Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Cardiff South and Penarth)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2018
Church Commissioners
Churches: Equality
Commons
To ask the right hon. Member for Meriden, representing the Church Commissioners, what steps are being taken to promote greater diversity by (a) gender (b) ethnicity and (c) sexual orientation in leadership positions within the Church.
A
Answered by: Dame Caroline Spelman
Answered on: 15 October 2018
Holding answer received on 11 October 2018

Increasing diversity among the clergy is a priority for the Church of England. Nationally the Church has set a target that it will increase the overall number of people recommended for training by 50% over a five-year period. The Church is well on the way to deliver this and has already seen a 22% increase in those entering training since 2016. The Ministry Division of the Archbishops’ Council has developed programmes to support those who are being called to the priesthood from as wide a range of communities and backgrounds as possible. Members of the Crown Nominations Commission who are involved in the recruitment and discernment process for the most senior appointments also undergo unconscious bias training.

During 2018 the Church recommended 316 women for training, which was 54% of the total. This represents the highest proportion of women entering training that the Church has seen in the last ten years.

The most recent data from 2017 shows that around 6% of those entering training self-identify as being from a minority ethnic background. The Church responded by recruiting a National ME Vocations Officer to address this underrepresentation of minority ethnic clergy and through the “Turning up the Volume” programme is supporting future senior leaders. The Ordained Vocations Mentor Directory was also created to help support those at any stage on the journey towards ordained vocations who would like a mentor.

The Church of England does not record or keep data on the sexual orientation of candidates.

Q
(York Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2018
Home Office
Immigration: Windrush Generation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Windrush generation cases remain outstanding; and what the timeframe is for those cases to be concluded.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The number of live applications is subject to frequent change. The Home Secretary provides the Home Affairs Select Committee with regular updates that give details on those applying and granted under the Windrush Scheme and the August update was published on 21 September 2018.

The Taskforce aims to complete straightforward applications within two weeks of all evidence being gathered however some will fall outside that timeframe due to complexity and the need to investigate thoroughly in order to reach a correct decision.

Q
Asked by Tom Brake
(Carshalton and Wallington)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Driving: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to Article 2 of Directive 2006/126/EC10, what assessment the Government has made of the effect on EU recognition of UK driving licences of the UK leaving the EU.
A
Answered by: Chris Grayling
Answered on: 15 October 2018

While the UK is still a member of the EU, the same rules apply and UK licences continue to be recognised by all Member States.

We will be seeking to negotiate a comprehensive agreement with the EU to cover the continued recognition and exchange of UK licences after exit so that UK licence holders are not required to carry additional documentation. In the absence of this we will be seeking bilateral agreements with individual member states.

If there is no deal with the EU, the contingency is that both private and professional drivers may need an International Driving Permit (IDP), as well as their UK driving licence to drive in the EU following exit. IDPs would be issued under either the 1949 Geneva Convention on Road Traffic, which is already in force for the UK or the 1968 Vienna Convention on Road Traffic which will come into force for the UK on 28th March 2019.

Q
Asked by Ben Bradley
(Mansfield)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Growth Hubs: East Midlands
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of Growth Hubs in supporting women in the East Midlands who want to (a) start and (b) grow a business.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The network of 38 Growth Hubs across England provides free and impartial advice to anyone wishing to start and a grow a business. At March 2018, Local Enterprise Partnerships in the East Midlands reported that since launch their Growth Hubs have supported over 36,500 businesses; of which 3,835 received intensive support. Furthermore, East Midlands Growth Hubs have helped over 2,000 entrepreneurs start their own business since launch.

Across the UK, there are now 1.1 million women-led small and medium-sized businesses and I want to see that number grow. Access to finance is key area that can support that aim and I am pleased to report that the government-supported Start-Up Loans Company has provided loans worth nearly £436 million to those wishing to start a business, of which nearly 40% have been given to female entrepreneurs at March 2018.

Q
Asked by Ben Bradley
(Mansfield)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Children: West Midlands
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what recent estimate she has made of the number of children living in workless households in the East Midlands.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The latest estimate of the number of children living in workless households** in the East Midlands is 99,000 (11.4%). In 2010 there were 131,000 such children; this is a decrease of 25%.

Nationally the number of children living in workless households has fallen by a third and now stands at just under 1.3 million (10.2%).

Notes:

Source: Labour Force Survey from April – June 2018 published by the Office of National Statistics

** Households including at least one person aged 16 to 64

Q
Asked by Ben Bradley
(Mansfield)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Youth Opportunity Fund: Nottinghamshire
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how much funding his Department has allocated from the Youth Opportunities Fund to projects in Nottinghamshire in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Rishi Sunak
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Youth Opportunity Fund was a Department for Education (DfE) programme until 2011, when it was one of several funding streams for children, young people and families to be replaced by the Early Intervention Grant. Responsibility for youth services transferred from DfE to the Office of Civil Society (OCS) in 2013. OCS is now a division of the Department of Digital, Culture, Media and Sport.

Q
(Birmingham, Edgbaston)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Vacancies: West Midlands
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what estimate her Department has made of the number of vacancies in the West Midlands for (a) permanent and (b) temporary positions.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Department for Work and Pensions provides a service to offer vacancies which are available on Gov.uk (‘Find a Job’). Current data sourced from this website in respect of vacancies for the West Midlands is below:

Total Jobs – 19,465

Permanent – 10,570

Contract – 8,361

The above data was obtained from Find a Job on 9th October 2018.

(Note: vacancies showing as live on ‘Find a Job’ may have now passed their closing date.)

There are many other job search sites available advertising vacancies, such as indeed.co.uk and reed.co.uk. Vacancies which appear on other sites may or may not appear on ‘Find a Job’; as such the numbers quoted above will not accurately reflect the total job market.

Q
(Stalybridge and Hyde)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Railways: North of England
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many days (a) Northern and (b) Transpennine Express have achieved their performance targets since the start of its franchise in April 2016.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The performance benchmarks for both Northern and TransPennine Express are calculated on a 4-weekly period based on a moving annual average rather than assessed against individual days.

There is a re-benchmarking process currently underway to assess the impact on the franchisees’ performance regimes of late the delivery of infrastructure against that assumed in their bids. Once this exercise has been completed, the Department will be able to assess how Northern and TransPennine Express have performed against their targets.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Driving under Influence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps the Government is taking to reduce the number of people who are (a) killed and (b) injured by motorists who are over the legal limit of alcohol.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Tackling drink driving is a priority for the Government and important steps have already been taken to tighten drink driving legislation. Since 2015, high risk offenders such as repeat drink drivers have to provide medical proof that they are not alcohol dependent before getting their licence back; the right to a blood test was also removed for drivers who narrowly fail a breathalyser test, denying those people the chance to sober up while waiting for the test to be taken; and a £350,000 innovation competition to provide police forces with the next generation of mobile breathalyser equipment has recently completed and bids are under review.

Q
(North Thanet)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
M20: Large Goods Vehicles
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Secretary of State for Defence was consulted on the use of Manston Airport as part of the planning process under the Town and Country Planning (Operation Stack) Special Development Order 2015 and its subsequent amendments in 2016 and 2017; and what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the use of Manston Airport as a lorry park on its high resolution direction finding facility.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

An operational protocol has been established between all relevant organisations in the event there is a requirement to utilise Manston Airport as a lorry holding area. This includes a protocol for the high resolution direction finding facility located on the site.

Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for International Trade
Department for International Trade: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.
A
Answered by: George Hollingbery
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

In addition, the department requires that our suppliers pay at least the National Minimum Wage.

Grouped Questions: 174129
Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for International Trade
Department for International Trade: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.
A
Answered by: George Hollingbery
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

The Department for International Trade does not have any staff that work inside and outside Greater London that are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

In addition, the department requires that our suppliers pay at least the National Minimum Wage.

Grouped Questions: 174128
Q
Asked by Kate Osamor
(Edmonton)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Treasury
Overseas Loans: Disclosure of Information
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to ensure that loans made to foreign governments under UK law by UK-based financial institutions are publicly disclosed when they are made.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The UK is working through the G20 to promote sovereign debt transparency and sustainability, particularly for low income developing countries.

UK-based lenders are subject to extensive prudential disclosure requirements under UK prudential and accounting law, including for material loans made to foreign Governments, which appropriately reflect firms’ exposures. Compliance with these requirements are independently assessed by the relevant UK regulator during their supervisory activities.

Q
(Stockton South)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Government Departments: Telephone Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he is taking to steps to increase the powers that Ofcom and the Phone-paid Services Authority have to prevent intermediaries charging people to use freephone Government services; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Ofcom has a power under the Communications Act 2003 to regulate premium rate services, those higher rate services charged to telephone bills, which it has delegated to the Phone-paid Services Authority (PSA).

Providers of intermediary connection services, known as information, connection and signposting services (ICSS) are subject to PSA’s strict mandatory Code of Practice if they operate under certain number and price ranges. Ofcom recently consulted on proposals to broaden the scope of the rules so that they would apply to all such services, meaning that all ICSS would be subject to the PSA’s remit. Ofcom aims to publish its decision before the end of 2018.

Q
(Gainsborough)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Education
Sex and Relationship Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to his oral statement of 19 July 2018, Official Report, column 615 on Relationships and Sex Education, to which case law he was referring when he said that a right for parents to withdraw their child up to 18 years of age is no longer compatible with English case law or the European convention on human rights.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 15 October 2018

With regard to the parental right to withdraw their child from sex education, we have proposed regulations that are compatible with the law as it now stands. The case law in relation to a child’s competence to make their own decisions has evolved over time. This is shown, for example, in the 2006 case of R (Axon) v Secretary of State for Health.

