Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019-21 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Owen Thompson
(Midlothian)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 April 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps he is taking to ensure that new businesses that are not yet profitable do not have their applications to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme rejected as a result of losses in their initial years of operation.
A
Answered by: Paul Scully
Answered on: 06 May 2020

The Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme is for businesses with turnover of up to £45m. For start-ups, or SMEs which have traded for less than 12 months, the lender should estimate turnover based upon the SME’s forecasted turnover for the first 12 months of trading. Turnover need not be generated with the intention of making a profit – charities and non-profit entities are potentially eligible for support.

Government has removed the forward-looking viability test that required an assessment of whether the business can trade out of the crisis. The only test that remains is whether a business was viable before Covid-19.

On Monday 20 April we announced a new £1.25 billion support package to protect start-ups and businesses driving research and development, which are one of our great economic strengths and will help power our growth out of the coronavirus crisis.

This package includes a £500 million investment fund for high-growth companies impacted by the crisis, made up of funding from government and the private sector, and £750 million of grants and loans for SMEs focusing on research and development.

Q
(Bristol East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 May 2020
Department for Transport
Buses: Exhaust Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the Prime Minister's oral statement of 11 February 2020, Official Report, column 71, what proportion of the £5 billion announced to support bus services will be used to replace diesel with zero emission vehicles.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 06 May 2020

The Prime Minster announced £5 billion of new funding to boost bus and cycling links on 11 February, including at least 4,000 new zero emission buses to make greener travel the convenient option, driving forward the UK’s progress on its net zero ambitions. The details of the programmes, including how funding will be distributed, will be announced in due course.

Q
(Newcastle upon Tyne North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 May 2020
Ministry of Justice
Courts: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many victims of crime have been affected by delays in court proceedings during the covid-19 outbreak; and what steps have been taken to communicate with them.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 06 May 2020

HM Courts & Tribunals Service (HMCTS) is working hard in partnership with the judiciary to keep our justice system functioning during this unprecedented public health emergency. Our priorities are to maintain access to justice and to protect the safety of all who work in the courts and tribunals.

We are continuously reviewing our approach in light of Public Health England advice and to understand impacts on our users. We do not collect information centrally on numbers of victims affected by delays in court proceedings during the outbreak. However, we are committed to ensuring victims continue to receive the support they need during this challenging time, and have robust and flexible plans in place to ensure that we can continue to deliver key services across the justice system, including the support of victims. We have been working across government and with justice partner agencies to ensure that there will be comprehensive support for victims and witnesses across England and Wales.

During the outbreak, magistrates’ courts have been covering urgent work and trials are now re-starting. Crown Courts have also been continuing to deal with a range of work, including sentencing hearings. The Lord Chief Justice and the Lord Chancellor are currently in close discussion regarding the safe re-start of limited Jury trials, which we hope can be resumed before the end of May. The decision to re-start jury trials is dependent on the system as a whole being ready. This will include HMCTS, the professions, those supporting victims and witnesses, and jurors who should have confidence that trials are able to operate effectively within social distancing guidelines.

Q
Asked by Greg Clark
(Tunbridge Wells)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 May 2020
Department for Transport
Motorcycles: Driving Instruction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether he plans to extend the expiry date of motorcycle and moped compulsory basic training certificates due to expire during the lockdown period due to covid-19 to enable key workers and others for whom a motorcycle is their only transport option to continue to make essential journeys.
A
Answered by: Rachel Maclean
Answered on: 06 May 2020

The Department for Transport is aware that the compulsory basic training certificate (CBT) for some people has already expired or is due to expire shortly and we are currently considering options on this matter. In the meantime, DVSA are prioritising motorcycle tests and CBT applications for workers whose jobs are critical to the coronavirus response as set out in government guidelines.

Q
(Rother Valley)
Asked on: 21 April 2020
Ministry of Justice
Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to (a) protect shop workers from violent attacks and (b) ensure that offenders are prosecuted.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 05 May 2020

Everyone has the right to feel safe at work and assaults on shop workers are unacceptable.

In April 2019, the Home Office launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff to help gather evidence to strengthen their understanding of the scale and extent of such abuse against retail workers. The Government’s response to that call for evidence is anticipated to be published shortly.

