Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked on: 18 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
British Overseas Territories
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received any proposals from the governments of any of the British Overseas Territories to alter the status of those Territories' relationships with the United Kingdom.
A
Answered on: 31 July 2018

As I have stated previously, and as set out in the 2012 White Paper, we believe that the fundamental structure of our constitutional relationship with the Overseas Territories is the right one. However, we are happy to consider any proposals on changes to constitutions put forward by any of the Overseas Territories. Officials are currently reviewing two such proposals.

Q
Asked on: 20 July 2018
Department for Transport
Driving: Licensing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many UK citizens resident in other EU member states, having exchanged their UK driving licences for licences in those states, will need to exchange their current licences for UK licences after the UK’s withdrawal from the EU; and whether those licences will be issued on the same conditions as their original UK licence.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 26 July 2018

We do not hold comprehensive data on the number of UK licence holders who exchange their licences for EU licences. The treatment of driving licences is part of wider negotiations and will depend on the outcome of the final deal between UK and the EU.

UK citizens who are already resident in another EU member state, can exercise their current right to exchange their UK driving licence for one of the state where they are resident. If they remain resident in the EU after exit, there should be no requirement for the licence holder to then re-exchange their EU licence back to a UK licence.

If the licence holder moves back to the UK from the EU and becomes resident, they will be able to re-obtain a UK licence with the same categories, on the basis that they passed their driving test in the UK.

Q
Asked on: 12 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
China: Belt and Road Initiative
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their strategy towards China’s belt and road initiative; and how that initiative affects UK interests.
A
Answered on: 25 July 2018

The British Government welcomes the opportunities presented by the Belt and Road Initiative; if implemented well, we believe it will have a significant impact on economic development in the Asia and Pacific region. During the Prime Minister’s visit to China in January, the UK and China agreed to work together to identify how best we can cooperate on the Initiative and ensure it meets international standards. We are currently taking forward the practical cooperation agreed at the UK-China Economic and Financial Dialogue in December 2017. Sir Douglas Flint, former Chair of HSBC, has been appointed the UK Financial and Professional Services Envoy for the Belt and Road. In addition, we are working with China to jointly identify infrastructure projects.

It is in everyone’s interests to ensure that the Initiative adheres to international standards and best practice, including to encourage responsible investment and sustainable development, in order to be a success in driving global growth and enhancing development outcomes.

Q
Asked on: 12 July 2018
Treasury
Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what involvement the UK has with the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 25 July 2018

The UK became a founding member of the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) in 2015, with a 3.18% shareholding, representing a capital contribution of $3.05 billion (of which 20% will be paid-in over five years, and 80% is callable).

The Chancellor of the Exchequer represents the UK at the AIIB Board of Governors. The UK also holds one of the 12 seats on the AIIB Board of Directors, representing the Wider Europe Constituency (Denmark, Hungary, Iceland, Norway, Poland, Sweden, Switzerland and the UK).

The UK is an active and committed shareholder of the Bank, in pursuit of the UK’s objectives of supporting economic growth in Asia, deepening economic ties globally, supporting the development of international financial institutions, and creating opportunities for British businesses.

Q
Asked on: 09 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Chemical Weapons
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have had any communication with the government of Russia, its agencies or any intermediaries on the issues arising from events in Salisbury and Amesbury; and if not, why not.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2018

The Prime Minister's statement in the House of Commons on 12 March set out the questions the former Foreign Secretary asked of the Russian Government when he summoned the Russian Ambassador to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office earlier that day. We still await a reply.

Grouped Questions: HL9361
Q
Asked on: 09 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Chemical Weapons
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what specific questions they intend to put to the government of Russia or its agencies that would give possible insight into the events in Salisbury and Amesbury; and whether they intend to request assistance from that government.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2018

The Prime Minister's statement in the House of Commons on 12 March set out the questions the former Foreign Secretary asked of the Russian Government when he summoned the Russian Ambassador to the Foreign and Commonwealth Office earlier that day. We still await a reply.

Grouped Questions: HL9360
Q
Asked on: 23 July 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
British Nationals Abroad
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether current Brexit negotiations will necessitate some UK citizens who do not reside in the UK, without property in the UK but in the European Union, to relocate to the UK after Brexit; and if so, whether they have plans to recompense those citizens.
 
Withdrawn
Q
Asked on: 09 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Sanctions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any online resources exist that give current and complete lists of goods, individuals or entities on sanctions lists worldwide.
A
Answered on: 19 July 2018

​The publication of lists of goods, individuals or entities on sanctions lists is the responsibility of those individual countries and multilateral institutions which impose and implement sanctions. I am not aware of the existence of a single global list. The UK currently imposes multilateral sanctions through the European Union, which publishes information on its website. The UK publishes details of UN and EU sanctions that it implements on the GOV.UK website.

Q
Asked on: 05 July 2018
Cabinet Office
Government: Migrant Workers
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many non-UK citizens work in central government; and what estimate they have made of how many non-UK citizens work in local government.
A
Answered by: Lord Young of Cookham
Answered on: 18 July 2018

All Civil Service organisations must comply with the Civil Service Nationality Rules which govern the eligibility of individuals to be employed in the Civil Service on the grounds of nationality. The Civil Service does not collate or hold central information on the nationality of civil servants.

Q
Asked on: 03 July 2018
Home Office
Immigration
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 25 June (HL8588), whether references to family members include non-EU citizens who are the (1) spouses, (2) civil partners, and (3) durable partners of UK citizens (a) before, and (b) after the UK leaves the EU.
Answered on: 13 July 2018

In line with the Surinder Singh caselaw, except where the family members are EU citizens exercising Treaty rights, the spouses and civil partners of UK nationals have EU law residence rights in the UK only in limited circumstances. This is where they have resided together as family members in another EU Member State where the UK national was genuinely exercising their Treaty rights, before returning to the UK. This provision does not extend to durable partners.

Although not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement, it is our intention that spouses and civil partners of UK nationals who have genuinely exercised their free movement rights in another EU Member State before returning to the UK before the end of the implementation period, on 31 December 2020, will also be eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. As per Surinder Singh, we do not intend for the relevant provisions of the scheme to extend to durable partners of British citizens.

Grouped Questions: HL9206 | HL9207
Q
Asked on: 03 July 2018
Home Office
Immigration
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 May (HL7540), whether references to family members include non-EU citizens who are the (1) spouses, (2) civil partners, and (3) durable partners of UK citizens (a) before, and (b) after the UK leaves the EU.
Answered on: 13 July 2018

In line with the Surinder Singh caselaw, except where the family members are EU citizens exercising Treaty rights, the spouses and civil partners of UK nationals have EU law residence rights in the UK only in limited circumstances. This is where they have resided together as family members in another EU Member State where the UK national was genuinely exercising their Treaty rights, before returning to the UK. This provision does not extend to durable partners.

Although not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement, it is our intention that spouses and civil partners of UK nationals who have genuinely exercised their free movement rights in another EU Member State before returning to the UK before the end of the implementation period, on 31 December 2020, will also be eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. As per Surinder Singh, we do not intend for the relevant provisions of the scheme to extend to durable partners of British citizens.

Grouped Questions: HL9205 | HL9207
Q
Asked on: 03 July 2018
Home Office
Immigration
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 8 May (HL7441), whether references to family members include non-EU citizens who are the (1) spouses, (2) civil partners, and (3) durable partners of UK citizens (a) before, and (b) after the UK leaves the EU.
Answered on: 13 July 2018

In line with the Surinder Singh caselaw, except where the family members are EU citizens exercising Treaty rights, the spouses and civil partners of UK nationals have EU law residence rights in the UK only in limited circumstances. This is where they have resided together as family members in another EU Member State where the UK national was genuinely exercising their Treaty rights, before returning to the UK. This provision does not extend to durable partners.

Although not covered by the Withdrawal Agreement, it is our intention that spouses and civil partners of UK nationals who have genuinely exercised their free movement rights in another EU Member State before returning to the UK before the end of the implementation period, on 31 December 2020, will also be eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme. As per Surinder Singh, we do not intend for the relevant provisions of the scheme to extend to durable partners of British citizens.

Grouped Questions: HL9205 | HL9206
Q
Asked on: 29 June 2018
Ministry of Defence
Army
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have any plans to disband (1) Headquarters 160th Infantry Brigade and Headquarters Wales, (2) 31st Infantry Brigade and Headquarters Scotland, or (3) HQ Northern Ireland; and if so why.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 04 July 2018

There are no plans to disband Headquarters 160th Infantry Brigade and Headquarters Wales, Headquarters 51st Infantry Brigade and Headquarters Scotland, or Headquarters 38th (Irish) Infantry Brigade. There is currently no 31st Infantry Brigade.