The draft regulations and associated guidance are currently subject to consultation. They include our proposed approach to the right for children to be withdrawn from sex education. The consultation closes on 7 November, and can be accessed via this link: https://consult.education.gov.uk/pshe/relationships-education-rse-health-education/.

Q
Asked by Giles Watling
(Clacton)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Transport
Members: Correspondence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, when he plans to respond to the letters of 17 May 2018 and 3 July 2018 from the hon. Member for Clacton regarding infrastructure improvements in Essex.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 15 October 2018

I apologise for the delay in responding to your letters. I understand that my Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State will be meeting with you shortly to discuss the specific issues you raised in your letters.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Home Office
Forced Marriage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many recorded crimes relating to forced marriage there have been since 16 June 2014.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The UK is a world-leader in the fight to stamp out the brutal practice of forced marriage, with our joint Home Office and Foreign and Commonwealth Office Forced Marriage Unit (FMU) leading efforts to combat it both at home and abroad.

We made forced marriage a criminal offence in 2014 to better protect victims and send a clear message that this abhorrent practice is totally unacceptable and will not be tolerated in the UK. To date, there have been four convictions under the offence.

The most recent Crown Prosecution Service Violence Against Women and Girls report shows that the volume of forced marriage referrals from the police to the Crown Prosecution Service (CPS) fell from 90 in 2015–16 to 56 in 2016–17, with a corresponding fall in the volume of defendants charged from 57 to 36. The volume of prosecutions completed fell from 53 in 2015–16 to 44 in 2016–17. The volume of convictions stayed steady at 32, as in 2015–16. The conviction rate increased from 60.4% in 2015–16 to 72.7% in 2016–17.

Q
Asked by Louise Haigh
(Sheffield, Heeley)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Home Office
Police: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to Figure 3 of the report, Financial sustainability of police forces 2018 published by the National Audit Office on 11 September 2018, if he will publish the reduction in real terms in £m for each police force.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Police funding allocations are set out annually to the House in the police funding settlement. Additionally, in July 2018, we published a statistical bulletin on police funding to provide a single source of statistical information on police funding levels. The bulletin can be read here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-funding-for-england-and-wales-2015-to-2019

Q
(Wallasey)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Arts: Wallasey
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, how much his Department has allocated in arts grants to Wallasey constituency in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Michael Ellis
Answered on: 15 October 2018

We are committed to ensuring that people from across the country have access to our world class art and culture, and Arts Council England has worked hard in recent years to ensure investment outside London has increased as a percentage and in cash terms.

In each of the last five years, Wallasey has received funding from Arts Council England as outlined in the table:

2013/14

2014/15

2015/16

2016/17

2017/18

£24,824

£14,800

£23,600

£9,533

£77,000

Q
Asked by Bill Wiggin
(North Herefordshire)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Education
Schools: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what plans he has to increase core funding for schools.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 15 October 2018

This year the core schools budget has increased to £42.4 billion and will rise further to £43.5 billion in 2019‑20. This increase follows the additional £1.3 billion announced last year, over and above what was promised at the last Spending Review, which is being provided by prioritising front-line spending within the Department’s budget.

This means that funding for the average primary school class this year is £132,000, which is £8,000 more in real terms than in 2008. The same children will receive on average £171,000 when they move to secondary school, a real terms rise of £10,000 compared to a decade ago. Figures from the Institute for Fiscal Studies show that real terms per-pupil funding in 2020 for five to sixteen year olds will be more than 50% higher than it was in 2000.

Funding after 2019-20 will be determined at the next spending review.

Q
Asked by Keith Vaz
(Leicester East)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Home Office
Emergency Calls
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many 999 call attendants are employed in (a) the UK and (b) Leicestershire.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Home Office does not hold the information requested centrally.

The Home Office collects and publishes information on the primary roles that police officers and staff perform, for Police Force Areas in England and Wales. Data are collected on a full-time equivalent (FTE) basis. These data are published annually as part of the 'police workforce, England and Wales' statistical bulletin, the latest of which can be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-england-and-wales

Within the functions framework is ‘Central Communications Unit’ where 999 call handlers would be included but they only account for subset of this function and it is not possible to separately identify them.

Table_F2 of the accompany data tables shows the number of full time equivalent (FTE) police staff in the ‘Central Communications Unit’ function, by each Police Force Area in England and Wales:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/728153/police-workforce-tabs-jul18.ods

Q
Asked by Keith Vaz
(Leicester East)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Home Office
Police: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many new police officers have been recruited since January 2018.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Home Office collects and publishes data on the number of police officers who join the police workforce during the financial year and are based on full-time equivalents. These data are published in the ‘Police workforce, England and Wales’ statistical bulletin.

The latest available data for the years 2006/07 to 2017/18 can be found in the accompanying Joiners Open Data Tables, available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-workforce-open-data-tables

Q
Asked by Keith Vaz
(Leicester East)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Home Office
Arrests: Leicester
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of arrests in Leicester have led to a conviction in the last 12 months for which information is available.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Home Office does not hold the information on the number of arrests that led to a conviction.

The Home Office collect and publish data on the number of arrests for notifiable offences, by Police Force Area, on an annual basis. Data can be found in the ‘Police Powers and Procedures’ statistical bulletin and accompanying tables, the latest of which can be accessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/police-powers-and-procedures-england-and-wales-year-ending-31-march-2017

Data on convictions are the responsibility of the Ministry of Justice.

Q
(Hornsey and Wood Green)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Treasury
Treasury: Staff
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, how many staff (a) are employed directly by (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.
A
Answered by: Robert Jenrick
Answered on: 15 October 2018
As at 31st July 2018 the headcounts were as follows: a) 1326 staff employed directly by the department b) 74 staff seconded to the department c) 14 staff working under contract
Q
(Hendon)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Arts: Copyright
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the EU Copyright Directive on the creative industries.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The EU Copyright Directive, which the Government supports, is currently in trilogue. The European Commission produced an initial impact assessment which looked across all affected sectors, including the creative industries. Additionally, the Intellectual Property Office has met extensively with stakeholders from the affected sectors, including the creative industries, to understand the potential impact of any changes.

Q
(Hornsey and Wood Green)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Ministry of Justice
Ministry of Justice: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The UK Living Wage (sometimes referred to as the ‘Real Living Wage’) and the London Living Wage, are both voluntary rates set by the Living Wage Foundation.

These are not statutory figures which relate to the government policy in this area, and so are not legally binding on employers. The statutory minimum rates are the National Living Wage and the National Minimum Wage.

For comparison, the National Living Wage is currently £7.83 per hour, and increased by 4.4% in April 2018.

The increases in the National Living Wage and the National Minimum Wage have produced increases for over 2 million workers this year, across the economy, and increased pay by £2,000 for those on the minimum rate, since these statutory arrangements were introduced.

All MoJ employees are paid at least the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage.

395 staff employed by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ HQ, HMCTS, LAA, OPD and CICA) and 24 by HMPPS work inside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Real Living Wage £10.20 per hour.

1479 staff employed by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ HQ, HMCTS, LAA, OPD and CICA) and 543 by HMPPS work outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the National Real Living Wage £8.75 per hour.

Q
Asked by Mr Ivan Lewis
(Bury South)
Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Brineura
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, for what reason there is no national service specification for ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2).
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The NHS England service specifications for Metabolic disorders (children) and Metabolic disorders (adults) both include ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2 (CLN2). These can be found on the NHS England website at the following links:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/e06-metab-disorders-child.pdf

https://www.england.nhs.uk/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/e06-metab-disorders-adult.pdf

Asked on: 12 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Business: Cybercrime
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans, if any, they have to invest in innovation to help support UK businesses in upgrading cyber security.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 15 October 2018

As part of the National Cyber Security Strategy, the Government has invested in a series of support programmes to stimulate innovation in cyber security and ensure there is a pipeline of innovative cyber security products and services to help UK companies and organisations stay secure. These will advance the UK's leadership in cyber security and help make the UK the safest place to live and do business online. The programmes include:

Two innovation centres in London and Cheltenham, which are driving the development of cutting-edge cyber products and dynamic new cyber security companies;

  • HutZero, a programme to encourage cyber entrepreneurs with innovative ideas to set up in business.
  • Cyber 101, a “bootcamp” to help entrepreneurs develop market strategy and business effectiveness.
  • The Academic Start-up Programme, that recognises the strong link between research and innovation, and helps teams from academia validate the market prospects for their research in cyber security and produce a minimum viable working product leading to commercialisation.

The Government also supports research in a range of strategically important areas of cyber security, including Industrial Control Systems, and Hardware through four Research Institutes, and facilitates industry engagement and funding of research in 17 Academic Centres of Excellence in Cyber Security Research across the UK through the Cyber Invest programme.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Tourism Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on with whom responsibility will lie for Tourism Ireland after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Michael Ellis
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Under the Belfast/Good Friday Agreement, the promotion of tourism in Northern Ireland and Ireland was set out in the North-South Ministerial Council as one of the priorities for co-operation. The UK Government has consistently placed upholding the Agreement at the heart of its approach, and recognises the basis it has provided for the deep economic and social cooperation on the island of Ireland. This includes North-South cooperation.

