Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 21-25 out of 25
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 13 March 2018
Department for Education
Special Educational Needs: Inspections
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions the Department for Education has had with the Department of Health and Social Care about the findings of the Ofsted and CQC report Local area SEND inspections: one year on, published on 18 October 2017, particularly in respect of the finding that access to therapy services was weak in half the local areas inspected.
A
Answered by: Lord Agnew of Oulton
Answered on: 27 March 2018

Officials from the Department for Education (DfE), Department of Health and Social Care (DHSC) and NHS England (NHSE) are working together closely to implement the special educational needs and disabilities (SEND) reforms underpinned by the Children and Families Act 2014.

We are addressing the finding on access to therapy services through follow up by DfE and NHSE officials with the individual local areas following the publication of an inspection report. This is particularly the case where Ofsted and CQC have required a local area to produce a written statement of action to address weaknesses.

We are about to launch a two-year national trial looking at extending the powers of the First-tier Tribunal (SEND) to make non-binding recommendations on the health and social care aspects of Education, Health and Care (EHC) plans. Currently the First-tier Tribunal (SEND) hears appeals with regard to education only. Health and social care aspects of EHC plans are resolved through separate complaint routes. The trial will give the Tribunal the power to consider all parts of a child’s EHC plan. We are trialling this (following an earlier small-scale pilot) as we need to gather further evidence to understand whether the new appeal route is easier for families, the impact on health and social care and whether recommendations are followed. These new powers will apply to local authority decisions made and EHC plans issued or amended from 3 April 2018.

We are working with stakeholders, which include DHSC and NHSE, through the Children’s Complex Needs board and across the Transforming Care programme to assure better support across health and care services for children and young people

Finally, the green paper, ‘Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Provision’, set out our proposals on how to improve access to mental health support for children and young people including those with SEND.

Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 13 March 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services: Children and Young People
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government with which professional bodies and third sector bodies they had discussions in developing the green paper Transforming children and young people's mental health provision.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 27 March 2018

The Green Paper team, across the Department of Health and Social Care and the Department for Education, had discussions with over 90 professional and third sector bodies on development of the Green Paper. A list of these stakeholders is attached due to the size of the data. This includes engagement before the Green Paper’s publication and during the consultation period through national roundtables, telephone conferences for large groups of additional stakeholders, focus groups and many bilateral discussions. The teams in both the Department of Health Social Care and the Department for Education also spoke about the Green Paper and engaged with stakeholders at a number of events and conferences organised by others.

The list may not be completely exhaustive of all bodies the two Departments engaged with. For example, discussions with stakeholders also took place in the margins of events or through networking opportunities, and with various individual schools and colleges.

List of stakeholders (Word Document, 23.92 KB)
Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 13 March 2018
Department for Education
Education: Social Mobility
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government with which professional bodies and third sector bodies they had discussions in developing their plan for improving social mobility through education Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential, published in December 2017.
A
Answered by: Lord Agnew of Oulton
Answered on: 27 March 2018

The department engaged a wide range of organisations during development of ‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’. This included think tanks, academics, sector bodies such as teaching unions and other representative groups, employers and children’s charities. Through meetings and roundtables, we discussed the department’s cross-cutting ambitions to improve opportunity across life stages and the country, as well as individual policies within the document.

‘Unlocking Talent, Fulfilling Potential’ was warmly received by key stakeholders including the Education Endowment Foundation, the Sutton Trust, Teach First, the Careers and Enterprise Company, the National Association of Head Teachers, the Association of Colleges, Universities UK, and the Consortium of Business and Industry.

Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 13 March 2018
Department for Education
Special Educational Needs
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is the proposed composition of the national leadership board for children and young people with high needs set out in the green paper Transforming Children and Young People’s Mental Health Provision.
A
Answered by: Lord Agnew of Oulton
Answered on: 27 March 2018

One of the key recommendations of the independent review of special residential schools and colleges, Good Intentions, Good Enough?, was for a new National Leadership Board for children and young people with high needs, reporting to my hon. Friend, the Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State for Children and Families. We have invited Dame Christine Lenehan and Mark Geraghty, who conducted the review, to sit on the board; and will confirm the other members in due course.

Q
Asked by Lord Shinkwin
Asked on: 05 February 2018
Ministry of Defence
Veterans
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many Armed Forces veterans there are in the UK in total, including those not in receipt of a pension or payment under the Armed Forces Compensation Scheme; and of those, how many are below the age of 66.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 15 February 2018

The Ministry of Defence estimates that in 2016 there were 2.5 million UK Armed Forces veterans residing in households across Great Britain (GB, excluding Northern Ireland), of whom 936,000 (some 37%) were aged between 16 and 64. A breakdown of those aged 16-65 is not available. Further detail on the estimated size and socio-demographic characteristics of the UK Armed Forces veteran population residing in GB can be found in the 'Annual Population Survey: UK Armed Forces Veterans Residing in Great Britain', the latest edition of which (2016) is published at the following address:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/annual-population-survey-uk-armed-forces-veterans-residing-in-great-britain.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 21-25 out of 25
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100