Q
Asked on: 12 June 2018
Home Office
Immigration
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 May (HL7540), whether spouses of EU citizens from countries outside the EU will be included in the right to free movement in the UK; and if not, how they reconcile the statement that "family members will be able to join EU citizens on current EU law terms" with EU law determining that those spouses may have access to the applicable EU state.
Answered on: 25 June 2018

The references to “family members” and “close family members” in the Written Answer of 14 May (HL7540) include those from countries outside the EU.

Q
Asked on: 07 June 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Sanctions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the potential effect of the counter-sanctions law, signed by the President of the Russian Federation on 4 June, on (1) UK–Russia relations, (2) UK–Russia trade, (3) UK investors in Russia, and (4) Russian investors in the UK.
A
Answered on: 19 June 2018

We have noted that President Putin signed the draft law on 4 June. It remains to be seen how the new law will be applied. We will continue to monitor the implementation of this new legislation closely, including any potential implications for UK companies.

Q
Asked on: 05 June 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Nicaragua: Peace Negotiations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to support the peace process in Nicaragua; and what assessment they have made of the role of the (1) Catholic Church, (2) Organization of American States, and (3) Inter-American Commission on Human Rights.
A
Answered on: 18 June 2018

The UK remains deeply concerned by the situation in Nicaragua.

We welcome the role the Episcopal Conference of Nicaragua has played in convening the national dialogue and urge the Church to continue its efforts to resolve the current crisis.

The dialogue needs to address both the issue of justice for victims of repression and human rights abuses, and the need for electoral reform. We welcomed the agreement between the Organisation of American States (OAS), the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights and the Nicaraguan Government to establish an international Interdisciplinary Group of Independent Experts (GIEI, in Spanish) to investigate human rights abuses. The GIEI must be allowed to work freely to ensure all those responsible for human rights abuses and acts of repression are held to account.

Q
Asked on: 05 June 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Nicaragua: Politics and Government
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of instability in Nicaragua.
A
Answered on: 18 June 2018

The UK remains deeply concerned by the situation in Nicaragua. Our Embassy in Costa Rica, which is accredited to Nicaragua, has been following developments closely. The Nicaraguan Government must take responsibility for ending the violence and protecting human rights, particularly the rights to freedom of expression and assembly. These are the essential conditions for the inclusive national dialogue to resume.

We have been clear with the Nicaraguan Government on these points, both in a public statement from the British Ambassador to Nicaragua on 5 June and in meetings between the Head of Latin America Department and the Presidential Advisor on International Relations on 29 May and 5 June.

Q
Asked on: 05 June 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Nicaragua: Politics and Government
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether there may be regional instability as a result of current disturbances in Nicaragua.
A
Answered on: 18 June 2018

​The current situation in Nicaragua is a national issue. We do not anticipate a wider regional impact.

Q
Asked on: 05 June 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Nicaragua: Peace Negotiations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the timetable for the peace process in Nicaragua proposed by the Organization of American States.
A
Answered on: 18 June 2018

The Organization of American States (OAS) timetable for electoral reform is a positive development and we encourage the Nicaraguan Government to continue engaging with the OAS to deliver on all its recommendations from the November 2017 electoral observation mission report.

However, for meaningful electoral reform to succeed the Government must end the current violence and the dialogue should resume under peaceful conditions.

Q
Asked on: 05 June 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
USA: Sanctions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the government of the United States regarding the impact of secondary sanctions and whether such sanctions are designed to give a long term benefit to US companies.
A
Answered on: 18 June 2018

The United States has a range of secondary sanctions in place. The British Government maintains a close dialogue with companies and financial institutions on sanctions and engages with the government of the United States on specific technical areas, including on secondary sanctions, where appropriate.

Q
Asked on: 22 May 2018
Treasury
Financial Markets: Corruption
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the use of the UK’s financial markets for corrupt transactions by overseas investors; and what steps they are taking to combat such practices.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 06 June 2018

The UK’s openness and status as a global financial centre exposes it to the risk of illicit financial flows.

The UK’s National Risk Assessment 2017 assessed that retail banking, wholesale banking, capital markets and wealth management are all exposed to high money laundering risks. This assessment can be viewed online.

This government is committed to ensuring the UK’s financial system is hostile to illicit finance, and is taking action to protect the integrity of the UK financial system.

This includes introducing the Criminal Finances Act 2017 to enhance law enforcement’s powers to investigate and tackle financial crime, and comprehensively updating the Money Laundering Regulations to bring them in line with the latest international standards.

The Financial Conduct Authority (FCA), which supervises financial institutions conducts regular, detailed AML inspections of the major retail and investment banks operating in the UK. Where financial institutions fall short of their legal and regulatory obligations, the FCA has taken tough action.

Q
Asked on: 21 May 2018
Home Office
UK Border Force: Right of Search
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) customs officials, or (2) border officials, have the authority to request or oblige an incoming passenger to hand over any password to unlock their smart phone; and if so, on how many occasions in the past 12 months this has occurred at each principal gateway into the UK.
Answered on: 04 June 2018

Border Force Officers can exercise either immigration or customs powers depending on their appointment as an Immigration Officer or a Designated Customs Official.

When exercising immigration powers, a Border Force Officer may only search a person until it is satisfactorily established that the person is a British Citizen, may enter the United Kingdom without leave or has leave to enter the United Kingdom. The Immigration Officer may search for any documents relevant to their examination of the individual. It is possible that such documents could be contained on a mobile phone. Failure to submit to a search may result in the person being refused leave to enter, or could constitute an offence under section 26(1)(b) of the Immigration Act 1971, and / or could lead to the mobile phone being seized under paragraph 15A(7) of Schedule 2 to that Act.

The Customs and Excise Management Act 1979 permits Border Force customs officers to question passengers regarding their baggage and anything carried with them, and to produce baggage for examination to ensure the payment of duties, to prevent the importation of prohibited items, or to search persons where there are reasonable grounds to suspect they are carrying prohibited or restricted goods or goods on which duty has not been paid. As part of this examination, they may request access to electronic equipment.

Section 24 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act (PACE) 1984 empowers Border Force immigration and customs officers in England and Wales to arrest persons who are committing an offence or who they have reasonable grounds to suspect are about to commit an offence. Section 32 permits them to search persons who have been arrested. Section 19 empowers officers to seize items that are evidence in relation to an offence.

Under Schedule 7 to the Terrorism Act 2000 a person must give an examining officer any information that the officer requests to establish whether the person is concerned in terrorist related activity. If a person fails to comply they can be prosecuted for wilful obstruction. While it is possible for designated Border Force Officers to be accredited to exercise Schedule 7 powers, in practice it is exercised at port by Police Officers.

We do not hold information on how many times this has occurred in the past 12 months.

Q
Asked on: 17 May 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Diplomatic Relations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the UK ambassador to Russia attended the recent swearing-in ceremony of President Putin; and if not, which extenuating circumstances prevented him from doing so.
A
Answered on: 01 June 2018

Her Majesty's Ambassador to the Russian Federation attended the inauguration of President Putin on 7 May.

Q
Asked on: 16 May 2018
Treasury
Taxation: Domicil
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to continue to adhere to the OECD residency criteria for tax purposes post-Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 24 May 2018

The UK will continue to adhere to the OECD’s tax standards after Brexit. These include the provisions relating to residence in the OECD model treaty that the UK uses as the basis for bilateral double taxation agreements.

Q
Asked on: 27 April 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 5 March (HL5692), whether they have responded to Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov’s proposal for bilateral interdepartmental consultations on international information security; if so, what that response was; and if not, when they intend to give a response.
A
Answered on: 14 May 2018

In her address to Parliament on 14 March 2018, the Prime Minister made clear that high level bilateral contact with Russia was suspended as a result of the Salisbury incident. This includes the bilateral consultations on international information security proposed by the Russian government. We will continue to discuss cyber security in multilateral fora with Russia, where appropriate.

Q
Asked on: 02 May 2018
Home Office
Immigration
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of (1) married couples, and (2) civil partners, that might be separated as a result of Brexit.
Answered on: 14 May 2018

The agreement we have reached with the EU on citizens’ rights protects those EU citizens and their family members, including spouses and civil partners, exercising free movement rights in the UK before the end of the implementation period on 31 December 2020.

During the implementation period, family members will be able to join EU citizens on current EU law terms. After the implementation period, close family members will be able to join an EU citizen covered by the Withdrawal Agreement, where their relationship existed before 31 December 2020 and continues to exist when they wish to join the EU citizen in the UK. Close family members includes spouses, civil partners and durable partners.