The UK Government is confident we will reach an agreement with the EU that avoids a hard border between Northern Ireland and Ireland. We do not anticipate any change to the agreement on how the island of Ireland is promoted.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Broadband: Northern Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what discussions he has had with the Chancellor of the Exchequer on releasing the £150 million allocated to improve rural broadband in Northern Ireland.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Ministers have regular discussions with Cabinet colleagues on a range of issues. My department has been working closely with both the Treasury and the Northern Ireland Office in order to agree the release of funding for broadband in Northern Ireland. In the meantime, work continues on preparing the competitive procurement that will deliver this important infrastructure to Northern Ireland.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Gaming Machines: Northern Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent discussions he has had with Cabinet colleagues on the lowering of stakes on fixed-odds betting terminals in Northern Ireland.
A
Answered by: Tracey Crouch
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Gambling in Northern Ireland is a devolved matter and the regulatory change to sub-category B2 machines will cover Great Britain only.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Ulster Scots Language
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he plans to provide funding for regional youth programmes on historical and cultural topics relevant to Ulster Scots.
A
Answered by: Michael Ellis
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Decisions on funding for culture are made independently of Government and Ministers, which means there is no question of any political involvement in arts funding decisions. Culture is also a devolved competence, and the Arts Council of Northern Ireland is responsible for funding cultural projects in Northern Ireland.

Q
Asked by Lyn Brown
(West Ham)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Burma: Overseas Aid
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies of reports that humanitarian access to conflict areas of the Kachin region has been systematically blocked by (a) the armed forces and (b) the Government of Myanmar.
A
Answered by: Mark Field
Answered on: 15 October 2018

​The UN HRC resolution that was passed on 27 September has asked for immediate, safe and unhindered humanitarian access, including to areas controlled by ethnic armed groups, in particular in Kachin State. We continue to impress on the Burmese Government the importance of open access to all parts of Burma, including access to the press, to stop the fighting and allow access for humanitarian aid.

Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Air Pollution
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent research he has consulted to formulate policy related to the effects on health of PM (a) 2.5 (b) 1 and (c) 0.1.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) has assessed the effects of particulate air pollution on mortality in the United Kingdom. The latest reports are available to be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/comeap-reports

Public Health England (PHE) estimated the mortality burden in 2010 associated with long-term exposure to human-made particulate air pollution at local authority level. The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/estimating-local-mortality-burdens-associated-with-particulate-air-pollution

COMEAP assessed the evidence on long-term exposure to ambient air pollutants (mainly particulate air pollution) and chronic bronchitis and respiratory symptoms. Although no separate assessments of the impact of the PM1 and PM0.1 fractions of particulate air pollution have been produced, PM1 and PM0.1 are included within the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions, on which assessments are usually based.

COMEAP is currently assessing the effects of air pollutants on dementia and cognitive decline. Research projects into the health effects of air pollution in two Health Protection Research Units, in which PHE is a partner, focus on various areas including health impact assessments of nanoparticles. There is also a COMEAP report on the mechanisms by which air pollutants affect cardiovascular health due to be published later this year.

PHE’s position is that well run and regulated modern Municipal Waste Incinerators (MWIs) are not a significant risk to public health. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact that modern MWIs make a small contribution to local concentrations of air pollutants.

When consulted, PHE provides an expert and independent opinion to the regulator (Environment Agency) on the potential impacts on human health of emissions arising from existing or proposed regulated facilities, such as MWIs. PHE will comment on the applicants’ risk assessments and how they demonstrate the installation’s impacts on human health, and when requested, any additional modelling and assessments conducted by the Environment Agency for chemicals and radiation including particulate matter and dioxins, providing health advice that is clear, concise and based on best available evidence and expert judgement. This assists the regulator in making decisions on whether or not to grant permits to regulated facilities. Guidance on PHE’s role in environmental permitting is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/477277/Environmental_permitting_guide_Nov_2015.pdf

PHE has reviewed the evidence on the effects of waste incinerators on human health including the effects of dioxin. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/municipal-waste-incinerator-emissions-to-air-impact-on-health

Available studies have not identified a threshold concentration below which there is no association between exposure to particulate air pollution and adverse health effects. The European Union Limit Value for PM2.5 (annual mean of 25 µg/m3) that the UK must comply with is included as an air quality objective in the national Air Quality Strategy available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality

Grouped Questions: 174603 | 174610 | 174612
Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Air Pollution
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what method his Department uses to assess the effects on health of emissions of PM (a) 2.5 (b) 1 and (c) 0.1 from waste incinerator sites.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) has assessed the effects of particulate air pollution on mortality in the United Kingdom. The latest reports are available to be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/comeap-reports

Public Health England (PHE) estimated the mortality burden in 2010 associated with long-term exposure to human-made particulate air pollution at local authority level. The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/estimating-local-mortality-burdens-associated-with-particulate-air-pollution

COMEAP assessed the evidence on long-term exposure to ambient air pollutants (mainly particulate air pollution) and chronic bronchitis and respiratory symptoms. Although no separate assessments of the impact of the PM1 and PM0.1 fractions of particulate air pollution have been produced, PM1 and PM0.1 are included within the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions, on which assessments are usually based.

COMEAP is currently assessing the effects of air pollutants on dementia and cognitive decline. Research projects into the health effects of air pollution in two Health Protection Research Units, in which PHE is a partner, focus on various areas including health impact assessments of nanoparticles. There is also a COMEAP report on the mechanisms by which air pollutants affect cardiovascular health due to be published later this year.

PHE’s position is that well run and regulated modern Municipal Waste Incinerators (MWIs) are not a significant risk to public health. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact that modern MWIs make a small contribution to local concentrations of air pollutants.

When consulted, PHE provides an expert and independent opinion to the regulator (Environment Agency) on the potential impacts on human health of emissions arising from existing or proposed regulated facilities, such as MWIs. PHE will comment on the applicants’ risk assessments and how they demonstrate the installation’s impacts on human health, and when requested, any additional modelling and assessments conducted by the Environment Agency for chemicals and radiation including particulate matter and dioxins, providing health advice that is clear, concise and based on best available evidence and expert judgement. This assists the regulator in making decisions on whether or not to grant permits to regulated facilities. Guidance on PHE’s role in environmental permitting is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/477277/Environmental_permitting_guide_Nov_2015.pdf

PHE has reviewed the evidence on the effects of waste incinerators on human health including the effects of dioxin. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/municipal-waste-incinerator-emissions-to-air-impact-on-health

Available studies have not identified a threshold concentration below which there is no association between exposure to particulate air pollution and adverse health effects. The European Union Limit Value for PM2.5 (annual mean of 25 µg/m3) that the UK must comply with is included as an air quality objective in the national Air Quality Strategy available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality

Grouped Questions: 174602 | 174610 | 174612
Q
Asked by Tom Pursglove
(Corby)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Sports: Urban Areas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what negotiations have taken place for the selection of training facilities for urban sports ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.
A
Answered by: Tracey Crouch
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Olympic sports' National Governing Bodies (NGB) are responsible for the training of their athletes during the period leading up to the Olympic Games, and with it the facilities they choose. UK Sport is working closely with NGBs to determine the appropriate level of facilities needed to sustain Olympic success ahead of the Tokyo Olympic Games, which are set to run from 24 July to 9 August 2020.

Q
Asked by Tom Pursglove
(Corby)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Sports Competitors: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what the timetable is for the announcement of the preferred training facilities for Team GB ahead of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.
A
Answered by: Tracey Crouch
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The British Olympic Association (BOA), as the National Olympic Committee (NOC) for Great Britain and Northern Ireland, is responsible for Team GB’s participation at the Olympic Games. The BOA – a privately funded organisation - has already announced its preferred training facilities for Tokyo 2020. Each sport’s National Governing Body (NGB) is responsible for the training of their athletes during the period leading up to the Olympic Games, and with it the facilities they choose. However, in the immediate run-up to each Summer Games, the BOA secures facilities for a multi-sport preparation camp within or near the host country. In 2017, the BOA secured three multi-sport facilities in the Greater Tokyo area to act as a multi-sport preparation camp for the Tokyo 2020 Olympic Games.

The three sites, all based in the Greater Tokyo area in the cities of Kawasaki and Yokohama, will make up the BOA’s biggest ever pre-Games preparation camp, allowing athletes the opportunity to acclimatise and complete their final preparations for Tokyo 2020 a short journey from the heart of Tokyo in dedicated International Federation standard venues. These facilities will provide Team GB’s athletes with optimal pre-Games training in world-class facilities ahead of the Games, which are set to run from 24 July to 9 August 2020.

Q
(Wallasey)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what comparative estimate he has made of the number of mental health staff employed in the NHS in Wirral (a) 2010 and (b) 2017.
A
Answered by: Matt Hancock
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The information is not available.

Q
(Wallasey)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Small Businesses: Wallasey
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support micro-enterprises in Wallasey constituency.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Through our Industrial Strategy, we will make sure that we are using all the tools we have to support business growth in places such as the Liverpool City Region boosting productivity and ensuring an economy that works for everyone.

We are helping small businesses grow through access to detailed advice and guidance on GOV.UK and the Business Support Helpline. We have already invested £12 million in the 38 Growth Hubs inthe Local Enterprise Partnership areas providing tailored advice to businesses across England. We are providing a further £24m to continue funding Growth Hubs for the next 2 years. The Liverpool City Region Growth Hub, which covers Wirral and the Wallasey constituency, has supported over 15, 632 businesses and helped 3,500 individuals to start a business.

In February 2017, through the government-owned British Business Bank (BBB), we launched the £400 million Northern Powerhouse Investment Fund to give small businesses in the North access to finance to help them start-up and grow. 40 investments or loans have been made in the Liverpool City Region worth £8m with two investments made in the Wallasey constituency, totalling £350, 000.

The Regional Growth Fund which was established to help create jobs and businesses grow has contracted £97.2m to businesses in the Liverpool City Region helping to create or safeguard 11,264 jobs. Of this £8.4m has been contracted to businesses in Wirral supporting 188 jobs.

In addition, we have invested over £1.5 billion through the Local Growth Fund in North West projects to boost local economies. We will invest £332m in Liverpool City Region Local Enterprise Partnership area creating 15,400 jobs. This will support projects such as the Wirral Metropolitan College Extreme Low Energy Project and a number of improvements to the key route networks in your constituency.

