transport
Shipping: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of vessels in British ports or territorial waters whose crews have been on board for more than eleven months; and what steps they are taking to ensure the repatriation of such crew members.
A
Answered on: 27 July 2020

For cruise vessels laid up in the UK, we are aware of 39 seafarers who have now gone over their 11 months. We continue to support operators in regard to repatriation and there are a number of planned repatriation flights over the next four weeks which should see many seafarers returning home. There are a small number of states where repatriation continues to be difficult or not possible and we are working with those States to seek solutions.

In regard to other vessels operating or calling at UK ports, we are not aware of any UK flagged ships in the UK territorial waters with seafarers who have been on board for more than 11 months.

With the exception of cruise vessels, the Maritime and Coastguard Agency, as the port state authority, has not been made aware of any seafarers who have been working on board for more than 11 months on non-UK ships.

Q
Asked by Tom Tugendhat
(Tonbridge and Malling)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Buses: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to ensure that there are sufficient buses requiring an MOT between March 2021 and June 2021, following the suspension of tests earlier this year and increased demand for bus MOTs during summer 2020.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 27 July 2020

In March 2020, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) took the difficult decision to suspend most MOTs for buses to support the Government’s efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Since then it has been working hard to safely reintroduce vehicle testing. It has worked closely with the bus industry to ensure operators are clear about test dates and exemptions, and it will increase testing capacity to minimise the operational impact on businesses.

Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport: Repairs and Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the value to the economy of investment in the maintenance and renewal of transport infrastructure.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 27 July 2020

A well maintained transport system helps goods and people move around the country and contributes to economic performance. Whilst impacts vary from case to case, well planned maintenance and renewals work has been demonstrated to deliver very high value for money and amongst the highest returns for investment in transport. Data on the value for money of investments is published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/percentage-of-dft-s-appraised-project-spending-that-is-assessed-as-good-or-very-good-value-for-money

Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to include quality of life metrics in his Department's Web-based Transport Analysis Guidance (WebTAG).
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 27 July 2020

The Department’s Transport Analysis Guidance (TAG) provides guidance on the transport appraisal process that allows decision-makers to be presented with a comprehensive account of all relevant impacts of a proposed transport investment. A range of impacts relating to quality of life are typically considered in scheme appraisals including congestion/crowding relief, journey quality, housing availability, air quality, noise, landscape, safety, security, physical activity, accessibility, and affordability.

As set out in last year’s Appraisal and Modelling Strategy, the Department is also progressing work in several areas that collectively serve to highlight the relationship between transport investment and quality of life, including the potential role of wellbeing analysis in transport appraisal.

Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport: Capital Investment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what weighting is given to the (a) environmental and (b) social impacts of transport investment in his Department's Web-based Transport Analysis Guidance (WebTAG).
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 27 July 2020

The Department’s Transport Analysis Guidance (TAG) provides guidance on the transport appraisal which provides a comprehensive account of all relevant impacts of a proposed transport investment. There is no prior weighting applied to any specific impact or group of impacts, with their importance determined by their scale and evidence on how society values these impacts. Environmental impacts considered include noise, air quality, greenhouse gases, landscape, townscape, historic environment, biodiversity, and water environment. Social impacts considered include accidents, physical activity, security, severance, journey quality, option and non-use value, accessibility, and personal affordability.

TAG also recommends the use of distributional analysis – the impacts of a proposal on more vulnerable groups of society. Where these distributional impacts are relevant to the scheme, a qualitative assessment of the extent and the vulnerable groups affected should be reported.

Q
Asked by Layla Moran
(Oxford West and Abingdon)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: Renewable Energy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 26 June 2020 to Question 60658 on Renewable energy, what plans his Department has to install more solar panels and wind turbines on its buildings in the next five years.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 27 July 2020

As part of improving the sustainable performance of our estate, the Department is looking at the feasibility of introducing further renewables to support the decarbonisation process. All options for the introduction of renewables will be explored particularly where they can act as a replacement for systems/functions which currently rely on a fossil fuel source. The additional renewables will form part of our next estates operational sustainability strategy which is being developed to align with the latest Greening Government Commitments framework of targets and also the development of a trajectory towards Net Zero.

Q
Asked by Layla Moran
(Oxford West and Abingdon)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: Renewable Energy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 23 June 2020 to Question 59354 on Energy, what proportion of the electricity used by his Department's buildings in (a) each of the last five years and (b) 2020 to date was produced by solar panels and wind turbines on those buildings.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 27 July 2020

The requested information is as follows:

2015

2016

2017

2018

2019

2020 (to 31/03/20)

Renewables as % of total electricity consumption

0.18

0.14

0.13

0.13

0.13

0.14

Q
Asked by Scott Benton
(Blackpool South)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Delivery Services: Self-employed
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of introducing a compulsory registration scheme for all drivers employed in the gig economy delivering food for (a) online retailers and (b) takeaways and restaurants.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 27 July 2020

All drivers and riders must ensure that they comply with road traffic regulations. The Department has not made an assessment, and does not plan to carry out an assessment, of the potential merits of introducing a compulsory registration scheme for all drivers employed in the gig economy for delivering food for either online retailers or takeaways and restaurants.

Q
Asked by Scott Benton
(Blackpool South)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Delivery Services: Self-employed
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the level of compliance with (a) vehicle tax and (b) insurance requirements of drivers employed in the gig economy delivering food for online retailers, takeaways and restaurants; and whether he plans to make an assessment of the effectiveness of regulation in that sector.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 27 July 2020

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s register records the name and address of registered keepers and their vehicles. As it does not include any information about an individual’s employment status, no assessment is made of the level of compliance with vehicle tax of drivers employed in the gig economy.