Q
Asked on: 08 May 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ensure both Houses of Parliament are able to scrutinise fully any implementation period following Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 14 May 2018

The degree of scrutiny Parliament wishes to give to ongoing EU business is of course a matter for Parliament. It will be for both Houses to determine the level of scrutiny they will want to undertake during the implementation period, on the basis of the detailed arrangements for the period agreed between the UK and the EU.

The Government supports a strong scrutiny process, and will continue to support and facilitate this for as long as EU legislation will continue to affect the UK. We are happy to engage in dialogue with the relevant committees as to how this may best be achieved.

Q
Asked on: 26 April 2018
Cabinet Office
National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps have been taken to date to improve coordination across Government departments through the Fusion Doctrine; and in which departments and under which co-ordinating ministers is the work being done to ensure that the UK has the relevant staff and private sector engagement to prevent and respond to hybrid threats.
A
Answered by: The Earl of Courtown
Answered on: 11 May 2018

The new national security doctrine, the Fusion Doctrine, builds on the creation and early years of the National Security Council (NSC), embeds the lessons from the Chilcot report and supports a whole-of-government approach to national security.

All NSC and NSC(Officials) meetings now use the Fusion Doctrine framework as a guide for the discussions. It is the responsibility of designated Senior Responsible Officials (SRO) to implement the Government’s strategy and coordinate across the whole of government.

Protecting the UK from hybrid threats is a whole-of-government effort. A range of Government departments (including the Cabinet Office, Foreign and Commonwealth Office and Ministry of Defence), working with the relevant parts of the private sector prepare for, prevent and respond to hybrid threats. The Government’s overall approach is overseen by the NSC and through sub-committees such as the NSC for Threats, Hazards, Resilience and Contingencies.

Q
Asked on: 26 April 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Cybercrime
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to modernise the legal environment to enhance the resilience of UK private sector organisations to defend themselves and their clients against cyber threats.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 11 May 2018

The forthcoming Data Protection Bill will require all organisations to have appropriate technical and organisational cyber security measures in place to protect personal data. In addition, for critical services and digital service providers, the Government is transposing the Network and Information Systems Directive into UK Law which requires relevant digital service providers to take appropriate and proportionate measures to secure their network and information systems from both cyber attacks and physical failures. In addition, as committed to in its Cyber Regulation and Incentives review published in 2016, the Government continues to monitor the wider cyber security regulatory landscape to ensure it remains fit for purpose.

Q
Asked on: 26 April 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Ashton of Hyde on 5 March (HL5690), whether they consider the National Cyber Security Centre guidance stated is sufficient to ensure that all sectors of industry and the general public are sufficiently protected against a hybrid threat; and if not, what additional guidance is planned.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 11 May 2018

The National Cyber Security Centre is focussed on the cyber security threat but works closely with its partners, CPNI and MOD, to ensure that the UK is protected against the hybrid threat. The NCSC seeks to provide actionable and accessible guidance and it also works closely with a range of key UK organisations to understand their systems, provide bespoke advice and ensure that cybersecurity is considered as part of new programmes and systems. The NCSC has also been strengthening the UK’s cyber defences through the Active Cyber Defence programme.

It is the responsibility of all organisations to ensure they are sufficiently cyber secure and, while the threat of cyber attacks cannot be eliminated completely, organisations can and should reduce the risks by acting on NCSC issued guidance on how best to defend against cyber attacks. This guidance is widely available to all and updated regularly.

Q
Asked on: 26 April 2018
Cabinet Office
Intelligence Services: Recruitment
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 13 April (HL6781), how many of the “over 1,900 additional security and intelligence staff” stated in the Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 have been successfully recruited and trained and remain in the relevant organisations.
A
Answered by: Baroness Stedman-Scott
Answered on: 10 May 2018

For reasons of national security, It has been the policy of successive Government not to go into detail regarding the ongoing recruitment, training and retention profile of security and intelligence staff. However, progress against each of the commitments made in the Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 is closely monitored, and reported annually to Parliament. The Second Annual Report, included in the National Security and Capability Review, was published in March 2018 attached. The Second Annual Report set out that we remain on track to meet this commitment.

National Security Capability Review (PDF Document, 2.73 MB)
Q
Asked on: 26 April 2018
Cabinet Office
National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answers by Earl Howe on 11 and 13 April (HL6782 and HL6848), how the Fusion Doctrine from the 2018 National Security Capability Review is now being used to “improve our collective approach to national security”; and how many new reservists or other resources to deal with hybrid threats, based on the 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015, have been recruited and trained.
A
Answered by: Baroness Stedman-Scott
Answered on: 10 May 2018

The Fusion Doctrine acts as a framework for our National Security Strategy so that we can identify the most effective and efficient combination of methods to achieve the Government’s objectives. The doctrine will ensure that in defending our national security we make better use of all of our capabilities: from economic levers; through cutting-edge military resources; to our wider diplomatic and cultural influence on the world’s stage.

Our response to the Salisbury attack is an example of the Fusion Doctrine in practice. We are deploying the full range of our National Security capabilities to counter the threats of hostile activity wherever it may come from.

The 2018 National Security Capability Review (NSCR) makes clear the Government’s commitment to addressing a complex and evolving threat picture to safeguard national security. The UK Volunteer Reserve Forces trained strength continues to grow, totalling 32,240 (as of January 2018). Both reservists and regulars contribute manpower and specialisms to two innovative Brigades which were established in direct response to hybrid threats as identified in the SDSR 2015, these units provide specialist capabilities in strategic communications, cyber and intelligence.

The two Brigades are:

· 77 Brigade which is comprised of approximately 200 Regular and 270 Reserve Service Personnel;

· 1 Intelligence Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) Brigade comprised of approximately 2,800 Regulars and around 2,100 Reservists.

Q
Asked on: 26 April 2018
Cabinet Office
National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Earl Howe on 13 April (HL6849), whether they consider they have sufficient financial resources to pre-empt and address a hybrid threat, with the knowledge that government departments are already prioritising their budgets to mitigate risks and in the light of the end of the £1.9 billion commitment to improve cyber resilience in the current funding round.
A
Answered by: Baroness Stedman-Scott
Answered on: 10 May 2018

The National Cyber Security Strategy clearly outlines how the Government is developing defences against the cyber threat we face. We are investing £1.9 billion through the National Cyber Security Programme and have opened a new National Cyber Security Centre that is activity working with international partners, industry and civil society to tackle this threat. The activities of the NCSP are aligned with robust physical and personnel security measures to guard against hybrid attacks.

We are working across government to ensure that effective defence against cyber and hybrid attacks remains a key priority for all departments up to and beyond March 2021.

Q
Asked on: 27 April 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have had, and with whom, about the inclusion of cyber security in the security treaty they hope to negotiate with the EU; to what extent stakeholders will be consulted during the process of negotiations on that treaty; and how such a treaty will relate to any international or bilateral cyber security agreements.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 10 May 2018

The exact future relationship with regard to cyber security remains subject to negotiations with our EU partners.

The UK is one of the world’s leading digital nations and a leader in the field of cyber security. We have accordingly taken a central role, both as an EU Member State and internationally, to push forwards the cyber agenda. To contend with a truly global threat such as this we need a truly global response - with not only the UK and EU, but industry, government, like-minded states and NATO all working together to strengthen our cyber security capabilities.

In the future partnership paper on, ‘Foreign Policy, Defence and Development’, published in September last year, we listed a number of specific areas for potential cooperation and collaboration with the EU, ranging from the exchange of information about cyber threats and incidents through participation in the Computer Security Incident Response Team (CSIRT) network and Co-operation Group to continuing to work to develop effective cyber security legislation and international standards.

The UK will also continue to work together with the EU to promote strategic frameworks for conflict prevention, cooperation and stability in cyberspace. These frameworks should consist of: the application of existing international law; the implementation of voluntary, non-binding norms of responsible state behaviour; and the development and implementation of practical cyber confidence building measures between states.

Q
Asked on: 30 April 2018
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what estimate they have made of the number of family separations that might occur as a result of Brexit.
Answered on: 08 May 2018

The agreement we have reached with the EU on citizens’ rights protects those EU citizens and their family members exercising free movement rights in the UK before the end of the implementation period on 31 December 2020.

During the implementation period, family members will be able to join EU citizens on current EU law terms. After the implementation period, close family members will be able to join an EU citizen covered by the Withdrawal Agreement, where their relationship existed before 31 December 2020 and continues to exist when they wish to join the EU citizen in the UK. Close family members are spouses, civil partners and durable partners, dependent children and grandchildren and dependent parents and grandparents. Children born or adopted after the UK leaves the EU to or by those covered by the Withdrawal Agreement will also be protected.

