Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019-21 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-37 out of 37
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 May 2020
Home Office
Cannabis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to paragraphs 4 and 5 on page 3 of her Department's Factsheet on Cannabis, CBD and other cannabinoids, what assessment she has made of the limit of detection that is the appropriate level of sensitivity to accurately determine through laboratory analysis that there are no controlled cannabinoids present in a CBD product and that the product contains CBD in its pure form.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 02 June 2020

The Department has made no assessment of limits of detection in relation to testing for the presence of controlled cannabinoids in CBD products. The Home Office approach is one of caution, that is, that a CBD product is likely to be controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 (‘the 2001 Regulations’) if it contains any controlled cannabinoids.

The term ‘administration’ in the exempt product definition is not defined by the 2001 Regulations. The Human Medicines Regulations 2012 provides the following as part of its definition:

““administer” means administer to a human being—

(a) orally, by injection, or by introduction into the body in any other way; or

(b) by external application (whether or not by direct application to the body)”

The interpretation of legislation is ultimately a matter for the courts to decide.

Grouped Questions: 48250
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 May 2020
Home Office
Cannabis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to limb A of the definition of an exempted product on page five of her Department's Drug Licensing Factsheet - Cannabis, CBD and other cannabinoids, what her Department's definition is of the term administration.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 02 June 2020

The Department has made no assessment of limits of detection in relation to testing for the presence of controlled cannabinoids in CBD products. The Home Office approach is one of caution, that is, that a CBD product is likely to be controlled under the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971 and the Misuse of Drugs Regulations 2001 (‘the 2001 Regulations’) if it contains any controlled cannabinoids.

The term ‘administration’ in the exempt product definition is not defined by the 2001 Regulations. The Human Medicines Regulations 2012 provides the following as part of its definition:

““administer” means administer to a human being—

(a) orally, by injection, or by introduction into the body in any other way; or

(b) by external application (whether or not by direct application to the body)”

The interpretation of legislation is ultimately a matter for the courts to decide.

Grouped Questions: 48249
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Health Services: Technology
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies on (a) improving access to innovative medicines and (b) fostering the life sciences sector of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence health technology evaluation review.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 29 May 2020

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is reviewing its methods for the development of technology appraisal and highly specialised technology recommendations in line with the commitment in the 2019 voluntary scheme for branded medicines pricing and access. The scheme also states the Government’s expectations for the review as follows: ‘“The Department expects that any future changes to NICE methods and processes would respond to the new types of innovation coming to the market, be consistent with improving the health gain achieved by spending on new innovative medicines, and support faster adoption of the most clinically and cost effective medicines.”’

Grouped Questions: 32039
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
National Institute for Health and Care Excellence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, if he will support the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence to undertake its methods and processes in a way that (a) enables the attractiveness of the UK as a place to conduct clinical trials or supply human medicines and (b) enables that organisation to fulfil its statutory duty to promote innovation.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 29 May 2020

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is reviewing its methods for the development of technology appraisal and highly specialised technology recommendations in line with the commitment in the 2019 voluntary scheme for branded medicines pricing and access. The scheme also states the Government’s expectations for the review as follows: ‘“The Department expects that any future changes to NICE methods and processes would respond to the new types of innovation coming to the market, be consistent with improving the health gain achieved by spending on new innovative medicines, and support faster adoption of the most clinically and cost effective medicines.”’

Grouped Questions: 32038
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Clinical Trials
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what guidance he has provided to regulatory and health authorities on ensuring that the UK remains an attractive place to conduct clinical trials and supply human medicines.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 29 May 2020

The Department is working directly with the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency, Health Research Authority, NHS England and NHS Improvement, the National Institute for Health Research and other partners across the health and life sciences sectors to ensure that the United Kingdom remains an attractive place to conduct clinical trials and supply human medicines.

The Medicines and Medical Devices Bill provides the UK the means to remain a world-leading regulator and an important market for medicines and medical devices and supports the delivery of the Life Sciences Industrial Strategy to make the UK a leading global hub for life sciences. The Bill makes clear the importance of ensuring the UK is an attractive place to bring new products to market and conduct clinical trials, specifying that before making any regulations under the Bill, the Secretary of State must consider this point.