There are already a range of offences that cover assaults against any worker including those in the retail sector. It is for our independent courts to determine the sentence in each individual case based on the full circumstances of the offence and offender, and in line with relevant sentencing guidelines – which are issued by the independent Sentencing Council. The most serious violent offences against shop workers can be punishable by sentences up to life imprisonment. The average custodial sentence length for, assault occasioning actual bodily harm (ABH) and assault occasioning grievous bodily harm (GBH) has increased over the last decade.

Sentencing guidelines on assault include an aggravating factor of ‘offence committed against those working in the public sector or providing a service to the public’. In its supplementary guidance issued in 2019, the Sentencing Council was clear that this could apply to those working in the private as well as the public sector. This aggravating factor is taken into account by the courts, when deciding what sentence to impose. The Sentencing Council is reviewing its guidelines on assault and has published a consultation on a revised assault guideline on 16 April 2020.

Grouped Questions: 38629
Q
(Rother Valley)
Asked on: 21 April 2020
Ministry of Justice
Crimes of Violence: Retail Trade
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what plans he has to bring forward legislative proposals to increase sentences for violent offences against shop workers.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 05 May 2020

Everyone has the right to feel safe at work and assaults on shop workers are unacceptable.

In April 2019, the Home Office launched a call for evidence on violence and abuse toward shop staff to help gather evidence to strengthen their understanding of the scale and extent of such abuse against retail workers. The Government’s response to that call for evidence is anticipated to be published shortly.

There are already a range of offences that cover assaults against any worker including those in the retail sector. It is for our independent courts to determine the sentence in each individual case based on the full circumstances of the offence and offender, and in line with relevant sentencing guidelines – which are issued by the independent Sentencing Council. The most serious violent offences against shop workers can be punishable by sentences up to life imprisonment. The average custodial sentence length for, assault occasioning actual bodily harm (ABH) and assault occasioning grievous bodily harm (GBH) has increased over the last decade.

Sentencing guidelines on assault include an aggravating factor of ‘offence committed against those working in the public sector or providing a service to the public’. In its supplementary guidance issued in 2019, the Sentencing Council was clear that this could apply to those working in the private as well as the public sector. This aggravating factor is taken into account by the courts, when deciding what sentence to impose. The Sentencing Council is reviewing its guidelines on assault and has published a consultation on a revised assault guideline on 16 April 2020.

Grouped Questions: 38628
Q
Asked on: 21 April 2020
Home Office
Immigration Controls: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to introduce COVID-19 health checks and quarantine measures at the borders and entry points for people travelling to the UK; and if not, why not. [T]
Answered on: 05 May 2020

Our approach to tackling coronavirus is driven by the latest scientific and medical advice. In line with that advice to date, no changes have been required at the UK border.

Any decision to implement additional restrictions on international travel to the UK or on arrival at ports/airports will be made based on the consideration and advice of SAGE/Public Health England.

We will continuously review the most appropriate response at the UK border to the changing situation in relation to CV-19, both in the UK and across the international community

To date medical and scientific advice is that screening at the border, particularly given the current low passenger volumes and CV-19 levels within the UK, would make no material impact. There are also significant challenges with thermal screening including:

  • Low likelihood of identifying individuals with COVID-19 given the incubation period can be anywhere between 2 and 14 days;
  • High probability of identifying false positives or those with other conditions who will need clinical assessments to ascertain they have Covid-19; and
  • Easy to circumvent: by taking fever-suppressing drugs.
  • There are similar concerns with clinical screening.
Asked on: 21 April 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Carbon Capture and Storage: Public Consultation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to respond to the consultation on Carbon Capture, Usage and Storage (CCUS) Business Models, which opened on 22 July 2019 and closed on 16 September 2019.
A
Answered by: Lord Callanan
Answered on: 05 May 2020

We are committed to deploying carbon capture, usage and storage (CCUS) this decade as we work towards net zero by 2050 and see an opportunity for the UK to become a global leader in CCUS.

We are determined to realise the key strategic opportunities of CCUS in a way that is affordable and value for money for the consumer and taxpayer. As part of this we continue to work closely with industry to design business models which provide value to the economy, drive decarbonisation and are compatible with existing market frameworks.