Q
Asked on: 28 March 2018
Home Office
Freezing of Assets
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what their freeze and seize programme consists of; when it will be implemented; how; and which Government department will lead on delivery of that programme.
Answered on: 16 April 2018

The Government is committed to ensuring that enforcement agencies have the necessary tools available to effectively seize and freeze the financial assets of criminals and terrorists.

To this end the Government brought in the Criminal Finances Act 2017 (CFA) which amended the Anti-Terrorism, Crime and Security Act 2001 and the Proceeds of Crime Act 2002 (POCA). The CFA provided for the freezing and forfeiture (including administrative forfeiture, without the need for a court order) of terrorist property held in bank accounts, and introduced unexplained wealth orders (UWOs) which allow the seizure/freezing and forfeiture of funds and property over £50,000 where it is believed the owner is involved in serious crime.

The bulk of the secondary legislation implementing the CFA came into force on 31 January 2018. The Home Office are responsible for the legislative implementation of these powers, which are used by enforcement agencies.

Q
Asked on: 29 March 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport: National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what role the Department of Digital, Culture, Media, and Sport plays in responding to national security threats; and if that Department plays no formal role, which department responds to digital threats and other security threats relating to culture, the media, or sport.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 16 April 2018

The Department for Digital, Culture Media and Sport (DCMS) is the Lead Government Department for the Broadcast, Internet and Telecommunications sectors as parts of the UK’s Critical National Infrastructure. As such, DCMS is responsible for the government’s security and resilience policy within those sectors.

DCMS plays a key role in delivering the Government’s National Cyber Security Strategy to support a prosperous digital nation. DCMS also undertakes work to prevent internet harms, such as disinformation. Other security threats would be managed as appropriate by individual digital, culture and media organisations in conjunction with law enforcement and other agencies.

Q
Asked on: 28 March 2018
Ministry of Defence
National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to proactively engage and collaborate further with the private sector in the prevention of, and action against, hybrid threats, to combat critical skill shortages and bring in further expertise; and if so, how.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 13 April 2018

It is the responsibility of individual Government Departments to collaborate with their own sectors to ensure that the private sector is aware of the need to protect against hostile state activity, as part of their contribution to national resilience. For example, the 2015 Strategic Defence and Security Review made significant commitments on Cyber and the National Cyber Security Strategy and in 2016 launched the National Cyber Security Centre.

Q
Asked on: 29 March 2018
Ministry of Defence
National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have a definition of “hybrid threat”; if so, what is that definition; and which Government department is responsible for managing and coordinating the responses to such threats.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 13 April 2018

Hybrid threats should be considered as Hostile State Activity and the Prime Minister set out in the 2018 National Security Capability Review that "we will harden our defences against all forms of Hostile State Activity". To achieve this we will "use a new national security doctrine, the Fusion Doctrine, to improve our collective approach to national security, building on the creation of the National Security Council eight years ago so that we use our security, economic and influence capabilities to maximum effect to protect, promote and project our national security, economic and influence goals." As highlighted in the Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 we will continue to work with NATO and allies to tackle current threats and adapt to combat future threats, focusing on cyber and countering hybrid threats.

Q
Asked on: 29 March 2018
Ministry of Defence
National Security
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether sufficient resources are available to (1) pre-empt, and (2) address, a hybrid threat; whether those resources include mobilisation of the armed forces; and what other resources have been made available.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 13 April 2018

Government Departments prioritise within their existing departmental budgets to adequately manage and mitigate all risks (including hazards, counter-terrorism and hostile state activity). The Strategic Defence and Security Review 2015 will continue to be implemented including specialist Army brigades focused on hybrid warfare and notably the £1.9 billion National Cyber Security Strategy to ensure the country keeps pace with the threat, including through the National Cyber Security Centre.

Q
Asked on: 28 March 2018
Ministry of Defence
Eastern Europe: NATO
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what coordination exists between NATO partners and those Eastern European nations most vulnerable to cyber-attacks and hybrid threats.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 11 April 2018

At its 2016 Summit in Warsaw, NATO made a Cyber Defence Pledge to strengthen both individual and collective capability. The Alliance now engages regularly with its European partners to discuss Cyber and Hybrid threats at both the strategic and operational level. The NATO Cooperative Cyber Defence Centre of Excellence (based in Tallinn) and the European Centre of Excellence for countering Hybrid Threats (based in Helsinki) provide expertise and encourage cooperation and information-sharing among NATO Allies, EU Member States, and their partners. The UK is a leading participant in both Centres.

Q
Asked on: 28 March 2018
Ministry of Defence
Reserve Forces
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to train and use reservists in both the public and private sectors to deal with hybrid threats.
A
Answered by: Earl Howe
Answered on: 11 April 2018

The need to respond to hybrid threats was recognised in the Strategic Defence and Security Review of 2015 which established, as part of Joint Force 2025, two innovative brigades comprising a mix of Regulars and specialist capabilities from the Reserves able to contribute to our strategic communications, tackle hybrid warfare and deliver better battlefield intelligence.

Q
Asked on: 23 March 2018
Department for International Trade
Import Duties
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the UK’s ability to negotiate exemptions to trade tariffs, and (2) whether that ability will be stronger before or after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 10 April 2018

Currently as a member of the European Union the UK is bound by the Common Commercial Policy that delivers a trade policy for all 28 member states. On leaving the EU the UK will be free to conduct trade negotiations that promote specifically UK interests, and maximise the benefit of trade for UK producers and consumers.

Q
Asked on: 23 March 2018
Department for International Trade
Trade Barriers
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the position the UK would take in the event of a global trade war; and in particular, with which country or countries the intend to ally the UK to maintain the current rules-based international trading system.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 10 April 2018

The UK fully supports the global rules-based trade system, open and free trade, and measures to tackle unfair trade where necessary. We maintain our position that multilateral action and a balanced, proportionate, WTO compliant approach remain the best ways of resolving issues within international trade without the need for escalation.

Grouped Questions: HL6616
Q
Asked on: 23 March 2018
Department for International Trade
Trade Barriers
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking, if any, to avert a global trade war.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 10 April 2018

The UK fully supports the global rules-based trade system, open and free trade, and measures to tackle unfair trade where necessary. We maintain our position that multilateral action and a balanced, proportionate, WTO compliant approach remain the best ways of resolving issues within international trade without the need for escalation.

Grouped Questions: HL6614
Q
Asked on: 26 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Trade: Anguilla
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of Anguilla's reliance on trade with other non-UK EU Caribbean islands; and what consideration they have given during the Brexit negotiations to the case for continuing trade and other relations between Anguilla and those islands.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 10 April 2018

We are working closely with the Government of Anguilla in order to understand the extent to which they rely on the EU Overseas Countries and Territories for Trade, and the impact of EU exit on existing trading arrangements with its neighbouring islands. The Government is considering Anguilla's interests, just as it is considering the interests of all UK Overseas Territories as we move forward with our exit from the EU.

The UK Government is fully committed to involving all the UK Overseas Territories in our planning as we leave the EU, and ensuring that their interests are properly taken into account.

Q
Asked on: 28 March 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Estonia: Defence
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what discussions they have conducted with the government of Estonia to learn from recent hybrid threat activities targeting that state, to help prevent further hybrid threats against the UK.
A
Answered on: 10 April 2018

We have a very strong and productive relationship with the Government of Estonia, and work closely together at ministerial and senior official level on a range of defence and security issues, including on how to tackle hybrid threats. We do so bilaterally and also through institutions such as the EU, NATO and the European Centre of Excellence for Countering Hybrid Threats. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office has posted an adviser to the region who is responsible for enhancing the UK's co-operation with the Governments of Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania on these issues.

Q
Asked on: 28 March 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Intelligence Services: International Cooperation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what provision is in place to allow Five Eyes nations to contribute support to one another (1) in preparation for, and (2) in the event of, a hybrid threat materialising.
A
Answered on: 10 April 2018

We collaborate on a wide range of intelligence and security matters, on numerous channels. This includes exchanging information on shared security challenges and emerging threats. We would expect to be in detailed contact with our closest partners, in the event of a serious hybrid threat materialising.

Q
Asked on: 23 March 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Diplomatic Relations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to recall the UK Ambassador to Russia for consultation.
A
Answered on: 09 April 2018

We and our EU partners stand shoulder to shoulder in sending the strongest signal to the Kremlin that Russia cannot continue to flout international law and threaten our security. All the other twenty-seven European Council leaders have confirmed they stand in unqualified solidarity with the UK in the face of the grave challenge Russia poses to our shared security. In addition, eighteen EU member states have so far announced they will expel a number of Russian diplomats.

We have no plans to recall the UK Ambassador to Russia for consultation. However, as part of our response to the Salisbury incident, we will keep further options under review and will not hesitate to act should it be necessary.

