Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Hyndburn)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Home Office
Police: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to allocate the funding for 20,000 extra police officers to local forces according to how many police officers each force has lost since 2010.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 06 September 2019

We recognise that demand on the police is changing and we are acting. We are committed to recruiting 20,000 additional police officers over the next three years to tackle the rise in crime. This is the start of a new relationship between the Government and the police, and we will work even more closely together to protect the public.

The National Policing Board has been set up to provide strong leadership and deliver on our commitment to recruit 20,000 more police officers. Following the first meeting, the government and police will move at pace to drive forward our plans to bolster the police’s ranks.

All force-level funding allocations will be set out in the usual way at the pro-visional police funding settlement in December. The Government is working with the sector through a number of important details, including on allocating officers between different functions and activities to ensure maximum value from this additional resource.

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Home Office
Young Offenders: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether children in secure care or detention are eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 06 September 2019

A person’s continuity of residence in the UK for the purposes of eligibility under the EU Settlement Scheme is broken when they serve a sentence of imprisonment. They will not generally be eligible to apply to the scheme while they are serving that sentence.

This is consistent with EU law on free movement, as currently given effect in the UK by the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. This provision applies to children in detention as it does for all applicants to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Grouped Questions: 282340
Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Home Office
Young Offenders: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether a period of imprisonment will be included in an assessment of a child's (a) eligibility and (b) continuous residence criteria under the EU settlement scheme.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 06 September 2019

A person’s continuity of residence in the UK for the purposes of eligibility under the EU Settlement Scheme is broken when they serve a sentence of imprisonment. They will not generally be eligible to apply to the scheme while they are serving that sentence.

This is consistent with EU law on free movement, as currently given effect in the UK by the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. This provision applies to children in detention as it does for all applicants to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Grouped Questions: 282339
Q
(Totnes)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Agriculture: Subsidies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government has taken to reduce the complexity of environmental schemes for land holders.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) took on responsibility for Environmental Stewardship and Countryside Stewardship schemes in October 2018, and has introduced a number of measures on agri-environment schemes to make it easier for farmers and land managers to apply and make it simpler for them to administer.

The RPA has made improvements to the online service, including making more offers available to apply for online and allowing applicants to download application packs. It has simplified both the rules regarding the evidence we require and the guidance manuals. In addition the RPA has made changes to the processing cycle which has reduced completion times for applications, agreements, claims and payments.

Looking forward we are considering ways to drive further online uptake, make improvements to the information on GOV.UK, and whether there are further simplifications we can make to the scheme to support the transition to a new Environmental Land Management Scheme, subject to exit negotiations and funding.

Q
(South Holland and The Deepings)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Wealth
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to narrow wealth differentials between the richest and poorest (a) individuals, (b) regions, (c) counties and (d) constituencies.
A
Answered by: Rishi Sunak
Answered on: 05 September 2019

Addressing inequalities is an important consideration for this Government, and steps have already been taken to ensure those with the broadest shoulders bear the greatest burden. That is why we have introduced reforms to dividend taxation and capital gains tax, and ended permanent non-domicile status – to ensure the rich pay their fair share. This has led to the top 1% of income taxpayers paying 29% of income tax – a record high.

This Government is also committed to ensuring opportunities are shared in every part of the country. People across all regions are benefitting from investments the Government is making. For example, since 2015, £12bn from the Local Growth Fund has been provided to local enterprise partnerships for projects that benefit the local area and economy. In addition to this, our new £3.6 billion Towns Fund will level up opportunity and create places across the UK where people want to live and thrive – supporting an initial 100 towns.

By supporting all places to reach their potential, we can drive growth at a national level and readily share the benefits of a more prosperous United Kingdom.

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Young Offenders: EEA Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Justice, what processes his Department has put in place to ensure that children that are EEA nationals who come into contact with the criminal justice system can be identified for the purposes of providing advice and support.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 05 September 2019

Youth Offending Services (YOS) were established in the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, which introduced a statutory duty for all local authorities to establish a multi-agency team, with members from police, social services, probation and education, to deliver youth justice services. YOS have a statutory duty to:

    • provide appropriate adults for children detained or being interviewed at the police station and provide support for children on bail;
    • help young people and their families through court proceedings;
    • write pre-sentence reports for the courts advising on appropriate interventions;
    • supervise young people serving a community sentence;
    • stay in touch with a young person if they’re sentenced to custody; and
    • assist in the child’s resettlement post-custody.

All children who come into contact with the YOS (including EEA nationals) will have their individual circumstances and needs assessed and will receive interventions and support accordingly.

