Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Barnsley East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Dangerous Driving: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the oral contribution of the Leader of the House of Commons of 25 July 2019, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to increase the maximum penalty for causing death by dangerous driving.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 03 September 2019

We are focused on getting the law right, to ensure the changes we make are comprehensive, proportionate and, crucially, practical.

We will bring forward proposals for changes in the law to increase the maximum penalties for causing death by dangerous driving and careless driving under the influence of drink or drugs to life imprisonment, and create a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving as soon as possible. These proposals will take account of other government proposals for safer roads.

Q
(Peterborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Dangerous Driving: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 23 July 2019 to Question 277861, whether his Department has begun drafting legislative proposals to increase the maximum penalties for causing death by dangerous driving and careless driving under the influence of drink or drugs to life imprisonment and create a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving; and whether he plans to publish those proposals by October 2019.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 03 September 2019

We will bring forward proposals for changes in the law as soon as possible.

Q
Asked by Mike Kane
(Wythenshawe and Sale East)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Education
Teachers: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department have made of the quality of training for primary teachers in religious education; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 03 September 2019

Providing the best possible initial teacher training (ITT) is the focus of the Department’s drive to improve teaching standards. In order to be awarded qualified teacher status (QTS), trainees must demonstrate that they have met the Teachers’ Standards, which includes a requirement that they demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge. Ofsted is responsible for testing the quality of teacher training and at their most recent inspection, 99% of all teacher training providers were rated good or outstanding.

The amount of time that primary trainees spend in training on each of the subjects in the national curriculum is not specified by the Government. It is for ITT providers to use their professional judgement to determine the content and structure of courses, but they must be designed so that trainees can demonstrate that they meet all the required standards at the appropriate level by the end of their training. This includes religious education.

In July 2016, the Department published a ‘framework of core content for initial teacher training’, further guidance which states that ‘trainees must be conversant with a range of effective subject-specific pedagogical approaches’. The framework also outlines providers’ responsibility to audit trainees’ subject knowledge early in their training and make provision to ensure that trainees have sufficient subject knowledge to satisfy the standard by the end of their training.

Q
(Hendon)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Cabinet Office
Public Sector: Artificial Intelligence
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment the Government has made of the ability of artificial intelligence and new technologies to save money and improve services in the public sector.
A
Answered by: Oliver Dowden
Answered on: 03 September 2019

In June this year, the Government Technology Innovation Strategy was published which sets out how government will use emerging technologies to build better public services. In order to develop this, Ministers and officials conducted significant research across government and the wider public sector to understand the opportunities and challenges of wider deployment of emerging technologies in our public service delivery.

Alongside it, the Government Digital Service and Office for Artificial Intelligence published ‘A guide to using artificial intelligence in the public sector’ which provides guidance on how to build and use AI in the public sector. This was produced as part of the Al Review which identified opportunities for using Al in the public sector to drive productivity and efficiency.

The Review focused on central departments and identified opportunities for using AI in the public sector to drive productivity and efficiency. The Review also identified key barriers and enablers to AI adoption, and a number of key areas where the application of AI across
government could improve services and make them more efficient.

Q
Asked by Chris Ruane
(Vale of Clwyd)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register: Students
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of (a) the University of Sheffield's initiative on voter registration for students and (b) mandating universities to promote students to register to vote.
A
Answered by: Kevin Foster
Answered on: 03 September 2019

The Government is encouraged by the University of Sheffield’s experience but has no plans to mandate a single approach across the country.

The Government is, however, committed to ensuring the electoral registration system is responsive to the needs of students. Ministerial Guidance was issued to the Office for Students (OfS) in February 2018 acting on a commitment made in Parliament during the
passage of the Higher Education and Research Act (2017), directing that they require Higher Education providers to comply with Electoral Registration Officer (ERO) requests for data and they be encouraged to work with Local Authorities to promote electoral registration amongst their student populations. The merits of working closely with EROs have been demonstrated by a number of Higher Education providers across the country.

Yet, the Government does not believe that one size fits all and instead favours an approach which allows innovation.

The Ministerial Guidance has since been used by the OfS to produce their own guidance to Higher Education providers, which advises them how they might best implement, and abide by, the requirements placed on them. The OfS guidance came into force in August. The Government is committed to ensuring everyone who is eligible to register to vote is able to do so and, in 2014, introduced online registration for the first time. Statistics show young people aged between 14 and 24 are more likely than average to use this as a means of registering to vote.

The Government believes these measures will drive up the number of applications to register from students – improving both the completeness and accuracy of the electoral register – as well as further improve the relationships between Higher Education provider and Local Authorities.

