Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-100 out of 111761
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Joan Ryan
(Enfield North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 05 June 2019
Home Office
Drugs: Organised Crime
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment he has made of the number of girls being sexually exploited in the county lines drugs trade.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The latest threat assessment on county lines was published by the National Crime Agency (NCA) in January 2019. This sets out that while criminal exploitation is the most common exploitation type within county lines, victims are sometimes subjected to sexual exploitation and these victims are largely female. The assessment also points out the likelihood that females are underrepresented as both victims and perpetrators of county lines criminality.

Work is ongoing to protect those who are exploited and target county lines offenders. The Home Office has provided £3.6m to establish the National County Lines Coordination Centre (NCLCC) to enhance our cross border intelligence and activity on county lines and to better safeguard and protect victims of county lines. NCLCC has so far carried out three separate weeks of operational intensification leading to over 1600 arrests and over 2100 individuals engaged with for safeguarding.

In addition, the Government provides a range of support for county lines victims including; funding Young People’s Advocates in Birmingham, Manchester and London to work directly with gang-affected women and girls, especially if they have been victims, or are at risk, of sexual violence by gangs including county lines; funding through the Trusted Relationships fund of £13 million over two years to help foster relationships between frontline professionals and young people at risk of exploitation including county lines; and we have provided funding through the £22m Early Intervention Youth Fund over two years for six projects which will specifically address those at risk of involvement in county lines and criminal exploitation.

Q
Asked by Lord Judd
Asked on: 11 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Conflict Resolution
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to review and strengthen the effectiveness of conflict resolution policies of the UK to address persistent and accelerating conflict, and flashpoints, particularly in (1) Benin, (2) Burkina Faso, (3) Cameroon, (4) Central African Republic, (5) Chad, (6) Democratic Republic of the Congo, (7) Mali, (8) Nigeria, (9) Togo, (10) Somalia, and (11) Sudan; and what steps they are taking with partners in the Commonwealth, the EU, and the UN to review equivalent policies.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

As outlined in our answer to HL16250, the British Government is taking a number of actions to prevent conflict. In Sub-Saharan Africa, we are:

  • Using funding from the Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) which has led, for example, to the roll out of new peacekeeping-intelligence architecture in the three missions with the highest number of casualties - Mali, Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) and the Central African Republic. Our sizeable funding contribution to the UN is used as leverage to advocate for UN reform and improve the way it operates.

  • Promoting peace and security in Burkina Faso, Chad and Mali through diplomacy and targeted support. We support UN and French security efforts through direct contributions to MINUSMA in Northern Mali and the deployment of three RAF Chinook helicopters to France’s Counter-Terrorism Operation Barkhane. We work closely with the G5 and other partners to provide life-saving assistance and protection to people on the frontline of conflict. The UK is also focusing on developing programmes to tackle the long-term drivers of instability and poverty.

  • Urging all parties in Benin to engage in dialogue to overcome their differences and find a peaceful solution. We share the concerns of the EU, France, the US and the UN about acts of violence in Benin following the 28 April legislative elections.

  • Regularly addressing the situation in the North-West and South-West (Anglophone) regions of Cameroon with international partners including the UN, EU, Commonwealth and African Union to encourage and support efforts to resolve the crisis. The UK remains deeply concerned about the deteriorating humanitarian and human rights situation in the Anglophone regions and the impact it is having on the lives of ordinary civilians. We have shared experiences with the Government of Cameroon (GoC) on conflict resolution; and remain ready to provide further support. We raised our concerns during briefings at the UN Security Council on 4 and 12 June, and led on a statement with Austria at the UN Human Rights Council in March, which was supported by 39 countries, calling on the GoC to establish a credible political dialogue to address root causes of the conflict.

  • Providing the Central African Republic (CAR) with significant humanitarian spend (£63m since 2013) and core contributions to key multilateral organisations on the ground, such as the World Bank and the EU. Support to UN peacekeeping efforts include assessed contributions (£40.5m per annum to MINUSCA peacekeeping mission and €2m to the EU Training Mission).

  • Pressing our long-term approach to stability in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC), including through significant contributions to the United Nations Stabilisation Mission in the DRC (MONUSCO). We are supporting security reforms, stabilisation and peace building initiatives through DFID programmes and the CSSF.

  • Providing training to Nigeria’s armed forces combat insurgent groups, support communities to better respond and manage the effects of violent conflict, and to support the reintegration of former members of Boko Haram. We are also working closely with the EU, US and UN to provide technical support to the Nigerian Government to address the underlying causes of intercommunal violence affecting many parts of Nigeria, including the recently announced National Livestock Transformation Plan, which aims to mitigate escalating violence between pastoralists and farmers. We are currently reviewing how we might further assist the Nigerian Government in their efforts to tackle conflict in the northeast of the country.

  • Building on the work of the UK-hosted London Conference on Somalia in 2017, which brought together Somalia’s key partners, including the UN, EU and a number of members of the Commonwealth. This established a set of agreements that provide the foundation for a more coherent international approach to Somalia with conflict resolution at its core. We are careful to ensure that all UK policies and programmes in Somalia maintain a focus on conflict sensitivity, and regularly undertake conflict analysis to support this. In particular, our work includes activity under the CSSF to address the drivers of conflict and build capacity at both local and regional levels.

  • Supporting community-based peacebuilding programmes, in concert with the UN and other international partners, namely the African Union, in areas of instability and conflict in Sudan. The UK has a long standing role in supporting sustainable peace in Sudan. As a member of the Troika and bilaterally, we have supported progress in the Peace Process seeking to find a solution to the conflicts in Darfur and the Two Areas. In addition the UK plays a leading role in the UN Security Council, particularly as the penholder on the mandate for UNAMID – the African Union hybrid Mission in Darfur.

  • The Minister for Africa met with Togolese President Gnassingbé and reiterated the importance of delivering 2020 Presidential elections on time and a return to inclusive politics. The UK continues to encourage all parties to avoid violence and respect the human rights of all Togolese people. The UK supports the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) brokered roadmap, along with the EU, which has seen Togo recently adopt two-term limits on presidential terms, in line with other ECOWAS states. The change however does not apply retrospectively and has been rejected by the opposition.

Q
Asked by Lord Judd
Asked on: 11 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Conflict Resolution
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to review and strengthen the effectiveness of conflict resolution policies of the UK to address persistent and accelerating conflict, and flashpoints, particularly in (1) Afghanistan, (2) Egypt, (3) Iran, (4) Iraq, (5) Libya, and (7) Syria; and what steps they are taking with partners in the Commonwealth, the EU, and the UN to review equivalent policies.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The British Government’s actions to prevent conflict in Afghanistan and in the Middle East and North Africa include:

  • Afghanistan: Continuing our close engagement with the Afghan government and our international partners to help bring about an inclusive and sustainable Afghan-led peace process as quickly as possible. We strongly support current US efforts to drive forward peace. The UK welcomed the conclusions of the Foreign Affairs Council in April that set out a clear path for how the EU will support peace in Afghanistan. We also support the important contribution made by the UN Assistance Mission to Afghanistan (UNAMA). Prospects for peace are probably better now than at any time since 2001. However, after decades of war and the lack of trust on all sides, achieving a credible and sustainable peace process is challenging.

  • Egypt: The UK plans to spend more than £50m from 2016 to 2020 to support Egypt’s continued stability, by providing economic opportunities for and protecting ordinary Egyptians, tackling radicalisation and safeguarding tourists and British nationals. The Home Office and Egyptian Ministry of Interior are committed to increasing cooperation across a wide range of areas, including counter-terrorism, illegal migration and organised crime.

  • Iran: We are working with regional and international partners to call for restraint in order to de-escalate the situation. Yet we remain determined to preserve the Iran nuclear deal, and are working with E3 partners to achieve this. This deal remains in our shared interests as long as Iran meets its commitments under the deal in full. It is a key achievement of the global nuclear non-proliferation architecture, which is in our shared security interests. We are deeply concerned at the heightened level of regional tension. Our priority remains de-escalation.

  • Iraq: Providing support, together with the Coalition and international partners, to the Iraqi security sector in countering the ongoing threat from Daesh, and addressing the root causes of this threat. This involves addressing the underlying political, social and economic drivers which led to Daesh’s rise. We continue to support, alongside UN partners, the UN Assistance Mission in Iraq (UNAMI) whose mandate renewal was unanimously approved on 21 May 2019. The UK held the pen on UNSCR 2379 which was unanimously adopted by the UNSC in 2017 and established the UN Investigative Team for the Accountability of Daesh (UNITAD). UNITAD will seek to ensure documentation and accountability for Daesh crimes and work with the Government of Iraq to support reconciliation efforts.

  • Libya: We are engaging in intensive diplomacy, involving the UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General, Ghassan Salamé, and partners in the UN and EU. The UK is clear that all parties must commit to a ceasefire, ensure humanitarian access, and return to UN-mediated political talks. The EU28 issued a statement on 12 April 2019 condemning the violence, and urging all parties to resume political dialogue.

  • Syria: Our diplomatic and programme efforts remain focused on bringing the conflict to an end through a UN-led negotiated political settlement. The UN-led Geneva process between the Syrian parties remains the forum to achieve this. We are also engaged in completing the enduring defeat of Daesh. As events unfold, we are keeping our approach under constant review.

Q
Asked by Lord Judd
Asked on: 11 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Conflict Resolution
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to review and strengthen the effectiveness of conflict resolution policies of the UK to address persistent and accelerating conflict, and flashpoints, particularly in (1) Myanmar, (2) Sri Lanka, and (3) Southern Philippines; and what steps they are taking with partners in the Commonwealth, the EU, and the UN to review equivalent policies.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The UK Government’s actions in respect of addressing conflict and unrest in the regions listed include:

  • Maintaining our provision of practical support to the Myanmar Peace Process, delivered through the multi-donor Joint Peace Fund (JPF), as well as technical advice and expertise. The UK is an active member of the JPF Governance Board which includes 11 other donors including the EU, Australia and Canada. We have played a pivotal role in maintaining high level UN attention to the ongoing conflict in Myanmar.

  • Playing a leading role, together with Core Group members Canada, Germany, Macedonia and Montenegro, in achieving a new Resolution on Sri Lanka at the UN Human Rights Council in Geneva in March. This continues Sri Lanka’s reconciliation and accountability commitments following the end of the civil war. We firmly believe that this is the best framework for establishing truth and achieving justice and lasting reconciliation. We will continue to refine our approach towards addressing conflict in Sri Lanka, working closely with local stakeholders and international partners including those in the Commonwealth, EU and UN.