We are determined to maintain the UK’s position as one of the best locations globally to run clinical trials.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 April 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Coronavirus: LGBT People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the health effects of the Covid-19 outbreak on (a) LGBT+ people and (b) other people with protected characteristics; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Ms Nadine Dorries
Answered on: 04 May 2020

The Department of Health and Social Care has indicated that it will not be possible to answer this question within the usual time period. An answer is being prepared and will be provided as soon as it is available.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 April 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Homelessness: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how the specific needs of (a) LGBT+ homeless people and (b) other homeless people with protected characteristics have been taken into account in the steps the Government is taking to tackle the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Luke Hall
Answered on: 04 May 2020

We have provided funding to assist local authorities to provide accommodation and support to vulnerable people who are at risk of, or who have been diagnosed with, coronavirus. This may include people identifying as LGBT+, as well as those who identify as having another protected characteristic.

£3.2 billion of additional funding was provided to local authorities to enable them to respond to Covid-19 pressures across the services they deliver. This is in addition to £3.2 million in targeted funding to ensure that we minimise the risk to those rough sleepers unable to self-isolate.

The Chancellor also announced a £750 million package of support for frontline charities across the UK. This will help charities to provide support to vulnerable people during the pandemic, including those whose beneficiaries have a protected characteristic.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 April 2020
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
LGBT People: Human Rights
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how the Government is using its term as co-chair of the Equal Rights Coalition to ensure that LGBT+ people's rights are being upheld globally (a) during the covid-19 pandemic and (b) more generally.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 04 May 2020

As co-chair of the Equal Rights Coalition (ERC) in partnership with Argentina, we are leading the ERC's work, in co-operation with civil society, to address violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals, and the ongoing criminalisation of same sex conduct in 70 countries. We have started work on a new ERC Strategy to guide and re-energise the work of the ERC, and are currently working on an ERC statement that calls on all governments to limit the repercussions of the Covid-19 pandemic on people identified based on real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity or sex characteristics. Likewise as Commonwealth Chair-in-Office, the UK continues to raise the importance of countering discrimination within the Commonwealth, including on grounds of gender identity or sexual orientation. In both of these roles working through international organisations, we regularly raise concerns about countries that do not comply with their human rights obligations and promote non-discrimination against LGBT people, including during the COVID-19 pandemic.

On 9 April, the UK participated in the UN Human Rights Council's first ever virtual conversation with the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. Discussion focused on the human rights implications of the COVID-19 crisis which included concerns about increased risks on vulnerable groups. In his statement to the Council, our Ambassador to the UN in Geneva stressed the importance to ensure that parliaments, media and civil society all play their role to scrutinise the actions of governments and international agencies, and that we do not lose sight of the international human rights frameworks. The British Government remains committed to upholding the rights and freedoms of LGBT people in all circumstances.

Grouped Questions: 41367
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 April 2020
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
LGBT People: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, how his Department is using its term as (a) co-chair of the Equal Rights Coalition and (b) Commonwealth Chair in Office to ensure governments around the world are protecting LGBT+ communities from increased marginalisation and violence during the covid-19 pandemic.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 04 May 2020

As co-chair of the Equal Rights Coalition (ERC) in partnership with Argentina, we are leading the ERC's work, in co-operation with civil society, to address violence and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) individuals, and the ongoing criminalisation of same sex conduct in 70 countries. We have started work on a new ERC Strategy to guide and re-energise the work of the ERC, and are currently working on an ERC statement that calls on all governments to limit the repercussions of the Covid-19 pandemic on people identified based on real or perceived sexual orientation, gender identity or sex characteristics. Likewise as Commonwealth Chair-in-Office, the UK continues to raise the importance of countering discrimination within the Commonwealth, including on grounds of gender identity or sexual orientation. In both of these roles working through international organisations, we regularly raise concerns about countries that do not comply with their human rights obligations and promote non-discrimination against LGBT people, including during the COVID-19 pandemic.

On 9 April, the UK participated in the UN Human Rights Council's first ever virtual conversation with the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights. Discussion focused on the human rights implications of the COVID-19 crisis which included concerns about increased risks on vulnerable groups. In his statement to the Council, our Ambassador to the UN in Geneva stressed the importance to ensure that parliaments, media and civil society all play their role to scrutinise the actions of governments and international agencies, and that we do not lose sight of the international human rights frameworks. The British Government remains committed to upholding the rights and freedoms of LGBT people in all circumstances.

