Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019-21 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 15 May 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Fund
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of applying to remove the EU State Aid cap on the Retail, Hospitality and Leisure Grant Scheme for sectors that are not affected by state aid rules.
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 February 2020
Home Office
Members: Correspondence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to her oral contribution of 9 January 2020, Official Report, column 588, whether she has received a response to her letter of 22 October 2019 to the European Commission on arrangements for refugee family reunion from 1 January 2021.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 11 February 2020

Whilst the Home Secretary wrote to the EU Commission on 22 October 2019, the Commission have not yet responded.

The Prime Minister made clear in his written statement to Parliament on 3 February that the UK is ready to discuss cooperation on asylum, including family reunion, with the EU.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 February 2020
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of EU citizens over the age of 65 living in the UK that have not applied for settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 11 February 2020

Published information on EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) applications and concluded applications by the applicant’s age to 31 December 2019, can be found in the Home Office’s ‘EU Settlement Scheme quarterly statistics’, statistics tables, tables EUSS_02 and EUSS_04 respectively, available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-quarterly-statistics-december-2019.

The published figures refer specifically to applications made to the EUSS and cannot be directly compared with Office for National Statistics (ONS) estimates of the resident population of EU/EEA nationals in the UK. The published EUSS figures include non-EEA family members, Irish nationals, and eligible EEA citizens not resident in the UK, none of whom are usually included in ONS estimates of the resident EU population. Furthermore, the population estimates do not take account of people’s migration intentions and will include people who have come to the UK for a range of purposes, including some who have no intention to settle in the UK.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 February 2020
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2020 to Question 3789 on Immigration: EU Nationals, how many people that applied for settled status have been granted pre-settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 11 February 2020

Published information on EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) conclusions by outcome type can be found in the Home Office’s fifth ‘EU Settlement Scheme statistics’, monthly statistics tables, table 2, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-statistics-december-2019.

Applicants to the EUSS who choose to provide their National Insurance Number as part of the application process are asked to confirm whether they agree with the status that the automated checks with the Department for Work and Pensions and HM Revenue and Customs confirm they are eligible for.

In cases where the applicant does not agree the level of status offered, caseworkers work with the applicant to identify the evidence needed to be granted the status they claim to be eligible for. Nobody has been granted pre-settled status without first being offered the opportunity to submit evidence that they qualify for settled status.

With regard to the accuracy of decision making, all cases in which an applicant is being granted a status other than that claimed are subject to a secondary supervisory check.

Grouped Questions: 12353
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 04 February 2020
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2020 to Question 3789 on Immigration: EU Nationals, what assessment her Department has made of the accuracy of decision-making on granting pre-settled status to EU citizens that applied for settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 11 February 2020

Published information on EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS) conclusions by outcome type can be found in the Home Office’s fifth ‘EU Settlement Scheme statistics’, monthly statistics tables, table 2, available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-statistics-december-2019.

Applicants to the EUSS who choose to provide their National Insurance Number as part of the application process are asked to confirm whether they agree with the status that the automated checks with the Department for Work and Pensions and HM Revenue and Customs confirm they are eligible for.

In cases where the applicant does not agree the level of status offered, caseworkers work with the applicant to identify the evidence needed to be granted the status they claim to be eligible for. Nobody has been granted pre-settled status without first being offered the opportunity to submit evidence that they qualify for settled status.

With regard to the accuracy of decision making, all cases in which an applicant is being granted a status other than that claimed are subject to a secondary supervisory check.

Grouped Questions: 12352
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 February 2020
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 23 January 2020 to Question 3789 on Immigration: EU Nationals, whether her Department has used the electoral roll to contact EU citizens on applying for (a) settled or (b) pre-settled status.
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 15 January 2020
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate her Department has made of the number of EU citizens resident in the UK that have not applied for (a) settled (b) pre-settled status.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 23 January 2020

The latest published information shows that more than 2.7 million (2,756,100) EU Settlement Scheme applications had been received up to 31 December 2019. The latest figures can be found in the Home Office’s ‘EU Settlement Scheme monthly statistics’ available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-statistics-december-2019

The published figures refer specifically to applications made to the EU Settlement Scheme and cannot be directly compared with estimates of the resident population of EU/EEA nationals in the UK. The published figures include non-EEA family members, Irish nationals, and eligible EEA citizens not resident in the UK, none of whom are usually included in estimates of the resident EU population. Furthermore, the population estimates do not take account of people’s migration intentions and will include people who have come to the UK for a range of purposes, including some who have no intention to settle in the UK.

In order to ensure that resident EEA nationals and their family members understand how and by when to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme, the Home Office has put in place a comprehensive communications and engagement plan, using all available channels to reach our audiences – such as marketing, presentations, email updates, toolkits and webinars.

The Home Office has delivered a £4 million marketing campaign to encourage resident EEA nationals to apply and further campaign activity is planned. Alongside this campaign activity, we have also undertaken extensive engagement and outreach with stakeholder groups, including employers, local authorities and community organisations. No-one will be left behind, which is why we are working in partnership with representatives of vulnerable groups and other experts to make sure everyone knows what they need to do and has the right level of support.

Grouped Questions: 3790
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 15 January 2020
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department have taken to contact EU citizens resident in the UK who have not yet applied for settled or pre-settled status, in order to regularise their residency in the UK after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 23 January 2020

The latest published information shows that more than 2.7 million (2,756,100) EU Settlement Scheme applications had been received up to 31 December 2019. The latest figures can be found in the Home Office’s ‘EU Settlement Scheme monthly statistics’ available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/eu-settlement-scheme-statistics-december-2019

The published figures refer specifically to applications made to the EU Settlement Scheme and cannot be directly compared with estimates of the resident population of EU/EEA nationals in the UK. The published figures include non-EEA family members, Irish nationals, and eligible EEA citizens not resident in the UK, none of whom are usually included in estimates of the resident EU population. Furthermore, the population estimates do not take account of people’s migration intentions and will include people who have come to the UK for a range of purposes, including some who have no intention to settle in the UK.

In order to ensure that resident EEA nationals and their family members understand how and by when to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme, the Home Office has put in place a comprehensive communications and engagement plan, using all available channels to reach our audiences – such as marketing, presentations, email updates, toolkits and webinars.

The Home Office has delivered a £4 million marketing campaign to encourage resident EEA nationals to apply and further campaign activity is planned. Alongside this campaign activity, we have also undertaken extensive engagement and outreach with stakeholder groups, including employers, local authorities and community organisations. No-one will be left behind, which is why we are working in partnership with representatives of vulnerable groups and other experts to make sure everyone knows what they need to do and has the right level of support.

Grouped Questions: 3789
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