Our intention is to respond to our consultation on CCUS business models in due course.

Q
Asked by Julian Sturdy
(York Outer)
Asked on: 24 April 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Take-away Food: Businesses
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps the Government is taking to encourage and facilitate the ordinary operation of (a) takeaway and drive-through food services and (b) other businesses who can operate safely during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Paul Scully
Answered on: 05 May 2020

The Department has published sector specific advice for a number of industries which can currently remain open. This advice can be found at https://www.gov.uk/guidance/social-distancing-in-the-workplace-during-coronavirus-covid-19-sector-guidance. This is to enable companies and their employees remain safe.

The health of our people and the protection of our NHS is the Government’s top priority. The Government has been very clear that in order to limit the transmission of coronavirus, people should only travel to work where they absolutely cannot work from home, and provided that they and members of their household are well. This is consistent with advice from the Chief Medical Officer. We have on going discussions with businesses, trade unions and BRO’s on how we can keep everyone safe both now and as the Government framework adjusts in the future.

Q
Asked by Nick Smith
(Blaenau Gwent)
Asked on: 24 April 2020
Ministry of Justice
Courts: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to ensure that court hearings proceed during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 05 May 2020

Our courts provide a vital public service and it is important that justice is delivered wherever possible. We are working closely with the courts and judiciary to ensure that cases are progressed through the system as quickly as possible, including through greater use of audio and video hearings.

The courts are expediting sentencing hearings and prioritising remand hearings to ensure that public protection remains a core goal. Magistrates’ court trials are now being listed wherever it is safe to do so and every effort is being made to resume Crown Court trials. Representatives from across the criminal justice system are working at pace to agree the best way of doing this safely.

Q
(Vale of Clwyd)
Asked on: 27 April 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what his policy is on protecting prisoners with underlying health conditions from covid-19.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 05 May 2020

To protect those most vulnerable to COVID-19 and reduce transmission of infection, new cohorting strategies were developed by Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service advised by the Public Health Authorities and implemented from March 31. As a result, prisons are in the process of implementing units to isolate the sick, shield the vulnerable (including those with underlying health conditions) and cohort new arrivals to reduce risk.

In addition, prisoners identified as ‘extremely vulnerable’ as defined in the NHS guidelines will merit consideration for Release on Temporary License (ROTL). Any prisoners released on temporary license must abide by the provisions of that licence; the licence can be revoked for breach of a condition or for any other reason. All prisoners released under ROTL will be returned to prison once the justification for temporary compassionate release ends, provided they are still serving the custodial element of their sentence at that point.

More widely, the Prison Service is creating extra cells, restricting regimes, limiting prisoner movement and releasing some prisoners early. The strong measures the Prison Service is taking are successfully limiting the transmission of the virus.

Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 27 April 2020
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
City Deals: Wales
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the continued viability of City Deals in Wales as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 05 May 2020

To date, the Government has committed up to £3.08 billion to City and Growth Deals across Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. This includes Deals already agreed in Cardiff, Swansea Bay, and North Wales.

These Deals are an important part of our approach to driving growth, attracting long-term investment, and creating sustainable, high-quality jobs in Wales.

Regions need to regularly assess the benefits and deliverability of their individual programmes in light of changing local circumstances. We will work with all areas to ensure City and Growth Deals respond are responsive, so they can continue to deliver maximum impact for their local area.

Q
Asked by Dr Rupa Huq
(Ealing Central and Acton)
Asked on: 27 April 2020
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Pets: Animal Welfare
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to introduce parity of treatment under the law for people found guilty of harming or injuring a domestic pet to bring them in line with the penalties imposed if a service dog used by the police or an assistance dog used by a visually impaired person is attacked or injured.
A
Answered by: Victoria Prentis
Answered on: 05 May 2020

The Government remains fully committed to animal welfare and supports increasing the maximum custodial sentences for animal cruelty offences from six months to five years. This will enable courts to take a firmer approach to cases such as dog fighting, abuse of puppies and kittens, or gross neglect of farm animals. The Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill was introduced into the House of Commons on 5 February by Chris Loder MP and is due to have its Second Reading on 10 July. The Government will continue to support the Bill as it makes its way through Parliament. The proposed new maximum sentence of five years would apply to all animals under the Animal Welfare Act 2006, and hence would provide parity of treatment under the law for domestic pets, for service dogs used by the police, and for assistance dogs used by visually impaired people.