  • We are spending £8.3m of Conflict, Stability and Security Fund (CSSF) funding on interfaith dialogue, reconciliation, police reform and training, and demining in Sri Lanka. The CSSF is a cross government fund, which supports and delivers activity to tackle instability and to prevent conflicts which threaten UK interests. We regularly review and adapt our CSSF programmes to ensure they effectively contribute to post-conflict reconciliation.

  • As a founding member of the International Contact Group, a hybrid mediation support initiative supporting the peace process in Southern Philippines, the UK took active interest in the January 2019 plebiscite, which paves the way for an autonomous region for Muslim Mindanao. UK development assistance to the reconstruction in Mindanao is through multilateral partners such as the World Bank and Asia Development Bank.

Asked on: 12 June 2019
Home Office
Madeleine McCann
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what funding they have provided to the Metropolitan Police Service for the purpose of the Operation Grange investigation into the disappearance of Madeleine McCann since its launch in May 2011; what estimate they have made of the total cost of that operation to date; and how much has been spent on investigations into other missing children since May 2011.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Home Office has awarded £11.75 million to cover the costs of Operation Grange up until March 2019. A request for further funding until the end of March 2020 has been received, the costs of which will be assessed against the Special Grant Award criteria. (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/police-funding-special-grant-guidance/special-grant-guidance). A decision will be made in October.

The Home Office has previously provided £1.1 million of Special Grant funding to South Yorkshire Police to meet the additional costs of the investigation into the disappearance of Ben Needham. We do not hold information on spending on other missing children investigations as these are funded locally by police forces.

Grouped Questions: HL16299
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Home Office
Madeleine McCann
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria they will use to assess the request from the Metropolitan Police Service for further funding for Operation Grange until March 2020.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Home Office has awarded £11.75 million to cover the costs of Operation Grange up until March 2019. A request for further funding until the end of March 2020 has been received, the costs of which will be assessed against the Special Grant Award criteria. (https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/police-funding-special-grant-guidance/special-grant-guidance). A decision will be made in October.

The Home Office has previously provided £1.1 million of Special Grant funding to South Yorkshire Police to meet the additional costs of the investigation into the disappearance of Ben Needham. We do not hold information on spending on other missing children investigations as these are funded locally by police forces.

Grouped Questions: HL16298
Q
Asked by Lord Bradshaw
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department for Transport
Midland Main Railway Line: Electrification
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to their commitment to net zero carbon emissions by 2050 and considering the decreasing costs of electrification, whether they will reconsider their decision to not electrify the Midland Main Line to Derby, Nottingham and Sheffield before they confirm any orders for hybrid trains.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

There are currently no plans to further extend electrification on the Midland Main Line (MML), beyond those works planned by the MML enhancements programme and HS2 Phase 2b.

The Government is committed to a greener, cleaner transport system, and recognises the important role this will play in reaching net zero carbon emissions by 2050. That’s why we are modernising the UK rail fleet to introduce more electric, bi-mode (electric and diesel hybrid) and alternative-fuel trains to the network. The new bi-mode intercity trains for the Midland Main Line will have less environmental impact than the current trains, some of which are over 30 years old. Our ambition is that these will be the cleanest ever bi-mode trains.

Abellio, who have recently been awarded the new East Midlands Railway franchise will be at the forefront of delivering a cleaner, greener rail network. They are seeking innovative ways to keep emissions to a minimum when running under diesel power, and will trial hydrogen fuel cell trains on the Midland Main Line and run zero-carbon pilots at six stations along the route.

Asked on: 12 June 2019
Home Office
Counter-terrorism
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to announce who will be conducting the independent review of the Prevent counter-extremism programme; and what will be the review’s (1) terms of reference, and (2) timescale for reporting.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Work is underway to appoint the Independent Reviewer of the Prevent Strategy, define the Terms of Reference for the Review, and to recruit a secretariat to support this work.

The aim is to inform the House of the arrangements for the Review, including the Reviewer and the Terms of Reference, by 12 August 2019, as required by the Counter Terrorism and Border Security Act 2019. The final report, recommendations and the Government response are due by August 2020.

Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Venezuela: Politics and Government
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions, if any, they have had with the Organization of American States and others about the situation in Venezuela and its consequences for neighbouring states; and what assessment they have made of possible prospects for resolution in that area.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

We have maintained regular discussions with key actors on Venezuela following UK recognition of Juan Guaido as interim Venezuelan President on 4 February 2019. The Minister for Europe and the Americas attended the Lima Group meeting of Foreign Ministers in Ottawa in February. In March, he spoke with the Chilean Foreign Minister, Ampuero, and met the Cuban Vice President, Cabrisas and Deputy Foreign Minister, Medina in Havana. We discussed the issue with Colombian President, Duque during his UK visit. We are a member of the EU-led International Contact Group which is leading international efforts towards a peaceful resolution of the crisis alongside the Lima Group, and support Norwegian-facilitated talks between the regime and opposition in Oslo. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office's Director for the Americas will attend the OAS Summit in Medellin on 26-28 June.

Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Chemicals: Regulation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether there has been any change in applicable standards for endocrine disrupting chemicals resulting from regulations made under the European Union (Withdrawal) Act 2018.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government has made a clear commitment that the UK’s high level of environmental protection will be maintained outside the EU. We will ensure that the regulation of pesticides continues to be robust and fit for purpose, so as to protect people and the environment. This includes maintaining controls on endocrine disrupting chemicals.

We have addressed a drafting error in an EU Exit Statutory Instrument to make it clear that these controls are maintained. A draft instrument has been submitted to Parliament for sifting.

Q
Asked by Lord Lexden
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department for Education
Education: Refugees
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the report by Refugee Action Turning Words into Action: why the Government must invest now to let refugees learn, published in June.
A
Answered by: Lord Agnew of Oulton
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The government recognises that learning English is essential in enabling refugees to rebuild their lives. We are working across government to develop a new strategy for English for speakers of other languages (ESOL) in 2019. The strategy will provide a shared vision for all publicly funded English language provision and it will include addressing the needs of refugees. We will explore what needs to be done to enable good local solutions and to support greater access to English language provision. We will consider the ‘Turning Words into Action’ report, attached, as we develop the strategy.

The department funds ESOL through the Adult Education Budget (AEB), which is allocated to providers on an annual basis. Colleges and adult learning providers have the freedom and flexibility to determine how they use their AEB allocation to meet the needs of their communities. This includes planning, with local partners, the ESOL courses that they will deliver locally. The Home Office and the Department for Education have provided £10 million to enable refugees resettled through the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme to access additional classes.

From the start of the 2019/20 academic year approximately 50% of the AEB will be devolved to 6 Mayoral Combined Authorities (MCAs) and to the Mayor of London through the Greater London Authority (GLA). The MCAs and GLA will be responsible for commissioning and funding AEB provision, including ESOL, for learners resident in their areas.

We know that there are many examples of good practice to overcome barriers for learners with childcare needs. Through the ESOL strategy, we will explore what else needs to be done to enable good local solutions and to support greater access to English language provision.

HL16314_report (PDF Document, 821.72 KB)
Q
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Food Standards Agency: Public Appointments
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to approve the appointment of a Chief Executive for the Food Standards Agency; and what has been the cause of the delay.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The appointment is subject to the approval process which governs the Civil Service Commission Recruitment Principles. An announcement will be made once that process has concluded.

Q
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
International Life Sciences Institute
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following the publication of the study on the International Life Sciences Institute "Are industry-funded charities promoting “advocacy-led studies” or “evidence-based science”?, whether they classify the International Life Sciences Institute as an industry lobby group or a scientific health charity.
A
Answered by: Baroness Barran
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Department funds research via the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The NIHR does not itself classify any organisation in terms of charitable status or lobby group. The NIHR regards a charity as a specific type of voluntary organisation which must conform to the regulations set out in charity law particularly the Charities Act 2011. Charity is a legal status for an organisation, not a legal form or organisational structure.

Any organisation which considers that it can carry out high-quality clinical, applied health or social care research is likely to be eligible for Departmental, NIHR-funded research programmes, either directly or with a partner. There are specific guidance documents setting out eligibility criteria for the NIHR’s programmes which include information on partnership working, funding mechanism and contractual obligations including reporting and disclosure of conflicts of interest.

Q
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Climate Change
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Henley on 17 April (HL15077), why they do not have any plans to increase global cooperation and governance of research on, and the use of, solar radiation management technologies; and what assessment, if any, they have made of the risk of that lack of plans leading to unilateral deployment without international consent
A
Answered by: Lord Henley
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The priority of the UK Government is to tackle the root cause of climate change by reducing emissions of greenhouse gases from human activities and adapting to those impacts that are unavoidable. We are aware of independent existing efforts to increase cooperation and governance of research into solar radiation management technologies, such as the Carnegie Climate Governance Initiative and the ‘Oxford Principles’ for the governance of geoengineering. We have not formally assessed the risk that lack of plans may lead to unilateral deployment without international consent.

Q
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Electric Vehicles: Batteries
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Gardiner of Kimble on 20 May (HL15733), what activity they are undertaking to explore second life applications for electric vehicle batteries which are no longer able to perform as required; what proportion of electric vehicle batteries would be diverted to secondary use; and what discussions they have had with industry and researchers on that topic.
A
Answered by: Lord Henley
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government has directly supported energy storage through research and innovation funding. This support includes current funding from BEIS for an energy storage cost reduction project, led by Nissan Motor Manufacturing (UK) Ltd, which is looking at reducing the cost of stationary energy storage by developing cost effective, large-scale processes for grading and sorting 2nd life Electric Vehicle batteries. This project is due to be completed by end March 2021.

There are several projects being funded as part of the Collaborative Research & Development (CR&D) activity of the Faraday Battery Challenge working on the development of the technical aspects of remanufacture and understanding the economic viability of using electric vehicle batteries for second life applications. These range in focus from diagnostic techniques to establish the suitability of batteries for a second life application and inform warranties for the second life devices, to developing effective methods of remanufacture which includes optimising the initial battery design for remanufacture. Second life applications are also a topic of research in the Faraday Institution (FI) supported Recycling of Lithium-Ion Batteries (ReLIB) project, with a cohort group established from the participants of the Collaborative Research & Development (CR&D) and FI recycling and second life projects to share learning in this area. The business cases for the types of electric vehicle batteries which are suitable both physically and from an economic perspective for second life applications are under development across the industry. These applications are dependent, among other factors, on the rapidly changing cost of new batteries and the value and efficiency of recovering the materials compared to the cost of remanufacture. Discussions are active with industry and researchers on this topic, both as part of the recycling and reuse cohort as well as conversations with companies and organisations across the UK, covering topics such as data handling and sharing to enable assessment of battery health at the end of EV life. The UK is also actively engaged in the World Economic Forum Global Battery Alliance and European Battery Alliance working groups in recycling and reuse.