Grouped Questions: 174640
Q
(Wallasey)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Small Businesses: Merseyside
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to support small business growth in (a) Merseyside and (b) Wirral.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Through our Industrial Strategy, we will make sure that we are using all the tools we have to support business growth in places such as the Liverpool City Region boosting productivity and ensuring an economy that works for everyone.

We are helping small businesses grow through access to detailed advice and guidance on GOV.UK and the Business Support Helpline. We have already invested £12 million in the 38 Growth Hubs inthe Local Enterprise Partnership areas providing tailored advice to businesses across England. We are providing a further £24m to continue funding Growth Hubs for the next 2 years. The Liverpool City Region Growth Hub, which covers Wirral and the Wallasey constituency, has supported over 15, 632 businesses and helped 3,500 individuals to start a business.

In February 2017, through the government-owned British Business Bank (BBB), we launched the £400 million Northern Powerhouse Investment Fund to give small businesses in the North access to finance to help them start-up and grow. 40 investments or loans have been made in the Liverpool City Region worth £8m with two investments made in the Wallasey constituency, totalling £350, 000.

The Regional Growth Fund which was established to help create jobs and businesses grow has contracted £97.2m to businesses in the Liverpool City Region helping to create or safeguard 11,264 jobs. Of this £8.4m has been contracted to businesses in Wirral supporting 188 jobs.

In addition, we have invested over £1.5 billion through the Local Growth Fund in North West projects to boost local economies. We will invest £332m in Liverpool City Region Local Enterprise Partnership area creating 15,400 jobs. This will support projects such as the Wirral Metropolitan College Extreme Low Energy Project and a number of improvements to the key route networks in your constituency.

Grouped Questions: 174639
Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Network Rail: Property
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate has been made of the potential annual savings that will accrue to Network Rail after the sale of its property portfolio to Telereal Trillium and Blackstone Property Partners.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Network Rail will save circa £18.1million annually, in operational costs of the Commercial Estate business.

Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, for what reason his call for evidence on last-mile deliveries excludes HGVs.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Last Mile Call for Evidence did not exclude HGVs. It sought ideas and evidence on ways of reducing emissions from the delivery of goods during the last mile of their journey, regardless of the size of vehicle used to deliver them.

The Call for Evidence is also interested in a wide range of potential technologies for reducing emissions from last mile deliveries. This includes hybrid technologies for commercial vehicles, such as range-extended or dual-fuelled HGVs.

The Department will be announcing its response to the call for evidence later this year.

Grouped Questions: 174780
Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles: Urban Areas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of the introduction of range-extended, dual-fuelled HGVs to reduce last-mile emissions in urban environments.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Last Mile Call for Evidence did not exclude HGVs. It sought ideas and evidence on ways of reducing emissions from the delivery of goods during the last mile of their journey, regardless of the size of vehicle used to deliver them.

The Call for Evidence is also interested in a wide range of potential technologies for reducing emissions from last mile deliveries. This includes hybrid technologies for commercial vehicles, such as range-extended or dual-fuelled HGVs.

The Department will be announcing its response to the call for evidence later this year.

Grouped Questions: 174779
Q
Asked by Alex Chalk
(Cheltenham)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Vehicle Number Plates: Clones
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps the Government is taking to encourage traffic enforcement teams to check with the DVLA vehicle enquiry service before issuing penalty notices in order to avoid problems caused by potential vehicle license plate cloning.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The purpose of the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s (DVLA) Vehicle Enquiry Service is to provide some details about the vehicle being checked, for example its licensing status.

The DVLA already has existing secure data sharing arrangements in place which are used by the police and local authorities for enforcement purposes.

If the registered keeper of a vehicle suspects that their number plate has been cloned, they should contact the police and the authority that issued any disputed penalty notice for investigations to be carried out. The DVLA is also able to issue a new registration number where appropriate.

Q
Asked by Alex Chalk
(Cheltenham)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Motor Vehicles: Registration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether the Government plans to introduce a combined form to enable people to notify the DVLA of a change of address for both driving licence and registered vehicle keeper.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) is currently improving the way it holds data and the services it provides to customers. As part of this process the DVLA will provide a new service to notify changes of address covering both driver and vehicle databases. As most customers want to notify changes online, the DVLA will focus on delivering a digital service, with other support and assistance available for those who need it.

Q
(Easington)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Driving: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether drivers of goods vehicles who hold UK driving licenses will be required to purchase an International Driving Permit to travel to EU member states after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Government is seeking to ensure that UK motorists can continue to drive in the EU after we have left. The treatment of driving licences will depend on the outcome of the final agreement.

If there is no deal with the EU, both private and professional drivers may need an International Driving Permit, as well as their UK driving licence, to drive in the EU after the UK leaves.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for International Trade
Overseas Trade: Israel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what steps he is taking to strengthen the collaboration between UK and Israeli companies in the medical sector.
A
Answered by: Graham Stuart
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The UK and Israel have a strong and important trading relationship, and we are committed to strengthening it. The commercial team in our Embassy in Tel Aviv actively promote UK-Israel trade in the medical sector and are sponsoring a delegation of 6 Israeli importers of medical devices to meet with UK companies at the upcoming Medica Trade Exhibition this year.


There is also extensive bilateral collaborative medical research between the UK and Israel. The UK-Israel Tech Hub, based at the Embassy, helps to create tech and innovation partnerships across several sectors, including healthcare.


Next month, the Embassy is organising a visit by a delegation of senior NHS officials to Tel Aviv to meet with Israeli healthcare companies who are looking to invest in the UK.

Q
(South West Wiltshire)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Fisheries: Republic of Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, on which dates in 2018 (a) Ministers and (b) officials met with Irish counterparts to discuss the Voisinage Agreement.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The UK Government remains committed to the principles behind the Voisinage Agreement and to continued cooperation between Northern Ireland and Ireland. I wrote to Minister Creed, the Irish Minister for Agriculture, Food and the Marine, on 6 June to reiterate our concerns about the suspension of the Voisinage Agreement by Ireland. The Secretary of State further raised the issue with Minister Creed when they met on 13 June. Defra officials have also raised the matter with Irish counterparts on separate occasions.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for International Trade
Exports: Northern Ireland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what discussion he has had with his Chinese counterpart on the export of goods and services from Northern Ireland.
A
Answered by: Graham Stuart
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Department for International Trade is a department for the whole of the UK and raises a number of issues with all counterparts that cover all four nations.


I have visited China four times this year and I have had discussions with several Chinese Ministries about removing barriers, increasing market access and helping businesses increase exports from across the whole of the UK. In August this year we successfully concluded an agreement with General Administration of Customs to enable UK dairy companies to export products containing dairy ingredients sourced from outside the UK. This will offer increased export flexibility to companies in Northern Ireland who wish to source ingredients from the Republic of Ireland. The agreement is estimated to be worth £240 million over 5 years to the UK. DIT China works closely with Northern Ireland’s Executive Office in the British Embassy Beijing.

Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 15 October 2018

There are no staff within the Department of Transport or its agencies, who are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Community Health Partnerships
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether Community Health Partnerships will be making a submission to the development of the long-term plan for the NHS.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Government has asked National Health Service leaders to produce a new ten-year plan for the NHS, underpinned by a five-year funding settlement which will see the NHS budget grow by over £20.5 billion a year in real terms by 2023-24. As it develops the long-term plan, the NHS has been engaging with system leaders, patients and the public for their views including through a consultation which closed 30 September.

Community Health Partnerships has not made a formal submission but instead works closely with its NHS partners to ensure the funding, design and utilisation of its healthcare facilities features appropriately in all future development plans.

Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 15 October 2018

There are no staff in the Department for Transport or its agencies, who are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage as defined by the Living Wage Foundation.

Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS Local Improvement Finance Trust
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what consultation his Department is planning ahead of making a decision on the distribution of dividends from NHS LIFT Companies.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The identification and distribution of dividends is a matter for each National Health Service Local Improvement Finance Trust Company and is set out in the Shareholder Agreement and/or Dividend Policy which is agreed from time to time by the Directors of each Company. Payment of Dividends is subject to the performance of the companies and their obligations to their debt funders.

Community Health Partnerships (CHP) is 100% owned by the Secretary of State for the Department of Health and Social Care. CHP manages the public investments in LIFT Companies and receives all dividends payable in respect of its shareholding of up to 40%. CHP’s board, on which the Secretary of State is represented by a Shareholder Director, is responsible for determining how this investment income is to be spent and no dividends have been paid to date to the Secretary of State.

All income from dividends and investments due to CHP in the 49 NHS LIFT Companies is currently reinvested in the NHS whether through:

- meeting the costs of managing those investments;

- part funding the running of the company and the direct costs of managing the LIFT portfolio of assets thus reducing charges to tenants; and

- supporting Departmental initiatives to benefit the wider NHS such as the Strategic Estates Planning service.

Grouped Questions: 174764
Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Treasury
Infrastructure
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, when he plans to respond to the July 2018 report of the National Infrastructure Commission’s entitled National Infrastructure Assessment.
A
Answered by: Robert Jenrick
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The government welcomed the publication of the National Infrastructure Assessment (NIA), and is considering the recommendations.

As set out in the National Infrastructure Commission’s Framework Document, the government will respond to the NIC’s recommendations as soon as practicable, and endeavour to respond within 6 months, and no longer than a year.

Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS Local Improvement Finance Trust
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has issued on how dividends from NHS LIFT Companies should be spent.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The identification and distribution of dividends is a matter for each National Health Service Local Improvement Finance Trust Company and is set out in the Shareholder Agreement and/or Dividend Policy which is agreed from time to time by the Directors of each Company. Payment of Dividends is subject to the performance of the companies and their obligations to their debt funders.