Grouped Questions: 41366
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 April 2020
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
LGBT People: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to ensure that support for LGBT+ initiatives remain adequately resourced during the covid-19 pandemic.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 04 May 2020

The British Government is fundamentally opposed to all forms of discrimination and works to uphold the rights and freedoms of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender (LGBT) people in all circumstances, including during the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding for LGBT projects comes from a variety of sources. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office will consider future funding cycles for FCO funded programmes as part of its preparation for the Spending Review.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 April 2020
Department for International Development
Overseas Aid: LGBT People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps she is taking to ensure that support for LGBT+ initiatives are adequately resourced during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 04 May 2020

Working on LGBT rights is essential to meet DFID’s vision of a world where no one is left behind. This is central to the Global Goals and a secure and prosperous world. Organisations implementing LGBT initiatives are facing significant challenges as a result of COVID-19. DFID supports many programmes on access to services for all, including vulnerable and persecuted minorities, promotion and protection of rights and tackling stigma and discrimination. These programmes include initiatives on LGBT inclusion. DFID is in discussion with partners to find flexible solutions to ensure they can use the resources allocated to implement these programmes effectively.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 April 2020
Department for Education
Relationship and Sex Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether it remains his Department's policy that statutory relationships and sex education will be implemented in schools from September 2020.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 04 May 2020

The Department is giving due consideration to the implementation of the statutory relationships, sex and health education (RSHE) curriculum in the context of COVID-19. There is no intention to change the regulatory requirements for the implementation of RSHE.

The Department continues to work with key stakeholders and subject experts to develop a comprehensive programme of support for schools which includes a digital service to be delivered through GOV.UK.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 April 2020
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: LGBT People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps she is taking to ensure that the most vulnerable LGBTI+ people in developing countries (a) have fair and equal access and (b) receive non-discriminatory treatment in clinics and other healthcare settings in relation to (i) covid-19, (ii) hormone, (ii) antiretroviral, (iii) PrEP, (iv) PEP and (v) condom provision during the covid-19 pandemic.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 04 May 2020

The UK Government works to ensure that all aid reaches the most vulnerable including lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people. Vulnerable populations will experience COVID 19 outbreaks differently. COVID 19 is likely to reinforce their marginalised position in society, their experience of discrimination, violence and stigma, and further limit their access to essential support and services. For this reason, on 9 April, further guidance was circulated across DFID highlighting that inclusion must be central to our response to COVID 19 and the specific contexts and needs of vulnerable people such as LGBT people should be taken into account when developing practical programmes to tackle COVID 19.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Cancer: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what Cancer Drugs Fund expenditure cap is for (a) 2019-20 and (b) 2020-21.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

The Government established the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) to ensure access for National Health Service patients in England to effective cancer drugs that would not otherwise have been available to them. New arrangements for the assessment and adoption of new cancer drugs were introduced in 2016 to help improve patient access to new cancer drugs and the CDF is now linked to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) technology appraisal programme.

Under the new arrangements, NICE now appraises all new cancer drugs, and NICE is able to recommend a drug for use through the CDF where there is too much uncertainty to be able to recommend routine use. All cancer drugs recommended by NICE are eligible for funding through the CDF from the point of NICE’s draft guidance.

Since it was reformed in July 2016, the CDF has had a fixed budget of £340 million. This will remain the same for 2020-21.

Grouped Questions: 32029
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Cancer: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has made an assessment of the reasons why the Cancer Drugs Fund has been underspent; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

The Government established the Cancer Drugs Fund (CDF) to ensure access for National Health Service patients in England to effective cancer drugs that would not otherwise have been available to them. New arrangements for the assessment and adoption of new cancer drugs were introduced in 2016 to help improve patient access to new cancer drugs and the CDF is now linked to the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) technology appraisal programme.

Under the new arrangements, NICE now appraises all new cancer drugs, and NICE is able to recommend a drug for use through the CDF where there is too much uncertainty to be able to recommend routine use. All cancer drugs recommended by NICE are eligible for funding through the CDF from the point of NICE’s draft guidance.

Since it was reformed in July 2016, the CDF has had a fixed budget of £340 million. This will remain the same for 2020-21.

Grouped Questions: 32028
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, which medicinal products were made available on the NHS with a managed access agreement in (a) 2018-19 and (b) 2019 to date.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has recommended 11 topics for access via a Managed Access Agreement (MAA) in 2019/20 to date. In 2018/19, 12 topics were recommended via an MAA.