Additionally, all motorists require motor insurance to cover minimum third-party risks. This must cover all purposes for which the driver is using the vehicle, such as for employment. As such the Department does not conduct assessments of compliance in individual sectors.

Q
Asked by Lord Patten
Asked on: 27 July 2020
Department for Transport
Shipping: Charities
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the role of (1) the Apostleship of the Sea, (2) the Mission to Seafarers, and (3) other UK based maritime worker welfare charities.
Q
Asked by Lord Shipley
Asked on: 10 July 2020
Department for Transport
Parking: Fines
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what checks are made by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency on the fitness of the operators of private car parks to issue valid fines.
A
Answered on: 24 July 2020

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) will only release vehicle keeper information to private parking companies that are members of an appropriate accredited trade association (ATA). The ATAs carry out checks on parking companies before allowing them to become members. This ensures that the company is legitimate and is monitored for compliance with the ATA’s code of practice that promotes fair treatment for motorists.

The DVLA carries out comprehensive auditing of companies, involving remote and also on-site audits in conjunction with the Government Internal Audit Agency. This ensures that keeper information is used appropriately. Any issues are investigated and action taken where necessary. This can include the suspension of the facility to request vehicle keeper information from the DVLA.

Q
Asked by Lord Pendry
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Parking and Road Traffic: Kent
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made (1) in preparing for any increased traffic, and (2) in providing additional lorry parking capacity, in Kent in preparation for the impact of new trade agreements following the exit from the single market.
A
Answered on: 24 July 2020

We are continuing to work at pace with the Kent Resilience Forum to revise traffic management contingency plans, to deal with the potential congestion at the end of the transition period. One such measure is Highways England’s Quick Movable Barrier project, which will be operational from December 2020. This flexible concrete barrier can be deployed on the M20 in Kent within 24 hours to form a safe contraflow, compared to the previous steel barrier which required a month of overnight closures to set up.

We can also confirm that the Department has purchased the MOJO site in Ashford. This site will form part of our contingency planning which aims to help ensure the free flow of freight and reduce the risk of disruption at the border at the end of the transition period. It was chosen due to its strategic location, with easy access to the M20, the primary corridor to and from key ports within the Dover Straits.

Q
Asked by Jon Trickett
(Hemsworth)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
High Speed 2 Railway Line
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department is taking steps to (a) restructure and (b) reassess the viability of the High Speed Two project as a result of the Infrastructure and Projects Authority issuing a red Delivery Confidence Assessment rating in its Annual Report on Major Projects 2019-20.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 24 July 2020

The IPA’s report refers to the status of the HS2 project in September 2019. This was before the project was comprehensively reset in February 2020 with a revised budget and schedule, and provision of adequate contingency. Steps have also been taken to ensure the project is delivered in a more disciplined and transparent manner with, for example, a dedicated HS2 Minister appointed and bi-annual updates to be provided to Parliament.

In line with the findings of the Oakervee Review, published in February 2020, we will also be creating new delivery arrangements for Euston, and have committed to drawing up an Integrated Rail Plan for the Midlands and the North by the end of this year.

Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Cycling and Walking
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many and what proportion of his Department's staff work primarily on policy in relation to cycling and walking.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 24 July 2020

The Government is committed to delivering the aims and ambitions set out in the Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy, which was published in April 2017. This includes ensuring that there are appropriate staff resources in place to deliver the Strategy, as well as the new commitments on active travel that have been announced recently. Around twenty officials in the Department for Transport now work on cycling and walking issues, and this will be kept under review.

Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Cycleways
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the adequacy of the 500 miles of Dutch-inspired kerb-protected cycleways designed and paid for by the Ministry of Transport between 1934 and 1941; and whether he plans to upgrade those cycleways to comply with modern standards.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 24 July 2020

The Department has made no assessment of the adequacy of the protected cycleways designed and built between 1934 and 1941. Local Authorities are responsible for assessing and identifying investment priorities for local transport infrastructure, including for cycling and walking. The Government intends to publish the updated version of the Department’s cycle infrastructure design guidance imminently.

On the 9th May the Government announced a £2 billion package of funding for cycling and walking over the next five years. £225 million will be available to local authorities this financial year. for immediate measures including new cycle lanes, wider pavements and safer junctions. Decisions on the remainder will be for the Spending Review in due course.

Q
(Huddersfield)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Motor Vehicles: USA
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the suitability of US (a) SUVs and (b) other larger vehicles for driving on UK roads in relation to a future free trade agreement with that country.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 24 July 2020

The Department for Transport has considered the differences between USA and UK technical standards across all vehicle types. In some areas the safety outcomes are broadly similar but there are also some important differences that would need to be considered, for example, the standards applicable to protecting pedestrians involved in collisions.

The British Government will decide how we establish and maintain our own standards and regulations, and no standards will be diminished as part of a Free Trade Agreement with the USA.

Q
(Warrington North)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
High Speed 2 Railway Line: Golborne
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what progress he has made on reviewing the merits of the inclusion of the Golborne Spur section in phase 2b of High Speed Two project.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 24 July 2020
  • The Government has committed to developing an Integrated Rail Plan (IRP) which will look at how to deliver Phase 2b of HS2, Northern Powerhouse Rail and other Network Rail programmes better and more effectively, ensuring the benefits are brought to the North and Midlands as quickly and efficiently as possible.