Community Health Partnerships (CHP) is 100% owned by the Secretary of State for the Department of Health and Social Care. CHP manages the public investments in LIFT Companies and receives all dividends payable in respect of its shareholding of up to 40%. CHP’s board, on which the Secretary of State is represented by a Shareholder Director, is responsible for determining how this investment income is to be spent and no dividends have been paid to date to the Secretary of State.

All income from dividends and investments due to CHP in the 49 NHS LIFT Companies is currently reinvested in the NHS whether through:

- meeting the costs of managing those investments;

- part funding the running of the company and the direct costs of managing the LIFT portfolio of assets thus reducing charges to tenants; and

- supporting Departmental initiatives to benefit the wider NHS such as the Strategic Estates Planning service.

Grouped Questions: 174763
Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: Working Hours
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Senior Civil Servants (SCS) are contracted to work a minimum (over a 5 day week) either 41 or 42 hours, including daily meal breaks for one hour. The new model contract was introduced on the 1st July 2013, which standardised the working hours to 42 hours. This has been applicable to all new SCS staff joining the Civil Service as well as those staff being promoted into or within SCS, from that date forward.

Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS Property Services and Community Health Partnerships: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress has been made on aligning the staff, roles and responsibilities of NHS Property Services and Community Health Partnerships into a regional structure alongside NHS England and NHS Improvement.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 15 October 2018

NHS Property Services and Community Health Partnerships operate throughout England. The two companies work closely with building occupiers, tenants, NHS clinical commissioning groups, sustainability and transformation partnerships and National Health Service England and NHS Improvement regional and national teams with the objective of ensuring their healthcare estate and facilities is fully utilised and delivers value for money for the NHS.

NHS Property Services deliver services locally and works out of 16 hub site offices; in many cases, these are co-located with NHS England or NHS Improvement teams. Community Health Partnerships delivers services through a regional field-based property and asset management team.

Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Department for Transport: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how may staff (a) are employed directly by, (b) are seconded to and (c) work under contract to her Department.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 15 October 2018

As at 30th June 2018, the number of staff employed directly, seconded to and working under contract in the Department (including the Central Department and Executive Agencies) is as follows:

The number of staff employed directly was 14,510, published in the following link:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/employmentandlabourmarket/peopleinwork/publicsectorpersonnel/datasets/publicsectoremploymentreferencetable.

There were 33 staff seconded to the Department and 361 staff working under contract.

Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Strategic Transformation Partnerships have developed and agreed a local strategic estates strategy.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 15 October 2018

All 42 sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) have produced an estate strategy articulating key estates issues and priorities in their STP area and outlining plans for transformation of clinical services to better meet the needs of patients.

The Department does not intend to publish or oversee the publication of these documents. It is for individual STPs to decide on how best to communicate the content of their strategies externally. It is expected that STPs’ estate strategies will continue to evolve in line with individual STPs’ clinical plans and following feedback provided by national organisations.

Commissioners and providers have a duty to undertake public engagement and involvement on a continuous basis and guidance issued by NHS England and NHS Improvement to STPs stated that estate strategies should demonstrate that there has been thorough consultation and participation from all partners.

Grouped Questions: 174767 | 174768
Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many Strategic Transformation Partnerships' local estates strategies have been published.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 15 October 2018

All 42 sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) have produced an estate strategy articulating key estates issues and priorities in their STP area and outlining plans for transformation of clinical services to better meet the needs of patients.

The Department does not intend to publish or oversee the publication of these documents. It is for individual STPs to decide on how best to communicate the content of their strategies externally. It is expected that STPs’ estate strategies will continue to evolve in line with individual STPs’ clinical plans and following feedback provided by national organisations.

Commissioners and providers have a duty to undertake public engagement and involvement on a continuous basis and guidance issued by NHS England and NHS Improvement to STPs stated that estate strategies should demonstrate that there has been thorough consultation and participation from all partners.

Grouped Questions: 174766 | 174768
Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Maternity Leave: Universal Credit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the roll-out of universal credit on women on maternity leave.
A
Answered by: Justin Tomlinson
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Maternity leave does not have a bearing on entitlement to UC.

For people who are working, UC has a single taper so payments reduce at a consistent and predictable rate and they generally keep a high proportion of extra earnings.

This applies to women on maternity leave. Some will be in receipt of UC, before, during and after their maternity leave and UC will provide a stable source of income throughout.

In addition support for child care has increased in UC from 70 per cent to 85 per cent and we will continue to pay childcare costs for an existing childcare place whilst a claimant is receiving Maternity Allowance and Statutory Maternity Pay.

No formal assessment has been made of the effect of the roll-out of Universal Credit on women on maternity leave.

Q
Asked by Karin Smyth
(Bristol South)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance his Department has provided on the requirement for consultation on the development of Strategic Transformation Partnerships' local estate strategies.
A
Answered by: Stephen Barclay
Answered on: 15 October 2018

All 42 sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) have produced an estate strategy articulating key estates issues and priorities in their STP area and outlining plans for transformation of clinical services to better meet the needs of patients.

The Department does not intend to publish or oversee the publication of these documents. It is for individual STPs to decide on how best to communicate the content of their strategies externally. It is expected that STPs’ estate strategies will continue to evolve in line with individual STPs’ clinical plans and following feedback provided by national organisations.

Commissioners and providers have a duty to undertake public engagement and involvement on a continuous basis and guidance issued by NHS England and NHS Improvement to STPs stated that estate strategies should demonstrate that there has been thorough consultation and participation from all partners.

Grouped Questions: 174766 | 174767
Q
Asked by Alan Brown
(Kilmarnock and Loudoun)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Network Rail: Property
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the annual rental income was in each financial year since 2010-11 for the Network Rail properties due to be sold to Telereal Trillium and Blackstone Property Partners.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 15 October 2018

We do not hold the data in the format requested for 2010/11, 2011/12, 2012/13, 2013/14, 2014/15. The below table details the income for the Commercial Estate business that Network Rail have exchanged contracts on, for the last 3 years.

Year

15/16

16/17

17/18

Property Rental income (£k)

68,531

73,058

80,853

Other Income

620

486

407

Total Income

69,151

73,544

81,260

Q
(Wimbledon)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Crossrail 2 Line
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the timetable is for the Crossrail 2 independent affordability review.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Crossrail 2 Independent Affordability Review, chaired by Mike Gerrard, has provided interim recommendations to the Secretary of State for Transport and Mayor of London this summer, including recommendations for further work to ensure the scheme taken forward is affordable. Further work is now being taken forward to inform the next steps for the project and complete the Review.

Following the additional work, we expect to publish the findings of the Gerrard Review in due course.

Q
(Brighton, Pavilion)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
Govia Thameslink Railway: Compensation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if he will extend the Govia Thameslink Railway additional industry compensation scheme to cover all part-time workers who travel on a regular basis; for what reasons that scheme covers only part-time workers who commute three days a week; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Department encourages all passengers who experience a delay in their journey to apply for compensation through the Delay Repay compensation scheme. This entitles holders of any ticket type – including passengers who travel less frequently– to claim compensation for delays of 15 minutes or more, whatever the cause of the delay.

Additionally, Govia Thameslink Railway (GTR) announced on 28 August 2018 an additional compensation scheme for regular travellers who are non-season ticket holders travelling a minimum three days’ return travel in any week during the qualifying period from the most affected stations. This is the first time that a train operating company has extended a special compensation scheme, introduced following a period of severe disruption, to non-season ticket holders. GTR does not have any plans to extend this.

Q
(Hornsey and Wood Green)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Ministry of Justice
Ministry of Justice: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The UK Living Wage (sometimes referred to as the ‘Real Living Wage’) and the London Living Wage, are both voluntary rates set by the Living Wage Foundation. These are not statutory figures which relate to the government policy in this area, and so are not legally binding on employers. The statutory minimum rates are the National Living Wage and the National Minimum Wage. For comparison, the National Living Wage is currently £7.83 per hour, and increased by 4.4% in April 2018. The increases in the National Living Wage and the National Minimum Wage have produced increases for over 2 million workers this year, across the economy, and increased pay by £2,000 for those on the minimum rate, since these statutory arrangements were introduced. All MoJ employees are paid at least the National Minimum Wage and the National Living Wage. 395 staff employed by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ HQ, HMCTS, LAA, OPD and CICA) and 24 by HMPPS work inside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage of £10.20 per hour. 7471 staff employed by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ HQ, HMCTS, LAA, OPD and CICA) and 6374 by HMPPS work outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage of £10.20 per hour.

Q
(Hornsey and Wood Green)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Treasury
Treasury: Working Hours
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what the contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.
A
Answered by: Robert Jenrick
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The highest paid member of staff is contracted to 37 hours a week.

Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for International Trade
Overseas Trade: Commonwealth
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the level of trade with and procurement from Commonwealth nations of the UK leaving the EU.
A
Answered by: Graham Stuart
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Commonwealth is an important part of our trade policy, and the UK hosted the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) earlier this year.

The Government is seeking continuity for our existing EU trade arrangements, including those with Commonwealth countries, as we leave the EU.

44 of our 52 Commonwealth partners currently benefit from development-friendly preferential access to the UK market. The Taxation (Cross-Border Trade) Act enables the UK to implement a scheme for developing countries which will, as a minimum, provide the same level of access as the current EU trade preference scheme, including maintaining duty-free, quota-free access for the world’s least developed countries. The UK is also seeking to remain in the Government Procurement Agreement (GPA) on the same terms and with the same level of coverage as it offers now, which will provide continuity with respect to Commonwealth nations’ access to UK public procurements.