These innovation projects exploring second life battery use will help to provide information on the proportion of electric vehicle batteries which could be cost-effectively diverted to secondary use.

Q
Asked by Lord Pendry
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Social Rented Housing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the merits of ending the practice of converting homes for social rent into “affordable” rented housing, in order to tackle (1) affordability issues in the housing market, and (2) homelessness.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

A mix of different tenures is vital to meet the needs of a wide range of people, and allow the sector to build the right homes in the right places. Alongside affordable home ownership to help those struggling to purchase their first home, our expanded programme now offers two rental products. Affordable Rent was introduced to maximise taxpayers’ money. It allows us to build more homes for every pound of Government investment - so more people in housing need can have access to a good quality home at a sub-market rent. Social rent will meet the needs of struggling families and those most at risk of homelessness in areas of the country where affordability is most pressured.

Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Home Office
Asylum: LGBT People
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether their introduction of a new asylum casework database will improve the capturing and recording of the details of LGBTQI+ people who (1) claim asylum, and (2) are held in detention; and if so, how.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The new Atlas case working system remains in development. It is therefore not possible to confirm at this time exactly what data it will record. Atlas is intended to improve how cases are recorded, managed and reported. This includes building on current reporting fields for LGBTQI+ people claiming asylum or being held in detention.

Q
Asked on: 12 June 2019
Home Office
Surveillance: Unmanned Air Vehicles
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of the use of drones on increasing the effectiveness of countering terrorism, piracy, kidnappings and other offences combatted by surveillance technologies.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Decisions to use drones and in which circumstances are operational matters for the Police and other law enforcement agencies.

Asked on: 12 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Rockall: Sovereignty
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have received from the government of the Republic of Ireland about the ownership of Rockall and its 12-mile territorial sea.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

​There have been no representations from the Irish Government about the ownership of Rockall. Both the Irish Prime Minister and Deputy Prime Minister have said that Ireland has no claim to Rockall and does not recognise any other sovereign claim to it.

Asked on: 13 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Obesity: Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure that Clinical Commissioning Groups have access to clear, comprehensive and coherent child obesity treatment services which extend from simple local community interventions through to more specialist treatments.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government will provide the National Health Service with an extra £33.9 billion a year by 2023/24 to help support the NHS Long Term Plan and ensure clinical commissioning groups can commission child obesity treatment services across the country.

The Long Term Plan sets out a number of actions to reduce obesity including investment in tier 3 weight management services for children and adults and plans are in development for its expansion. This will result in, for example, a further 1,000 children a year being treated by 2022/23 for severe complications related to obesity.

The Long Term Plan also commits to work with the professional bodies and universities to ensure nutrition has a greater place in professional education training, making sure staff on the frontline who are in contact with thousands of patients a year feel equipped to talk to them about nutrition and achieving a healthy weight in an informed and sensitive way.

Asked on: 13 June 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Buildings: Insulation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government to list the trade descriptions, names, and specifications of those forms of building external cladding material which should be removed for reasons of home security and safety in the case of buildings meeting minimum height requirements and at potential risk of fire.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

On the advice of the Independent Expert Advisory Panel the Department has published a number of advice notes for building owners or anyone responsible for, or advising on, the fire safety of external wall systems of residential buildings 18m or above in height. These are available (attached) at : https://www.gov.uk/guidance/the-building-safety-programme#advice-notes

Advise Note 18 (PDF Document, 146.95 KB)
Spandrel Panel (PDF Document, 134.37 KB)
Advice Note on ACM (PDF Document, 331.14 KB)
Q
Asked by Earl Cathcart
Asked on: 13 June 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Business Premises: Solar Power
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for requiring all new industrial and commercial buildings to include extensive solar panel coverage on their roofs.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Building Regulations energy performance standards are deliberately couched in performance terms and do not prescribe the technologies, materials or fuels to be used, allowing builders the flexibility to innovate and select the most appropriate solutions for the circumstances. For example, many roofs are not suitable for solar photovoltaic (PV) panels because of building orientation, roof design, or over shading. We do, however, plan to consult on uplifting the energy efficiency standards of the building regulations in the coming months, including those for new non-domestic buildings.

Q
Asked on: 13 June 2019
Treasury
Occupational Pensions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that independent governance committees (IGCs) monitor and provide effective oversight of the suitability of all the retail fund choices available to pension scheme members through the firm which an IGC oversees.
A
Answered by: Lord Young of Cookham
Answered on: 26 June 2019
The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) introduced rules in 2015 to require contract-based pension providers to set up independent governance committees (IGCs) to address poor consumer outcomes. IGCs have a duty to scrutinise the value for money of the provider’s workplace personal pension schemes, taking into account transaction costs, raising concerns and making recommendations to the provider’s board as appropriate. IGCs have a duty to assess whether all the investment choices available, including default options, are suitable for the interests of consumers.

In 2016, the FCA reviewed IGCs and found that they were “generally effective” in influencing and advancing cost reductions for members. The FCA has announced that it will undertake a further review of IGCs in 2019/20.
Asked on: 13 June 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
UK Shared Prosperity Fund
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they expect to issue guidance for local areas to give clarity on the details of the new UK Shared Prosperity Fund.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The government recognises the importance of reassuring local areas on the future of local growth funding and providing clarity on the UK Shared Prosperity Fund. Therefore, we will consult widely on the Fund.

Decisions on the allocation and quantum of the Fund are due to be made following the Spending Review.

Q
Asked on: 13 June 2019
Department for Transport
Unmanned Air Vehicles: Regulation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce regulations that require manufacturers to have a signalling beacon on all (1) drones, and (2) other flying toys.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The European Union Aviation Safety Agency (EASA) have published new product standards for drones which will become fully applicable by 2022. Some of these standards include the mandatory requirement for drones to be fitted with a geo-awareness software before being placed on the market. This software will notify the pilot when the drone is entering a restricted zone and when it’s coming close to other aircraft. This new requirement will ensure that our airspace is safely shared and managed more effectively to maintain the UK’s strong air safety record.

Asked on: 13 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Syria: Chemical Weapons
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 4 June (HL15867), what plans they have to reassess their initial assessment of who was responsible for the use of chemical weapons in Duoma when the further investigations by the OPCW Investigation and Identification Team are completed.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

​I refer the Noble Lord to the answer of 4 June 2019 (PQ HL15867) given by the Minister of State for Defence. Our assessment remains as stated in my Noble Friend's answer.

Q
Asked by Lord Truscott
Asked on: 14 June 2019
Department for Transport
Railways: North of England
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for prioritising HS3 over HS2.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

HS2 paves the way for Northern Powerhouse Rail (NPR) and the full benefits of both can best be realised by integration. There is no either / or choice between HS2 and NPR. Both projects have the potential to be transformative for the North. Whilst Transport for the North’s plans for NPR are at an earlier stage of development, they are being designed to complement HS2 and transform connectivity across the north of England.

We are currently consulting on proposals to include passive provision for two future junctions that would one day allow NPR trains to use the HS2 route into Manchester and vice versa. These proposals have been developed with Transport for the North, and, in the future, could allow a potential new route between Manchester and Liverpool that could also be used for services between London and Liverpool.

Q
Asked by Dr Rupa Huq
(Ealing Central and Acton)
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Food: Hygiene
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of making it mandatory for restaurants to display their food hygiene ratings in England and Wales.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Food Hygiene Rating Scheme is operated by the Food Standards Agency (FSA) in partnership with local authorities across England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

Food businesses covered by the scheme are provided with stickers showing their rating. Those in Wales and Northern Ireland are already required by law to display the stickers at their premises, while those in England are encouraged to do so.

The FSA considers that mandatory display should extend to England and is currently finalising an evidence-based case for a statutory scheme. The case for extending mandatory display to England is being finalised by the FSA for ministerial consideration and ultimately cross Government approval.

Q
Asked by Ben Bradley
(Mansfield)
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Small Businesses: East Midlands
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent steps the Government has taken to boost the productivity of small and medium-sized enterprises in the East Midlands.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Small and medium sized enterprises in the East Midlands can access business advice through their local Growth Hubs. Led and governed by Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEP), Growth Hubs provide a free, impartial, ‘single point of contact’ to help businesses in the area identify and access the right support for them at the right time no matter their size or sector. The LEPs which cover the East Midlands have self-reported that in FY2017-2018 their Growth Hubs supported over 12,000 businesses and helped over 300 individuals start a business

Since its creation in 2012, the Government-backed Start Up Loans company has made 3,573 loans worth over £25.5m to the East Midlands region. In the Mansfield constituency, 66 loans have been made worth £503,200[1].

April 2019’s increase in the National Living Wage (NLW) means that 157,000 workers in the East Midlands have received an inflation-beating pay rise of 4.9%. The latest estimates suggest that 5,000 workers in Mansfield are receiving the NLW and National Minimum Wage.

The Industrial Strategy is creating an economy that works for everyone; setting out a long-term plan to boost productivity by backing businesses to create good jobs and increase the earning power of people throughout the United Kingdom. Nationally, the Government is providing up to £18.6 million to Be the Business to increase firm level productivity by supporting SMEs to make simple changes and learn from each other.

And the £9 million Business Basics Programme is testing innovative ways of encouraging SMEs to take-up proven technology and business practices that can boost productivity. A total of £2 million has been allocated to projects from the first round of the Business Basics Fund and we are expecting to allocate a further £2 million of funding in Autumn 2019.

[1] At May 2019

Q
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Education
Students: Disability
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that higher education institutions are fulfilling their obligation to support students who would previously have been supported by Bands 1 and 2 of the Disabled Students' Allowance.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Higher Education Providers (HEPs) are responsible for providing reasonable adjustments for disabled students under the Equality Act 2010, and since September 2016 expected to deliver, as reasonable adjustments, less specialist non-medical help (NMH) previously funded through Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) NMH Bands 1 and 2.

The government expects all HEPs to meet their Equality Act responsibilities and to be making reasonable adjustments for all disabled students, not just those in receipt of DSAs. HEPs are entirely responsible for ensuring the support they offer disabled students meets any legal requirements to which they are subject.

Students who enter into dispute with their HEP over the support provided by their HEP as a recommended reasonable adjustment have access to the Exceptional Case Process, which provides interim funding to support DSAs-eligible students whilst the dispute is being resolved.