Q
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for International Trade
Overseas Trade
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish their Regional Trade Plans.
A
Answered by: Lord Young of Cookham
Answered on: 16 August 2019

Regional Trade Plans (RTPs), set out an overseas region’s overarching strategy, key objectives and priorities, which will drive the delivery of Her Majesty’s Government’s trade objectives overseas. Currently, the RTPs are internal documents, but the Department for International Trade intends to publish executive summaries of the RTPs in due course.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 19 July 2019
Department for Education
Teachers: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to improve the provision of mental heath training for teachers and lecturers at universities.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 08 August 2019
Holding answer received on 24 July 2019

Higher education providers have legal responsibilities under the Equality Act (2010) to support students, including those with mental health conditions. As independent and autonomous institutions it is for providers to determine the precise nature of any mental health training they offer to staff.

Mental health service provision is a priority for the government, which is why the former Prime Minister (Theresa May), my right. Hon friend for Maidenhead recently announced measures on 17 June which overhaul the government’s approach to preventing mental illness. These measures included providing £1 million to the Office of Students (OfS) for a competition to find innovative new ways to support mental health at universities and colleges. The OfS is currently working with students, sector representatives, experts and relevant government departments to develop priorities. They aim to publish further details by the end of the year.

The department is also working closely with Universities UK on embedding the Step Change programme. This calls on higher education leaders to adopt mental health service provision as a strategic priority and take a whole-institution approach to embed a culture of good mental health practice.

The University Mental Health Charter, which was announced in June 2018, is also expected to drive up standards in promoting mental health and wellbeing, positive working environments and excellent support for both students and staff.

The former Minister for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation (Chris Skidmore), my hon. Friend for Kingswood gave a speech on 7 May 2019 that focused on early career researcher contracts and employment conditions. The Independent Review of the Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers, led by Professor Julia Buckingham, has recognised issues of wellbeing and poor mental health as a significant challenge faced by early career academics and researchers. Recommendations to address these challenges are currently under review and a revised concordat is expected in September.

We hope future joint work by the OfS and Research England into the mental health and wellbeing of doctoral researchers can identify good practice to take forward in this area.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Health Services and Social Services: Departmental Responsibilities
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the benefits to date of bringing health and social care together in one political portfolio, and (2) the benefits that will arise in future years of bringing the two areas together.
Answered on: 07 August 2019

The Department was renamed the Department of Health and Social Care in January 2018 and took on responsibility for the Social Care Green Paper.

Whilst we have made no specific assessment, the Department has been working on bringing health and social care together to achieve whole-person, integrated care with the National Health Service and social care systems operating in a joined-up way. The Better Care Fund continues to drive forward the integration of health and social care in England.

Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the implementation of the guidance on Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 to 2018.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280421 | 280422 | 280423
Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the document entitled Guidance – Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 – 2018, published by NHS England in October 2015, how many commissioners have identified a local senior or executive champion to drive local work on nutrition and hydration and to make improvements.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280420 | 280422 | 280423
Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of commissioners that (a) reviewed existing service provision and (b) agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the NHS England Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 to 2018 guidance.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280420 | 280421 | 280423
Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to update the Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015-2018 NHS England guidance.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280420 | 280421 | 280422
Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Nabeel Rajab
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Written Answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 4 July (HL16567), why they were not aware of Nabeel Rajab’s application, and subsequent rejection, for alternative sentencing, given (1) reports by international news outlets, and (2) their close monitoring of his case; and what mechanisms they use to assess Bahrain’s provision of alternative sentences.
A
Answered on: 06 August 2019

We are not privy to individual applications for alternative sentencing. We assess information that is publically released through official channels. The decision making process of the application of alternative sentencing is subject to meeting qualifying conditions and remains the responsibility of the Bahraini judicial system. We are closely monitoring the trials of Mr Rajab with officials from the Embassy regularly attending court hearings. We have raised the case as part of the UK's ongoing open dialogue with Bahrain at senior levels. We continue to urge the Government of Bahrain to protect freedom of expression for all its citizens in line with its international commitments.

Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Bahrain: Sentencing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Instagram post by the British Embassy in Manama on 22 July stating that Prosecutor Ali Al Showaikh revealed that 586 individuals in Bahrain have benefited from non-custodial sentences since the new legislation on alternative sentencing was implemented in May 2018, whether they know the names of those individuals; and what representations they have made to the government of Bahrain about discrimination in the implementation of that law.
A
Answered on: 06 August 2019

Bahrain has brought in new legislation related to alternative sentencing and has already started to implement provisions under this new legal framework. We welcome this positive move in reforming the judicial system. UK expertise has supported this process. The names of the 586 individuals that have benefited from non-custodial sentences have not been published.

Q
Asked by Scott Mann
(North Cornwall)
Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Transport
Electric Vehicles: North Cornwall
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to increase the number of electric car charging points in North Cornwall.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 05 August 2019

We want to encourage private sector investment to build and operate a self-sustaining public network that is affordable, reliable and accessible. In many cases, the market is best placed to identify the right locations for chargepoints and make improvements to the network and it is essential that viable commercial models are in place.