After leaving the EU, we will be able to forge our own way by negotiating, ratifying and signing trade deals. As part of preparations for that, the Government has launched public consultations on possible UK trade agreements with Australia and New Zealand and potential accession to the Comprehensive and Progressive Agreement for Trans-Pacific Partnership (CPTPP), which includes 6 members of the Commonwealth.

Q
(Brighton, Pavilion)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Eating Disorders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 25 July 2018 to Question 165490 on Eating Disorders, if he will make it his policy to introduce waiting time targets for adults with eating disorders.
A
Answered by: Matt Hancock
Answered on: 15 October 2018

This Government recognises that early intervention is vital and is committed to ensuring everyone with an eating disorder has access to timely treatment based on clinical need.

There are no current plans to introduce a waiting time standard for adults with an eating disorder.

Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Education
Children: Day Care
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, when he plans to respond to the research report, Evaluation of the first year of the national roll-out of 30 hours free childcare, commissioned by his Department and published on 11 September 2018.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 15 October 2018

As with the independent reports from the early delivery of 30 hours, the department will use evidence from the evaluation report to inform and support the future delivery of 30 hours free childcare.

More than 340,000 children benefitted from a 30 hours place throughout the first year of delivery. The year one evaluation found that 30 hours is making a real difference to family finances, with 78% of parents reporting they had more money to spend since taking up the offer.

We have just announced a year extension to our contract with the delivery contractor, Childcare Works. We will continue to work with them to disseminate the learning from the evaluation report to local authorities and childcare providers.

Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Air Pollution
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the release of dioxins by waste incineration sites on people's health.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) has assessed the effects of particulate air pollution on mortality in the United Kingdom. The latest reports are available to be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/comeap-reports

Public Health England (PHE) estimated the mortality burden in 2010 associated with long-term exposure to human-made particulate air pollution at local authority level. The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/estimating-local-mortality-burdens-associated-with-particulate-air-pollution

COMEAP assessed the evidence on long-term exposure to ambient air pollutants (mainly particulate air pollution) and chronic bronchitis and respiratory symptoms. Although no separate assessments of the impact of the PM1 and PM0.1 fractions of particulate air pollution have been produced, PM1 and PM0.1 are included within the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions, on which assessments are usually based.

COMEAP is currently assessing the effects of air pollutants on dementia and cognitive decline. Research projects into the health effects of air pollution in two Health Protection Research Units, in which PHE is a partner, focus on various areas including health impact assessments of nanoparticles. There is also a COMEAP report on the mechanisms by which air pollutants affect cardiovascular health due to be published later this year.

PHE’s position is that well run and regulated modern Municipal Waste Incinerators (MWIs) are not a significant risk to public health. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact that modern MWIs make a small contribution to local concentrations of air pollutants.

When consulted, PHE provides an expert and independent opinion to the regulator (Environment Agency) on the potential impacts on human health of emissions arising from existing or proposed regulated facilities, such as MWIs. PHE will comment on the applicants’ risk assessments and how they demonstrate the installation’s impacts on human health, and when requested, any additional modelling and assessments conducted by the Environment Agency for chemicals and radiation including particulate matter and dioxins, providing health advice that is clear, concise and based on best available evidence and expert judgement. This assists the regulator in making decisions on whether or not to grant permits to regulated facilities. Guidance on PHE’s role in environmental permitting is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/477277/Environmental_permitting_guide_Nov_2015.pdf

PHE has reviewed the evidence on the effects of waste incinerators on human health including the effects of dioxin. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/municipal-waste-incinerator-emissions-to-air-impact-on-health

Available studies have not identified a threshold concentration below which there is no association between exposure to particulate air pollution and adverse health effects. The European Union Limit Value for PM2.5 (annual mean of 25 µg/m3) that the UK must comply with is included as an air quality objective in the national Air Quality Strategy available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality

Grouped Questions: 174602 | 174603 | 174612
Q
Asked by Dr David Drew
(Stroud)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Air Pollution
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what his Department's policy is on the safe limit for public health of inhalation of (a) PM 0.1, (b) PM1 and (c) PM2.5.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Committee on the Medical Effects of Air Pollutants (COMEAP) has assessed the effects of particulate air pollution on mortality in the United Kingdom. The latest reports are available to be viewed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/comeap-reports

Public Health England (PHE) estimated the mortality burden in 2010 associated with long-term exposure to human-made particulate air pollution at local authority level. The report is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/estimating-local-mortality-burdens-associated-with-particulate-air-pollution

COMEAP assessed the evidence on long-term exposure to ambient air pollutants (mainly particulate air pollution) and chronic bronchitis and respiratory symptoms. Although no separate assessments of the impact of the PM1 and PM0.1 fractions of particulate air pollution have been produced, PM1 and PM0.1 are included within the PM10 and PM2.5 fractions, on which assessments are usually based.

COMEAP is currently assessing the effects of air pollutants on dementia and cognitive decline. Research projects into the health effects of air pollution in two Health Protection Research Units, in which PHE is a partner, focus on various areas including health impact assessments of nanoparticles. There is also a COMEAP report on the mechanisms by which air pollutants affect cardiovascular health due to be published later this year.

PHE’s position is that well run and regulated modern Municipal Waste Incinerators (MWIs) are not a significant risk to public health. This view is based on detailed assessments of the effects of air pollutants on health and on the fact that modern MWIs make a small contribution to local concentrations of air pollutants.

When consulted, PHE provides an expert and independent opinion to the regulator (Environment Agency) on the potential impacts on human health of emissions arising from existing or proposed regulated facilities, such as MWIs. PHE will comment on the applicants’ risk assessments and how they demonstrate the installation’s impacts on human health, and when requested, any additional modelling and assessments conducted by the Environment Agency for chemicals and radiation including particulate matter and dioxins, providing health advice that is clear, concise and based on best available evidence and expert judgement. This assists the regulator in making decisions on whether or not to grant permits to regulated facilities. Guidance on PHE’s role in environmental permitting is available at the following link:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/477277/Environmental_permitting_guide_Nov_2015.pdf

PHE has reviewed the evidence on the effects of waste incinerators on human health including the effects of dioxin. Further information is available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/municipal-waste-incinerator-emissions-to-air-impact-on-health

Available studies have not identified a threshold concentration below which there is no association between exposure to particulate air pollution and adverse health effects. The European Union Limit Value for PM2.5 (annual mean of 25 µg/m3) that the UK must comply with is included as an air quality objective in the national Air Quality Strategy available at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality/2010-to-2015-government-policy-environmental-quality

Grouped Questions: 174602 | 174603 | 174610
Q
(Birmingham, Hall Green)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Horse Racing: Animal Welfare
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many times officials in (a) his Department and (b) other Government Departments have met with the British Horseracing Authority in (a) 2016, (b) 2017 and (c) 2018 to date to discuss horse deaths on racecourses.
A
Answered by: David Rutley
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Whilst officials have not met representatives of the British Horseracing Authority (BHA) to discuss racehorse fatalities during the years stated, I am aware that the BHA work alongside animal welfare organisations, such as the RSPCA, and regularly review the safety of racetracks and where necessary, make improvements. The Government is satisfied that the BHA work to make horseracing as safe as possible. Annual statistics on the numbers of racehorses killed on racetracks are available on the BHA website, here:https://www.britishhorseracing.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Equine-Injuries-and-Fatalities-2017-data-.pdf .

Regarding training fatalities, under BHA rules, all trainers are required to notify deaths of horses to Weatherbys. As part of their work on a new equine database, the BHA are also looking at enhancing the information to be provided in these circumstances.

The Government has been in regular contact with a number of stakeholders about a range of horse welfare issues including those relating to racehorses.

Grouped Questions: 174616
Q
(Birmingham, Hall Green)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Horse Racing: Animal Welfare
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, whether the Government has requested from the British Horseracing Authority (a) information on racehorse deaths, (b) reviews by that authority of racecourses with unusually high mortality rates and (c) information relating to the number of racehorses killed in training.
A
Answered by: David Rutley
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Whilst officials have not met representatives of the British Horseracing Authority (BHA) to discuss racehorse fatalities during the years stated, I am aware that the BHA work alongside animal welfare organisations, such as the RSPCA, and regularly review the safety of racetracks and where necessary, make improvements. The Government is satisfied that the BHA work to make horseracing as safe as possible. Annual statistics on the numbers of racehorses killed on racetracks are available on the BHA website, here:https://www.britishhorseracing.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Equine-Injuries-and-Fatalities-2017-data-.pdf .

Regarding training fatalities, under BHA rules, all trainers are required to notify deaths of horses to Weatherbys. As part of their work on a new equine database, the BHA are also looking at enhancing the information to be provided in these circumstances.

The Government has been in regular contact with a number of stakeholders about a range of horse welfare issues including those relating to racehorses.

Grouped Questions: 174615
Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Education
Slavery: Victims
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of granting all survivors of modern slavery rights to education through the National Referral Mechanism.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Home Office is responsible for setting criteria used by the National Referral Mechanism, in identifying victims of human trafficking or modern slavery. The Department for Education is responsible for setting the criteria for accessing 16-19 and adult (19+) education funding based on education policy. These criteria are set out in funding rules, which further education providers refer to when assessing eligibility. Depending on individual circumstances, some survivors of modern slavery may meet the eligible criteria and are therefore able to access further education. Officials keep these rules under review. All children of compulsory school age in the UK, including those freed from modern slavery, are able to access an English state-school.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Treasury
Individual Savings Accounts
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, pursuant to the Answer of 16 July 2018 to Question 162093 on Individual Savings Accounts, whether the data for the first quarter of 2018-19 is available for publication.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 15 October 2018

HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC) has not received any withdrawal charges from Lifetime Individual Saving Accounts (LISA). The functionality to receive these charges is expected to be in place by spring 2019. In the meantime, LISA providers are deducting the appropriate withdrawal charges as required and holding the funds, pending the roll out of the collection functionality.