Q
Asked on: 26 March 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Anguilla: Hurricanes and Tornadoes
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they have given to Anguilla since Hurricane Irma to help re-build infrastructure; and what support they will give in the next five years.
A
Answered on: 09 April 2018

In the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Irma, the crew of RFA Mounts Bay repaired the generator and electricity distribution at Anguilla's only hospital; effected emergency repairs to ensure the integrity of a ruptured storage tank at the island's bulk fuel depot established the integrity of the Road Bay Jetty, Anguilla's only point of sea access, and of the airport runway.

In the following weeks, the principal elements of support provided by the UK Government have been:

  • generators to allow Anguilla's six primary schools and the one secondary school to reopen within five weeks of the hurricane
  • two large generators to the hospital which now has a full independent generating capacity, including redundancy
  • a large capacity generator to ensure the island's main water desalination plant is able to operate without mains power
  • approximately:
    • £1.5 million to secure the services of a Canadian contractor to accelerate the restoration of power across Anguilla before Christmas
    • £1.2 million of assistance to enable the airport to resume commercial operations with an emergency control tower and the equipment and services needed to allow the airport to resume night flights – this is critical to the island's economy
    • £200,000 to effect repairs to Her Majesty's Prison Anguilla
    • £200,000 of repairs to the main hall at the Secondary School to enable children to take external public exams which could not be delayed and repairs to the Teachers Education Centre
    • £2.5 million of funding transferred to the Government of Anguilla to effect emergency repairs to a range of public buildings

Looking ahead Her Majesty's Government has committed a further £60 million to fund a range of long term infrastructure projects.

Q
Asked on: 26 March 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Anguilla: Foreign Relations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their assessment of the strength of the relationship between the UK and Anguilla.
A
Answered on: 09 April 2018
The relationship between the UK Government and the Government of Anguilla is one based on partnership with each responsible for delivering their duties under Anguilla's constitution; always acting in the best interests of the people of Anguilla.
Q
Asked on: 23 March 2018
Home Office
Passports
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether there is an operational need for the negotiations regarding the supply of new British passports to proceed immediately; and if not, what assessment they have made of whether the awarding of the new contract should be postponed.
Answered on: 04 April 2018

Her Majesty’s Passport Office has run a fair and open competition in line with UK law, EU and World Trade Organisation rules that has concluded in the identification of a preferred supplier. There are no grounds for a national security waiver.

The current passport contract expires in 2019 and we will need to proceed immediately to contract award to ensure a smooth and safe transition to the new contract.

Q
Asked on: 19 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what additional documentation they will publish to accompany the final Brexit agreement.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 29 March 2018

Once the negotiations have concluded, the Government has committed to give Parliament a vote on the final deal. When the time comes for the vote to be held, the Government will put the appropriate analysis before both Houses to ensure that they are appropriately informed.

In addition to this, as outlined in the Constitutional Reform and Governance Act 2010, any treaty laid before Parliament must be accompanied by an explanatory memorandum.

Q
Asked on: 23 March 2018
Treasury
Trade Barriers
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they intend to protect the economy from the effects of any trade war, following the UK's withdrawal from the EU.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 29 March 2018

The UK is a global advocate for free trade and continues to work with global partners and as part of multilateral discussions at the WTO to tackle protectionism and protectionist measures.

When the UK leaves the EU, we will play a full part in promoting compliance with the rules-based trading system and, if necessary, make use of the WTO’s dispute resolution procedures in defence of our national interests.

As part of preparations for the UK’s exit from the EU, we are also committed to creating a trade remedies framework which is able to react efficiently and effectively to tackle unfair trade where necessary.

Q
Asked on: 19 March 2018
Leader of the House of Lords
Brexit
Lords
To ask the Leader of the House how much time she proposes that the House will allocate to the debate of the final draft of the Brexit agreement.
Answered on: 28 March 2018

Business in the House of Lords is arranged through consultation with the Usual Channels. For its part, the Government will ensure that sufficient time is offered to consider the final deal in Parliament, including in the House of Lords.

Q
Asked on: 19 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much time they expect there will be between the publication of the final Brexit agreement and the vote in the House of Commons.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 26 March 2018

It is our intention to conclude the Withdrawal Agreement and the terms for our future relationship in good time before we leave the EU in March 2019. It remains our shared aim with the EU to reach agreement on the Withdrawal Agreement by October. This would allow both the UK Parliament and the European Parliament time to scrutinise and debate the agreement reached between both sides. We expect and intend that the vote will take place before the European Parliament debates and votes on the final agreement.

Grouped Questions: HL6474 | HL6475
Q
Asked on: 19 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to present the final Brexit agreement to select committees of Parliament; and how long they expect that to be before a vote in either House of Parliament.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 26 March 2018

It is our intention to conclude the Withdrawal Agreement and the terms for our future relationship in good time before we leave the EU in March 2019. It remains our shared aim with the EU to reach agreement on the Withdrawal Agreement by October. This would allow both the UK Parliament and the European Parliament time to scrutinise and debate the agreement reached between both sides. We expect and intend that the vote will take place before the European Parliament debates and votes on the final agreement.

Grouped Questions: HL6473 | HL6475
Q
Asked on: 19 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much time they expect there will be between the vote in the House of Commons on the Brexit agreement and exit day.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 26 March 2018

It is our intention to conclude the Withdrawal Agreement and the terms for our future relationship in good time before we leave the EU in March 2019. It remains our shared aim with the EU to reach agreement on the Withdrawal Agreement by October. This would allow both the UK Parliament and the European Parliament time to scrutinise and debate the agreement reached between both sides. We expect and intend that the vote will take place before the European Parliament debates and votes on the final agreement.

Grouped Questions: HL6473 | HL6474
Q
Asked on: 19 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how the resolution presented to the House on the final Brexit agreement will be worded.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 26 March 2018

The Government has committed to hold a vote on the final deal in Parliament as soon as possible after the negotiations have concluded. This vote will take the form of a resolution in both Houses of Parliament and will cover both the Withdrawal Agreement and the terms for our future relationship. We have been clear that Parliament will be able to vote to accept the deal, or move forward without one.

The exact wording of any motion is yet to be determined.

Q
Asked on: 08 March 2018
Home Office
Migrant Workers
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what is their definition of a required skill for the purposes of immigration; in which sectors of the economy such skills are needed; whether they intend that that definition will change following Brexit; and what is their assessment of future skills requirements.
Answered on: 16 March 2018

Tier 2 is the main immigration route for skilled non-EEA workers. The Tier 2 (General) route is designed to fill skilled vacancies for which no suitable resident workers are available. Applicants must have an offer of a graduate level job, paying an appropriate salary, from an employer which has been licensed by the Home Office to sponsor migrant workers. The skill level of a post must be level 6 on the Regulated Qualification Framework with some exceptions for the Shortage Occupation List and certain creative roles.

In July 2017, the Government commissioned the independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) to advise on the economic and social impacts of the UK’s exit from the European Union and also on how the UK’s immigration system should be aligned with a modern industrial strategy. The MAC’s call for evidence sought information on EU migrants’ skills, amongst other things, and this will be considered in their final report due in September 2018. Details can be found on the gov.uk website at: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/call-for-evidence-and-briefing-note-eea-workers-in-the-uk-labour-market

The Government will take account of the MAC’s advice when making any final decisions about our future immigration system for EU nationals.

Q
Asked on: 05 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ascertain the views of each of the EU 27 parliaments on the UK's current position on Brexit.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 13 March 2018

The Government continues to engage with Member States and our partners in the EU, alongside our formal negotiations with the European Commission. Ministers, senior officials and our diplomatic missions in Europe speak to a wide range of people and groups. Engaging representatives from national European Parliaments is an important element of our work.

Q
Asked on: 22 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Data Protection
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government with which countries the UK has no data sharing agreements.
A
Answered on: 09 March 2018

Under the Data Protection Act 1998 (which implements the EU’s 1995 Data Protection Directive), personal data can be transferred to countries within the European Economic Area and with other countries or territories that have an ‘adequate’ level of protection for the rights and freedoms of data subjects in relation to the processing of personal data. The Data Protection Bill currently before Parliament will provide for the continuation of these arrangements under the new EU framework, the General Data Protection Regulation and the Data Protection Directive, from May 2018. The UK is currently party to EU adequacy decisions that enable data sharing with Andorra, Argentina, Faroe Islands, Guernsey, Isle of Man, Israel, Jersey, New Zealand, Switzerland and Uruguay. The EU has reached partial findings of adequacy in relation to Canada, and in relation to the USA for data transfers under the Privacy Shield Framework. The UK is also party to several EU agreements on Passenger Name Records with the US, Australia and Canada (PNR) and on law enforcement (EU-US Umbrella Agreement).