Q
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Education
Students: Disability
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the support available for disabled students is included in the Teaching Excellence and Student Outcomes Framework.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Teaching Excellence and Student Outcomes Framework (TEF) recognises and rewards high quality teaching in higher education. Its purpose is to give all students clear information about where teaching quality is best, and to hold higher education providers to account for the quality of their teaching, learning environment and student outcomes. The TEF recognises the needs of all students, including students with disabilities, for high quality teaching and outcomes.

The TEF metrics used in the assessment process are benchmarked to take account of the entry qualifications and characteristics of students, and the subjects studied at each university or college. These benchmarks include disability. The TEF assessment is therefore based on what each college or university achieves for its particular students. The contextual information provided to assessors to help them interpret the metrics for a provider includes information about disabled students at that institution.

Higher education providers, in the submissions that support their assessments, can also highlight aspects of their provision, which might include support for their students with specific needs. Assessors will consider the whole range of factors before arriving at a final TEF rating.

Q
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Education
Higher Education: Technology
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the use of technology for recording and sharing higher education lectures and other teaching activities.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

In 2017 the Institute for Employment Studies (IES) published a research report, commissioned by the Higher Education Funding Council for England, which reviewed the levels of support for disabled students across the higher education (HE) sector in 2016/17 and the progress made by HE providers (HEPs) towards inclusive, social models of support.

The report is available at: https://www.employment-studies.co.uk/resource/models-support-students-disabilities and is also attached.

The research found that the majority of institutions used audio or video recording of at least some of their lectures. Most of those who did not currently use lecture capture planned to introduce it in the future.

The Office for Students has commissioned follow-up research from IES, a report of which will be published in summer 2019.

Furthermore, in January 2019, the department published an evaluation research report of the support provided to disabled students in higher education through Disabled Students’ Allowances (DSAs) and the support provided by HEPs. This report showed that disabled students were aware and took advantage of support from their HEPs, including online course materials, the provision of lecture notes in advance and lecture capture, and specialist software and assistive technology. The DSAs evaluation research report is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/evaluation-of-disabled-students-allowances-dsas and is also attached.

HL16387_PDF (PDF Document, 2.05 MB)
HL16387_PDF (PDF Document, 1.28 MB)
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Education
Overseas Students
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the amount that will be contributed to the UK economy by students from overseas between 2019–20 and 2024–25.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Almost 460,000 international students chose to study at a UK higher education institution (HEI) in 2017/18. We have made no estimate of the number of overseas students that will attend UK HEIs between 2019-20 and 2024-25, or their contribution to the UK economy.

In the International Education Strategy, published in March 2019, the government set out its ambition to both increase the value of education exports to £35 billion per year and to increase the total number of international students hosted by UK universities to 600,000 by 2030, an increase of over 30%.

We fully recognise the important contribution that international students make to the UK’s higher education sector, both economically and culturally. They bring greater diversity to university and college campuses, an international dimension to the experience of all students, stimulate demand for courses, and add to the UK’s impressive research capacity. They are also an important source of income for our education sector. International students at UK HEIs contributed an estimated £11.9 billion to the UK economy in 2016 through tuition fees and living expenditure.

Grouped Questions: HL16395
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Education
Overseas Students
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many overseas students they estimate will attend UK universities between 2019–20 and 2024–25.
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Almost 460,000 international students chose to study at a UK higher education institution (HEI) in 2017/18. We have made no estimate of the number of overseas students that will attend UK HEIs between 2019-20 and 2024-25, or their contribution to the UK economy.

In the International Education Strategy, published in March 2019, the government set out its ambition to both increase the value of education exports to £35 billion per year and to increase the total number of international students hosted by UK universities to 600,000 by 2030, an increase of over 30%.

We fully recognise the important contribution that international students make to the UK’s higher education sector, both economically and culturally. They bring greater diversity to university and college campuses, an international dimension to the experience of all students, stimulate demand for courses, and add to the UK’s impressive research capacity. They are also an important source of income for our education sector. International students at UK HEIs contributed an estimated £11.9 billion to the UK economy in 2016 through tuition fees and living expenditure.

Grouped Questions: HL16394
Q
Asked by Lord Birt
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Natural Gas: Storage
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Henley on 20 February (HL13575), what percentage of the maximum theoretical gas storage is utilised on average for the last full year for which data are available.
A
Answered by: Lord Henley
Answered on: 26 June 2019

In 2018, the last full year for which data are available, UK gas storage had on average 62% utilisation, measured as an average of how full storage facilities were on a daily basis.

Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Transport
Esk Valley Railway Line
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had with Northern Rail about the provision of additional services on the Esk Valley railway from Middlesbrough to Whitby, following the extra funding secured for these services by the Community Rail Partnership.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government understands the importance of this line and welcomes the funding secured to improve its services. These plans are linked to a wider development vision for Whitby. Transport for the North is supporting North Yorkshire County Council on the delivery of this important Esk Valley project and will be leading aspects of the project going forwards. In delivering extra services, the priority is to find a solution that is affordable and acceptable to all stakeholders with the aim of helping deliver improved transport opportunities to support the economy of North Yorkshire. Northern is currently working with Network Rail to look at the feasibility of running an earlier service from Whitby to Middlesbrough from December 2019.

Asked on: 17 June 2019
Department for Education
Breakfast Clubs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answers by of Lord Agnew of Oulton on 13 June (HL16098 and HL16099), whether they will answer the question put about (1) when a decision will be made on the future funding of the National School Breakfast Programme, and (2) what is the current annual cost of the programme to the public purse.
A
Answered by: Lord Agnew of Oulton
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Decisions about any funding beyond March 2020 will be taken as part of the upcoming Spending Review. Up to £26 million has been allocated to the National Schools Breakfast Programme over 2018-20.

Asked on: 17 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Jamal Khashoggi
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to recent reports that the government of the USA has called on Saudi Arabia to show tangible progress in their investigation into the killing of Jamal Khashoggi, what new information they have on the investigation; and when they last received a progress report.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The UK attends the trial on the death of Jamal Khashoggi as part of a group of international observers. We attend all trials of international concern where host governments permit us to do so. It would not be appropriate for us to comment on the ongoing legal process.

Q
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Gaza: Fisheries
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of Israel about that country's control over the use of the coastal waters off Gaza by fishermen living there.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

​We regularly raise with the Government of Israel the urgent need to ease all access and movement restrictions on Gaza, including fishing limits.

Q
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
West Bank: Demolition
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the demolition by the government of Israel of Palestinian facilities, including commercial shops, in the Qalandia refugee camp.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

​Whilst we have not made any assessment on this issue, we are gravely concerned by continued demolition of Palestinian property by the Israeli authorities.

Q
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
West Bank: Demolition
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they plan to make to the government of Israel about reports of the destruction of 530 Palestinian-owned olive trees and four water wells by the Israel Defense Forces east of Tammun town while legal efforts are ongoing to prevent the area being turned into a nature reserve.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

​While we have not made any representations on this specific incident, we are gravely concerned by continued demolition of Palestinian property by the Israeli authorities. We are aware of the difficulties facing Palestinian olive growers. We have expressed our serious concerns to the Israeli Government and security officials about the destruction of olive trees on a number of occasions.

Q
Asked on: 17 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Palestinians: Electric Cables
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they are making to the government of Israel about reports that that country has prohibited the setting up of high-voltage power lines in the Berin area to supply Palestinian residents with electricity.
A
Answered on: 26 June 2019

​While we have not made any representations on this specific matter, we recognise the need for improvements in infrastructure, employment, energy and water supply to improve living conditions in the Occupied Palestinian Territories.

Q
Asked by Angela Smith
(Penistone and Stocksbridge)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Food: Safety
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans his Department has to ensure that the Food Standards Agency is able to uphold food safety standards after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Department is committed to ensuring that the Food Standards Agency (FSA) maintains the high standards of food safety and consumer protection that we currently enjoy in this country. Leaving the European Union does not change the FSA’s top priority which is to ensure that food in the United Kingdom remains safe and is what it says it is.

One of FSA’s main priorities is to have a robust and effective regulatory regime which will mean business can continue as normal. All FSA’s exit plans are either complete or on schedule to deliver in time for day one of exit. As part of this, the Department has laid 18 EU Exit Statutory Instruments on behalf of the FSA to ensure that our high standards of food hygiene and safety will be maintained in a no deal scenario.

Q
(Greenwich and Woolwich)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Cabinet Office
Members: Correspondence
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, when he plans to respond to the letter from the hon. Member for Greenwich and Woolwich of 18 April 2019 with regard to Mr Clive Barbour.
A
Answered by: Oliver Dowden
Answered on: 26 June 2019

I responded to the Hon Member for Greenwich and Woolwich’s correspondence on 26 June 2019. I apologise for the delay in responding to this letter

Q
Asked by Keith Vaz
(Leicester East)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Gulf of Oman: Tankers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what discussions he has had with his Iranian counterpart on recent attacks on oil tankers in the Middle East.
A
Answered by: Dr Andrew Murrison
Answered on: 26 June 2019

This incident is deeply worrying at a time of already huge tension. These latest attacks build on a pattern of destabilising Iranian behaviour and pose a serious danger to peace and stability in the region.

The UK remains in close coordination with international partners to find diplomatic solutions to de-escalate tensions. Our Ambassador to Iran sought and was granted a meeting with the Iranian government on 15 June, where they discussed developments in the region and a range of other topics.

We have long made clear to Iran our concern about their destabilising regional activity, particularly the proliferation of ballistic missiles and support to non-state groups, in Iraq, Syria, Yemen and elsewhere. In targeting civilian shipping, international norms have been violated. It is essential that tankers and crews are able to pass through international waters safely. We call on Iran urgently to cease all forms of destabilising activity.

On 22-23 June, I met with senior Iranian Government representatives. I held open, frank and constructive conversations with the Iranian authorities. I was clear about the UK’s long-held concerns over Iran’s activities, as well as the UK’s determination to maintain the nuclear deal which is in our shared security interests.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Retail Trade: Urban Areas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, when the decision on future high street fund applications will be published.
A
Answered by: Jake Berry
Answered on: 26 June 2019

We are currently assessing the expressions of interest received and expect to make an announcement on which places are successfully shortlisted and will move to business case development this summer. As set out in the Fund’s prospectus, the final decision on the places which will receive funding will be made by the Secretary of State.