Q
(Huntingdon)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Transport
A14: Road Works
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to the Answer of 11 September 2018 to Question 169126 on A14: road works, what estimate he has made of the delay to work on that road as a result of the archaeological work; and what estimate he has made of the cost of that delay.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The A14 Cambridge to Huntingdon scheme is on budget and on target to open to traffic by 2020/21 as planned.

Highways England have encountered some challenges with the archaeology work schedule, but they have been able to work flexibly to ensure there has not been an impact on the construction programme. Highways England confirm this will not have an impact on the overall scheme budget and will be able to publish final costs once the scheme has completed.

Q
Asked by Tulip Siddiq
(Hampstead and Kilburn)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Illness: Children and Young People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many children and young people have been admitted to accident and emergency in hospitals in London because of mental illness in each year since 2015.
A
Answered by: Matt Hancock
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The data is not held in the format requested.

Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Universal Credit: Garston and Halewood
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many universal credit claimants there are in the Garston and Halewood constituency.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The latest available information on the number of people on Universal Credit by parliamentary constituency and local authority is published and can be found at:

https://stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/

Guidance on how to extract the information required can be found at:

https://sw.stat-xplore.dwp.gov.uk/webapi/online-help/Getting-Started.html

Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Universal Credit: Garston and Halewood
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will estimate the number of households in Garston and Halewood constituency that will be migrated from legacy benefits to universal credit after its introduction at the end of 2018.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The requested information is not available for publication by constituency

Q
(Easington)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Ministry of Defence
Armed Forces: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, what estimate he has made of the number of people from the North East of England who have enlisted in the (a) Army, (b) Royal Air Force and (c) Royal Navy in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Mark Lancaster
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The North East of England has been interpreted to mean one of the nine Nomenclature of Territorial Units for Statistics (NUTS) of England: https://www.ons.gov.uk/methodology/geography/ukgeographies/eurostat#north-east-england

The requested information is provided in the following tables. All figures are single Service estimates and as such, are non-comparable:

Royal Navy (RN) / Royal Marines (RM)

The numbers of RN/RM Other Ranks (Regular and Reserve) recruited in the last five full Financial Years (FY) through Armed Forces Careers Offices in Middlesbrough and Newcastle are as follows:

FY

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

Regulars (Other Ranks)

260

200

240

210

230

Reserves (Other Ranks)

20

30

30

20

20

Officer recruitment has not been included as this is carried out on a regional basis; officer recruits from the North-East are recruited alongside recruits from the whole of Northern England through the Manchester Officer Careers Liaison Centre. The figures do not necessarily indicate that the individuals reside in the North East.

Army

The table below shows the number of people who have enlisted in the Army for each of the last five Financial Years, with a contact address within the North East.

FY

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

Regulars and Reservists, (Officers and Other Ranks)

520

800

770

630

530

Figures relate to untrained intake to initial training (Phase 1) by Recruiting Year. Figures do not include Gurkhas, Gibraltarians or Military Provost Guard Service. The figures do not necessarily indicate that individuals reside in the North East.


Royal Air Force (RAF)

The numbers of Regular RAF Service personnel (Officers and Other Ranks) who enlisted through the Armed Forces Careers Offices in Newcastle are as follows:

FY

2013-14

2014-15

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

Regulars and Reservists, (Officers and Other Ranks)

100

80

120

130

110

The figures do not necessarily indicate that the individuals reside in the North East.

There is no unit within the North East which has Royal Auxiliary Air Force (RAuxAF, RAF Reserves) Squadrons. RAF Leeming in the Yorkshire and The Humber NUTS is the closest location for individuals from the North East to join the RAuxAF. The figures for RAF Reservists enlisted at RAF Leeming are as follows:

Recruiting Year

Total

2013-14

20

2014-15

50

2015-16

40

2016-17

80

2017-18

50

All numbers have been rounded. Totals may not equal the sum of their parts. All numbers are rounded to the nearest 10 with numbers ending in 5 rounded to the nearest multiple of 20 to avoid bias.

Q
Asked by Maria Eagle
(Garston and Halewood)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Universal Credit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to ensure claimants of universal credit who receive a salary advance in December to cover the costs of Christmas do not have their eligibility for universal credit reduced as a result.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Where a claimant receives an advance on their earnings, including at Christmas, such advances are not taken into account as earnings for the period in which they are received. This also applies when the advance is repaid. This aligns with the treatment of such payments for tax purposes.

Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 13 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the use of funds allocated for mental health treatment by NHS Trusts and Clinical Commissioning Groups; and what steps his Department takes to ensure that such Trusts and Groups use such funds efficiently and effectively.
A
Answered by: Matt Hancock
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Mental Health Investment Standard requires clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) to increase mental health investment in line with overall growth in their allocations. The guidance noted “Each CCG must meet the Mental Health Investment Standard (MHIS) by which their 2018/19 investment in mental health rises at a faster rate than their overall programme funding. CCGs’ auditors will be required to validate their 2018/19 year-end position on meeting the MHIS”. It is for CCGs to plan on how these funds should be deployed to develop mental health services locally.

NHS England recently published an updated Mental Health Five Year Forward View dashboard, which brings together key data from across mental health services to measure the performance of the National Health Service in delivering our plans to improve mental health services. The dashboard provides the greatest transparency ever in how the NHS is performing, alongside detail on how mental health services are funded and delivered at CCG level. As such it gives a good indication of the effectiveness with which the increased finds are translating into improved services. The dashboard can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/publication/mental-health-five-year-forward-view-dashboard/

Further detail on funding and investment tracking can be found at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/taskforce/imp/mh-dashboard/

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many technology appraisals NICE has undertaken for medicines which have successfully passed through the Early Access to Medicines Scheme; and how long it has taken for a NICE recommendation to be reached on each of those appraisals.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

To date, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has published final technology appraisal guidance on 18 drugs with a positive Scientific Opinion through the Early Access to Medicines Scheme. Information on the length of time between receipt of a positive Scientific Opinion and final NICE technology appraisal guidance for each drug is attached due to the size of the data.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Crimes against Humanity
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the difference between genocide, crimes against humanity and war crimes; and to what extent they consider the risk of the annihilation of a group of people a distinguishing factor between each of those.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

It is the policy of the British Government, that any judgment as to whether war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide have occurred is a matter for judicial decision after consideration of all the available evidence, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. This approach provides a clear, impartial, and independent measure of whether genocide has occurred.

As the majority of mass atrocities occur in and around conflict, the Government believes a focus on conflict prevention is the best means to prevent most mass atrocities. The Government adopts a whole-of-government effort, using our diplomatic, development, defence and law enforcement capabilities, to help find pathways to peace and stability.

As a party to the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, the UK is fully committed to the prevention and punishment of genocide as appropriate under the Convention. This is reflected in the Government's support for the remit of the International Criminal Court under the Rome Statute. The Government has also supported the establishment of evidence gathering mechanisms and fact finding missions such as the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism for Syria, the Burma collect and preserve mechanism, and the Daesh Investigative Team.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Genocide
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the difference between the interim determination of genocide, as made by parliaments, governments or international non-judicial bodies, and the final determination of genocide by a domestic or international court after a full trial.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

It is the policy of the British Government, that any judgment as to whether war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide have occurred is a matter for judicial decision after consideration of all the available evidence, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. This approach provides a clear, impartial, and independent measure of whether genocide has occurred.

As the majority of mass atrocities occur in and around conflict, the government believes a focus on conflict prevention is the best means to prevent most mass atrocities. Her Majesty's Government (HMG) adopts a whole-of-government effort, using our diplomatic, development, defence and law enforcement capabilities, to help find pathways to peace and stability.

As a party to the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, the UK is fully committed to the prevention and punishment of genocide as appropriate under the Convention.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Genocide
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have a generic policy to guide their responses to mass atrocities and the determination of possible genocide; and, if not, what assessment they have made of the risk of inconsistent responses from the UK.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

It is the policy of the British Government, that any judgment as to whether war crimes, crimes against humanity or genocide have occurred is a matter for judicial decision after consideration of all the available evidence, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. This approach provides a clear, impartial, and independent measure of whether genocide has occurred.

As the majority of mass atrocities occur in and around conflict, the government believes a focus on conflict prevention is the best means to prevent most mass atrocities. Her Majesty's Government (HMG) adopts a whole-of-government effort, using our diplomatic, development, defence and law enforcement capabilities, to help find pathways to peace and stability.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Genocide
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the UK’s duties under the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide to prevent and punish the crime of genocide; and what steps they take to ensure that the UK meets those duties.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

As a party to the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, the UK is fully committed to the prevention and punishment of genocide as appropriate under the Convention. This is reflected in the British Government's support for the remit of the International Criminal Court under the Rome Statute. The British Government has also supported the establishment of evidence gathering mechanisms and fact finding missions such as the International, Impartial and Independent Mechanism for Syria, the Burma collect and preserve mechanism, and the Daesh Investigative Team.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
South Sudan: Peace Negotiations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the outcome of the signing of the Cessation of Hostilities agreement by leaders in South Sudan at the end of 2017.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Cessation of Hostilities signed on 21 December 2017 was violated repeatedly by all sides. The September 2018 peace agreement recommits the parties to laying down their weapons. In order for meaningful progress to be made, all parties must now deliver on their promises, including: an immediate and verifiable end to fighting; the release of political prisoners; unimpeded access for humanitarian actors; and access for UN peacekeepers.