Q
Asked by John Lamont
(Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Cabinet Office
Civil Servants
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to increase the number of Civil Service roles outside of London.
A
Answered by: Simon Hart
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Government has committed to ensure that the administration of government, including civil service roles and public bodies are located in the regions and nations of the United Kingdom. The Cabinet Office is co-ordinating this activity through the Places for Growth programme.

To date the Programme has identified over three thousand roles for relocation over a phased timetable and it is working with all departments and public bodies to drive location and workforce planning ahead of the next Spending Review.

Q
(Leicester South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to report Neuro Patience: Still Waiting for Improvements in Treatment and Care published by the Kings Fund on 9 July 2019, what steps the Government is taking to improve support for people with neurological conditions who have unmet health, social care and mental health needs.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Neuro Patience report, published by the Neurological Alliance, presents the findings of an online survey of the experiences of people with neurological conditions in engaging with health and social care. Patient insights can provide useful intelligence to commissioners and service planners when delivering or reviewing service provision, highlighting areas where improvements can be made.

NHS England works to provides tailored national support, enabling local commissioners and providers to drive improvement and ensure services best reflect the needs of individual communities. NHS England also works with patient organisations such as the Neurological Alliance to raise awareness and support improved outcomes for people living with neurological conditions. This includes reflecting on intelligence and insights, such as those provided by the survey report, to drive improvements in care.

NHS England established the National Neurology Advisory Group (NNAG) with the Neurological Alliance, which led the development of a national collaborative clinical leadership model, bringing together key stakeholders, a range of national clinical leaders and patient groups. The NNAG, which is co-chaired by Professor Adrian Williams (who serves as chair for NHS England’s neurosciences Clinical Reference Group), aims to support alignment between neurology improvement programmes in NHS England, arm’s length bodies and system partners; and to guide the strategic development of work to improve outcomes for people living with neurological conditions.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Hearing Aids: Research
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support research and development of new hearing aid technology.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Department funds research mainly through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The usual practice of the NIHR and other research funders is not to ring-fence funds for expenditure on particular topics. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including hearing aid technology.

In 2017-18 the NIHR was supporting four studies related to hearing aid technology and improving the use of hearing aids through its research infrastructure in the National Health Service. Between 2017 and 2019, the NIHR Clinical Research Network supported eight clinical studies related to hearing aid technology.

The NIHR funds three Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) which have research themes related to hearing loss, deafness and hearing health. The total NIHR investment in these three BRC research themes over the five years from 1 April 2017 is £10.9 million. This includes the Manchester BRC that has established the United Kingdom’s only Hearing Device Research Centre to drive innovation in interventions for hearing loss and to accelerate the translation of new hearing technologies into the NHS.

Q
(Thirsk and Malton)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Repossession Orders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to her Department's publication, Mortgage and landlord possession statistics in England and Wales, April to June 2019 (provisional), published on 8 August 2019, which large mortgage provider has driven up the number of home repossessions to their highest level since 2014.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The organisation was required to provide its details to enable the court to process its possession claims. It would be inappropriate to release such information where it would be likely to prejudice an organisation’s commercial interests.

Q
(Dunfermline and West Fife)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 05 September 2019
Department for Transport
Driving Instruction: Electric Vehicles
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department provides incentives for driving instructors to use electric vehicles.
Q
Asked by Angela Rayner
(Ashton-under-Lyne)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Education
Schools: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his policy is on increasing (a) overall school funding and (b) the minimum level of funding per pupil; and when those policies will be implemented.
A
Answered by: Gavin Williamson
Answered on: 04 September 2019
Holding answer received on 28 August 2019

On Friday 30 August the department announced an over £14 billion, 3 year settlement for primary and secondary schools.

This funding package builds on the government reforms which have seen education standards in England increase, with more primary school children on track to become fluent readers, more 19 year olds leaving education with English and mathematics GCSEs, and almost one million school places created.

This funding package builds on the reform agenda that we have pursued since 2010 which has driven better standards, rigour, discipline and outcomes for pupils in England.

This settlement includes cash increases of £2.6 billion for 2020-21, £4.8 billion for 2021-22 and £7.1 billion for 2022-23 compared with 2019-20. Part of this settlement includes over £700 million more for the special educational needs and disabilities budget in 2020-21 compared to this year, which is equivalent to an increase of over 11%.

In addition, the settlement also includes £1.5 billion in each of the next 3 years for teachers’ pensions. This is on top of the £14 billion overall increase.