Q
Asked on: 22 February 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Government Departments: Training
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what budget they are allocating to train and evaluate personnel on individual tools, techniques and processes related to live, virtual and constructive simulated environments.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 07 March 2018

Individual Government departments and agencies make decisions on the appropriate tools to train and evaluate their workforces to meet their specific needs.

Q
Asked on: 20 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government which state actors they originally identified to have levied cyber-attacks against UK institutions in the past five years; and whether their assessment of the origins of those attacks has subsequently altered.
A
Answered on: 06 March 2018

​There are several established, capable states seeking to exploit computers and communications networks to gather intelligence and intellectual property from British Government, military, industrial and economic targets. We attribute malicious cyber activity where we believe it is in the best interests of the UK to do so. Sometimes this is in public, and sometimes we have private conversations with the country concerned. The Government has publicly stated that the Russian government, specifically the Russian military, was responsible for the destructive NotPetya cyber-attack that affected some UK companies. It has also publicly stated that it is highly likely that North Korean actors known as the Lazarus Group were behind the WannaCry ransomware campaign. The Government's view on both has not changed.

Q
Asked on: 20 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what criteria they use to determine whether cyber aggression constitutes an act of war; and in such cases, what plans they have to allow for Parliamentary scrutiny of any evidence.
A
Answered on: 06 March 2018

The UN Charter applies in its entirety to state actions in cyberspace, including the prohibition of the use of force (Article 2(4)). The Government considers that a cyber-operation may constitute an “armed attack” if its scale and physical effects are equivalent to those achieved by a conventional attack which would meet the same threshold. Whether a particular cyber operation constituted an “armed attack” would need to be considered in light of all the relevant facts and circumstances.

Q
Asked on: 20 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made formal representations to the government of Russia regarding recent accusations by the Foreign and Commonwealth Office of cyber-attacks originating in Russia; whether they plan to present evidence in support of their accusations; and whether they consider that the government of Russia was instrumental in these cyber-attacks.
A
Answered on: 06 March 2018

The UK's National Cyber Security Centre assesses that the Russian military was almost certainly responsible for the destructive NotPetya cyber-attack of June 2017. Given the high confidence assessment and the broader context, the British Government has made the judgement that the Russian government was responsible for this cyber-attack. The Prime Minister has been clear about UK concerns that Russia is seeking to weaponise information and that the UK will defend its interests when threatened, this includes identifying activity which seeks to do us harm. The Government set out the UK's assessment, and concerns, directly with Russian Government representatives on 15 February 2018 in both the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Moscow and the Russian Embassy in London.

Q
Asked on: 26 February 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
EU Citizenship
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have sought legal advice on whether the withdrawal of the UK from the EU automatically leads to the loss by British nationals of EU citizenship and the consequent loss of the rights and freedoms deriving from that citizenship; and if so, what was that advice.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 06 March 2018

The Government has considered this matter carefully. The EU treaty provisions state only citizens of EU Member States are able to hold EU citizenship.

Therefore, when the UK ceases to be a member of the European Union, British nationals will no longer hold EU citizenship, unless they hold dual nationality with another EU Member State.

Q
Asked on: 20 February 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what advice they have given to UK institutions and companies to minimise their being a victim of cyber-attacks in the event of cyber warfare.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 05 March 2018

The goal of the National Cyber Security Centre (NCSC) is to help make the UK the safest place to live and do business online. To that end, the NCSC provides expert guidance for all organisations in the UK, large and small, including businesses and industry, government departments, the critical national infrastructure, universities and charities. Following this advice will enable these institutions and companies to put measures in place to help protect themselves from cyber attacks, and help to protect the UK’s economic prosperity and reputation.

Q
Asked on: 20 February 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
European Network and Information Security Agency
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether, following the speech of the Prime Minister at the Security Conference in Munich on 17 February, they plan to cooperate with the EU Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) after Brexit; and if so, what form any such cooperation would take; and whether they consider that ENISA's programme of implementation of EU policy and laws falls under the jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the European Union.
A
Answered by: Lord Ashton of Hyde
Answered on: 05 March 2018

Membership of the European Network and Information Security Agency (ENISA) is one of the ways in which the UK discusses cyber security policy and shares expertise with European partners.

We remain absolutely committed to ensuring European security and developing a deep and special partnership with a strong, secure and successful European Union that covers both economic and security cooperation. A close working relationship on foreign and security policy is unconditional. We are proud of the UK’s capability and record on cyber security and will continue to support our European partners in this area.

In leaving the European Union, we will bring about an end to the direct jurisdiction of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU) in the UK. There are a number of existing precedents where the EU has reached agreements with third countries which provide for a close cooperative relationship, without the CJEU having direct jurisdiction over those countries.

Our aim is to secure a relationship that provides for practical operational cooperation; facilitates data driven law enforcement; and allows multilateral cooperation through EU agencies. We believe that the UK and the EU should work together to design new, dynamic arrangements as part of our future partnership that support this. The details of our future relationship are a matter for negotiations.

Q
Asked on: 20 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Electronic Warfare
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether Foreign Minister Lavrov of Russia extended an invitation to the UK Foreign Secretary during the bilateral meeting on 22 December 2017 in Moscow for respective state cyber agencies to meet to address areas of concern; and if so, how the Foreign Secretary responded and if he has not responded when he will.
A
Answered on: 05 March 2018

Russian Foreign Minister Lavrov proposed bilateral interdepartmental consultations on international information security to the Foreign Secretary during his visit in December 2017. The British Government is considering its response. The Russian government claims to support responsible behaviour in cyber space, yet secretly conducts destructive cyber attacks. This is not the relationship we want; this kind of behaviour gets in the way of a sensible dialogue.

Q
Asked on: 22 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
British Nationals Abroad: EU Citizenship
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any UK minister, official, or embassy staff member has been in communication with any Netherlands minister, official, or embassy staff member, either directly or via a representative, regarding the decision by the District Court of Amsterdam (case number: C/13/640244/KG ZA 17-1327) to refer the question of whether UK citizens living in EU countries are entitled to keep their EU citizenship rights after Brexit to the Court of Justice of the European Union; and if so, what was the outcome of those discussions.
A
Answered on: 05 March 2018

British Government officials have had limited conversations with Dutch counterparts on this case, principally in order to ascertain the factual details.

As regards the issue of UK citizens living in the EU after our exit from the European Union, the Government has secured a deal that will safeguard their rights, so that they can continue living their lives broadly as they do now. Our view is that EU treaty provisions state that only citizens of EU Member States are able to hold EU citizenship. Therefore, when the UK ceases to be a member of the European Union, British nationals will no longer hold EU citizenship, unless they hold dual nationality with another EU Member State.

Grouped Questions: HL5808
Q
Asked on: 22 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
British Nationals Abroad: EU Citizenship
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any UK minister, official, or embassy staff member has been in communication with any Netherlands minister, official, or embassy staff member, either directly or via a representative, regarding an interim appeal to the decision by the District Court of Amsterdam (case number: C/13/640244/KG ZA 17-1327) to refer the question of whether UK citizens living in EU countries are entitled to keep their EU citizenship rights after Brexit to the Court of Justice of the European Union; and if so, what was the outcome of those discussions.
A
Answered on: 05 March 2018

British Government officials have had limited conversations with Dutch counterparts on this case, principally in order to ascertain the factual details.

As regards the issue of UK citizens living in the EU after our exit from the European Union, the Government has secured a deal that will safeguard their rights, so that they can continue living their lives broadly as they do now. Our view is that EU treaty provisions state that only citizens of EU Member States are able to hold EU citizenship. Therefore, when the UK ceases to be a member of the European Union, British nationals will no longer hold EU citizenship, unless they hold dual nationality with another EU Member State.

Grouped Questions: HL5807
Q
Asked on: 21 February 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
European Union: English Language
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to seek to ensure that, after Brexit, English will be retained as an official language of the EU.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 01 March 2018

While the UK will maintain an interest, any decision on official languages of the EU after the UK’s withdrawal will be one to be taken by the EU institutions and their Member States.

Q
Asked on: 21 February 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
European Court of Justice
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of which cases currently before the European Court of Justice on which they expect to receive adjudication before 29 March 2021.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 01 March 2018

Based on average timescales for cases before the European Court of Justice (ECJ) to reach their conclusion, we expect all cases currently before the ECJ to receive adjudication before 29 March 2021 (notwithstanding any appeals from the General Court to the ECJ).