  • The Golborne Link is part of the current plans for the western leg of Phase 2b of HS2.

  • The Golborne Link is being considered as part of the IRP, which will assess the Link’s benefits, costs and the best way to serve the North West of England and Scotland.

  • We expect the findings of the IRP to be published by the end of this year. Should any design changes be proposed, they will be subject to future consultation.

Q
Asked by Ms Lyn Brown
(West Ham)
Asked on: 16 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits for (a) reducing the risk of covid-19 transmission and (b) consumer welfare of mandating that airlines seat groups of people who are travelling together are seated closely together during the covid-19 pandemic.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 24 July 2020

The Government has published guidance specifically for both aviation operators and for air passengers on safer travel during the COVID-19 pandemic. This operator guidance maps out the measures airlines can take to protect passengers and staff on board aircraft, and includes advice on hygiene measures, face coverings, and social distancing in the aircraft setting. On the specific issue of seating passengers travelling in a group together, the guidance states ‘where possible and where mass and balance allow, enable social distancing among passengers of different households or support bubbles, where relevant.’

The Government expects all airlines to manage the risks of coronavirus as far as possible in order to provide safer workplaces and services for workers and passengers. For further information, the operator guidance is available to view at the following link: https://www.gov.uk/guidance/coronavirus-covid-19-safer-aviation-guidance-for-operators

Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Asked on: 16 July 2020
Department for Transport
Railways: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the losses incurred by rail-card holders who have not had access to (a) rail services and (b) compensation available for loss of service during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 24 July 2020

Railcards are sold and managed by the Rail Delivery Group on behalf of the rail industry. While no specific assessment has been made of the losses incurred by Railcard holders, many customers can make back their initial investment with the savings resulting from a single journey, or a small number of rail journeys.

Proposals for amendments to existing Railcard policies are for the Rail Delivery Group to bring forward. The Rail Delivery Group is working with train companies on a number of ways to assist Railcard holders, in light of the current COVID-19 related travel restrictions. Departmental officials have been engaging regularly with the Rail Delivery Group as they consider possible changes to Railcard conditions.

Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicle Drivers: Working Hours
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what agreement they have reached, if any, with the EU to resolve regulatory differences with regard to driving hours for truck drivers travelling from mainland Europe to the UK.
A
Answered on: 24 July 2020

Commercial road vehicles in use on UK roads are expected to meet roadworthiness standards, be suitably loaded and have their drivers’ hours controlled to ensure road safety standards are maintained. We will continue to enforce these standards in a non-discriminatory way with regard to UK/non-UK operators and expect that European Union Member States will continue to act in a similar manner. Discussions are continuing towards a future UK/EU free trade agreement, including international commercial road transport.

Grouped Questions: HL7024 | HL7025
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles: Road Traffic Offences
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what agreement they have reached, if any, with the EU to resolve regulatory differences with regard to overloading of vehicles for truck drivers travelling from mainland Europe to the UK.
A
Answered on: 24 July 2020

Commercial road vehicles in use on UK roads are expected to meet roadworthiness standards, be suitably loaded and have their drivers’ hours controlled to ensure road safety standards are maintained. We will continue to enforce these standards in a non-discriminatory way with regard to UK/non-UK operators and expect that European Union Member States will continue to act in a similar manner. Discussions are continuing towards a future UK/EU free trade agreement, including international commercial road transport.

Grouped Questions: HL7022 | HL7025
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles: Testing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what agreement they have reached, if any, with the EU to resolve regulatory differences with regard to vehicle roadworthiness for truck drivers travelling from mainland Europe to the UK.
A
Answered on: 24 July 2020

Commercial road vehicles in use on UK roads are expected to meet roadworthiness standards, be suitably loaded and have their drivers’ hours controlled to ensure road safety standards are maintained. We will continue to enforce these standards in a non-discriminatory way with regard to UK/non-UK operators and expect that European Union Member States will continue to act in a similar manner. Discussions are continuing towards a future UK/EU free trade agreement, including international commercial road transport.

Grouped Questions: HL7022 | HL7024
Q
(Paisley and Renfrewshire North)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has made for the UK's continued participation in the European Conference of Ministers of Transport's haulage permit scheme after the end of the transition period.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 24 July 2020

The UK Government will remain a member of the European Conference of Ministers for Transport (ECMT) regime after the transition period as it is a multilateral agreement independent of the European Union.

Q
(Bexleyheath and Crayford)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Public Transport: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to covid-19 lockdown restrictions, what recent assessment he has made of the level of compliance of people wearing face coverings on public transport.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 24 July 2020
  • Regular reports from Network Rail and the train operating companies continue to suggest high rates of compliance. The Office for National Statistics weekly survey which tracks the proportion of people declaring they use a face covering on public transport also suggests high levels of compliance with the regulation. Latest data (collected 8-12 July) shows 82% of public transport users in England used a face covering - a significant increase in compliance from 57% in the first week of June. Not all people can wear or are required to wear a face covering and so we would not expect compliance rates to be 100%.

  • We have implemented a significant communications campaign, and have been working with transport operators on raising public awareness and encouraging all groups of passengers to comply with the requirement to wear a face covering. We are aware of lower levels of compliance in some areas and are working with local transport authorities to understand and tackle the reasons for such variance. British Transport Police, Transport for London enforcement officers and local police forces are working hard to encourage compliance and, where necessary have been fining passengers who fail to comply.