The Government is also providing support through a number of schemes, which can be accessed across the country, including in North Cornwall. This includes schemes to help fund chargepoint infrastructure at people’s homes and workplaces and on residential streets. The Government’s on-street residential charging scheme offers grants to local authorities to help support this investment at local level. In February 2019, Cornwall County Council were awarded £94,000 through the Government’s Ultra Low Emission Taxi Infrastructure competition, to deliver five chargepoints dedicated to charging electric taxis and private hire vehicles.

In conjunction with the Energy Savings Trust, this year the Office for Low Emission Vehicles has been running a series of roadshows for local authorities and public bodies across the UK, on best practice approaches to driving the uptake of ultra-low emission vehicles. The event in Bristol was well attended including local authority and public sector representatives from across the south west.

Q
Asked by Tim Farron
(Westmorland and Lonsdale)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Social Rented Housing: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to recent English Housing Survey statistics which show that four per cent of local authority housing and 13 per cent of social housing fail to meet the Decent Homes Standard, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of restoring central Government funding for housing providers to enable the remaining non-decent homes to be improved.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 05 August 2019

The Decent Homes Standard has driven improvements to the quality of social housing. Between 2011 and 2016 Government provided a total of £1.76 billion to 45 councils across England to tackle the backlog of non-decent homes, making over 158,000 homes decent.

Local Authority Housing Statistics show that the proportion of non-decent local authority dwellings was 4 per cent 1 April 2018. The English Housing Survey shows that, in 2017, 13 per cent of social rented homes overall (516,000) were considered non-decent, down from 20 per cent (759,000) in 2010. This is lower than the proportion of private rented (25 per cent) and owner occupied (19 per cent) homes.

The Social Housing Green Paper asks if there are any changes to what constitutes a decent home that we should consider, and whether we need additional measures to make sure homes are safe and decent. We are currently considering the responses to the consultation.

Q
(Stockton North)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of (a) incentivising or requiring housebuilders to monitor and collect data on the performance of homes post-occupancy and (b) requiring housebuilders to publish that information.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 05 August 2019

The Government is taking action to raise the quality of new build homes. We are reforming the building safety system, reviewing the Approved Documents to the Building Regulations including the conservation of fuel and power, and working with industry to improve productivity and skills, all of which will raise building performance and standards. We are also currently consulting on the design and delivery of a New Homes Ombudsman, including their role in driving up the quality of new build homes.

Q
Asked by Ruth Jones
(Newport West)
Asked on: 17 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Young Offender Institutions: Ethnic Groups
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many BAME young people were held in young offender institutions and secure units in (a) Wales, (b) Northern Ireland, (c) England and (d) Scotland in the most recent period for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 02 August 2019

Figures published on 12th July 2019 showed that in May of this year, out of a total of 830 children, the ethnicity was known for 811 children, out of which the number of children from a Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic background held within the youth custodial estate was 408 in England and 7 in Wales. Overall, this represents 51% of the youth custodial estate population for which the ethnicity was known across England and Wales. These figures are provisional, and might change as more data is reported.

Snapshots of the youth custody data are published monthly, showing the percentage of children in custody who are from a Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic background. Although there are monthly fluctuations, over the year 2018/19 an average of 48% of children in custody in England and Wales were from a Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic background.

The MoJ does not hold figures for Northern Ireland and Scotland.

We accepted every recommendation made in David Lammy’s review of racial disparities in the criminal justice system and have since been reviewing fairness of sentence outcomes and working to improve understanding of legal advice and options for Black, Asian and ethnic minority children.

Q
Asked by Lord Dholakia
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Young Offenders
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 10 and 11 year olds received a youth caution or criminal conviction in each of the past five years; and what proportion of those children were in care at the time of the caution or criminal conviction.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 02 August 2019
20142015201620172018
Cautions issued450359309218159
Convicted7686717037

The table above shows the total number of cautions and convictions issued to 10-11 year olds over the past five calendar years. Published figures do not allow us to distil the number of individuals but instead only the number of cautions/sentences. This is the latest annual data available from the ‘Criminal Justice Statistics quarterly: December 2018 – Outcomes by Offence data tool’: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

Data on looked after children is not held centrally by the Ministry of Justice. However, children supervised by the local Youth Offending Team or in custody will have their needs, including identifying whether they are looked after, assessed and appropriate measures will be put in place to ensure their individual needs are met.

Q
Asked by Lord Dholakia
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Youth Custody
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 10 and 11 year olds received a custodial sentence in each of the past 10 years.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 02 August 2019

Custody should always be a last resort for children. The table below sets out the number of 10 and 11 year olds who have received a custodial sentence since 2009:

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Total Immediate Custody

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

This is the latest annual data available from the ‘Criminal Justice Statistics quarterly: December 2018 – Outcomes by Offence data tool’:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

Q
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Digital Technology: Innovation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to incentivise more innovative digital projects in the UK.
A
Answered by: Baroness Barran
Answered on: 02 August 2019

The Industrial Strategy set out our commitment to becoming the world’s most innovative economy, ensuring the UK is the best place for researchers and innovators throughout Britain. We are already delivering record increases in public sector R&D investment — an extra £7bn committed by 2021/21 — with a target to reach 2.4% of GDP investment in R&D across the whole economy by 2027.