The UK urges the parties to implement the September agreement sincerely and inclusively. We continue to call for an end to the culture of impunity for those working against peace, including by implementation of UN sanctions and the arms embargo that the UK played a leading role in securing in July.

Grouped Questions: HL10376
Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
South Sudan: Peace Negotiations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the progress which could be made as a result of the signing of a Peace Agreement in South Sudan in September 2018; and what assurances they have received that there will now be appropriate accountability by the government of South Sudan for the management of its oil revenues.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Cessation of Hostilities signed on 21 December 2017 was violated repeatedly by all sides. The September 2018 peace agreement recommits the parties to laying down their weapons. In order for meaningful progress to be made, all parties must now deliver on their promises, including: an immediate and verifiable end to fighting; the release of political prisoners; unimpeded access for humanitarian actors; and access for UN peacekeepers.

The UK urges the parties to implement the September agreement sincerely and inclusively. We continue to call for an end to the culture of impunity for those working against peace, including by implementation of UN sanctions and the arms embargo that the UK played a leading role in securing in July.

Grouped Questions: HL10375
Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Venezuela: Human Rights
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they propose to take following their support for the resolution passed at the Human Rights Council on 27 September 2018 to promote and protect human rights in Venezuela and to call upon the government of Venezuela to open its doors to humanitarian assistance to address the scarcity of food and medicines and rise in malnutrition.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The UK has long expressed its deep concern at the human rights situation in Venezuela. In November 2017, the EU unanimously agreed a sanctions regime on Venezuela. Targeted measures have been imposed on 18 individuals responsible for serious human rights abuses, and undermining democracy and the rule of law. We are continuing to work closely with EU, regional and international partners and urge the Venezuelan government to engage in serious, credible, and results-based negotiations with the opposition; to respect democratic institutions; to ensure free and fair elections, and to release all political prisoners.

The UK is already providing support to the crisis through our funding to key UN and humanitarian agencies, as well as through our support to the EU Commission which is providing 35 million Euros. The UK is deploying two humanitarian advisors to the region. The Department for International Development is also funding 5 UN experts through the Stand-by partnership mechanism, who are helping to coordinate the response in the region.

Venezuelan government political restrictions pose constraints for the delivery of assistance to those most in need. It will remain difficult until the Venezuelan government recognises the plight of its citizens and accepts international cooperation.

Q
Asked by Lord Beecham
Asked on: 01 October 2018
Ministry of Justice
Community Rehabilitation Companies
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they will take to ensure that any failures identified by HM Inspectorate of Probation of community rehabilitation companies adequately to protect the victims of domestic abuse are addressed; and in what timescale such action will be taken.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Government takes extremely seriously the findings of HM Inspectorate of Probation in relation to the work of Community Rehabilitation Companies (CRCs) on domestic abuse. A detailed Action Plan to address the recommendations will be published in due course, in line with the normal process for responding to HMIP reports.

We have already been clear that CRCs must improve. This is why we are taking decisive action to end current contracts early, and put in place new arrangements from 2020 which will ensure probation plays its full part in tackling domestic abuse and protecting victims. The Government has also set out plans to better support victims of domestic abuse, bring more offenders to justice and ultimately keep the public safe through our proposed Domestic Abuse Bill. These include new Domestic Abuse Protection Orders to allow police and courts to act earlier and more effectively when abuse is suspected, and the creation of a Domestic Abuse Commissioner to stand up for victims, monitor the provision of domestic abuse services and hold the Government to account.

Q
Asked by Lord Birt
Asked on: 01 October 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Burma: Press Freedom
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of Myanmar about the trial and imprisonment of the two Reuters reporters, Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo.
A
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Government Ministers have repeatedly called for the release of Wa Lone and Kyaw Soe Oo since their arrest in December 2017, and with their council in September 2018. During his meeting with State Counsellor Aung San Suu Kyi on 20 September, the Foreign Secretary expressed his deep concern, and asked her to review the case. The Minister for Asia and the Pacific also called for their release in his conversation with Burma's Minister for International Cooperation on 17 August.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Brain Cancer: Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether new biomarker-linked treatments for glioblastoma multiforme would be considered candidate technologies for the Accelerated Access Pathway under the Accelerated Access Review.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

As set out in the response to the Accelerated Access Review, the Accelerated Access Pathway (AAP) will focus on affordable products which can dramatically improve efficiency, fill an unmet need or make a step change in patient outcomes.

There are no restrictions on what type of products the AAP should focus on. The AAP will be launched shortly after the next meeting of the Accelerated Access Collaborative.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Brain Cancer: Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to support future patient access to new and clinically-effective medicines for glioblastoma multiforme.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

A number of drugs currently being developed for potential use in the treatment of glioblastoma have been referred to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) for the development of technology appraisal guidance. New arrangements for the assessment and adoption of cancer drugs were introduced in 2016 that are designed to ensure that patients benefit from rapid access to the most promising new cancer drugs. Under these arrangements, wherever possible, NICE aims to publish draft guidance on cancer drugs before the product receives a marketing authorisation for use in the United Kingdom, and drugs recommended in draft NICE guidance will be eligible for Cancer Drugs Fund funding from the time that the drug receives a marketing authorisation.

In May, the Government announced £40 million for brain cancer research in honour of Dame Tessa Jowell. Funding will be invested through the National Institute for Health Research to support a wide range of research from early translation (experimental medicine) through clinical and on to applied research. This will support the translation of laboratory discoveries into treatments and better care for patients.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Drugs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the implementation of the recommendations of the Independent Review of the Early Access to Medicines Scheme.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

Since the publication of the independent review of the Early Access to Medicines Scheme (EAMS) the Government has made a number of improvements.

Partners have worked together to provide updated guidance on the benefits and entry requirements for EAMS and are developing further guidance on collecting real world data in the scheme to support National Institute for Health and Care Excellence appraisal.

Furthermore, the EAMS task group exists to provide a forum for industry to engage with Government, the devolved administrations and arm’s length bodies regarding EAMS, as per the recommendations of the 2016 review.

Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Buprenorphine
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the availability and price of the opiate treatment medication buprenorphine; whether there is a shortage of buprenorphine; if so, what analysis they have made of the reasons of such a shortage; and whether there are mechanisms in place to monitor the long-term supply of the medication following the recent rise in deaths associated with opioid abuse.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

We are aware that there was a short-term supply issue which may have affected availability in May 2018. This was because one of the main generic suppliers experienced delays in delivery, resulting in a short-term out of stock period. Although supplies continued to remain available from other suppliers, we are aware that some may have struggled to support the increase in demand at short notice. The delivery issues were resolved quickly and the overall supply of buprenorphine tablets improved shortly afterwards. The Department has not been made aware of patients who were unable to access supplies of buprenorphine during this period.

Since this period, the Department has remained in regular contact with all United Kingdom licensed suppliers of buprenorphine and has been working closely with them to monitor their supply position. Based on these conversations, we have been assured that the available supplies are sufficient to meet the usual UK requirements for this drug. The Department continues to monitor this very closely.

As there have been no long-term shortages of buprenorphine tablets, no such assessment has been undertaken on the impact of this scenario on individuals and substance misuse treatment providers. The Department is aware that since the short-term supply issue affecting buprenorphine, the market price has increased. This increased purchase price is reflected in the reimbursement price paid to pharmacies, to ensure that supplies remain available to patients.

Grouped Questions: HL10394
Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Buprenorphine
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure any shortage of buprenorphine does not adversely affect people in treatment for opiate use; and what assessments they have carried out of the impact of any long-term buprenorphine shortages on individuals and substance misuse treatment providers.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

We are aware that there was a short-term supply issue which may have affected availability in May 2018. This was because one of the main generic suppliers experienced delays in delivery, resulting in a short-term out of stock period. Although supplies continued to remain available from other suppliers, we are aware that some may have struggled to support the increase in demand at short notice. The delivery issues were resolved quickly and the overall supply of buprenorphine tablets improved shortly afterwards. The Department has not been made aware of patients who were unable to access supplies of buprenorphine during this period.

Since this period, the Department has remained in regular contact with all United Kingdom licensed suppliers of buprenorphine and has been working closely with them to monitor their supply position. Based on these conversations, we have been assured that the available supplies are sufficient to meet the usual UK requirements for this drug. The Department continues to monitor this very closely.

As there have been no long-term shortages of buprenorphine tablets, no such assessment has been undertaken on the impact of this scenario on individuals and substance misuse treatment providers. The Department is aware that since the short-term supply issue affecting buprenorphine, the market price has increased. This increased purchase price is reflected in the reimbursement price paid to pharmacies, to ensure that supplies remain available to patients.

Grouped Questions: HL10393
Q
Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Gambling
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, following Public Health England’s estimate in its guidance Alcohol and drug prevention, treatment and recovery: why invest? published on 12 February, that for every £1 invested in local alcohol treatment provision £3 is saved in wider social costs, what estimate they make of the savings to wider social costs for every £1 invested in local gambling treatment provision.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The Government has made no estimate of the wider social cost savings for every pound invested in local gambling treatment provision. Public Health England has been asked to conduct a review of the evidence of the health aspects of gambling-related harm to inform action on prevention and treatment. The Government will reflect carefully on the outcome from this work in future policy development.

Q
Asked on: 01 October 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Gambling
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many hospital admissions in the last five years they estimate were linked to gambling addiction.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 15 October 2018

The volume of finished admissions episodes (FAEs) with a primary or secondary diagnosis of pathological/compulsive gambling for the last five years is shown in the following table.

Year

FAEs

2013-14

65

2014-15

89

2015-16

86

2016-17

72

2017-18

107

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics, NHS Digital

A FAE is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.

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