Q
Asked on: 01 February 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Intelligence Services
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government with which countries the UK has no intelligence sharing agreements.
A
Answered on: 15 February 2018

​It is the long standing policy of successive Governments not to comment on matters of intelligence.

Q
Asked on: 31 January 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Diplomatic Service
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government [This question has been withdrawn].
 
Withdrawn
Q
Asked on: 16 January 2018
Department for Transport
Driving: Licensing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to enable UK citizens who are resident in another EU member state and who have exchanged their UK driving licence for a licence in that state to exchange their current licence for a UK licence on the same conditions as their original UK licence.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 30 January 2018

UK citizens living in an EU Member State who have exchanged their driving licence in that country can apply for a UK licence if they return to the UK. Provided they meet requirements including residency and medical standards, they can be granted a licence with the same entitlements.

Q
Asked on: 15 January 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Balfour Declaration
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of which of the aspirations contained in the Balfour Declaration have been fulfilled; and if not all, which ones they consider not to have been fulfilled, and why.
A
Answered on: 29 January 2018

While we are proud that the UK played a role in helping to make a Jewish homeland a reality, the Balfour Declaration remains unfinished business. That is why we are committed to ensuring that the whole of Balfour is fulfilled, through a two-state solution which provides security and justice for both Israelis and Palestinians. Our focus now is on encouraging the parties to take steps which bring them closer to peace.

Q
Asked on: 15 January 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Palestinians: Recognition of States
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for (1) recognition of a Palestinian state, and (2) Jerusalem to be a shared capital, within a defined period of time, following the announcement by President Trump that the United States will recognise Jerusalem as the capital of Israel; and if they do not consider that there is a case to be made, why not.
A
Answered on: 29 January 2018

The Government wishes to see the creation of a sovereign, independent, contiguous, and viable Palestinian state living in peace and security, side by side with Israel, and with Jerusalem as a shared capital. We disagree with the US' decision to move its embassy to Jerusalem and recognise Jerusalem as the Israeli capital before a final status agreement. We believe it is unhelpful to prospects for peace in the region. The UK will recognise a Palestinian state at a time when it best serves the objective of peace. Recognition cannot end the occupation; only a negotiated agreement can. We regularly press both parties to engage in negotiations.

Q
Asked on: 15 January 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Palestinians: Recognition of States
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for imposing a fixed timetable for the achievement of an agreed settlement for a Palestinian state on both the government of Israel and the Palestinian Authority; and, in the absence of any such timetable or agreement, whether they intend to unilaterally recognise the state of Palestine.
A
Answered on: 29 January 2018

A resolution of the conflict that leads to peace and security for Israelis and Palestinians is long overdue. But the imposition of fixed timescales without agreement from the parties, and given the present absence of direct talks, is unlikely to be productive. The UK will recognise a Palestinian state at a time when it best serves the objective of peace. Bilateral recognition in itself cannot end the occupation. Without a negotiated settlement the occupation, and the problems that come with it, will continue.

Q
Asked on: 15 January 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Israel: USA
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have made any recent representations to the government of the United States concerning the application of the provisions of the Jerusalem Embassy Act 1995; and if so, what response they received.
A
Answered on: 29 January 2018

While we have not discussed the specific application of the provisions of the Jerusalem Embassy Act 1995 with the Government of the United States, the Prime Minister made clear in her statement of 6 December 2017 that the UK disagrees with the United States' plans to move its embassy to Jerusalem and recognise Jerusalem as the Israeli capital before a final status agreement. The Prime Minister reiterated our position when she spoke to President Trump in December 2017.

Q
Asked on: 12 December 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Trade Promotion
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to discuss the possible re-establishment of the Russo–British Trade and Investment Council during the forthcoming visit of the Foreign Secretary to Moscow.
A
Answered on: 21 December 2017

The Inter-Governmental Steering Committee on Trade and Investment was postponed in 2014, following Russia's illegal annexation of Crimea. Given Russia's continued destabilising activities in Ukraine, we have no plans to revive the talks.

The Foreign Secretary will be discussing a range of issues during his visit later this month, in particular international security issues including Ukraine, Syria, Iran and North Korea.

We have no current plans to appoint a trade envoy to Russia. The Department for International Trade (DIT) regularly assess markets' suitability for a Trade Envoy, based on a number of criteria, including the current political situation. DIT continues to support UK companies with targeted events and trade missions through our staff in the British Embassy in Moscow and the Consulates in St Petersburg and Ekaterinburg, provided they are compliant with EU sanctions legislation.

Grouped Questions: HL4125
Q
Asked on: 12 December 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Trade Promotion
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to appoint a Prime Minister’s trade envoy to Russia.
A
Answered on: 21 December 2017

The Inter-Governmental Steering Committee on Trade and Investment was postponed in 2014, following Russia's illegal annexation of Crimea. Given Russia's continued destabilising activities in Ukraine, we have no plans to revive the talks.

The Foreign Secretary will be discussing a range of issues during his visit later this month, in particular international security issues including Ukraine, Syria, Iran and North Korea.

We have no current plans to appoint a trade envoy to Russia. The Department for International Trade (DIT) regularly assess markets' suitability for a Trade Envoy, based on a number of criteria, including the current political situation. DIT continues to support UK companies with targeted events and trade missions through our staff in the British Embassy in Moscow and the Consulates in St Petersburg and Ekaterinburg, provided they are compliant with EU sanctions legislation.

Grouped Questions: HL4124
Q
Asked on: 29 November 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Central Asia: EU External Relations
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether (1) the UK Ambassador to the Republic of Uzbekistan, and (2) any other member of Embassy staff, attended meetings of the 13th EU–Central Asia Ministerial Meeting in Samarkand in November; and if so, what was the outcome of those meetings.
A
Answered on: 13 December 2017

The Ministerial meeting was held between the Foreign Ministers of the countries of Central Asia and the EU High Representative for Foreign and Security Policy, Federica Mogherini, who represented EU member states. As with other EU Member States, the UK was not represented directly. They committed to adopting a new EU-Central Asia strategy and regular EU-Central Asia summits in a Joint Communiqué issued after the meeting. Ms Mogherini commended the Foreign Ministers' commitment to reform and to working together in regional coordination and co-operation with the EU.

Q
Asked on: 29 November 2017
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Uzbekistan: Taxation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have received a request from the government of Uzbekistan to support Uzbekistan’s economic policy by contributing to a tax reform programme through an appropriate professional development programme; if so, what was their response; and from which source of funding such support would be met.
A
Answered on: 13 December 2017

No such request has been received.

Q
Asked on: 23 November 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have determined in what circumstances they would withdraw from negotiations to exit from the EU; and if so, what are those circumstances.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 29 November 2017

We continue to engage constructively, as a full and responsible Member State in the negotiations. For our part, we are ready to move these negotiations on, as doing so will allow us to best achieve our joint objectives and move towards a deal that works for both the UK and the EU.

We are confident that a future partnership between the UK and EU is in the interests of both sides, so we are approaching these negotiations with optimism. We do not want or expect a no deal outcome.

Q
Asked on: 05 September 2017
Home Office
Visas
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether biometric and fingerprint data taken from a visa applicant's application to enter the UK are deleted from any database if that applicant is subsequently refused entry; and if not, for what specific purpose the data are retained.
Answered on: 18 September 2017

Fingerprints taken from visa applicants are normally retained for up to ten years regardless of whether the application was successful, as set out in regulations made under the Nationality, Immigration and Asylum Act 2002.

This enables the Secretary of State to identify easily those who make further applications for visas to come to the UK, preventing immigration abuse and those who are a risk of high harm from entering the country.

Q
Asked on: 20 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, with regard to the rights of citizens being negotiated with the EU-27, what progress has been made to date; what are their negotiating red lines; and when they anticipate that those negotiations will conclude.
Answered on: 03 August 2017

The Citizens’ Rights Working Group completed a technical note that maps the alignment between the EU and UK positions, to prioritise future discussions. It can be found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/joint-technical-note-on-the-comparison-of-eu-uk-positions-on-citizens-rights.

There is much common ground between the UK’s and the EU’s positions on citizens’ rights. We are both clear that we want to protect the broad range of rights and entitlements currently enjoyed by both EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU. However, there are, naturally, points on which our positions differ.

We are making a fair and serious offer, and want to reach a reciprocal agreement as quickly as possible.

Q
Asked on: 19 July 2017
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, with reference to paragraph 31 of their White Paper Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU, published on 26 June, whether EU citizens in the UK and their family members, in particular children of EU citizens eligible for settled status, will be able to apply for settled status as a family unit or whether each member of the family will be required to make a separate application for settled status.
Answered on: 01 August 2017

It is intended to make the application process for the new settled status as streamlined and user-friendly as possible. Further details will be published in due course.

