Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 09 July 2019
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters: Cycleways
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 5 July (HL16757), why electrically powered cycles are allowed on cycle ways provided that the cycle is designed only to provide electric assistance if the rider provides some pedal power, but electric scooters which can permit the addition of rider power by pushing on the road are not permitted on cycle ways.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2019

Electrically assisted pedal cycles (EAPCs) are allowed on cycle routes provided they conform with the Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycles Regulations. If an EAPC meets those regulatory requirements it is treated the same as a pedal cycle.

In the UK, electric scooters are treated like any other motor vehicle under the Road Traffic Act. This means they are subject to laws requiring them to conform to technical standards and be used safely. This includes requirements for users to have insurance, driving licences, number plates, and helmets. At present, it is difficult for electric scooters to meet these requirements.

Therefore, it is illegal to use an electric scooter on public roads and pavements. They are legal for use on private land with the landowners’ permission.

The Future of Mobility regulatory review will address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulation are fit for the future. This is a broad programme of work, and we expect to publish an initial consultation in autumn this year.

Grouped Questions: HL17025 | HL17026 | HL17027
Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 09 July 2019
Department for Transport
Transport: Regulation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 5 July (HL16757), when they expect the Future of Mobility review to be published.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2019

Electrically assisted pedal cycles (EAPCs) are allowed on cycle routes provided they conform with the Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycles Regulations. If an EAPC meets those regulatory requirements it is treated the same as a pedal cycle.

In the UK, electric scooters are treated like any other motor vehicle under the Road Traffic Act. This means they are subject to laws requiring them to conform to technical standards and be used safely. This includes requirements for users to have insurance, driving licences, number plates, and helmets. At present, it is difficult for electric scooters to meet these requirements.

Therefore, it is illegal to use an electric scooter on public roads and pavements. They are legal for use on private land with the landowners’ permission.

The Future of Mobility regulatory review will address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulation are fit for the future. This is a broad programme of work, and we expect to publish an initial consultation in autumn this year.

Grouped Questions: HL17024 | HL17026 | HL17027
Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 09 July 2019
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters: Cycleways
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 5 July (HL16757), whether, pending any relevant legislative changes, they intend to allow drivers of electric scooters to use cycle ways and cycle lanes on roads without requiring them to possess a driving licence for motor vehicles.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2019

Electrically assisted pedal cycles (EAPCs) are allowed on cycle routes provided they conform with the Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycles Regulations. If an EAPC meets those regulatory requirements it is treated the same as a pedal cycle.

In the UK, electric scooters are treated like any other motor vehicle under the Road Traffic Act. This means they are subject to laws requiring them to conform to technical standards and be used safely. This includes requirements for users to have insurance, driving licences, number plates, and helmets. At present, it is difficult for electric scooters to meet these requirements.

Therefore, it is illegal to use an electric scooter on public roads and pavements. They are legal for use on private land with the landowners’ permission.

The Future of Mobility regulatory review will address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulation are fit for the future. This is a broad programme of work, and we expect to publish an initial consultation in autumn this year.

Grouped Questions: HL17024 | HL17025 | HL17027
Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 09 July 2019
Department for Transport
Electric Vehicles
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Vere of Norbiton on 5 July (HL16757), whether electrically powered personal vehicles such as scooters, gyroscopic one or two-wheel vehicles and other similar vehicles are permitted to operate anywhere.
A
Answered on: 23 July 2019

Electrically assisted pedal cycles (EAPCs) are allowed on cycle routes provided they conform with the Electrically Assisted Pedal Cycles Regulations. If an EAPC meets those regulatory requirements it is treated the same as a pedal cycle.

In the UK, electric scooters are treated like any other motor vehicle under the Road Traffic Act. This means they are subject to laws requiring them to conform to technical standards and be used safely. This includes requirements for users to have insurance, driving licences, number plates, and helmets. At present, it is difficult for electric scooters to meet these requirements.

Therefore, it is illegal to use an electric scooter on public roads and pavements. They are legal for use on private land with the landowners’ permission.

The Future of Mobility regulatory review will address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulation are fit for the future. This is a broad programme of work, and we expect to publish an initial consultation in autumn this year.