Q
Asked by Rosie Cooper
(West Lancashire)
Asked on: 20 July 2020
Department for Transport
Members: Correspondence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to reply to the correspondence of 21 May 2020 from the hon. Member for West Lancashire on the Burscough Curves.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 24 July 2020

A response to your correspondence of 21 May was sent via email on 3rd July. Unfortunately, due to an administrative error, an incorrect date was quoted on that letter for which I apologise. A revised copy of that letter with the correct date can be found in the attached document.

Letter response - Burscough Curves (Word Document, 100.9 KB)
Q
Asked by Lord Pendry
Asked on: 24 July 2020
Department for Transport
Manston Airport: Large Goods Vehicles
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 24 July (HL6859), how much they have spent on preparations for the provision of additional lorry parking capacity at Manston Airport.
Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 13 July 2020
Department for Transport
Railways: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to provide companies operating international rail services that are affected by travel restrictions with comparable financial support to that provided to businesses operating international air services.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2020

The Government recognises the significant financial challenges facing companies operating international transport services, including aviation and international rail, as a result of Covid-19.

The Government has therefore announced a broad range of significant measures to assist UK businesses across all sectors in distress, including the Job Retention Scheme. The Department has engaged with operators across transport sectors, including international rail, to support access to these schemes where appropriate.

The Government has also now announced measures to exempt countries from self-isolation requirements, which will open up opportunities for international travel, help the travel sector’s recovery and protect jobs.

The Government will continue to engage closely with transport operators, including those in the international rail sector, as we move towards the next phase of our Covid-19 response, and in particular as we look to safely restart our travel sectors.

Q
Asked by Lord Bradshaw
Asked on: 13 July 2020
Department for Transport
East Midlands Rail Franchise
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 10 July 2020 (HL6210), for what reasons they rejected the view of the majority of respondents to the East Midlands Rail franchise consultation who opposed splitting the Liverpool–Norwich service at Nottingham.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2020

On June 2018, the DfT published the East Midlands Rail Franchise Stakeholder Briefing document, which set out the Department for Transport’s reasons for its decision, following a review of all the feedback received by respondents. In reaching such decisions, the balance of consultation responses received is one of many elements that has to be considered when weighing up the arguments.

Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Tilbury Port: Lower Thames Crossing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the updated design of the Lower Thames Crossing allows for the Tilbury link road; and whether they have established a timeline for the design, business and funding cases for the Tilbury link road in the Road Investment Strategy 2.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2020

Highways England has designed the Lower Thames Crossing route so that a Tilbury Link Road can, subject to funding and planning permission, be built in the future as a single carriageway connection to Tilbury.

The second Road Investment Strategy (RIS2) identifies the Tilbury Link Road as a proposal to be developed for potential inclusion in RIS3. Highways England’s Delivery Plan and Strategic Business Plan, which include plans for taking forward the RIS3 pipeline proposals, will be published shortly.

Q
Asked by Layla Moran
(Oxford West and Abingdon)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Public Transport: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps the Government is taking to use public transport capacity monitoring technology to help restore public confidence in the public transport network during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 23 July 2020

The Department maintains regular contact with transport operators on a range of issues affecting the network, including capacity and messaging during the COVID-19 Pandemic.

The rail industry supported by government is taking a variety of approaches to keep passengers informed about what’s happening across the rail network. National Rail Enquiries (NRE) is making a range of real time updates available across its platforms based on operational train data provided by the train operators and industry systems. Additionally, the NRE Alert Me service as announced by the Secretary of State at a No10 press conference on May 23rd helps passengers to stagger their journeys and avoid busy hotspots on the rail network, allowing passengers to travel safely and maintain social distancing.

To manage the expected increased demand for public transport, the Department is seeking to provide travel demand management support to local authorities in England outside London. However, it is clear that solutions must be locally led between transport authorities and operators.

Q
Asked by Emma Hardy
(Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Taxis: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans he has to make the use of face coverings in taxis compulsory.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 23 July 2020

The Government has published safer transport guidance on the safe provision of transport services during the coronavirus pandemic. The guidance to passengers says that passengers should wear a face covering when using taxis or private hire vehicles. Taxi drivers are able to refuse carriage to passengers where it is reasonable to do so, and private hire vehicle operators can make wearing a face covering a condition of hiring. We are aware of private hire vehicle operators that are doing this and requiring the driver they work with to do the same. We continually review guidance for safer transport in line with scientific advice.

Q
Asked by Ruth Cadbury
(Brentford and Isleworth)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Highway Code
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his Department's document entitled, Cycling and Walking Investment Strategy: Safety Review, when his Department plans to commence its review of the Highway Code.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 23 July 2020

The Department has been working with interested groups to conduct a review of The Highway Code focused on improving safety for cyclists, pedestrians and horse-riders. We are hoping to consult on the proposed changes shortly.

Q
(Huddersfield)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Roads: Safety
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what comparative assessment his Department has made of road safety standards in the (a) UK and (b) US.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 23 July 2020

The Department for Transport has not made a comparative assessment between road safety standards in the UK and the USA because no direct comparison is possible.

Q
Asked by Sajid Javid
(Bromsgrove)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Buses: Electric Vehicles
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the proposed timeline is of the roll-out of the electric bus town scheme.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 23 July 2020

We have received 19 expressions of interest in becoming Britain’s first All-Electric Bus Town, and each sets out a proposed timeline for roll-out. We expect to announce the phase one winner, who will proceed to develop a business case, over the summer. Further details, including confirmation of timings, will therefore be available in due course.