The government is supporting organisations that promote digital innovation. The Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund is incentivising innovation, including in digital projects, by bringing together world-class UK research with business investment to develop new technologies. The Digital Catapult, an advanced digital technology innovation centre, receives funding to drive the early adoption of digital technologies to make UK businesses more competitive. It provides physical and digital facilities for experimentation and brings small companies, corporates, researchers and investors together through innovation programmes.

We are also helping innovative companies to access funding to expand and develop new projects. This includes the £2.5 billion British Patient Capital programme, delivered through the British Business Bank, which will support innovative UK companies to access the long-term investment they need to grow and expand worldwide.

The Industrial Strategy also supports the development of projects in specific sectors through Sector Deals: long term partnerships between industry and the government. These have included commitments to develop several digital projects to improve productivity in sectors ranging from Rail to Creative Industries to Tourism.

Q
Asked on: 15 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners' Release
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what data prisons are required to collect on the purposes for which prisoners are Released on Temporary Licence.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 01 August 2019

It is not possible, except at disproportionate cost, to establish the number of prisoners who have been released on ROTL to allow access to higher and further education in each of the last three years.

There are four categories of ROTL: Resettlement Day Release (RDR), Resettlement Overnight Release (ROR), Special Purpose Licence (SPL) and Childcare Resettlement Licence (CRL). Prisons are required to record the reasons for each release on temporary licence choosing from the following options. They are not required to specify the level of education:

(RDR) Education or Training

(RDR) Paid Work - Retail and Wholesale

(RDR) Paid Work – Manufacturing

(RDR) Paid Work - Catering and hospitality

(RDR) Paid Work - Transportation and storage

(RDR) Paid Work - Construction and recycling

(RDR) Paid Work - IT and communication

(RDR) Paid Work - Agriculture and horticulture

(RDR) Paid Work - Other

(RDR) Unpaid Work - Retail and Wholesale

(RDR) Unpaid Work – Manufacturing

(RDR) Unpaid Work - Catering and hospitality

(RDR) Unpaid Work - Transportation and storage

(RDR) Unpaid Work - Construction and recycling

(RDR) Unpaid Work - IT and communication

(RDR) Unpaid Work - Agriculture and horticulture

(RDR) Unpaid Work - Other

(RDR) Prisoner Apprenticeships Pathway

(RDR) Maintain Family Ties

(RDR) Outside Prison Activities

(RDR) Accommodation Related

(RDR) Other RDR Linked to Sentence/Resettlement Plan

(ROR) Resettlement Overnight Release

(SPL) Funeral

(SPL) Visit Dying Relative

(SPL) Medical/Dental Inpatient Appointment

(SPL) Medical/Dental Outpatient Appointment

(SPL) Other Compassionate Reason

(SPL) Court/Legal/Police/Prison Transfer

(CRL) Childcare Resettlement Licence

Q
Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Tourist Attractions: Disability
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what recent steps they have taken to improve the accessibility of tourist sites to wheelchair users and those with mobility impairments.
A
Answered by: Baroness Barran
Answered on: 01 August 2019

The recently published Tourism Sector Deal sets out Government’s support for improving tourism for visitors with accessibility requirements. Working with VisitBritain, we aim to improve the sharing of good practice across the sector, continue to provide excellent business support and promote our accessible tourism product.

Additionally, the Minister for Disabled People, Health and Work has appointed a number of Sector Champions including Champions for Art and Culture, Hotels, Tourism and Countryside and Heritage. These champions use their influential status as leaders within their sectors to drive improvements to the accessibility and quality of services and facilities for disabled people. They also share good practice both widely within their sectors and with others.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to address the reduction in energy efficient upgrades to domestic housing since 2014.
A
Answered on: 01 August 2019

The Clean Growth Strategy set out the aspiration that as many homes as possible will be EPC Band C by 2035 where practical, cost-effective and affordable.

The current iteration of the Energy Company Obligation (ECO3) will upgrade around a million homes for low income and vulnerable households by March 2022, and we have committed to driving £6 billion into energy efficiency.

In April 2018, we introduced for the first time a minimum energy efficiency standard of EPC Bane E for private rented sector properties.

And, we have launched Simple Energy Advice, a new digital and phoneline service to provide homeowners with impartial and tailored advice on how to cut their energy bills and make their homes greener, as well as information on any available financial support.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Housing: Insulation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish a national fund to help low income, vulnerable and fuel poor households insulate their homes.
A
Answered on: 01 August 2019

We agree that increasing the energy efficiency of homes is the most sustainable long-term strategy to tackle fuel poverty.

That is why we have committed to driving £6 billion of investment in energy efficiency over the decade. Support for energy efficiency is available now through the Energy Company Obligation scheme, which requires energy companies to deliver heating and energy efficiency measures such as cavity wall insulation. The updated scheme, launched in late 2018 and running until March 2022, focuses entirely on providing support to low income, vulnerable and fuel poor households and is funded at £640m per year.