The new maximum penalty of five years is in line with campaigns by key stakeholders such as Battersea Dogs and Cats Home, Blue Cross, Dogs Trust and the RSPCA. This is a positive step forward in improving animal welfare and will act as a serious deterrent against animal cruelty. The increase to five years' imprisonment will provide one of the toughest sanctions in Europe, strengthening the UK's position as a global leader on animal welfare and will apply where anyone is convicted of causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal under the Animal Welfare Act 2006.

Q
Asked by Rosie Cooper
(West Lancashire)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 April 2020
Ministry of Justice
Brian Healless
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reasons Brian Healless was sent to a mental health institution rather than a prison following his sentencing on 24 March 2020.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 05 May 2020

I understand that officials have written to the Honourable Member, providing a full explanation of the decisions taken in the case of Mr Healless.

The Mental Health Act 1983 (the 1983 Act) provides powers for the Court to divert people during trial or at the point of sentencing away from the criminal justice system to hospital for assessment and/or treatment for their condition. Alternatively, if a convicted (or remanded) prisoner becomes unwell or experiences a relapse in an existing condition while in prison custody, the 1983 Act also provides for the Secretary of State for Justice to direct that the prisoner be transferred to a secure hospital for treatment. The 1983 Act stipulates the criteria which must be met before the Secretary of State may authorise detention in a secure hospital - namely that on the recommendation of two psychiatrists, the prisoner is suffering of a mental disorder of a nature or degree that warrants hospital detention. Any such transfer does not alter the sentence of the Court, including where the sentence is mandatory life imprisonment for murder.

At the point a prisoner who has been transferred to hospital responds positively to treatment and no longer meets the criteria for detention under the 1983 Act, he will return to prison to serve the remainder of their custodial sentence. In the case of a prisoner serving a life sentence, he will be eligible for release only where he has completed the minimum term set by the Court. He will only then be released if an independent Parole Board has assessed that it is no longer necessary for the protection of the public for the offender to remain confined.

Where prisoners are transferred to hospital for treatment under the 1983 Act, they are most likely to be subject to a restriction order. This means that certain decisions about the management of that patient, for instance decisions over leave and transfer, are subject to the consent of the Secretary of State. This function exists to ensure public protection is upheld.

Q
Asked by Olivia Blake
(Sheffield, Hallam)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 April 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Surgery: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department plans to take to tackle the backlog of elective surgical procedures during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 05 May 2020
Holding answer received on 04 May 2020

With evidence now suggesting that we have reached the peak of this wave of COVID-19, and with the National Health Service well-placed to provide world-leading care for those who do still have the virus, we have started to reset services, including non-urgent elective care. These services had previously been suspended as part of ensuring sufficient capacity was in place to manage the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The approach to this will be flexed at local level according to capacity and demand in different parts of the country, and will be gradual, over the coming weeks. We will work on the principle that the most urgent treatments, including mental health support, should be brought back first and this will be driven by local demands on the system.

Grouped Questions: 41200
Q
Asked by Olivia Blake
(Sheffield, Hallam)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 28 April 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
Surgery: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department plans to take to ensure that elective surgical procedures are able to recommence safely and efficiently after the peak of the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 05 May 2020
Holding answer received on 04 May 2020

With evidence now suggesting that we have reached the peak of this wave of COVID-19, and with the National Health Service well-placed to provide world-leading care for those who do still have the virus, we have started to reset services, including non-urgent elective care. These services had previously been suspended as part of ensuring sufficient capacity was in place to manage the initial outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The approach to this will be flexed at local level according to capacity and demand in different parts of the country, and will be gradual, over the coming weeks. We will work on the principle that the most urgent treatments, including mental health support, should be brought back first and this will be driven by local demands on the system.