Q
Asked by Lord Greaves
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 14 July (HL6304), whether the advice in their Safer Transport guidance “that people should consider all other forms of transport, such as cycling and walking, before using public transport” includes the use of private motor vehicles; whether they intend to discourage the use of private motor vehicles as COVID-19 restrictions relax; if so, when; when they expect to announce the details of the “£5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycling links across England” and the distribution of that funding; and at what stage of their post-COVID-19 recovery plans they intend to start to encourage people to use public transport including in particular the railways; and on the basis of what criteria.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2020

To support the reopening of the economy, we have been working hard with public transport operators to return services as close as possible to pre-Covid-19 levels. It is vital that the transport network continues to operate safely as demand increases for services, and we are continuing to work with the transport industry to ensure they remain able to deliver a safe service.

We keep our guidance under constant review as COVID-19 incidence and scientific evidence changes. Our guidance now sets out that people should walk or cycle if they can. Where this is not possible, people can use public transport or drive.

I would like to assure you that the Government remains committed to meeting its target of net zero emissions by 2050. Encouraging people to use alternatives to petrol or diesel cars for travel is central to this ambition. We are striving to embed and build on the green travel habits adopted by the public during lockdown. Further details of the £5 billion funding package for buses and cycling, which includes support for the purchase of at least 4,000 new zero-emission buses, will be announced in due course. The Department has also fast-tracked plans for e-scooter trials around the country to open new ways to travel.

Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Parking: Pedestrian Areas
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how long the consultation period on a national ban on pavement parking, announced on 12 March, is planned to be; and when there will be a detailed plan with a time frame for action to address issues caused by pavement parking.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2020

The Department is committed to launch the public consultation over the summer which will run for 12 weeks. Ministers will decide the appropriate course of action in light of the consultation findings, which will determine the timeframe for delivering a solution to this problem.

Q
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Roads: Capital Investment
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the speech on a New Deal for Britain by the Prime Minister on 30 June, what are the 29 road network projects that they have committed to funding this year; and how much money they will allocate to each such project.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2020

On 30 June the Department for Transport announced funding of £100.445 million for 29 local highway maintenance projects through the Highways Maintenance Challenge Fund, following a competition. All grant will be paid in summer 2020. The projects are listed in the attached table.

List of Road Network Projects and funding (Word Document, 22.25 KB)
Q
Asked by Darren Jones
(Bristol North West)
Asked on: 16 July 2020
Department for Transport
Motor Vehicles: Exhaust Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to his news story, Idling drivers could face higher fines under new government crackdown, published 29 June 2019, what progress he has made on proposals to charge idling drivers higher fines.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 23 July 2020

Existing guidance to Local Authorities makes clear that fines should be dispensed to motorists only as a last resort. The priority must be to change motorists’ behaviour – to encourage them not to idle, which after all is wasting their fuel, and instead to encourage motorists towards using the technological solutions now available.

Q
Asked by Tom Tugendhat
(Tonbridge and Malling)
Asked on: 17 July 2020
Department for Transport
Buses: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the additional Bus MOT testers required by the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency to test all vehicles due an MOT since March 2020.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 23 July 2020

In March 2020, the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) took the difficult decision to suspend most MOTs for lorries, buses and trailers to support the Government’s efforts to limit the spread of COVID-19.

Since then it has been working hard to keep people safe, whilst still providing a critical worker testing service to support the national emergency response.

The DVSA is managing the reintroduction of vehicle testing and demand for MOTs by:

  1. using existing testing resource efficiently through an overtime scheme and redeployment of duties; and

  2. implementing a phased return to testing by:

      • giving 2 three-month MOT exemptions to those vehicles whose MOTs were originally due in March and April, and;

      • giving 1 three-month MOT exemption initially, to those vehicles whose MOTs were originally due from June – initially this will be done for those MOTs due in June, July and August.

      • giving vehicles due an MOT in May an exemption until August.

Q
Asked by Tom Tugendhat
(Tonbridge and Malling)
Asked on: 17 July 2020
Department for Transport
Buses: Testing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has made an assessment of the number of registered buses due an MOT before 30 November 2020.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 23 July 2020

The Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency (DVSA) has carried out a detailed assessment of the number of registered buses due an MOT before 30 November 2020. Based on exemptions currently issued, the volume of tests due from July 2020 to November 2020 for all public service vehicles, which includes buses and coaches, is 52,500.

Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 09 July 2020
Department for Transport
High Speed 2 Railway Line
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government who are the members of the HS2 land and property acquisition programme review, announced in May; what are the review's terms of reference; and whether external independent inputs will be taken into account as part of the review.
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The review commissioned by the Minister for HS2, Andrew Stephenson MP, in May is being undertaken by officials in the Department for Transport supported by their counterparts in High Speed Two Limited. A single external consultant has also provided support to the review.

The terms of reference were intentionally wide-ranging, and required the review team to examine HS2 Ltd’s land and property acquisition processes and, where the evidence demonstrates it, associated wider-government policies.

The review team has considered evidence from numerous independent external sources, both written and through stakeholder interviews. Discussions with practitioners in the land and property field possessing direct personal knowledge of HS2 transactions were a particular source of insight for the review.