We have also introduced, from 1 April 2018, Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards which require landlords to invest up to £3,500 in energy efficiency improvements such as insulation to improve their rented properties to Energy Performance Certificate rating Band E.

We are consulting on an update to the Fuel Poverty Strategy for England. In this consultation, we seek views from stakeholders on what policies might be included in a policy plan to improve energy efficiency for households in fuel poverty.

Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners' Release: Electronic Tagging
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of people released on Home Detention Curfew in each year since 2010 were serving sentences relating to (a) criminal damage and arson, (b) drug offences, (c) fraud, (d) miscellaneous crimes against society, (e) possession of weapons, (f) public order, (g) robbery, (h) sexual offences, (i) summary motoring, (j) summary non-motoring, (k) theft and (l) violence against the person.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

HDC is a robust scheme which allows suitable, risk assessed, prisoners to work towards rehabilitation in the community, while remaining subject to strict monitoring and other conditions. If they breach these, they can be returned to custody. HDC allows reintegration back into the community in a controlled and supervised way, which research suggests may help to reduce the risk of further offending.

The attached table shows the number and proportion of offenders released on Home Detention Curfew, in each year since 2010 by offence group.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 18.42 KB)
Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were convicted but did not receive an immediate custodial sentence who had (a) zero, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50, (g) between 51 and 75, (h) between 76 and 100 and (i) 101 or more previous convictions for (i) violence against the person, (ii) theft, (iii) drug offences, (iv) robbery, (v) common assault and battery, (vi) burglary in a dwelling, (vi) production, supply and possession with intent to supply a controlled drug - Class A, (vii) possession of an article with a blade or point and (viii) assaulting, resisting or obstructing a constable or designated officer in execution of duty in each of the last 10 years.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The number of people who were convicted but did not receive an immediate custodial sentence who had (a) zero, (b) between one and four, (c) between five and nine, (d) between 10 and 15, (e) between 16 and 25, (f) between 26 and 50, (g) between 51 and 75, (h) between 76 and 100 and (i) 101 or more previous convictions for (i) violence against the person, (ii) theft, (iii) drug offences, (iv) robbery, (v) common assault and battery, (vi) burglary in a dwelling, (vi) production, supply and possession with intent to supply a controlled drug - Class A, (vii) possession of an article with a blade or point and (viii) assaulting, resisting or obstructing a constable or designated officer in execution of duty in each of the last 10 years can be viewed in the table.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 17.88 KB)
Q
(Peterborough)
Asked on: 08 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Dangerous Driving: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans the Government has to introduce tougher sentences for people convicted of causing death by dangerous driving.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

We will bring forward proposals for changes in the law as soon as possible. These proposals will take account of other government proposals for safer roads.

Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 09 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Assaults On Police: Convictions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were convicted of assault of a police officer in each year since 2007 who had (a) 26 to 50, (b) 51 to 75, (c) 76 to 100 and (d) over 100 previous convictions or cautions; how many people in each of those categories received a (i) custodial and (ii) non custodial sentence, and what the average length of custodial sentence was.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The number of people convicted of an assault of a police officer, in each year since 2007, with more than 26 convictions, and the number of people who received a non-custodial or custodial sentence, and the average length of custodial sentences, can be found in the tables 1 and 2.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 23.72 KB)
Asked on: 09 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Sexual Offences
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to (1) introduce tougher sentences for sex offenders, and (2) stop sex offenders being granted parole.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The Sexual Offences Act 2003 provides for a range of sexual offences which rightly carry robust penalties to deal with this serious offending – including some which carry a maximum penalty of life imprisonment. Since 2010, the average length of a custodial sentence for sex offenders has increased by more than 25 per cent. Sentencing in individual cases is a matter for the independent judiciary, who take into account the full facts of each case. The courts are required to follow any guidelines produced by the independent Sentencing Council relevant to the case before them, including the definitive guideline on Sexual Offences.

For those who receive a life sentence, they must serve the minimum term in prison required by the sentencing court, following which they will only be released by the independent Parole Board if the Board is satisfied they no longer need to be detained for the protection of the public. Other sex offenders may receive an Extended Determinate Sentence (EDS) if the court considers they could pose an ongoing risk. In those cases, the offender must serve at least two-thirds of the custodial term in prison and will only be released before the end of the full custodial term if the Parole Board is satisfied it would be safe to do so


The Government has no current plans to abolish the possibility of parole for offenders serving these types of sentences. Offenders should rightly be punished for their offences, but once they have served their punishment they should only continue to be held in prison if their risk remains too high for them to be released.

Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Crime: Convictions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people who have previously received (a) 25 or more and (b) 50 or more convictions or cautions, have been convicted of an offence and not been given a custodial sentence in each year since 2007; and how many of those people have previously been convicted of (i) possession of a blade or point, (ii) possession of an offensive weapon, (iii) common assault, (iv) assaulting a police officer, (v) sexual assault, (vi) public order, (vii) theft, (viii) robbery, (ix) burglary, (x) drugs, (xi) criminal damage, (xii) breach of anti social behaviour order, (xiii) fraud and (xiv) vehicle taking.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The number of people who have previously received (a) 25 or more and (b) 50 or more convictions or cautions, have been convicted of an offence and not been given a custodial sentence in each year since 2007; and the number of those people have previously been convicted of (i) possession of a blade or point, (ii) possession of an offensive weapon, (iii) common assault, (iv) assaulting a police officer, (v) sexual assault, (vi) public order, (vii) theft, (viii) robbery, (ix) burglary, (x) drugs, (xi) criminal damage, (xii) breach of anti social behaviour order, (xiii) fraud and (xiv) vehicle taking can be viewed in the table.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 15.73 KB)
Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prison Sentences
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence for the first time for (a) possession of a blade or point, (b) possession of an offensive weapon, (c) common assault, (d) assaulting a police officer, (e) sexual assault, (f) public order, (g) theft, (h) robbery, (i) burglary, (j) drugs, (k) criminal damage, (l) breach of and anti-social behaviour order, (m) fraud and (n) vehicle taking had (i) no, (ii) between one and four, (iii) between five and nine, (iv) between 10 and 15, (v) between 16 and 25, (vi) between 26 and 50, (vii) between 51 and 75, (viii) between 76 and 100 and (ix) 101 or more convictions and cautions for previous offences of any type in each year since 2007.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous convictions and cautions for any offence, who were sentenced to immediate custody for the first time for a specified offence.
  • The average number of previous convictions for any offence, and the average number of previous cautions for any offence, for offenders who were sentenced to immediate custody for the first time for a specified offence.

This data is not regularly published or held in an easily accessible format. The information supplied has been sourced from a number of complicated retrievals from the Police National Computer database.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 25.47 KB)
Grouped Questions: 275835
Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prison Sentences
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average number of previous (a) cautions and (b) convictions offenders had before being sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence for the first time for (i) possession of a blade or point, (ii) possession of an offensive weapon, (iii) common assault, (iv) assaulting a police officer, (v) sexual assault, (vi) public order, (vii) theft, (viii) robbery, (ix) burglary, (x) drugs, (xi) criminal damage, (xii) breach of anti social behaviour order, (xiii) fraud and (xiv) vehicle taking in each year since 2007.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The number of offenders with a specified number of previous convictions and cautions for any offence, who were sentenced to immediate custody for the first time for a specified offence.
  • The average number of previous convictions for any offence, and the average number of previous cautions for any offence, for offenders who were sentenced to immediate custody for the first time for a specified offence.

This data is not regularly published or held in an easily accessible format. The information supplied has been sourced from a number of complicated retrievals from the Police National Computer database.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 25.47 KB)
Grouped Questions: 275834
Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Alternatives to Prison
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what was the largest number of community sentences previously received by an offender who was (a) convicted of a crime and (b) convicted of a crime and sentenced to a community sentence in each year since 2007.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The largest number of community sentences previously received by an offender who was (a) convicted of a crime and (b) convicted of a crime and sentenced to a community sentence in each year since 2007 can be viewed in the table.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 10.31 KB)
Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Burglary: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what proportion of people sentenced for domestic burglary for (a) the third time and (b) more than three times received an immediate custodial sentence of (i) less than three years, (ii) exactly three years and (iii) more than three years in each year since 2007.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

This data is not regularly published or held in an easily accessible format. The information supplied in the table attached has been sourced from several complicated retrievals from the Police National Computer database.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 14.23 KB)
Q
(Barnsley East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 19 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Fly-tipping
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what funding his Department has allocated to (a) Barnsley local authority and (b) local authorities in England to encourage them to search and seize vehicles of suspected fly-tippers.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 31 July 2019

We are taking strong action to tackle waste crime. We have created a Joint Unit on Waste Crime. The Environment Agency has received an extra £60m to tackle waste crime since 2014. We have updated legislation regulating waste. These include increasing the powers for the Environment Agency to tackle problem waste sites, enhanced technical competence requirements for permitted waste sites, and introducing new penalties for breaches of the duty of care for household waste. We will further reform the legislative framework for the waste duty of care and carriers, brokers and dealers, mandating the digital tracking of waste (subject to consultation), tackling the waste exemptions most often linked to criminal activity and enhancing operator competence.

We are developing a toolkit for local authorities and others to tackle fly-tipping, including specific guidance on strengthening evidence for prosecution cases. We will work with magistrates and the Judicial Office to raise awareness for magistrates of the prevalence and importance of tackling waste crime, including fly-tipping, and offer training in the environmental offences sentencing guideline.

The Government has provided local authorities with over £200 billion for this spending period. While councils make their own spending decisions, we would expect councils to prioritise these to deliver what their residents want to see, including investing in tackling fly-tipping.