Grouped Questions: 41199
Q
(East Lothian)
Asked on: 05 May 2020
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners' Release: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for what reason Government guidance entitled Coronavirus Restricted Temporary Release measures states that children serving sentences for drug offences, including simple possession of a class A drug under s5(1) and (2) of the Misuse of Drugs Act, are specifically excluded from consideration for release.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 18 May 2020

Protecting the health and well-being of our staff and the children in our care is paramount. Currently, the youth secure estate has sufficient headroom to enable every child to have their own room and physical distancing is being observed in line with Public Heath England guidance.

We will temporarily release a small number of children who are judged to be low risk and near the end of their sentence. Children who have committed drug-related offences are excluded from eligibility to ensure public confidence in the administration of justice. The threshold for custody is higher for children and young people so drug offences are likely to be more serious ones.

Q
Asked by Lord Bowness
Asked on: 21 April 2020
Cabinet Office
UK Relations With EU
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord True on 23 March (HL2421), how many agreements have been reached in respect of mutual recognition of (1) driving licences, and (2) blue badges.
A
Answered by: Lord True
Answered on: 04 May 2020

The recognition of both driving licenses and blue badges is a member state competence and the Government is seeking to secure both with EU members via bilateral agreement. Discussions are ongoing in both of these policy areas. Recognition of disabled blue badges currently operates on a policy of goodwill among EU member states. The Government has asked UK local authorities to continue to recognise disabled blue badges and hopes that EU member states will reciprocate.

Q
Asked by Lord Wills
Asked on: 23 April 2020
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Disclosure of Information
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to remind NHS trusts of their responsibilities to whistle-blowers.
A
Answered by: Lord Bethell
Answered on: 04 May 2020

Speaking up is vital for ensuring patient safety and improving the quality of services and should be a routine part of business in the National Health Service. The NHS should support and welcome all staff to raise concerns wherever they spot them.

The Government has proactively encouraged NHS staff to raise concerns over recent years and provided support by establishing an independent National Guardian to help drive positive cultural change across the NHS so that speaking up becomes business as usual.

On 23 April the Care Quality Commission and the National Guardian issued a joint statement to providers of health and social care reminding them of the importance of speaking up. This followed a letter that the National Guardian sent to NHS trust chairs in March, which also highlighted the importance of staff having the freedom to speak up and the need to support Local Freedom to Speak Up Guardians at this time.

We will continue to encourage and support the rights of staff to raise concerns.

Q
Asked by Afzal Khan
(Manchester, Gorton)
Asked on: 24 April 2020
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Agriculture: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what support the Government is providing to farmers to ensure they are able to harvest their crops during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Victoria Prentis
Answered on: 04 May 2020

The ongoing impacts of the Coronavirus outbreak have meant that there will be a shortfall in the numbers of workers who usually travel to the UK from Europe to work during the harvest season, with the demand for workers peaking from late May through the summer. We need to mobilise the British workforce to fill that gap and make sure our excellent fruit and vegetables are on people's plates over the summer months.

Farming leaders have already kick-started a recruitment drive for work on farms. With many British workers furloughed from their jobs, and students having to put their summer plans on hold, the Government is supporting industry efforts to help farmers bring in this year’s harvest, working to build on these numbers.

The majority of roles for the early part of the harvest season have already been filled. We are closely monitoring the situation and we will shortly be launching a public- facing campaign to highlight the roles available from late May onwards and to encourage people to apply. The Government has confirmed that those who have been furloughed from their jobs due to coronavirus, and who are contractually allowed to work for another employer, can take on this seasonal work.

The Pick for Britain website is a recently launched joint Defra and industry initiative to support this effort. The website will act as a central hub to signpost people to the jobs available and to hold guidance and resources so growers, workers and industry can have a single place to go, available at https://pickforbritain.org.uk/. The website will also provide links to a wide range of recruitment campaigns organised by labour providers. The Pick for Britain website includes links to the Government's 'Find A Job' website, which will give access to a wide reach of potential applicants. The Find a Job website has more than 1.6 million registered users and is available here: https://findajob.dwp.gov.uk/.

Our farmers are doing a fantastic job of feeding the nation during this challenging time. To help our farmers, industry Best Practice Guidance for employers of seasonal agricultural workers to avoid the spread of coronavirus has also now been published, which has been endorsed by Public Health England: https://ahdb.org.uk/coronavirus/social-distancing-farm-businesses.

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