Q
Asked on: 09 July 2020
Department for Transport
Bus Services: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to support the bus and coach industry after the current COVID-19 financial support expires in August; and what discussions they have had with the bus and coach industry to understand that industry's strategic requirements.
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The Department continues to work closely with transport authorities and operators to understand the risks and ongoing issues in the bus and coach industry and how these can be addressed, so that public transport services can adapt to any ‘new normal’ that emerges from the COVID-19 outbreak and work towards a sustainable long-term recovery.

Q
Asked on: 09 July 2020
Department for Transport
Transport: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much new COVID-19 funding they have spent to date (1) in total, and (2) per passenger, on (a) roads, (b) rail, (c) bus, (d) coach, (e) light-rail, (f) walking, and (g) cycling.
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

Government’s new spending to date due to COVID-19 is £3.473 billion. This includes funding brought forward from 2020-21. £2.8 billion has been spent on rail franchised operators, £84 million on buses outside London and £42 million on walking and cycling. Light rail has been allocated £29 million. It is important to note that the spend on buses, walking and cycling only reflects spend to date, and significant further sums will be spent as bus services continue to ramp up and local authorities roll out active travel schemes.

Transport for London has received £547 million. Other funding, including roads and coaches, has come from existing budgets. Government does not hold data for COVID-19 funding per passenger.

Q
Asked on: 09 July 2020
Department for Transport
Public Transport: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much they have spent on the COVID-19 communications campaign advising people to avoid using public transport; and what (1) plans they have for, and (2) associated spending they have allocated to, a communications campaign to encourage people to resume using public transport.
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The Department for Transport launched a campaign in May, with the objective of providing clear communications to avoid public transport unless the journey is essential and no other option (i.e. walking, cycling or driving) is available. The Department worked with operators across the transport network who amplified the message. The cost of the May and June activity, which had a primary message advising people to avoid to public transport, was £245k. This activity alone had reached more than 15 million people by 3 July 2020.

At the start of the campaign, the 2m social distancing rule meant public transport was running at 10% of capacity. To enable key workers to access the network safely, the department encouraged those who could avoid travel altogether, or use an alternative mode, to do so. Overcrowding has remained a risk as lockdown restrictions have been lifted and sectors have reopened, so managing demand to protect those who cannot work from home or travel in another way has remained a priority. The campaign to date has helped to prevent such overcrowding by providing clear and consistent advice to the public.

However, ‘avoid travel’ was just one message in a suite communicated to the public, and shared with our partners to disseminate. The campaign has also informed passengers about the steps they can take to protect themselves and others should they need to use the network. Materials and messages have been updated and added regularly to reflect the evolving policy and guidance positions, including, for example, the move to mandatory use of face coverings.

The campaign is therefore not clearly split between advising people to avoid public transport and encouraging them to resume using it. It has, and will continue to, communicate a range of messages to different audiences and will shift over time to reflect the latest advice to the public. Our priority must be the safety of passengers, but when we are able to welcome more people back to the network, we will use the same channels and mechanisms utilised to date. This is an ongoing issue and further spending on communications will be a part of that.

Transport was also a key element of the Stay Alert campaign run by Cabinet Office, with an estimated £2.35 million invested up to 12 July 2020, accounting for 19% of Stay Alert investment. Cabinet Office have worked closely with stakeholders such as TfL who have provided free access to poster sites and Network Rail who have provided 30,000 48 sheet and 96 sheet advertising slots per week.

Q
Asked on: 09 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation and Bus Services: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the different requirements in the guidance for social distancing for (1) airlines, and (2) bus operators; whether that assessment demonstrated that the guidance for one is more prescriptive than the other; and if so, why.
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

Our safer transport guidance and safer aviation guidance provide advice to help transport organisations and the aviation industry manage the risks of coronavirus. This includes suggested measures for how they can provide safer workplaces and services for workers and passengers, including mitigations where social distancing is not possible or more difficult to manage. The measures suggested are intended as a guide, not as a prescriptive set of requirements. Transport organisations and the aviation industry will need to carry out their own risk assessments.

Both sets of guidance have been developed in collaboration with industry, Public Health England, and relevant health and safety regulators. The risk control measures suggested in both reflect the nature of the settings for which they are intended. Aviation settings differ in several key ways from buses and other modes of public transport, particularly the higher level of control inherent in aviation settings. In comparison, bus and other land transport services operate in less controlled environments with a greater degree of passenger autonomy.

Q
Asked on: 09 July 2020
Department for Transport
Shipping: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the proportion of registered UK seafarers who have been stranded abroad during the COVID-19 pandemic who have been repatriated; and what plans they have to ensure that all seafarers are given assistance to enable them to return to the UK.
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

Within the cruise sector we have repatriated 1,209 British national seafarers since 16 April. There are 471 British nationals remaining on cruise vessels globally but these are essential staff.

We continue to work with industry and the unions to get better overall data for British seafarers on other types of vessels.

Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 10 July 2020
Department for Transport
High Speed 2 Railway Line
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they plan to take to in response to the report by the Infrastructure and Projects Authority Annual Report on Major Projects 2019–20, published on 9 July, and its finding that in relation to the HS2 programme, the "successful delivery of the project appears to be unachievable".
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The IPA’s report refers to the status of the HS2 project in September 2019. This was before the project was comprehensively reset in February 2020 with a revised budget and schedule, and provision of adequate contingency. Steps have also been taken to ensure the project is delivered in a more disciplined and transparent manner with, for example, a dedicated HS2 Minister appointed and bi-annual updates to be provided to Parliament. As a result, we are confident HS2 is being delivered with the strict oversight needed.