Q
Asked by Dan Carden
(Liverpool, Walton)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 19 July 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Pakistan: Capital Punishment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether the Counter Terrorism Associated Prosecutory Reforms initiative monitors the number of death sentences handed down by the civilian anti-terror court in Pakistan.
A
Answered by: Dr Andrew Murrison
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The Counter Terrorism Associated Prosecutorial Reform Initiative programme does not manage cases through the Anti-Terrorism Courts in Pakistan. The programme supports the reform of the criminal justice system and the Government is confident it has been delivered in a way that is consistent with our opposition to the death penalty.

All our capacity building work is carefully considered using our Overseas Security and Justice Assistance (OSJA) Guidance, which ensures the assistance being provided is properly assessed against a comprehensive range of human rights risks, including possible indirect outcomes of our activity and what mitigations are being put in place.

Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Reoffenders: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the largest number of previous convictions received by a person sentenced to immediate custody for the first time was in each year since 2007.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The highest number of previous convictions of offenders convicted and sentenced to immediate custody for the first time.
  • The highest number of previous convictions of offenders convicted and not sentenced to immediate custody.
Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 11.04 KB)
Grouped Questions: 280390
Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Reoffenders: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the largest number of previous convictions received by a person convicted but not sentenced to an immediate custodial sentence was in each year since 2007.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The information requested is provided in the tables attached with this answer. These tables include data, covering the period 2007 – 2018, on:

  • The highest number of previous convictions of offenders convicted and sentenced to immediate custody for the first time.
  • The highest number of previous convictions of offenders convicted and not sentenced to immediate custody.
Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 11.04 KB)
Grouped Questions: 280388
Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the (a) average length of sentence for and (b) the number of people convicted of (i) violence against the person, (ii) sexual offences, (iii) robbery, (iv) theft offences, (v) criminal damage and arson, (vi) drug offences, (vii) possession of weapons and (viii) public order offences for offenders for which this was their (A) first, (B) second, (C) third, (D) fourth, (E) fifth, (F) sixth, (G) seventh and (H) eighth or more conviction for that type of offence in each of the last five years; and what estimate he has made of the proportion of those offenders who were not given an immediate custodial sentence.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

The requested information cannot be obtained without incurring disproportionate cost.

Q
(East Londonderry)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Enterprise Zones: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding allocated to enterprise zones.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 31 July 2019

Enterprise Zones act as a driving force for growth in local economies as they unlock key development sites, consolidate infrastructure, attract business and create jobs across 48 locations within England.

Government has provided a range of funding and other incentives for Enterprise Zones, including a £120 million ‘Building Foundations for Growth’ grant fund to accelerate development in Enterprise Zones, a five year tax relief for businesses and simplified planning processes.

LEPs have utilised proportions of their Growth Deal programmes to support development in their Enterprise Zones.

The ability to retain business rates locally for 25 years allows LEPs to borrow against predicted income which provides a sustainable funding model to support improvements required in the Enterprise Zone as well as in the wider local economy.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Rehabilitation and Reoffenders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking in prisons to (a) reduce reoffending rates and (b) improve offender rehabilitation.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 31 July 2019

We are committed to ensuring offenders leaving prison have the tools they need to turn their backs on crime - reducing reoffending and ultimately keeping the public safe.

One year ago, we published our Education and Employment strategy, which set out how we will transform our approach to ensure offenders develop the skills they need to secure employment on release.

Since the publication of the Education and Employment Strategy, we have given governors greater autonomy over their budgets to strengthen their education provision and implemented the New Futures Network to broker partnerships with employers, giving offenders more opportunities to work and train while serving their sentence and increase their chances of securing an immediate job on release. More than 230 businesses have registered to work with prisons and set offenders on a path to employment.

We recently made changes so that governors can now consider Release on Temporary Licence (ROTL) earlier and in more cases meaning offenders can enter the workplace sooner. We have also invested £7 million in in-cell telephones to allow offenders to maintain important family ties, which is fundamental to their rehabilitation.

It is also vital that everyone leaving prison has somewhere safe and secure to live. Having stable accommodation acts as a platform to accessing other services vital to rehabilitation, as well as employment and education opportunities. As part of the Government’s Rough Sleeping Strategy, we are investing up to £6.4 million in a pilot scheme to support individuals released from three prisons; Bristol, Leeds and Pentonville.

Asked on: 16 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Belmarsh Prison
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many prisoners there are in HMP Belmarsh; and how many of those are serving sentences for civil offences.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 30 July 2019

HMP Belmarsh had a population of 826 on the 31st March 2019. On the same date there were 11 Prisoners at HMP Belmarsh who were serving sentences for Civil Offences, which represents 1.33% of the population.

Q
Asked by Dan Carden
(Liverpool, Walton)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department for International Trade
Department for International Trade: Overseas Aid
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether his Department (a) currently has or (b) has plans for Official Development Assistance-funded programmes other than the Investment Promotion Programme.
A
Answered by: Conor Burns
Answered on: 30 July 2019

DIT is currently building a portfolio of development programming to drive trade and investment between international business and developing country markets. DIT’s interventions are under design but will link to DIT’s unique competencies in trade and investment. DIT’s development projects will adhere to the word and spirit of the International Development Act and follow the priorities set out in the 2015 Aid Strategy, including maintaining the commitment to keep aid untied.

Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average sentence length in months was for people who pleaded guilty and received an immediate custodial sentence for (a) violence against the person (b) theft, (c) drug offences, (d) robbery, (e) common assault and battery, (f) burglary in a dwelling, (g) production, supply and possession with intent to supply a controlled drug - Class A, (h) possession of article with blade or point and (i) assaulting, resisting or obstructing a constable or designated officer and who had (i) no, (ii) between one and four, (iii) between five and nine, (iv) between 10 and 15, (v) between 16 and 25, (vi) between 26 and 50, (vii) between 51 and 75, (viii) between 76 and 100 and (ix) 101 or more previous convictions in each of last 10 years.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 30 July 2019

Information on the average sentence length for offenders with a specified number of previous convictions for any offence who pleaded guilty to and received an immediate custodial sentence for a specified offence, covering the period 2009 – 2018, can be viewed in the attached table.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 18.61 KB)
Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prison Officers: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many additional prison officers have been recruited since 31 March 2017; and how many of those posts were funded by the additional funding allocated by the Treasury at that time; and what additional funding the Treasury has allocated for the recruitment of prison offices since 31 March 2019.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 30 July 2019

The number of new officers appointed to work in public sector prisons and youth custody establishments between 1 April 2017 and the 31 March 2019 is published in the Quarterly Workforce Statistics for HM Prison and Probation Service at table 8a -https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/hm-prison-and-probation-service-workforce-quarterly-march-2019

Additional funding of £106m was announced by the Secretary of State on 3 November 2016, for an additional 2,500 prison officer posts, which have now been filled. With growth, the £100m equates to £112m for the 2019/20 financial year, £97m of which is for public sector prisons.

Our recruitment drive continues to replace turnover in officer numbers and meet required staffing levels across the prison estate. We constantly monitor the need for further funding.

Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Assaults On Police: Convictions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many people were convicted of assaulting a police officer in each police force area in each year since 2007; how many received a sentence other than an immediate custodial sentence; and what the average sentence was received by those who received a custodial sentence.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 30 July 2019

The number of people who were (i) convicted, (ii) received a sentence other than an immediate custodial sentence and (iii) data on the average custodial sentence length for those who received a sentence by Police Force area for assault on a police constable in each year since 2007, can be found in the accompanying tables.

Please note that police force areas provide breakdowns of where offences where dealt with (not where they were committed).

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 35.56 KB)
Q
Asked by Chris Law
(Dundee West)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Mohammed Abdullah al-Shahi
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, whether Ministers of his Department have seen the Amnesty International statement of 22 May 2019 entitled, Oman: Life Sentence for Prisoner of Conscious on the imprisonment of Mohammed Abdullah al-Shahi.
A
Answered by: Dr Andrew Murrison
Answered on: 30 July 2019

Officials in London met a UK-based Non-Governmental Organisation to listen to their concerns about the Shihuh and Oman on 15 July. I have also raised this issue with the Omani authorities, as has our Ambassador in Muscat. We are aware that human rights authorities in Oman have responded directly to Amnesty International with a detailed reply regarding one of their reports. Omani authorities have given us the strongest assurances that the individuals concerned were given full legal assistance and treated in accordance with Oman’s constitution and international laws and conventions. There is no evidence of discrimination against the Shihuh more generally, many of whom occupy senior positions in the Omani state and wider society. We continue to monitor developments closely.

Grouped Questions: 281039 | 281040 | 281042
Q
Asked by Dawn Butler
(Brent Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 June 2019
Women and Equalities
Government Equalities Office: Staff
Commons
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, if she will publish the number of staff employed by the Government Equalities Office by (a) grade and (b) policy areas those staff are assigned to.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 25 July 2019

As at 14 June 2019, GEO has 110 staff in post (107 FTE).

GEO staff work on a range of priority areas, including work to empower all women to reach their full potential, advancing equality for LGBT people, ensuring our laws protect equality and provide equal rights and driving forward work to put qualities at the heart of government.

Q
Asked by Lord Freyberg
Asked on: 16 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Medicine: Research
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the amount of research and development funding required by organisations involved in (1) health research, and (2) data-driven health research, in the UK.
Answered on: 25 July 2019

The Department’s National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) budget for 2019/20 is just over £1 billion and welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health. The NIHR funds research projects, training and research infrastructure. Applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.

The NIHR also is a co-funder of Health Data Research UK who are committed to uniting the United Kingdom’s health data to enable discoveries and ensure that every health and care interaction and research endeavour will be enhanced by access to large scale data and advanced analytics. The NIHR also supports a number of initiatives to help researchers to access health data, samples and to identify participants for research.

The future of budgets outside of the NHS England resource settlement, including capital budgets for research and development, will be confirmed later this year at the Spending Review 2019.

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