These topics are listed in the following table.

NICE ref

Drug

Indication

Managed access start date

2018/19

TA522

Pembrolizumab

locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer where cisplatin is unsuitable

27 April 2018

TA529

Crizotinib

ROS1-positive advanced non-small-cell lung cancer

31 May 2018

TA528

Niraparib

platinum-sensitive ovarian cancer after second response to chemotherapy

1 June 2018

TA540

Pembrolizumab

Relapsed or refractory classical Hodgkin lymphoma

25 July 2018

TA554

Tisagenlecleucel

relapsed or refractory B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

16 November 2018

TA553

Pembrolizumab

adjuvant treatment of resected melanoma with high risk of recurrence

19 November 2018

TA557

Pembrolizumab (with pemetrexed and platinum chemotherapy)

untreated metastatic non-squamous NSCLC

21 November 2018

TA558

Nivolumab

adjuvant treatment of resected stage III and IV melanoma

30 November 2018

TA559

Axicabtagene ciloleucel

diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and primary mediastinal B-cell lymphoma after 2 or more systemic therapies

7 December 2018

TA567

Tisagenlecleucel

relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma after 2 or more systemic therapies

1 February 2019

TA573

Daratumumab with bortezomib

Multiple myeloma

12 March 2019

TA578

Durvalumab

NSCLC

28 March 2019

2019/2020

TA579

Abemaciclib with fulvestrant

HER2-negative breast cancer after endocrine therapy

2 April 2019

TA581

Nivolumab with ipilimumab

untreated advanced renal cell carcinoma

5 April 2019

TA592

Cemiplimab

cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma

2 July 2019

TA588

Nusinersen

Spinal Muscular Atrophy

3 July 2019

TA593

Ribociclib

in combination with fulvestrant for treating advanced hormone-receptor positive, HER2-negative breast cancer

17 July 2019

TA598

Olaparib

maintenance treatment of newly diagnosed BRCA-mutated advanced ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer, after response to first-line platinum-based chemotherapy

26 July 2019

TA600

Pembrolizumab with carboplatin and paclitaxel

Metastatic squamous NSCLC

8 August 2019

TA611

Rucaparib

maintenance treatment of relapsed platinum-sensitive ovarian, fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer

11 October 2019

TA619

Palbociclib in combination with fulvestrant

advanced, HR+ HER2- breast cancer after endocrine therapy

28 November 2019

TA620

Olaparib

maintenance treatment of BRCA-mutated platinum sensitive relapsed ovarian, fallopian tube and peritoneal cancer, after response to platinum-based chemotherapy

29 November 2019

HST12

Cerliponase alfa

neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis type 2

5 November 2019

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential effect of the NHS Commercial Framework on access to medicines through managed access agreements.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

NHS England and NHS Improvement has advised that the Commercial Framework for new medicines remains in draft at this time with publication expected in spring 2020. The Commercial Framework is designed to complement the processes and methods of the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence’s technology appraisal programme which provides direction on when managed access agreements may be appropriate. The framework will promote the opportunities that currently exist and clarify NHS England and NHS Improvement’s involvement within the existing arrangements rather than advising on new opportunities for managed access agreements.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Medical Treatments: Innovation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2020 to Question 18744 on Medical Treatments: Innovation,whether he plans to hold a public consultation on his proposals for an innovative medicines fund.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

Detailed proposals for the new Innovative Medicines Fund are in development and will be consulted on in due course. The Fund will build on the success of the reformed Cancer Drugs Fund so that doctors can use the most advanced, life-saving treatments for conditions such as autoimmune disease or cancer, or for children with other rare diseases.

Grouped Questions: 32033
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Rare Diseases: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 26 February 2020 to Question 18743 on Medical Treatments: Innovation, if he will include provisions on improving access to medicine for rare diseases as part of the innovative medicines fund.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

Detailed proposals for the new Innovative Medicines Fund are in development and will be consulted on in due course. The Fund will build on the success of the reformed Cancer Drugs Fund so that doctors can use the most advanced, life-saving treatments for conditions such as autoimmune disease or cancer, or for children with other rare diseases.