Q
Asked by Lord Shipley
Asked on: 10 July 2020
Department for Transport
Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency: Staff
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many staff were employed by the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency in each of the past three years to respond to requests for the personal details of motorists by private car park operators.
A
Answered on: 22 July 2020

It is not possible to say how many staff are employed specifically to process requests from private car park operators. The staff involved deal with these requests as part of their role alongside a variety of other duties.

Q
Asked by John McNally
(Falkirk)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Buses: Exhaust Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking ensure that funding from his Department for the ultra-low emissions bus scheme is released to transport operators by September 2020 to protect jobs in that sector.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The Ultra Low Emission Bus Scheme (ULEBS) awarded £48 million across 19 local authorities and bus operators, and will support 263 zero emission buses and infrastructure. To release the funding to operators, government must be presented with evidence of purchase of the vehicles.

More recently the Government has announced £5 billion of new funding to overhaul bus and cycling links across England outside of London, which includes funding for at least 4,000 new zero-emission buses.

Q
(Altrincham and Sale West)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Renewable Fuels
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support the commercialisation of sustainable aviation fuel in the UK.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 22 July 2020

To help overcome barriers to the production of sustainable fuels for aviation on a commercial scale, the Department’s Future Fuels for Flight and Freight Competition (F4C) makes capital funding available. As part of the competition we are currently supporting two projects to build plants capable of supplying advanced fuels for use in aviation.

In addition, the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligation (RTFO), a certificate trading scheme, promotes a market for low carbon fuels. Sustainable aviation fuels are eligible for support under the RTFO and are categorised as a development fuel, so potentially benefit from a higher tradeable certificate value.

On 12 June the Department announced the Jet Zero Council to create a partnership between industry and Government and bring together Ministers and CEO-level stakeholders to drive high ambition in the delivery of new technologies and innovative ways to cut aviation emissions. The Council will be jointly chaired by the Secretary of State for Transport and the Secretary of State for BEIS.

Q
(Altrincham and Sale West)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aircraft: Electric Motors
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to support research into (a) improving aircraft efficiency and (b) new technologies to enable electric and hybrid powered flight.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The focus of our policy development and analysis to date has been on ways to meet our 2050 net zero carbon commitment. We have not specifically made an assessment of the savings that could be made if the focus were the next five or ten years, but we continue to develop policies to reduce emissions over both the short term and the medium term.

The Transport Secretary recently announced the Jet Zero Council, which will provide leadership and strategic direction to cut aviation emissions. The Council will focus on developing UK capabilities to deliver zero emission flight.

Through the Aerospace Growth Partnership, Government and industry are committing a total of £3.9bn in funding for mid-stage aerospace research and development between 2013 and 2026.

DfT’s Future Fuels for Flight and Freight Competition makes £20 million of capital funding available for projects that will produce low carbon waste-based fuels for use in aircraft and heavy goods vehicles. This government funding will be matched by the private sector, and is expected to support construction of first-of-a-kind plants by 2021. The sustainable aviation fuel produced in these plants is expected to have emissions savings of at least 70% when compared to traditional jet fuel.

Grouped Questions: 73713
Q
(Altrincham and Sale West)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Airspace
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what plans his Department has for airspace modernisation.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 22 July 2020

Airspace modernisation is vital to the future of aviation, to delivering net zero and, now, to supporting the aviation sector’s recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. It is a critical infrastructure programme of national importance.

However, in light of the pandemic, we recognise that the timescales in which airspace modernisation will take place will change. We are working with the CAA to review the Airspace Modernisation Strategy, to consider the recommendations from ACOG’s recent report ‘Remobilising the Airspace Change Programme’, and will advise stakeholders of our preferred approach in the early Autumn.

Q
(Altrincham and Sale West)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Exhaust Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate his Department has made of the carbon emissions reductions that could be achieved in the next (a) five and (b) 10 years from (i) more sustainable aviation fuels, (ii) more efficient aircraft, (iii) hybrid and electric flight and (iv) airspace modernisation.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The focus of our policy development and analysis to date has been on ways to meet our 2050 net zero carbon commitment. We have not specifically made an assessment of the savings that could be made if the focus were the next five or ten years, but we continue to develop policies to reduce emissions over both the short term and the medium term.

The Transport Secretary recently announced the Jet Zero Council, which will provide leadership and strategic direction to cut aviation emissions. The Council will focus on developing UK capabilities to deliver zero emission flight.

Through the Aerospace Growth Partnership, Government and industry are committing a total of £3.9bn in funding for mid-stage aerospace research and development between 2013 and 2026.

DfT’s Future Fuels for Flight and Freight Competition makes £20 million of capital funding available for projects that will produce low carbon waste-based fuels for use in aircraft and heavy goods vehicles. This government funding will be matched by the private sector, and is expected to support construction of first-of-a-kind plants by 2021. The sustainable aviation fuel produced in these plants is expected to have emissions savings of at least 70% when compared to traditional jet fuel.

Grouped Questions: 73711
Q
Asked by Bill Wiggin
(North Herefordshire)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Road Traffic Control
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he has plans to ensure that local authorities compensate motorists for the closure of publicly funded roads.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The Department does not compensate motorists for the closure of roads. Roads are funded by general taxation for the benefit of all. Local authorities are responsible for managing their roads and have a wide range of measures available to them to do so, including road closures. They have various legal duties on them to manage their roads for all users, and ‘traffic’ is defined to include both cyclists and pedestrians.