Grouped Questions: 266143
Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Retail Trade: Urban Areas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, who will be making decisions on applications to the future high streets fund.
A
Answered by: Jake Berry
Answered on: 26 June 2019

We are currently assessing the expressions of interest received and expect to make an announcement on which places are successfully shortlisted and will move to business case development this summer. As set out in the Fund’s prospectus, the final decision on the places which will receive funding will be made by the Secretary of State.

Grouped Questions: 266142
Q
Asked by Jo Platt
(Leigh)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Alcoholic Drinks: Sales
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 24 May 2019 to Question 255697 on Alcoholic Drinks: Sales, what assessment he has made of whether the BSI Publicly Available Specification (a) 499: 2019 entitled Code of practice for digital identification and strong customer authentication and (b) 1296:2018 entitled Online age checking: Provision and use of online age check services: Code of Practice could be used to amend the mandatory licensing condition on age verification.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The formation of a joint Digital Identity Unit by the Cabinet Office and the Department of Culture Media and Sport was recently announced. My officials will seek to work with that unit to examine the suitability of existing standards for the purpose of amending the mandatory licensing condition.

Q
(Leicester South)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Heart Diseases: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the early detection of heart valve disease in primary care settings; and what assessment he has made of trends in the level of stethoscope usage in every NHS Health Check for people over 65 years old.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The NHS Long Term Plan sets out the National Health Service’s commitment to provide greater access to echocardiography in primary care to improve the early detection of heart valve disease, and advises that people with heart failure and heart valve disease will be better supported by multi-disciplinary teams as part of primary care networks.

In relation to stethoscope usage, Public Health England has advised that the NHS Health Check does not currently include formal assessment of heart sounds. Therefore, stethoscopes are not used for this purpose in the programme.

The NHS Health Check is made up of three key components: risk assessment, risk awareness and risk management. During the risk assessment, standardised tests are used to measure key risk factors and establish the individual’s risk of developing cardiovascular disease. The outcome of the assessment is then used to raise awareness of cardiovascular risk factors, as well as inform a discussion on, and agreement of, the behavioural and medical approaches best suited to managing the individual’s health risk.

Q
Asked by John Healey
(Wentworth and Dearne)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Attorney General
Prosecutions: South Yorkshire
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of days taken from the date of offence to a decision to charge an individual in South Yorkshire in each year since 2010 was.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) works closely with the Police to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated before charges are brought. There has been an increase in the complexity of cases investigated by the police, with investigations often involving large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This impacts on the average number of consultations and length of time taken for prosecutors to reach a charging decision.

The CPS does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from offence through to a decision to charge. However, data is held on the average number of days from submission of a case by the police to the CPS to the date of the CPS decision to charge.

Data relating to to all cases in South Yorkshire, summary only cases in South Yorkshire, and indictable only cases in South Yorkshire is shown in Annex A.

The data in Annex A relating to summary only cases provides figures for only a minority of summary only cases. This is because the CPS is only responsible for charging a small minority of summary only matters, with the majority charged by the police. In 2017-18 the police charged 75% of all summary only matters with only 25% charged by CPS, while for indicatable only offences the CPS charged 95% of these cases.

There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. Police are now more regularly encouraged to seek ‘early investigative advice’ to help determine what evidence is required for a charge. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, the CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings which impacts on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.

Annex A (Word Document, 16.31 KB)
Grouped Questions: 266095 | 266096
Q
Asked by John Healey
(Wentworth and Dearne)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Attorney General
Prosecutions: South Yorkshire
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of days taken from the date of an offence to a decision to charge and individual for summary offences in South Yorkshire in each year since 2010 was.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) works closely with the Police to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated before charges are brought. There has been an increase in the complexity of cases investigated by the police, with investigations often involving large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This impacts on the average number of consultations and length of time taken for prosecutors to reach a charging decision.

The CPS does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from offence through to a decision to charge. However, data is held on the average number of days from submission of a case by the police to the CPS to the date of the CPS decision to charge.

Data relating to to all cases in South Yorkshire, summary only cases in South Yorkshire, and indictable only cases in South Yorkshire is shown in Annex A.

The data in Annex A relating to summary only cases provides figures for only a minority of summary only cases. This is because the CPS is only responsible for charging a small minority of summary only matters, with the majority charged by the police. In 2017-18 the police charged 75% of all summary only matters with only 25% charged by CPS, while for indicatable only offences the CPS charged 95% of these cases.

There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. Police are now more regularly encouraged to seek ‘early investigative advice’ to help determine what evidence is required for a charge. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, the CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings which impacts on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.

Annex A (Word Document, 16.31 KB)
Grouped Questions: 266094 | 266096
Q
Asked by John Healey
(Wentworth and Dearne)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Attorney General
Prosecutions: South Yorkshire
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, what the average number of days taken from the date of an offence to a decision to charge an individual for an indictable offence in South Yorkshire in each year since 2010 was.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) works closely with the Police to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated before charges are brought. There has been an increase in the complexity of cases investigated by the police, with investigations often involving large amounts of electronic material (social media, emails, text messages, video and photographs) which needs to be reviewed by prosecutors before a charging decision can be made. This impacts on the average number of consultations and length of time taken for prosecutors to reach a charging decision.

The CPS does not maintain a record of the average number of days taken from offence through to a decision to charge. However, data is held on the average number of days from submission of a case by the police to the CPS to the date of the CPS decision to charge.

Data relating to to all cases in South Yorkshire, summary only cases in South Yorkshire, and indictable only cases in South Yorkshire is shown in Annex A.

The data in Annex A relating to summary only cases provides figures for only a minority of summary only cases. This is because the CPS is only responsible for charging a small minority of summary only matters, with the majority charged by the police. In 2017-18 the police charged 75% of all summary only matters with only 25% charged by CPS, while for indicatable only offences the CPS charged 95% of these cases.

There are a number of reasons for the steady increase in the average number of days and average number of consultations per case since 2010/11. Police are now more regularly encouraged to seek ‘early investigative advice’ to help determine what evidence is required for a charge. Early investigative advice helps to ensure that cases are thoroughly investigated and the evidence to be brought before the court is strong. As a result, the CPS is more often involved at an earlier stage in proceedings which impacts on the average number of consultations and overall timeliness.

Annex A (Word Document, 16.31 KB)
Grouped Questions: 266094 | 266095
Q
Asked by Liz McInnes
(Heywood and Middleton)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Sudan: Peace Negotiations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what diplomatic steps his Department is taking to encourage the Transitional Military Council in Sudan to resume negotiations with protesters in that country.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 26 June 2019

On 3 June, the Foreign Secretary condemned the attack on protestors by Sudanese security forces, and held the Transitional Military Council (TMC) fully responsible. We also expressed serious concern over TMC's announcement that it would cease negotiations and called for an agreed transfer of power to a civilian-led government. Our Embassy in Khartoum has called on the TMC to take the steps needed to improve the situation in Sudan, including the release of all political detainees.

The TMC now need to take appropriate steps to provide confidence for protestors and create the conditions necessary for the resumption of dialogue, which includes an investigation into the 3 June attack and Freedom of Media and blockages to the internet ceasing, and free media being allowed. We have said that the TMC must re-engage in the political process with the protestors and opposition to ensure an agreed transfer of power to a civilian-led authority, as demanded by the Sudanese people, in a swift, orderly and peaceful manner. The UK will continue to engage with all sides to support a settlement that works for all Sudanese people.

Q
Asked by Liz McInnes
(Heywood and Middleton)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Mali: Ethnic Groups
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent assessment he has made of trends in the level of ethnic tension in Mali.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 26 June 2019

I am deeply concerned by the deteriorating security and humanitarian situation in Mali, and particularly the recent and continuing violence between communities in the central Mopti region, which has included attacks on children and civilians. I have and will continue to call for perpetrators to be brought to justice and for the cycle of violence to end. It is essential that the Government of Mali puts in place and implements a comprehensive strategy to address the insecurity and the lack of dialogue between communities in conflict. The UK is increasing support to help address the complex challenges faced by Mali, including developing programmes to address the long-term drivers of instability and conflict in the region.

Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Work and Pensions
Poverty
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment her Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on her Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 1 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Will Quince
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU with a deal remains the Government’s top priority. As the Prime Minister has made clear, the best way forward is for the UK to leave the EU in an orderly way with a good deal and the Government is working to deliver legal certainty on the UK’s future relationship with the EU.

However, as a responsible Government, we continue to prepare appropriately for all scenarios. This includes the potential impact of a no deal scenario on the full range of government priorities.

Accurately predicting poverty rates is very difficult. Poverty projections are inherently speculative as they require projecting how income will change for every individual in society which are affected by a huge range of unknown factors.

Whatever the outcome of our future relationship with the EU, Tackling poverty will always be a priority for this government and we remain committed to supporting the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals both domestically and internationally. The UK’s first Voluntary National Review (VNR) will be published shortly. The VNR will review UK action both domestically and internationally in support of Goal 1. It will also outline key challenges and next steps, recognising that while progress is being made, there is more work to do.

Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 2 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU, however that is achieved, will have no impact on the department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goals 2, 6, 12, 14 and 15.

Grouped Questions: 266131 | 266181 | 266183 | 266184
Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Health: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 3 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Stephen Hammond
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the European Union, with or without a deal, will not affect our commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals. We remain committed to supporting the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals, both domestically and internationally.

Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Education
Education: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 4 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU, with or without a deal, will not affect the Department’s commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals.

The UK’s first Voluntary National Review (VNR) will be published shortly. The VNR will review UK action both domestically and internationally in support of Goal 4.

The Government has been clear that it does not want or expect a ‘no deal’ scenario, but whatever the outcome of our future relationship we remain committed to supporting the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals, both domestically and internationally.

Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 6 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU, however that is achieved, will have no impact on the department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goals 2, 6, 12, 14 and 15.

Grouped Questions: 266127 | 266181 | 266183 | 266184
Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Urban Areas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 11 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Jake Berry
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU, with or without a deal, will not affect our commitment to the Sustainable Development Goals. The UK’s first Voluntary National Review (VNR) will be published shortly. The VNR will review UK action both domestically and internationally in support of Goal 11. It will also outline key challenges and next steps, recognising that while progress is being made, there is more work to do.

The UK and the EU have agreed the terms of the UK’s smooth and orderly exit from the EU in the form of the Withdrawal Agreement, and a detailed political declaration on the terms of our future relationship which will support the Government's commitment to meeting the full range of Sustainable Development Goals. However, the Government will continue to do the responsible thing and prepare for all eventualities. This includes the potential impact of a no deal scenario on the full range of government priorities. This Government has been clear that we do not want or expect a ‘no deal’ scenario, but whatever the outcome of our future relationship we remain committed to supporting the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals both domestically and internationally.

Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 12 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU, however that is achieved, will have no impact on the department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goals 2, 6, 12, 14 and 15.

Grouped Questions: 266127 | 266131 | 266183 | 266184
Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 14 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU, however that is achieved, will have no impact on the department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goals 2, 6, 12, 14 and 15.

Grouped Questions: 266127 | 266131 | 266181 | 266184
Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 15 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Leaving the EU, however that is achieved, will have no impact on the department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goals 2, 6, 12, 14 and 15.

Grouped Questions: 266127 | 266131 | 266181 | 266183
Q
(Islington South and Finsbury)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Home Office: Sustainable Development
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effect of the UK leaving the EU with no deal on his Department’s ability to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 16 in the UK.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The UK Government remains focussed on ensuring a smooth and orderly withdrawal from the EU with a deal as soon as possible, and we have been clear that we do not want or expect a no deal scenario. However, as a responsible government, we continue to prepare for all scenarios.

The Home Office has been planning and preparing for a no deal scenario for some time, and we have contingency plans in place across areas including law enforcement, passports and the border. Whatever the outcome of our exit from the EU, we remain committed to supporting the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals both domestically and internationally. The UK’s first Voluntary National Review (VNR) will be published shortly. The VNR will review UK action both domestically and internationally in support of Goal 16. It will also outline key challenges and next steps, recognising that while progress is being made, there is more work to do.

Q
Asked by Ben Bradley
(Mansfield)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Cabinet Office
Public Bodies
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what the annual cost to the public purse of the 406 agencies and other public bodies listed on the gov.uk website is.
A
Answered by: Kevin Foster
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Public Bodies 2018/19 report, published on 22 March 2019, sets out the gross resource expenditure of
the 301 arm’s length bodies which include all executive agencies and non-departmental public bodies as well
as non-ministerial departments, the latter of which are not included in the 406 bodies listed on gov.uk. As of
31 March 2018, the gross resource expenditure was £203.8 billion. Further information on how this cost is
broken down per organisation across services provided, running costs of the organisation and other costs
can be obtained from the organisations directly

The annual cost to the public purse of the other public bodies listed on the gov.uk website is not held
centrally.

Q
(Leicester South)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Debts
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to NHS Improvement’s publication entitled Quarterly performance of the NHS provider sector: quarter 4 2018-19, for what reasons the underlying deficit of the NHS provider sector has grown to £5.0 billion; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Stephen Hammond
Answered on: 26 June 2019

We have seen an improvement in the provider deficit from £991 million in 2017-18 to £827 million.

We recognise that it is important that the provider sector balances and there is still much more to do. The National Health Service has committed to returning the provider sector to balance, as well as all providers, as part of its NHS Long Term Plan, supported by the new cash terms funding commitment of £33.9 billion by 2023-24.

It is misleading to infer the financial health of the provider sector from changes in the reported underlying deficit. The purpose of calculating of an underlying deficit is to use as a baseline for planning purposes for individual trusts. Adjustments made to construct this figure include the removal of funding that is recurrent in the national NHS budget (but not for individual trusts), for example the Provider Sustainability Fund, which grew from £1.8 billion in 2017-18 to £2.45 billion in 2018-19. The growth in the underlying deficit simply reflects a growth in this recurrent income stream.

Q
(Haltemprice and Howden)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Police: Biometrics
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the statutory basis for the use of facial recognition technology by the police is.
A
Corrected answer by: Mr Nick Hurd
Corrected on: 26 June 2019
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 25 June 2019.
The correct answer should have been:

The UK Government remains focussed on ensuring a smooth and orderly withdrawal from the EU with a deal as soon as possible, and we have been clear that we do not want or expect a no deal scenario. However, as a responsible government, we continue to prepare for all scenarios.

The Home Office has been planning and preparing for a no deal scenario for some time, and we have contingency plans in place across areas including law enforcement, passports and the border. Whatever the outcome of our exit from the EU, we remain committed to supporting the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals both domestically and internationally. The UK’s first Voluntary National Review (VNR) will be published shortly. The VNR will review UK action both domestically and internationally in support of Goal 16. It will also outline key challenges and next steps, recognising that while progress is being made, there is more work to do.

The Government believes that there is a legal framework for the use of live facial recognition technology, although that is being challenged in the courts and we would not want to pre-empt the outcome of this case.

The police have common law powers to use the technology for the purposes of preventing or detecting crime. Part 3 of the Data Protection Act 2018 is the statutory basis for the processing of the facial images obtained from the technology for these purposes. Possible matches produced by these sys-tems are always checked by a human operator before deciding what, if any, action to take.

A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 25 June 2019

The UK Government remains focussed on ensuring a smooth and orderly withdrawal from the EU with a deal as soon as possible, and we have been clear that we do not want or expect a no deal scenario. However, as a responsible government, we continue to prepare for all scenarios.

The Home Office has been planning and preparing for a no deal scenario for some time, and we have contingency plans in place across areas including law enforcement, passports and the border. Whatever the outcome of our exit from the EU, we remain committed to supporting the delivery of the Sustainable Development Goals both domestically and internationally. The UK’s first Voluntary National Review (VNR) will be published shortly. The VNR will review UK action both domestically and internationally in support of Goal 16. It will also outline key challenges and next steps, recognising that while progress is being made, there is more work to do.

The Government believes that there is a legal framework for the use of live facial recognition technology, although that is being challenged in the courts and we would not want to pre-empt the outcome of this case.

The police have common law powers to use the technology for the purposes of preventing or detecting crime. Part 3 of the Data Protection Act 2018 is the statutory basis for the processing of the facial images obtained from the technology for these purposes. Possible matches produced by these sys-tems are always checked by a human operator before deciding what, if any, action to take.

Q
(Haltemprice and Howden)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Carbon Capture and Storage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of progress on the carbon capture and storage project announced in November 2018.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government believes that carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS) has the potential to play an important role in meeting the UK’s climate targets. CCUS can add value to the economy and help tackle hard to decarbonise sectors.

The Government published its CCUS Action Plan in November 2018, designed to progress CCUS in the UK, including enabling the UK’s first CCUS facility to be operational from the mid-2020s. We have also announced £50m of innovation funding to drive down the cost of CCUS.

I welcome the progress being made on the range of CCUS projects in the UK, including those that were announced in November 2018. Officials from the Department are engaging with these and all other CCUS projects in the UK.

Q
(Haltemprice and Howden)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Education
Literacy: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, with reference to the National Literacy Trust report, Children, young people and digital reading, published on 30 April 2019, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the report's conclusions on the literacy benefits of children reading both digital and print formats.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Department welcomes the National Literacy Trust’s research on reading in both print and digital forms. The Department wants children to develop the habit of reading widely and often, for both pleasure and information, whatever the format. Research suggests that reading for pleasure is more important for children’s educational development than their parents’ level of education.

There is sound evidence that systematic synthetic phonics is a highly effective method of teaching reading to children. Phonics performance is improving. In 2018, there were 163,000 more 6-year-olds on track to become fluent readers compared to 2012. This represented 82% of pupils meeting the expected standard in the phonics screening check, compared to just 58% when the check was introduced in 2012.

In 2018 the Department launched a £26.3 million English Hubs Programme, building on the success of the Department’s phonics partnerships and phonics roadshows programmes. Hub schools are taking a leading role in improving the teaching of early reading through systematic synthetic phonics, early language development, and reading for pleasure. The Department has appointed 34 primary schools across England as English Hubs.

Q
Asked by Jo Swinson
(East Dunbartonshire)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Aung Marm Oo
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Burmese counterpart on the charges of unlawful association against the journalist Aung Marm Oo.
A
Answered by: Dr Andrew Murrison
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Press freedom and the rule of law are fundamental to any democratic society, and journalists must be allowed to work freely and without intimidation. The British Ambassador has been clear in making this point, and recently raised this case with Burma's Minister for International Cooperation. The UK will continue to work hard to support media freedom within Myanmar.

Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Transport
Radar: Wind Power
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has taken steps to ensure that the operation of radar does not restrict the implementation of the Government’s offshore wind sector deal.
A
Answered by: Michael Ellis
Answered on: 26 June 2019

It is essential that UK aviation continues to benefit from a high standard of safety, and the windfarm industry will continue to play a key role in ensuring that this remains the case. The Offshore Wind Sector deal could deliver up to 30GW by 2030 and the Government has committed to work across Government, including aviation, to ensure this is achieved in a sustainable way taking account of users of the sea, aviation and Ministry of Defence.

The process of upgrading civil and military radar by around 2030 will be led by the Ministry of Defence and National Air Traffic Services, as they look to procure systems in line with their future requirements.

An Aviation Management Board has been established for the Government to work jointly with both the windfarm industry and the aviation sector to find a solution which meets the needs of both industries and ensures a safe airspace.

Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Transport
Radar: Wind Power
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the future aviation strategy will include the potential effect of the operation of radar on the implementation of the offshore wind sector deal.
A
Answered by: Michael Ellis
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The offshore wind sector is a success story for the UK. From 2010 the offshore wind’s share of annual UK generation increased over 5% to 6.2% in 2017, with costs falling faster than anyone could have envisaged 10 years ago. The Offshore Wind Sector deal could deliver up to 30GW by 2030 and the Government has committed to work across Government, including aviation, to ensure this is achieved in a sustainable way taking account of users of the sea, aviation and MOD.

Although wind turbines can impact the effectiveness of radar systems, it’s essential that aviation continues to benefit from a high standard of safety, and therefore ongoing cooperation between Government and the windfarm industry will continue to play a key role in ensuring that this remains the case.

The Government’s current policy is that the mitigation costs of offshore wind’s impacts on radar should be recovered from those windfarm developers who stand to benefit commercially. Therefore, the wind sector deal is currently dealt with separately from the upcoming aviation strategy.

An Aviation Management Board, in which the Government and relevant bodies such as NATS and the CAA participate, has been established for the Government to work jointly with both the windfarm industry and the aviation sector to find a solution which meets the needs of both industries and ensures a safe airspace. This will ensure cross-Government coordination on radar and aviation policy matters.

Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Transport
Aviation: Wind Power
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government’s aviation strategy will assume an increase in offshore and onshore wind deployment up to 2050 as the baseline operating scenario for aviation.
A
Answered by: Michael Ellis
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Our aviation forecasts do not make any assumptions about the underlying general energy mix. The Government, however, does undertake cross sectoral energy analysis of that nature. The locations of wind farms are considered through the planning process.