Grouped Questions: 32032
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to paragraph 3.21 of the 2019 voluntary scheme for branded medicines pricing and access, when NICE will review the process and methods for the highly specialised technology evaluation programme; and what methodology will be used in that review.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) has now initiated the review of its technology appraisal and highly specialised technologies methods in line with the commitment made in the 2019 Voluntary Scheme for Branded Medicines Pricing and Access. Further information about the process and timescale for the review is available on the NICE website at the following link:

https://www.nice.org.uk/about/what-we-do/our-programmes/nice-guidance/nice-technology-appraisal-guidance/changes-to-health-technology-evaluation

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Orphan Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of establishing a new orphan medicines pathway at NICE to enable orphan medicines which do not qualify for the highly specialised technology evaluation programme to be appraised.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

There are no current plans to establish a further National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) assessment programme for orphan medicines. Where companies are willing to price their drugs fairly in a way that reflects the benefits they bring to patients, NICE has been able to recommend a number of orphan medicines for routine NHS funding through its technology appraisal programme. NICE is reviewing its methods for the development of technology appraisal and highly specialised technology recommendations, including the methods for the assessment of medicines licensed for rare diseases. The creation of an Innovative Medicines Fund will also build on the success of the Cancer Drugs Fund and support access to the most advanced medicines for patients with rare diseases.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Orphan Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he made of the effect of the (a) introduction of the ultra-orphan pathway by the Scottish Medicines Consortium and (b) additional factors and modifiers for orphan medicines and medicines that have evidence of achieving a substantial improvement in life expectancy and/or quality of life considered by the Scottish Medicines Consortium in relation to informing methods and processes at the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) is responsible for the review of the methods it uses in the development of its technology appraisal and highly specialised technology recommendations in England. NICE has advised that additional factors and modifiers that may affect NICE’s decisions, including factors relevant to orphan medicines and medicines that substantially improve health and/or life expectancy, are being considered within its methods review. This review will give consideration to approaches in other health technology assessment bodies, including the devolved administrations.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Health Services: Technology
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence plans to publish the full outputs of the task and finish groups engaged in the development of its health technology evaluation review.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 27 April 2020

The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence has advised that it is considering the most appropriate way to publish the relevant information supporting the methods review work. Details will be released in due course.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Saudi Arabia: Women's Rights
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies of the ongoing judicial proceedings against women’s rights activists in Saudi Arabia; and whether UK officials have been granted access to attend the trial sessions.
A
Answered by: James Cleverly
Answered on: 27 March 2020

We are concerned about the continued detention of women's rights activists in Saudi Arabia. Saudi Arabia remains a Foreign and Commonwealth Office human rights priority country, particularly because of the use of the death penalty and restrictions on women's rights, freedom of expression, freedom of assembly and freedom of religion or belief. We will continue to call for political detainees, including women's rights defenders, to be given adequate legal representation. We have pressed for due process and raised concerns over the use of solitary confinement and the use of torture. The UK attends trials of international importance in all countries where permitted. The UK, along with other embassies in Saudi Arabia, has requested and been denied access to each and every trial we have been aware of since October 2018, with the exception of the trials for those involved in the killing of Jamal Khashoggi. We regularly raise human rights issues with Saudi Arabia, most recently by the Foreign Secretary during his visit earlier this month.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 19 March 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Saudi Arabia
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many Saudi citizens applied for asylum in the UK in (a) 2017, (b) 2018 and (c) 2019.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 27 March 2020

The Home Office publishes data on the number of asylum applications received by the UK in the chapter ‘How many people do we grant asylum or protection to?’ in the quarterly ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/immigration-statistics-quarterly-release

Data on the number of asylum applications broken down by nationality are available in tables Asy_D01 of the ‘Asylum applications, initial decisions and resettlement datasets’.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to the year ending December 2019.

Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the ‘summary tables’. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on asylum and resettlement.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’. https://www.gov.uk/search/research-and-statistics?keywords=immigration&content_store_document_type=upcoming_statistics&organisations%5B%5D=home-office&order=relevance

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 04 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Human Papillomavirus: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether human papillomavirus screening is able to identify specific strains of that virus.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 12 March 2020

Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is the primary screening test used in the National Health Service Cervical Screening Programme. This can be reviewed at the following links:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/human-papilloma-virus-hpv/

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/cervical-screening-programme-overview

While there are many different types of HPV, the screening programme in England uses tests to detect for HPV 16, 18 and several other high-risk HPV types. HPV 16 and 18 are the two most common high-risk strains of HPV that are found in 99.8% of cervical cancer cases. This can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/health-professional/cancer-statistics/statistics-by-cancer-type/cervical-cancer/risk-factors#heading-Two.