Q
(Shrewsbury and Atcham)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Public Transport: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps his Department is taking to prevent individuals form removing their face coverings on public transport.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 22 July 2020
  • The regulation makes it mandatory for passengers to wear a face covering, if they are able to, whilst travelling on public transport in England. We are working closely with operators to ensure passengers follow this requirement closely but recognise that reasonable adjustments need to be made to allow people to eat or drink if necessary or they have a medical need to do so, to take essential medication, or there is a medical emergency.

  • If someone is not complying with the regulations, operators have new powers under the Public Health Act 1984 to deny access to a service or to direct someone to leave a service if they do not wear a face covering when asked to. As a final step, operators are able to involve police, including the British Transport Police, where there is a clear breach of the rules without a reasonable excuse.

Q
Asked by Paul Maynard
(Blackpool North and Cleveleys)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Aviation: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has undertaken an assessment of the effect of the covid-19 outbreak on the aviation (a) sector and (b) supply chain.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 22 July 2020

Before the impact of COVID-19, the UK aviation sector, including air transport and aerospace, directly employed around 230,000 people and supported around 500,000 jobs in total, including the jobs supported through its purchase of goods and services along its supply chain.

The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a sharp contraction in aviation demand, which has created large revenue losses for airlines, airports and companies along the aviation supply chain. The sector has responded to falling revenues by taking action to cut costs.

The Department keeps impacts of Covid-19 on the transport sector under regular review and recognises the importance of the aviation sector to the UK economy. As a result, a series of measures have already been introduced.

The aviation sector can draw upon the unprecedented package of measures announced by the Chancellor, including a Bank of England scheme for firms to raise capital, Time to Pay flexibilities with tax bills, financial support for employees and VAT deferrals.

The Department also influenced the airport flight slot usage rules at the start of the pandemic, enabling airlines to cut their services without penalty and protect the environment from unnecessary flying.

The Government has also commenced a policy of ‘travel corridors’, a risk-based alternative to blanket self-isolation requirements with lower risk countries.

We are working with the sector to enable its restart.

Q
Asked by Paul Maynard
(Blackpool North and Cleveleys)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Airports: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the covid-19 pandemic on connectivity from each UK airport.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The Department has been speaking regularly to airport operators and airlines to understand the effect COVID-19 has had on connectivity as part of our engagement on restart and recovery in the sector.

We will continue to work closely with the industry, to understand how the aviation sector is recovering. This will support government in developing a clear recovery plan for aviation that considers the long-term impacts of COVID-19 on regional connectivity from each UK airport.

Q
(Central Suffolk and North Ipswich)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Bus Services: Suffolk
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding he has allocated to bus companies operating local routes in Suffolk to ensure that key routes are not closed as a result of limits on passenger numbers during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 22 July 2020

During this period of unprecedented disruption and uncertainty, the bus industry has played a critical role in keeping Britain moving. On 23 May, the Transport Secretary announced a further £283 million in funding – of this, £254 million was for buses and £29 million for light rail – as part of the Government’s efforts to help protect and increase bus and light rail services. This is in addition to a funding package totalling £397 million announced in April.

Suffolk County Council to date have received funding totalling £416,712 from the Covid-19 Bus Services Support Grant (CBSSG).

The Department is working with the Department for Education as a matter of urgency to explore options to increase capacity to ensure students can get to school or college in September, and manage the expected increased demand for public transport that this will bring. This includes seeking to provide travel demand management support to local authorities in England outside London. However, it is clear that solutions must be locally led between transport authorities and operators.

Grouped Questions: 73788
Q
(Central Suffolk and North Ipswich)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Bus Services: Suffolk
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what funding his Department plans to allocate to Suffolk County Council to ensure that local bus routes provide an adequate service to (a) people commuting to work and (b) children travelling to school during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 22 July 2020

During this period of unprecedented disruption and uncertainty, the bus industry has played a critical role in keeping Britain moving. On 23 May, the Transport Secretary announced a further £283 million in funding – of this, £254 million was for buses and £29 million for light rail – as part of the Government’s efforts to help protect and increase bus and light rail services. This is in addition to a funding package totalling £397 million announced in April.

Suffolk County Council to date have received funding totalling £416,712 from the Covid-19 Bus Services Support Grant (CBSSG).

The Department is working with the Department for Education as a matter of urgency to explore options to increase capacity to ensure students can get to school or college in September, and manage the expected increased demand for public transport that this will bring. This includes seeking to provide travel demand management support to local authorities in England outside London. However, it is clear that solutions must be locally led between transport authorities and operators.

Grouped Questions: 73787
Q
Asked by Julian Sturdy
(York Outer)
Asked on: 14 July 2020
Department for Transport
Travel: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how frequently his Department updates the list of counties not subject to covid-19 travel quarantine exemptions; and when he plans to next update that list.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The Health Regulations relating to the self-isolation requirements remain under constant review, and are updated as required. The next formal review will be on 27 July 2020.

Q
(Huddersfield)
Asked on: 15 July 2020
Department for Transport
Motor Vehicles: Safety Measures
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether it remains the Government's policy to implement the EU (a) general safety regulations and (b) pedestrian safety regulations that will take effect in the EU from 2022.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 22 July 2020

The package of European measures known as the General Safety Regulation includes vehicle construction requirements covering pedestrian safety and a range of additional new technologies. The Department for Transport was involved in developing these requirements but as they are scheduled to apply after we have left the EU, it will be for the British Government to decide whether to mandate the same systems in GB; no decision has yet been taken.

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