The Offshore Wind Sector Deal, published by Government in March this year, envisages up to 30GW of offshore wind deployment by 2030. An Aviation Management Board, in which the Department and relevant bodies such as NATS and CAA participate, has been established for the Government to work jointly with both the windfarm industry and aviation sector to find a solution which meets the needs of both industries and secures a safe airspace. This will ensure cross-Government coordination on radar and aviation policy matters. The Department will take account of the outputs of this work in developing aviation policy.

Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Knives: Crime
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the press release of 5 June 2019 entitled New anti-knife crime lessons ahead of summer, what estimate he has made of the number of schoolchildren (a) reached by the anti knife-crime lessons produced in 2018 and (b) who will be reached by the new lesson plans.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 26 June 2019

At the start of June 2019, 20,000 teachers and professionals were sent new Key Stage 3 and 4 lesson plans via the PSHE association, to further equip them to challenge myths and communicate to their pupils the dangers of carrying a knife.

The #knifefree lesson plans have been made available to secondary schools across the UK, to download from the PSHE Association website. It is up to individual schools to download and use the lesson plans in their classrooms.

The lesson plans released in 2018 had been downloaded over 14,000 times by June 2019 when the new lesson plans launched. To date (19/06), the lesson plans have been downloaded over 17,000 times, an increase of over 3,000 since the updated plans were released.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Heart Diseases: Surgery
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate his Department has made of the number of people who have had open-heart surgery in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The information is not available in the requested format.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Heart Diseases: Surgery
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many heart operations the NHS conducted using minimally invasive cardiac surgery in the most recent 12-month period for which data is available.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The information is not available in the requested format.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Dementia: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to increase the accuracy of dementia diagnoses.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Challenge on Dementia 2020 sets out the ambition for two thirds of people with dementia to receive a formal diagnosis. This has been achieved and exceeded nationally. Our focus now is on reducing the variation in local diagnosis rates and NHS England has published guidance and put programmes in place to further improve the quality and timeliness of diagnosis across the country.

For example, the ‘Implementation guide and resource pack for dementia care’ published in July 2017 sets out key recommendations on how services should be configured to provide good-quality diagnosis and post-diagnostic care for people with dementia and their carers. It includes key roles and activity in primary care and memory assessment services to facilitate an accurate and timely diagnosis of dementia, while ensuring access to appropriate support following diagnosis. The resource pack is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/dementia/implementation-guide-and-resource-pack-for-dementia-care/

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Epilepsy: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent discussions he has had with the Royal College of Nursing on monitoring the level of suicides among people who take antiepileptic drugs.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 26 June 2019

We have had no such discussions. As with all medicines, the safety of antiepileptic drugs remains under constant review by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Prostate Cancer: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what plans the NHS has to introduce a once-in-a-lifetime test for prostate cancer.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The United Kingdom National Screening Committee (UK NSC) has commenced work to look at the evidence to screen for prostate cancer during 2019/20 as part of its three-yearly review.

An external review will be commissioned, and a public consultation will follow welcoming comments from individuals and organisations. Information about the consultation will be made available at the following link:

https://legacyscreening.phe.org.uk/screening-recommendations.php

The UK NSC can be alerted to the publication of any new peer-reviewed evidence which suggests a change in the current recommendation, such as a new test via the UK NSC’s early update process. Submissions are accepted throughout the year.

More information on how an early update can be submitted to the UK NSC for consideration is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/uk-nsc-evidence-review-process/uk-nsc-evidence-review-process

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Cystic Fibrosis: Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps he has taken to ensure the availability of treatment for cystic fibrosis.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Specialised services for the support and treatment of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are commissioned by NHS England. CF services are delivered in about 20 Paediatric Cystic Fibrosis Centres and about 20 Adult Cystic Fibrosis Centres. There are separate service specifications for adults and children. These specifications are important in clearly defining what NHS England expects to be in place for providers to offer evidence-based, safe and effective care and they support equity of access to a nationally consistent, high quality service.

The specifications can be found via the following links:

www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/08/Cystic-fibrosis-adult.pdf

www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/a01Sb-spec-cystic-fibrosis-child.pdf

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Hypertension: Pregnancy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what advice his Department provides to pregnant women with high blood pressure to reduce the risk of suffering a heart attack or stroke.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 26 June 2019

NHS England and NHS Improvement recommend that women attend all antenatal appointments, which will involve regularly monitoring blood pressure. Cases of high blood pressure should be referred to their obstetrician for ongoing management.

The management of high blood pressure in pregnancy can reduce the risk of a stroke, and further information on the management of high blood pressure in pregnancy is available at the following link:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/hypertension-blood-pressure-pregnant/

Public Health England’s Start4Life programme also provides information for pregnant women about the risks of high blood pressure and key related behaviours, such as healthy eating and exercise during pregnancy, on its website and through the Information Service for Parents email programme. Relevant details on the Start4Life website are available at the following link:

www.nhs.uk/start4life/pregnancy/

Start4Life is Public Health England’s national programme that delivers trusted advice and practical guidance to parents-to-be and families with babies and under-fives, to help them adopt healthy behaviours and build parenting skills.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Dental Health
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve preventative dental healthcare.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government is committed to improving oral health and preventing future dental disease.

The Department and NHS England are continuing to test a new way of providing National Health Service dental services which aims to further improve oral health and increase dental access. There are now 102 practices trialling the new approach to providing dentistry which focusses on prevention and helping patients to reduce their risk of future dental disease.

NHS England’s ‘Starting Well’ programme is working in 13 high needs areas to reach children most at risk of tooth decay, who are not currently under the routine care of a dentist.

Nationally, NHS England has developed a complementary Starting Well Core offer, a commissioning approach designed to facilitate increased access and early preventive care for young children. This programme is supported by the Chief Dental Officer, which commissioners can use, and fund locally based on their own assessment of need.

Health Education England’s Advancing Dental Care programme is also aiming to ensure that all dental care professionals deliver high quality care and prevent future disease.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Antibiotics: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to reduce antibiotic use among babies and children.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Public Health England’s (PHE’s) English surveillance programme for antimicrobial utilisation and resistance (ESPAUR) has worked with the National Health Service and across sectors, to improve surveillance and feedback of antimicrobial use to raise awareness among healthcare professionals and the public of antibiotic prescribing in adults and children. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/english-surveillance-programme-antimicrobial-utilisation-and-resistance-espaur-report

PHE collaborates with the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) to develop evidence based antimicrobial guidelines that can be used when managing common infections and thereby promoting prudent use of antibiotics in key patient groups, including infants and children. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/about/what-we-do/our-programmes/nice-guidance/antimicrobial-prescribing-guidelines

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Gallstones: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many people have had NHS treatment for gallstones in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

A count of finished admission episodes with a primary diagnosis of cholelithiasis and gallstone ileus for the financial years 2013-14 to 2017-18 is shown in the following table. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period:

Financial year

Finished Admission Episodes

2013-14

120,449

2014-15

124,098

2015-16

126,471

2016-17

129,811

2017-18

125,300

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics, NHS Digital

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Montelukast: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to reduce the use of montelukast to treat children with asthma.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Montelukast is an effective treatment for asthma in patients whose asthma is not adequately controlled by their usual medication.

As with many medications, there are some recognised side effects of this treatment. Individual patients should discuss risks and benefits of treatments with their general practitioner.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Hydrops Fetalis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many fetuses and newborn babies have been diagnosed with hydrops fetalis in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Information on the number of fetuses and newborn babies diagnosed with hydrops fetalis are available from NHS Digital Hospital Episode Statistics as a count of finished admission episodes (FAEs). A FAE is the first period of inpatient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of inpatients, as a person may have more than one admission within the year.

The number of FAEs with a primary diagnosis of hydrops fetalis grouped by fetus or newborn, for the years 2013-14 to 2017-18 is provided in the following table.

Financial Year

Fetus

Newborn

2013-14

94

68

2014-15

82

54

2015-16

109

52

2016-17

98

62

2017-18

114

45

Q
Asked by Deidre Brock
(Edinburgh North and Leith)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Ministry of Justice
Ministry of Justice: CTF Partners
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his (a) Department and (b) Department's agencies have entered into contracts with CTF Partners since 2015.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Ministry of Justice has not entered into any contracts with CTF Partners since 2015.

Q
Asked by Dan Jarvis
(Barnsley Central)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Housing: Heating
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to implement NICE guidance NG6 on reducing excess winter deaths and illness and the health risks associated with cold homes.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Public Health England (PHE) publishes resources to support those who wish to implement the recommendations within the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence Guidelines NG6, including local authorities, the National Health Service and other frontline staff. These include the Cold Weather Plan for England, collated resources on the Homes for Health collection webpage, and guidance to support local authorities in identifying at risk individuals.

The Cold Weather Plan can be viewed at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/748492/the_cold_weather_plan_for_england_2018.pdf

More details on the Homes for Health can be found at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/housing-for-health

Further information on the guidance to support local authorities can be found at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/770963/data_sources_to_support_local_services_tackling_health_risks_of_cold_homes.pdf

Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Youth Endowment Fund
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many officials are currently working on the Youth Endowment Fund.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 26 June 2019

In March 2019, the Home Secretary announced the award of a £200m endowment to the charity Impetus, to establish the Youth Endowment Fund. Applied over ten years, the funding will be used by the Youth Endowment Fund to support interventions steering children and young people away from involvement in crime and violence and to find, generate and apply best available evidence about which approaches are most successful.

The Youth Endowment Fund has been established to operate independently of Government, and publishes information about its activities here: https://impetus.org.uk/youth-endowment-fund.
The £200m endowment was awarded at the end of March by way of a Grant Agreement. Since this award, Impetus has rapidly been establishing the Youth Endowment Fund’s operations and has launched its first call for proposals.

This is an open call, to fund and evaluate interventions primarily targeting young people aged 10-14 who are judged to be at risk of being drawn into crime and violence. This first funding round opened on the 28 May and will close on the 23 July, at which point applications will be assessed. As such, no projects have yet been awarded funding and no bids have been rejected. Further information about this first funding round can be found here: https://www.sibgroup.org.uk/youth-endowment-fund.

There are currently four officials in the Home Office whose responsibilities include oversight of the Youth Endowment Fund

The Youth Endowment Fund has been established as an independent charitable trust and is ultimately accountable to the Impetus Board. Appointment of the Youth Endowment Fund’s Independent Chair is expected to take place by the Autumn. The Youth Endowment Fund Committee comprises one representative from each of Impetus and the two organisations partnering it in delivering the Fund: the Social Investment Business and the Early Intervention Foundation; as well as a Home Office representative and other co-opted members. The Advisory Committee is yet to be established but will bring together a broad range of relevant expertise.