The £14 billion means the department can ‘level up’ school funding by raising the minimum per pupil funding to all secondary schools to £5,000 next year, and the minimum per pupil funding for primary schools to £3,750 in 2020-21 and £4,000 in 2021-22.

This will bring the schools budget to £52.2 billion by 2022-3 and will deliver on my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister’s pledge to deliver the following:

  • increase school funding by £4.6 billion a year above inflation;
  • delivering minimum secondary school funding of £5,000 per pupil; and
  • delivering minimum primary school funding of £4,000 per pupil by 2022-23.

In doing so, the government is giving all young people the same opportunities to succeed — regardless of where they grow up or go to school— and providing for a real terms increase in per pupil funding in all schools next year. The funding formula will ensure that all parts of the UK will receive significant funding uplifts.

Q
Asked by Tim Farron
(Westmorland and Lonsdale)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Carbon Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the BRE Code for Sustainable Homes data that 107,000 homes have been built in England to the zero carbon homes standard, if he will include in the forthcoming review of Building Regulations a proposal to reinstate that standard from 2020.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 03 September 2019

The recent UK Green Building Council report on new homes ( https://www.ukgbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Driving-sustainability-in-new-homes-UKGBC-resource-July-2018-v4.pdf ) stated that 107,000 homes have been built to the Code Level 4 standard. Code Level 4 represents a 19 per cent uplift on current Part L energy efficiency standards across the build mix.


We have noted these findings and are preparing to consult on options to deliver the government’s ambitious commitments for future housing. In the Government’s Clean Growth Strategy, we committed to reviewing the Part L standards, including consulting on improving energy efficiency requirements in new and existing buildings where the evidence suggests it is cost effective, affordable, practical and safe to do so. In the Spring Statement, government committed to introduce a Future Homes Standard by 2025 for new build homes to be future-proofed with low carbon heating and world-leading levels of energy efficiency, to create healthy homes that are fit for the future, have low energy bills, and are better for the environment.

Q
Asked by Jo Stevens
(Cardiff Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Education
Universities: Mental Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Office for Students has taken since its establishment to assess the adequacy of provision of mental health services and student support at universities.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 03 September 2019

In our latest guidance to the Office for Students (OfS), we asked that it continue its work to support student experience, with a focus on wellbeing and mental health.

Where a provider has significant gaps in outcomes between students with a declared mental health condition and their peers, the OfS require providers to set out an ambitious strategy to narrow these gaps and promote equality of opportunity, as part of their access and participation plans.

The OfS also regulates at a sector level to share evidence and examples of effective and innovative practice. On 5 June 2019, the OfS announced the award of almost £6 million for 10 large-scale projects through a challenge competition, encouraging higher education providers to find new ways of combating student mental health issues. The OfS has commissioned a programme-level evaluation to gather what works most effectively and to disseminate learning across the sector.

On 17 June 2019, the government announced a £1 million fund for a further OfS challenge competition to find innovative proposals that drive improvements in mental health support for higher education students.

Q
(Newcastle upon Tyne North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Home Office
Money Laundering: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason the UK has not opted into EU Directive 2018/1673 on combating money laundering by criminal law.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 September 2019

As set out in the Eighth Annual Report to Parliament on the Application of Protocols 19 and 21 to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Union (TFEU) in Relation to EU Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) Matters (1 December 2016 – 30 November 2017) (Cm 9580), the UK Government decided not to opt into the EU Directive on combating money laundering by criminal law as our domestic legislation is already largely compliant with the Directive’s measures, and in relation to the offences and sentences set out in the Directive, the UK already goes much further. Therefore, it was not considered that opting in would enhance the UK’s approach to tackling money laundering.

Q
(Newcastle upon Tyne North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Home Office
Money Laundering: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the equivalence of the UK's corporate liability regime achieve with article 7 (the liability of legal persons) of EU Directive 2018/1673 on combating money laundering by criminal law.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 September 2019

As set out in the Eighth Annual Report to Parliament on the Application of Protocols 19 and 21 to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Union (TFEU) in Relation to EU Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) Matters (1 December 2016 – 30 November 2017) (Cm 9580), the UK Government decided not to opt into the EU Directive on combating money laundering by criminal law as our domestic legislation is already largely compliant with the Directive’s measures, and in relation to the offences and sentences set out in the Directive, the UK already goes much further. Therefore, it was not considered that opting in would enhance the UK’s approach to tackling money laundering.

Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Private Sector
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Written Statement of 22 July 2019 on Prisons and Probation, HCWS1783, what assessment he has made of how partnering with the private sector to operate prisons offers value for money.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 03 September 2019

A balanced estate, with a mix of public, voluntary and private sector involvement has been shown to introduce improvements and deliver value for money for the taxpayer. The private sector has an important role to play in our system; it has led the way in driving innovation in areas such as in-cell technology and family support services.

Some privately run prisons are among the best performing across the estate. For example, HM Inspectorate of Prisons said in July 2018 that Oakwood is an “impressive prison” and found it to be reasonably good or better on all four healthy prison tests (safety, respect, purposeful activity, and rehabilitation and release planning). General living conditions, staff-prisoner relationships and prisoner consultation were reported to be very good or excellent.

To manage the performance indicators set out in the contracts, each privately managed prison has a full-time on-site Controller, Deputy Controller and Assistant Controller, all employed by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). The Controller has regular review meetings with the contractor against a range of performance indicators that will reflect numbers of staff in post, recruitment, training, sickness, and attrition. Where action is needed, progress is monitored by the Controller and escalated within HMPPS where appropriate action can be taken in accordance with the contract. This may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions.

The Prison Operator Framework will increase the diversity and resilience of the custodial services market in England and Wales, by creating a pool of prison operators who can provide high quality, value for money, custodial services and enable us to effectively and efficiently manage a pipeline of competition over the next six years. The MoJ sets out very clearly the standards that all private prison operators are required to deliver. Bids will be subject to value for money and affordability tests. Contracts will not be awarded if bids do not meet quality or value for money thresholds based on a public sector benchmark, and in this scenario, HMPPS would act as the provider.

Although privately managed prisons do face many of the same challenges encountered in public sector prisons, by providing good quality custodial and rehabilitation services, private operators are helping us to reduce reoffending and deliver long term savings to the taxpayer.

Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effect of (a) prison violence and (b) exposure to new psychoactive substances on the (i) physical and (ii) mental health of prison staff.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 03 September 2019

The physical, emotional and social wellbeing of our staff is paramount. All HMPPS staff have access to an occupational health service, and employee assistance programme. This includes 24-hour, 365 days a year access to signposting and counselling, and trauma support services.

Violence against our hard-working staff will never be tolerated. The Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act came into force in November and doubled sentences for those who attack emergency workers, including prison officers. Post-incident care teams, occupational health support, counselling and clinical treatment are available for those who experience trauma while doing their jobs.

We are investing £100 million investment to boost security and combat crime in prisons. Tough airport-style security, including x-ray scanners and metal detectors, will be put into prisons across the estate to clamp down on the drugs, weapons and mobile phones that fuel violence – increasing the risk to our officers and hindering rehabilitation.

Psychoactive substances have presented a particular challenge and in September 2016, we became the first prison service in the world to introduce innovative mandatory drug tests for these substances, a significant step in tackling the supply and use of them.

Following reports from staff of the effects of secondary inhalation Her Majesty's Prison & Probation Service commenced work with unions, independent scientists and clinicians to assess the impact of reported secondary exposure to psychoactive substances. A programme of voluntary post-exposure biological testing of staff is now being expanded and will enable an assessment of the biological effects on staff to be made.

Q
(Birmingham, Edgbaston)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for International Development
Department for International Development: Cost Effectiveness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to his Department's Main Estimates memorandum for 2019-20, if he will publish an impact assessment of the efficiency savings made by his Department since 2015.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 03 September 2019

DFID has introduced tough reforms to deliver good value for money for UK taxpayers. DFID is on track to deliver almost £500m in efficiency savings by 2019-20, higher than the £400m target set in the 2015 Spending Review.

The majority of these savings have been driven by more effective procurement practices.

DFID’s Annual Procurement and Commercial Report, which was published in July 2019, outlines some of the steps taken to deliver value for money.

These efficiency savings have been used to deliver further aid programming, meaning that DFID delivers the maximum impact for UK Aid, continues to lead the fight against global poverty and contribute toward the global goals.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Radicalism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the system for collating statistics on extremist behaviours in prisons.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 03 September 2019

Extremist behaviours in prison are identified and monitored through a robust case management process reviewing Terrorism Act (TACT) and TACT-related prisoners throughout their sentence. Information and statistics relating to extremist behaviours are routinely collected at local, regional and national levels. Related statistics for persons in custody and released from custody are routinely provide as part of Home Office Official Counter Terrorism statistics, published quarterly as statistical bulletins [see link below]. These statistics present details regarding the number of persons in custody for terrorism-related offences in Great Britain, including details of ethnicity, nationality, ideology and religion.

The latest statistics can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/counter-terrorism-statistics

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