The results from a HPV screen test will indicate to the individual whether they are HPV positive or negative and the next steps.

HPV infection is very common and most abnormalities that develop as a result will clear themselves without intervention or treatment.

Grouped Questions: 24996
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 04 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Human Papillomavirus: Vaccination
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps Public Health England plans to take to assess the effectiveness of the HPV vaccination programme.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 12 March 2020

Public Health England (PHE) is conducting surveillance activities to monitor the effectiveness of the National Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Programme. The current HPV vaccine protects against two high-risk HPV types, HPV16 and HPV18 which cause around 80% of cervical cancers in the United Kingdom and two low-risk HPV types, HPV6 and HPV11 which cause most genital warts.

Surveillance conducted among young sexually active women in England has compared changes in the number of women who have a HPV infection over time since the introduction of the HPV vaccination.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 04 March 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Human Papillomavirus: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination status of the patient will be recorded under the new HPV primary screening programme.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 12 March 2020

Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is the primary screening test used in the National Health Service Cervical Screening Programme. This can be reviewed at the following links:

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/human-papilloma-virus-hpv/

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/cervical-screening-programme-overview

While there are many different types of HPV, the screening programme in England uses tests to detect for HPV 16, 18 and several other high-risk HPV types. HPV 16 and 18 are the two most common high-risk strains of HPV that are found in 99.8% of cervical cancer cases. This can be viewed at the following link:

https://www.cancerresearchuk.org/health-professional/cancer-statistics/statistics-by-cancer-type/cervical-cancer/risk-factors#heading-Two.

The results from a HPV screen test will indicate to the individual whether they are HPV positive or negative and the next steps.

HPV infection is very common and most abnormalities that develop as a result will clear themselves without intervention or treatment.

Grouped Questions: 24994
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 05 February 2020
Home Office
Cannabis: Imports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many schedule 1 (a) domestic and (b) import licences cannabis and cannabis-based products were granted in 2019.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 12 February 2020

In 2019, the Drugs and Firearms Licensing unit issued to premises in Great Britain 362 domestic licences covering possession of schedule 1 drugs.

Controlled drug import licences are issued for individual consignments with reference to the drug substance(s) contained in the shipment. An import licence can cover up to four different types of drug substance or preparation. A total of 452 import licences for shipments containing cannabis or with a controlled cannabinoid content were issued in 2019.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 29 January 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his policies on housing developments of the Campaign to Protect Rural England report titled, A housing design audit for England, published on 21 January 2020.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 10 February 2020

The Department welcomes the report and the research team provided evidence to the Building Better, Building Beautiful Commission and that their findings have informed the 45 recommendations from the commission. The Government will respond to in due course.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 29 January 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Planning Permission
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the proposed White Paper on planning will include guidance on the benefits of designing (a) higher density developments and (b) highways that are sensitive to their surroundings.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 10 February 2020

Guidance on design issues is not within the remit of the Planning White Paper. The purpose of the White Paper will be to make the planning process clearer, more accessible and more certain for all users, including homeowners and small businesses. It will also address resourcing and performance in Planning Departments. Designing at higher densities and making effective use of land, and the creation of highways that take into account place-making, are covered by our National Planning Policy Framework. These are also referenced within our recently published National Design Guide and are intended to form part of the forthcoming National Model Design Code.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
Asked on: 29 January 2020
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Planning Permission
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that local planning authorities reject planning applications which do not comply with the guidance set out in (a) the National Design Guide and (b) paragraph 130 of the National Planning Policy Framework.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 10 February 2020

Within the National Planning Policy Framework, and the National Design Guide, the importance of design quality and how it can be achieved was emphasised. Steps we have taken to ensure this is reflected in decision making include convening the Building Better, Building Beautiful Commission, which published its final report and recommendations on 30 January and which we will respond to in due course. We have also committed to producing the National Model Design Code this year which will set detailed standards for key elements of successful design.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 27 January 2020
Home Office
Cannabis: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) high-THC cultivation licences, (b) low-THC cultivation licences, (c) Schedule 1 domestic licences and (d) Schedule 1 import licences were granted in 2019.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 04 February 2020

In 2019, the Drugs and Firearms Licensing unit issued to premises in Great Britain (a) 33 low THC licences to cultivate low THC cannabis (b) 20 licences to cultivate high THC cannabis (c) 362 domestic licences covering possession of schedule 1.