The pay of the Youth Endowment Fund’s Executive Director and Senior Team are a matter for the Youth Endowment Fund. However, when running the Competition to secure an organisation to run the Fund, all bidders were assessed against the expectation that no member of staff should receive a salary in excess of £150k. Under the terms of the Grant Agreement, Impetus is required to ensure that senior remuneration is proportionate and justifiable. The Home Office has also recommended that the Fund publishes details of senior staff remuneration.

Grouped Questions: 266234 | 266235
Q
Asked by Dan Jarvis
(Barnsley Central)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Housing: Heating
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure vulnerable patients are not discharged into a cold, damp home.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 26 June 2019

As part of the hospital discharge process patients will receive an assessment of the care and support needed after they leave hospital. In addition to the provision of domiciliary care and reablement support this may include necessary adaptation to a patient’s home. However, while this may include minor adaptations, such as bathroom grab rails, it would not include the provision of home insulation and heating or the treatment of damp.

Q
Asked by Dan Jarvis
(Barnsley Central)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Preventive Medicine
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to ensure the value of preventative health-related fuel poverty initiatives is recognised in the forthcoming green papers on (a) prevention and (b) social care in England.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

We are considering a range of policy options for both Green Papers and we will be mindful of fuel poverty.

Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Incinerators: Air Pollution
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to page five of Public Health England's position statement on the impact on health of emissions to air from municipal waste incinerators, what steps Public Health England is taking to increase its understanding of the measurement of number concentrations of particles in health terms.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Public Health England (PHE) undertakes various air quality research projects, working with academic partners, to review the evidence for the health effects of air pollutants, regarding the health effects of particulate matter (PM0.1 and PM1). PHE is a partner in two health protection research units funded by the National Institute for Health Research, whose remit includes air pollution research. These projects can be viewed at the following link:

http://www.hpru-ech.nihr.ac.uk/

PHE also draws on scientific studies and reviews published in the peer reviewed literature and by authoritative bodies.

Grouped Questions: 266069
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Youth Endowment Fund
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, who the Independent Chair of the Youth Endowment Fund will be; and who will sit on the (a) management committee and (b) advisory council of that fund.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 26 June 2019

In March 2019, the Home Secretary announced the award of a £200m endowment to the charity Impetus, to establish the Youth Endowment Fund. Applied over ten years, the funding will be used by the Youth Endowment Fund to support interventions steering children and young people away from involvement in crime and violence and to find, generate and apply best available evidence about which approaches are most successful.

The Youth Endowment Fund has been established to operate independently of Government, and publishes information about its activities here: https://impetus.org.uk/youth-endowment-fund.
The £200m endowment was awarded at the end of March by way of a Grant Agreement. Since this award, Impetus has rapidly been establishing the Youth Endowment Fund’s operations and has launched its first call for proposals.

This is an open call, to fund and evaluate interventions primarily targeting young people aged 10-14 who are judged to be at risk of being drawn into crime and violence. This first funding round opened on the 28 May and will close on the 23 July, at which point applications will be assessed. As such, no projects have yet been awarded funding and no bids have been rejected. Further information about this first funding round can be found here: https://www.sibgroup.org.uk/youth-endowment-fund.

There are currently four officials in the Home Office whose responsibilities include oversight of the Youth Endowment Fund

The Youth Endowment Fund has been established as an independent charitable trust and is ultimately accountable to the Impetus Board. Appointment of the Youth Endowment Fund’s Independent Chair is expected to take place by the Autumn. The Youth Endowment Fund Committee comprises one representative from each of Impetus and the two organisations partnering it in delivering the Fund: the Social Investment Business and the Early Intervention Foundation; as well as a Home Office representative and other co-opted members. The Advisory Committee is yet to be established but will bring together a broad range of relevant expertise.

The pay of the Youth Endowment Fund’s Executive Director and Senior Team are a matter for the Youth Endowment Fund. However, when running the Competition to secure an organisation to run the Fund, all bidders were assessed against the expectation that no member of staff should receive a salary in excess of £150k. Under the terms of the Grant Agreement, Impetus is required to ensure that senior remuneration is proportionate and justifiable. The Home Office has also recommended that the Fund publishes details of senior staff remuneration.

Grouped Questions: 266230 | 266235
Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Air Pollution
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the safe level of exposure is to (a) PM1 and (b) PM0.1.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 26 June 2019

Public Health England (PHE) undertakes various air quality research projects, working with academic partners, to review the evidence for the health effects of air pollutants, regarding the health effects of particulate matter (PM0.1 and PM1). PHE is a partner in two health protection research units funded by the National Institute for Health Research, whose remit includes air pollution research. These projects can be viewed at the following link:

http://www.hpru-ech.nihr.ac.uk/

PHE also draws on scientific studies and reviews published in the peer reviewed literature and by authoritative bodies.

Grouped Questions: 266068
Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Youth Endowment Fund
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the pay scale will be of the executive director and senior team recruited by Impetus to lead the Youth Endowment Fund's work.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 26 June 2019

In March 2019, the Home Secretary announced the award of a £200m endowment to the charity Impetus, to establish the Youth Endowment Fund. Applied over ten years, the funding will be used by the Youth Endowment Fund to support interventions steering children and young people away from involvement in crime and violence and to find, generate and apply best available evidence about which approaches are most successful.

The Youth Endowment Fund has been established to operate independently of Government, and publishes information about its activities here: https://impetus.org.uk/youth-endowment-fund.
The £200m endowment was awarded at the end of March by way of a Grant Agreement. Since this award, Impetus has rapidly been establishing the Youth Endowment Fund’s operations and has launched its first call for proposals.

This is an open call, to fund and evaluate interventions primarily targeting young people aged 10-14 who are judged to be at risk of being drawn into crime and violence. This first funding round opened on the 28 May and will close on the 23 July, at which point applications will be assessed. As such, no projects have yet been awarded funding and no bids have been rejected. Further information about this first funding round can be found here: https://www.sibgroup.org.uk/youth-endowment-fund.

There are currently four officials in the Home Office whose responsibilities include oversight of the Youth Endowment Fund

The Youth Endowment Fund has been established as an independent charitable trust and is ultimately accountable to the Impetus Board. Appointment of the Youth Endowment Fund’s Independent Chair is expected to take place by the Autumn. The Youth Endowment Fund Committee comprises one representative from each of Impetus and the two organisations partnering it in delivering the Fund: the Social Investment Business and the Early Intervention Foundation; as well as a Home Office representative and other co-opted members. The Advisory Committee is yet to be established but will bring together a broad range of relevant expertise.

The pay of the Youth Endowment Fund’s Executive Director and Senior Team are a matter for the Youth Endowment Fund. However, when running the Competition to secure an organisation to run the Fund, all bidders were assessed against the expectation that no member of staff should receive a salary in excess of £150k. Under the terms of the Grant Agreement, Impetus is required to ensure that senior remuneration is proportionate and justifiable. The Home Office has also recommended that the Fund publishes details of senior staff remuneration.

Grouped Questions: 266230 | 266234
Q
Asked by Ben Lake
(Ceredigion)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Israel: Arms Trade
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the effect of UK arms exports to Israel on peace talks between Israel and Palestine.
A
Answered by: Dr Andrew Murrison
Answered on: 26 June 2019

​The Government takes its defence exports responsibilities extremely seriously and operates some of the most robust export controls in the world. We only approve equipment which is for Israel's legitimate self-defence, when we are satisfied that this would be consistent with the Consolidated EU and National Arms Export Licensing Criteria and other relevant commitments. We will not issue a licence if there is a clear risk that the equipment might be used for internal repression, or if there is a clear risk that it would provoke or prolong conflict. We continue to believe the best way to achieve this is through substantive peace talks between the parties leading to a two-state solution with Jerusalem as a shared capital.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Circuses: Animal Welfare
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to prevent domestic animals being harmed and exploited in circuses.
A
Answered by: David Rutley
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 (the 2018 regulations) came into force on 1 October 2018. The regulations require anyone in England who is in the business of keeping or training animals (regardless of whether they are domestic or wild kept animals) for exhibition, educational or entertainment purposes, including within a circus, to be licensed by the relevant local authority.

The regulations include powers for local authorities to inspect the premises where the animals are kept to ensure minimum welfare standards are being maintained. In addition, all kept animals including those in a circus are protected by the provisions of the Animal Welfare Act 2006. If anyone considers that an animal in a circus is suffering or its welfare is being compromised then they should report it to the local authority who have powers under the 2006 Act to investigate, or to the RSPCA who will also investigate such matters.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Dog Fighting
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps his Department is taking to prevent people giving away dogs online to tackle the dog fighting industry.
A
Answered by: David Rutley
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government abhors the mistreatment of animals, including organised dog fighting. It is an offence under the Animal Welfare Act 2006 to be involved in or to promote animal fighting including dog fighting. The Government has announced it will increase the maximum custodial penalty for animal cruelty, including animal fighting, from six months to five years’ imprisonment and legislation will be introduced as soon as possible.

In relation to online advertising of pets and other animals, the Government has worked with the Pet Advertising Advisory Group (PAAG - a group of animal welfare, veterinary and animal keeping interests) who promote the responsible advertising of pet animals. Five online animal adverting platforms have adopted PAAG’s minimum standards for advertising animals which are endorsed by the Government. The minimum standards include that the websites run automated checks for key words and terms such as banned dog breeds, and filter for misleading or inappropriate adverts which are then removed. The websites must exclude any advert where there is a reasonable concern for the health and welfare of the animal involved and provide a clearly visible function for purchasers to report illegal or inappropriate adverts. The Government will continue to work with PAAG to encourage more online advertising platforms to sign up to PAAG’s minimum standards.

Q
Asked by David Simpson
(Upper Bann)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Dogs: Tagging
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many dogs were microchipped in 2018.
A
Answered by: David Rutley
Answered on: 26 June 2019

The Government estimates, from figures provided by the relevant microchip databases, that around 8.1 million dogs in the UK were microchipped in 2018. This represents around 90% of all dogs in the UK.

Q
Asked by Jeff Smith
(Manchester, Withington)
Asked on: 18 June 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services: Older People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many mental health staff have been trained in issues relating to older adults since the 2016 Five Year Forward View targets were set.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 26 June 2019

This information is not held in the format requested as most training for mental health staff relates to a range of ages and not just older adults.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-100 out of 111761
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100