Q
Asked on: 30 June 2016
Cabinet Office
Groceries Code Adjudicator
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government, in the event of the UK's withdrawal from the EU, whether they plan to amend domestic legislation prior to the ratification of any final outcome of negotiations with the EU.
A
Answered on: 07 July 2016

The implementation of the withdrawal agreement will be a matter for the next government and the new Prime Minister.

Q
Asked on: 30 June 2016
Cabinet Office
Groceries Code Adjudicator
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government whether they intend to table motions in both Houses of Parliament to enable Parliament to debate the negotiations for the UK exiting the EU holistically, or whether they intend to table motions to debate individual elements of the negotiations.
A
Answered on: 07 July 2016

This is a matter for the new Prime Minister and their Cabinet. As the PM has said, we have now got to look at all the detailed arrangements, and Parliament will clearly have a role in making sure that we find the best way forward.

Q
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether those EU citizens who have lived in the UK for more than five years, and who have therefore already qualified for permanent residency status, will be treated in the same manner as EU citizens who have not so qualified, for the purpose of applying for any new citizenship status following Brexit.
Answered on: 25 July 2017

For the purpose of applying for citizenship, individuals will be required to meet the current eligibility criteria for naturalisation. These include a period of continuous residence, being of good character, and having sufficient knowledge of English and of life in the UK. A person who is married to or the civil partner of a British citizen can apply for naturalisation once settled; others must wait until they have been settled for 12 months.

Those who are already permanently resident in the UK will be able to apply for citizenship if they meet the statutory requirements.

Those who are not permanently resident must first apply for settled status. To do so, they must have been resident in the UK before a specified date and have completed a period of five years’ continuous residence. Once they are settled they can apply for British citizenship, if they meet the other statutory requirements.

Q
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Home Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government under what circumstances a British citizen resident in the UK may seek leave for elderly dependants to enter the UK; and whether, following Brexit, the same rules will apply to EU citizens who have been granted permanent residency status.
Answered on: 25 July 2017

In ‘The United Kingdom’s Exit from the European Union: Safeguarding the Position of EU Citizens Living in the UK and UK Nationals Living in the EU’ (Cm 9464), published on 26 June 2017, we indicated in paragraph 30 that, in respect of EU citizens who arrived here before the specified date, their family members who come to the UK after we leave the EU will be subject to the same rules that apply to non-EU nationals joining British citizens, or alternatively to the post-exit arrangements for EU citizens who arrive after the specified date. The current Immigration Rules for adult dependent relatives of British citizens are contained in Appendix FM: family members.

Q
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, in the light of the offer to UK citizens living in other EU member states made by the EU on 22 May, why the Prime Minister made a separate, and different, offer to EU citizens living in the UK on 22 June; whether they intend to negotiate to bring those two offers into line; and if so, how.
Answered on: 24 July 2017

The Prime Minister has always been clear that our first priority is to reach agreement on the post-exit position of EU citizens now living in the UK and of UK nationals and living in other EU countries. The UK’s offer on citizens rights is set out in the policy paper “Safeguarding the position of EU citizens in the UK and UK nationals in the EU” and seeks to ensure that EU citizens in the UK retain their rights to residence, benefits and pensions, and access to services, including healthcare and education. It makes clear that the UK expects reciprocity for UK nationals living in the EU in return for its offer which we believe is a fair and serious one.

Q
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, in the light of the Prime Minister's offer made on 22 June concerning EU citizens living in the UK, in particular the statement that the UK courts would have jurisdiction over the enforcement of those rights, how they intend to ensure that those individual rights will be enforced; whether they intend to legislate to ensure that European Court of Justice (ECJ) judgments relating to citizenship rights following Brexit will be enforceable in the UK courts; whether, and if so how, they intend to ensure that decisions of the UK courts and ECJ in this area do not diverge in terms of their interpretation of the relevant agreements; and whether those matters will form part of the Article 50 withdrawal agreement.
Answered on: 24 July 2017

The agreement on Citizens Right will be enshrined in UK law and enforceable through the UK judicial system, up to and including the Supreme Court. We are also ready to make commitments in the Withdrawal Agreement which will have the status of international law. We are committed to a rules-based international order and the UK takes its responsibilities signed up to via international agreements seriously.

Q
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they have given any consideration to the creation of a new supra-national dispute resolution mechanism relating to the enforcement of the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and UK citizens living in the the EU following Brexit.
Answered on: 24 July 2017

We recognise that the large majority of ​international agreements involve some form of dispute resolution or enforcement mechanism​ and there are a range of models for dispute resolution mechanisms in international agreements.
​We have been clear that we will bring an end to the jurisdiction of the European Court of Justice in the United Kingdom. The dispute resolution mechanisms adopted as part of our future relationship with the EU will be a matter for negotiation.

Q
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Department for Exiting the European Union
Lords
Her Majesty's Government whether they intend to negotiate an agreement relating to the rights of EU citizens living in the UK and UK citizens living in the EU following Brexit separately to other aspects of the Brexit negotiations; and if so, whether they intend for that agreement to come into force in the event that an overall withdrawal agreement is not reached by March 2019.
Answered on: 24 July 2017

The Prime Minister has been clear that we want to have reached an agreement about our future partnership, which includes citizens rights, by the time the two-year Article 50 process has ended in March 2019. The rights of EU citizens living in the UK and UK citizens living in the EU following exit is of importance to both sides, and we are sure it can be agreed in the time period set out by the Treaty.

Q
Asked on: 11 July 2017
Home Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to ensure that EU nationals living in the UK are not discriminated against, for example in respect of letting arrangements and employment, (1) during the Brexit negotiating period, and (2) following Brexit.
Answered on: 24 July 2017

The Government has set out its intention in its published document “Safeguarding the position of EU citizens living in the UK and UK nationals living in the EU” to issue residence documentation to EU citizens who will be granted settled status on the basis of their residence in the UK. The Government will set out its plans in due course for redesigning the immigration system to introduce controls on future migration to the UK by EU citizens, including any plans for adjusting statutory checks by employers, landlords and other service providers.

Q
Asked on: 12 July 2017
Home Office
Lords
Her Majesty's Government, in the light of the responsibilities imposed on landlords, employers and others to check individuals' immigration statuses, what guidance they will issue to enable those responsible for such checks to differentiate between (1) EU citizens who are entitled to settled status following Brexit, and (2) those who are not entitled to such status.
Answered on: 24 July 2017

The Government has set out its intention in its published document “Safeguarding the position of EU citizens living in the UK and UK nationals living in the EU” to issue residence documentation to EU nationals who will be granted indefinite leave to remain on the basis of their residence in the UK. The Government will set out its plans in due course for redesigning the immigration system to introduce controls on future migration to the UK by EU citizens, including any plans for adjusting statutory checks by employers, landlords and other service providers.

Q
Asked on: 27 June 2016
HM Treasury
Asylum
Lords
To ask Her Majesty’s Government what measures they and the Bank of England will be taking to protect and promote (1) the City of London, and (2) Edinburgh, as financial centres until negotiations to exit the EU are completed.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Neill of Gatley
Answered on: 11 July 2016

The Chancellor has met with financial institutions this week to discuss the impact of the United Kingdom’s decision to leave the European Union.

Britain’s economy and financial system are fundamentally strong. Action by the government and the Bank of England over the last six years has substantially strengthened the resilience of the financial system, and the authorities have all the necessary tools in place to protect financial stability.

The UK is a leading global financial centre serving not just Britain or Europe, but the entire world. It has natural strengths such as a central time zone and the English language, together with an unrivalled pool of firms and investors, supported by world leading legal and professional services. Major banks from across the globe have bases in the UK, and the UK has the fourth highest share of cross-border banking. It is also fast establishing itself as a global hub for renminbi, rupee, Islamic finance, green finance and FinTech business.

Formal negotiations with the EU will not begin until the UK triggers Article 50. In the meantime, and during the negotiations that will follow, there will be no change to people’s rights to travel and work, and to the way our goods and services are traded, or to the way our economy and financial system is regulated.

The government is committed to deepening relationships with new and established trade partners. Earlier this week the Chancellor laid out plans to build a highly competitive economy by targeting a corporation tax rate of less than 15%, focusing on a new push for investment from China, ensuring support for bank lending, redoubling efforts to invest in the Northern Powerhouse and maintaining the UK’s fiscal credibility.

The government will also maintain an open and constructive dialogue with the UK financial services industry, including through the Financial Services Trade and Investment Board, which is tasked with boosting and promoting the UK’s financial services competitiveness position and supporting jobs. Government and industry collaboration will continue to play a central role in delivering a global, sustainable, innovative and competitive UK financial services industry that continues to go from strength to strength.

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