Import licences are issued for individual drug substances as opposed to by schedule of drug. Thousands of drug substances could fall within schedule 1 control so it is not possible to provide a figure for the number of ‘schedule 1’ import licences granted.

Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 15 January 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Cannabis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether there are circumstances under which Specialist Importers of cannabis-based products for medicinal use are permitted to import that product in bulk.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 24 January 2020

Unlicensed cannabis-based products for medicinal use (CBPM) may only be imported to meet the special clinical need of individual patients. It is not currently possible to import bulk quantities of these products. This restriction forms part of the checks and balances that the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs asked the Government to put in place when rescheduling CBPMs to minimise the risk of misuse and diversion.

The Medicines and Healthcare products and Regulatory Agency has received 242 notifications for the importation of unlicensed CBPMs from specialist importers in the past 12 months.

Unlicensed medicines, including CBPMs are not assessed by the MHRA for quality, safety and efficacy, but must be notified to the MHRA prior to import and meet basic production standards.

Importers registered with the MHRA can import active pharmaceutical ingredients where intended for the production of a medicinal product for use in humans.

Grouped Questions: 3662 | 3663 | 3664
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 15 January 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Cannabis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many notifications the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has received from (a) pharmacies and (b) Specialist Importers on importation orders for unlicensed cannabis-based products for medicinal use in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 24 January 2020

Unlicensed cannabis-based products for medicinal use (CBPM) may only be imported to meet the special clinical need of individual patients. It is not currently possible to import bulk quantities of these products. This restriction forms part of the checks and balances that the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs asked the Government to put in place when rescheduling CBPMs to minimise the risk of misuse and diversion.

The Medicines and Healthcare products and Regulatory Agency has received 242 notifications for the importation of unlicensed CBPMs from specialist importers in the past 12 months.

Unlicensed medicines, including CBPMs are not assessed by the MHRA for quality, safety and efficacy, but must be notified to the MHRA prior to import and meet basic production standards.

Importers registered with the MHRA can import active pharmaceutical ingredients where intended for the production of a medicinal product for use in humans.

Grouped Questions: 3661 | 3663 | 3664
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 15 January 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Cannabis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency has assessed the (a) safety and (b) quality of unlicensed cannabis-based products for medicinal use.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 24 January 2020

Unlicensed cannabis-based products for medicinal use (CBPM) may only be imported to meet the special clinical need of individual patients. It is not currently possible to import bulk quantities of these products. This restriction forms part of the checks and balances that the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs asked the Government to put in place when rescheduling CBPMs to minimise the risk of misuse and diversion.

The Medicines and Healthcare products and Regulatory Agency has received 242 notifications for the importation of unlicensed CBPMs from specialist importers in the past 12 months.

Unlicensed medicines, including CBPMs are not assessed by the MHRA for quality, safety and efficacy, but must be notified to the MHRA prior to import and meet basic production standards.

Importers registered with the MHRA can import active pharmaceutical ingredients where intended for the production of a medicinal product for use in humans.

Grouped Questions: 3661 | 3662 | 3664
Q
Asked by Crispin Blunt
(Reigate)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 15 January 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Cannabis: Medical Treatments
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether there are circumstances under which Specialist Importers may import cannabis-based active pharmaceutical ingredients for use in the manufacturing of cannabis-based products for medicinal use in the UK.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 24 January 2020

Unlicensed cannabis-based products for medicinal use (CBPM) may only be imported to meet the special clinical need of individual patients. It is not currently possible to import bulk quantities of these products. This restriction forms part of the checks and balances that the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs asked the Government to put in place when rescheduling CBPMs to minimise the risk of misuse and diversion.

The Medicines and Healthcare products and Regulatory Agency has received 242 notifications for the importation of unlicensed CBPMs from specialist importers in the past 12 months.

Unlicensed medicines, including CBPMs are not assessed by the MHRA for quality, safety and efficacy, but must be notified to the MHRA prior to import and meet basic production standards.

Importers registered with the MHRA can import active pharmaceutical ingredients where intended for the production of a medicinal product for use in humans.

Grouped Questions: 3661 | 3662 | 3663
Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-37 out of 37
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100