Grouped Questions: HL17024 | HL17025 | HL17026
Asked on: 10 July 2019
Leader of the House of Lords
Government Bills
Lords
To ask the Leader of the House, further to her Written Answer on 3 July (HL16472), what steps are being taken to increase the proportion of government bills published in draft and submitted for pre-legislative scrutiny by a joint committee or committee of either House.
Answered on: 23 July 2019

The Government is supportive of the role of pre-legislative scrutiny, and looks to take steps wherever possible to facilitate it. In the 2016-17 session, the Government published 3 draft bills. In this session we have published ten draft pieces of legislation for pre-legislative scrutiny by a joint committee or a committee of either house, these were: Draft Health Service Safety Investigations Bill; Draft Domestic Gas and Electricity (Tariff Cap) Bill; Draft clause on the Personal Injury Discount Rate - subsequently included in the Civil Liability Bill; Draft Tenants Fees Bill; Draft Animal Welfare (Sentencing and Recognition of Sentience) Bill 2017; Draft Finance Bill; Draft Registration of Overseas Entities Bill; Draft Parliamentary Buildings (Restoration and Renewal) Bill; Draft Environment (Principles and Governance) Bill; Draft Domestic Abuse Bill.

Q
(Hendon)
Asked on: 15 July 2019
Department for Transport
Motor Vehicles: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what recent guidance he has published on the use of off-road all-terrain vehicles by people under the legal driving age.
A
Answered by: Michael Ellis
Answered on: 23 July 2019

The Government has not published any guidance as the legislation governing the legal age to drive applies to on-road vehicles only. The Department for Transport’s remit covers road traffic legislation which applies to the road or public place. There is no legislation which covers use outside of a road or public place.

Q
Asked by Steve Double
(St Austell and Newquay)
Asked on: 15 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Heating: Rural Areas
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government’s heat strategy include a comparative assessment of the costs associated with improving an Energy Performance Certificate between (a) rural homeowners and landlords that are off the gas grid and (b) homeowners and landlords are on the gas grid.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 23 July 2019

I have committed to publishing a Heat Policy Roadmap in in 2020 which will set out the programme of work required to enable key strategic decisions in the first part of the 2020s over the future of low-carbon heating. BEIS officials will be working closely with stakeholders as they develop its content.

The annual running costs of a Band C rated home are £650 lower than the average Band E rated home. This is why we set out our aspiration in the Clean Growth Strategy that as many homes as possible should be EPC C Band C by 2035 where practical, cost effective and affordable. We estimate that between £35 - 65 billion of investment will need to be mobilised to meet that aspiration.

There is not one ‘silver bullet’ policy that will drive uptake of energy efficiency amongst homeowners and so we are committed to building a vibrant and sustainable market through introducing a suite of mutually supporting policies and measures. These include a £5 million innovation fund to help mortgage lenders develop innovative green mortgage products in support of home energy efficiency and a £10m innovation fund to reduce the cost of whole house retrofit. Low income and vulnerable households are also supported in making energy efficiency improvements under the reformed Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme. ECO is worth £640m a year and has already installed 2.5 million measures since 2013.

Q
(Peterborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 16 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Dangerous Driving
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he has taken to implement his Department’s response to the consultation on driving offences and penalties relating to causing death or serious injury, published on 17 October 2017, Cm 9518.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 23 July 2019

We are focused on getting the law right, to ensure the changes we make are comprehensive, proportionate and, crucially, practical.

We will bring forward proposals for changes in the law to increase the maximum penalties for causing death by dangerous driving and careless driving under the influence of drink or drugs to life imprisonment, and create a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving as soon as possible. These proposals will take account of other government proposals for safer roads

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
Asked on: 17 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Offenders: Electronic Tagging
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 12 July 2019 to Question 273385 on Offenders: Electronic Tagging, when he plans to publish the quantitative process evaluation of the GPS Pilot.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 23 July 2019

The quantitative process evaluation of the GPS location monitoring Pilot was published alongside a speech on sentencing by my Rt Hon Friend the Secretary of State for Justice on Thursday 18 July. The evaluation can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/process-evaluation-of-the-global-positioning-system-electronic-monitoring-pilot-quantitative-findings The Secretary of State also announced in his speech on 18 July that we are planning to roll out a variation of location monitoring to children.

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
Asked on: 17 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Television: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 18 June 2019 to Question 264316 on Television: Licensing, how many (a) men and (b) women were given a prison sentence for failure to pay fines imposed for non-payment of the BBC licence fee in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 23 July 2019

The requested information can be viewed in the attached table.

Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 8.93 KB)
Q
Asked by Steve McCabe
(Birmingham, Selly Oak)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Insolvency
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to prevent insolvency; and what assessment he has made of the disparity in insolvency rates between (a) regions of England and Wales and (b) men and women.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 23 July 2019
Holding answer received on 22 July 2019

The Government is committed to helping people make good financial decisions, establishing the Money and Pensions Service to provide free support and guidance on all aspects of people’s financial lives. It has increased funding for the provision of debt advice in each of the past two years rising to almost £56million this year in England, which will deliver 560,000 debt advice sessions.

Where individuals do get into problem debt the government has announced it will deliver its manifesto commitment for a Breathing Space scheme, which will protect debtors from creditor action, help them get professional advice on their debt problems, and enable them to find an appropriate and sustainable debt solution.

The regional personal insolvency rate increased in 2018, driven mainly by individual voluntary arrangements (IVAs), with all regions following the national trend.

Historically, males had a higher rate of insolvencies per 10,000 adults than females, but the gender gap noticeably narrowed from 2009 onwards and, by 2014, females began to have higher insolvency rates than males. This change coincided with a decline in the number of bankruptcies (where males have a higher rate of insolvency), the introduction and growth in the number of debt relief orders (where the rate for women is higher), and the narrowing and subsequent reversal of the gender gap for IVAs.

The latest data providing a breakdown of individual insolvencies can be found in Individual Insolvencies by Location, Age and Gender, England and Wales, 2018; released on 17th July 2019 on the GOV.UK website.

Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 17 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Fuel Poverty
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to establish a national fuel fund to support those unable to meet gas and electricity bills.
A
Answered by: Lord Henley
Answered on: 23 July 2019

We have no current plans to establish a national fuel fund.

The Government provides support to those struggling with their gas and electricity bills through:

• The Warm Home Discount, which provides a £140 rebate to more than two million households;

• Winter Fuel Payments, that provides £200-300 to pensioners, ensuring that they can keep warm during the colder months; and

• Cold Weather Payments, which were automatically provided to more than one million households during winter 2018-19.

In addition, the default tariff cap protects all consumers on default tariffs from being overcharged and Ofgem’s safeguard price cap protects consumers on pre-payment meter tariffs.

The most sustainable approach to decreasing energy bills is improving energy efficiency.

• The Energy Company Obligation drives £640 million of investment annually into improving the efficiency of low income and vulnerable households.

• The Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards require landlords spend up to £3500 (including VAT) improving their rented properties to EPC Band E.

Q
(Sheffield Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Design of UK Funding Schemes for European and International Collaboration Review
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Written Statement of 26 March 2019, HCWS1449, whether the interim findings of the Adrian Smith Review on the design of UK funding schemes for international collaboration, innovation and curiosity-driven blue-skies research will be published before Parliament rises on 25 July 2019.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 23 July 2019

Sir Adrian’s interim findings will be presented to BEIS ministers in the Summer of 2019. We do not anticipate that this will be before Parliament rises.

The Review will be published by BEIS in due course.

Q
Asked by Stephen Twigg
(Liverpool, West Derby)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Schools
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of the findings of the UNESCO report entitled Meeting commitments: are countries on track to achieve sustainable development goal four that more than 220 million children, adolescents and youth will not be in school in 2030.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 23 July 2019

We welcome the recent UNESCO reports focusing on how to achieve SDG 4 on Global Education by 2030. These reports resonate well with DFID’s Education Policy: Get Children Learning. The UK will continue to support 12 years of quality education for girls and boys, starting with the basics of literacy and numeracy.

To achieve this, we:

a) Drive improvements in teaching which benefit all children in the classroom;

b) Support ambitious system reform which helps teachers succeed and keeps children safe; and

c) Provide targeted support to disadvantaged girls, children with disabilities and those affected by conflict and crisis.

We use our leadership on the world stage to shine a spotlight on the needs of the most marginalised and strengthen the multilateral system of support for education.

Grouped Questions: 278888 | 278889
Q
Asked by Stephen Twigg
(Liverpool, West Derby)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, if he will make an assessment of the implications for his Department's policies of the findings of the UNSECO report entitled Beyond commitments how do countries implement SDG 4, published on 8 July 2019.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 23 July 2019

We welcome the recent UNESCO reports focusing on how to achieve SDG 4 on Global Education by 2030. These reports resonate well with DFID’s Education Policy: Get Children Learning. The UK will continue to support 12 years of quality education for girls and boys, starting with the basics of literacy and numeracy.

To achieve this, we:

a) Drive improvements in teaching which benefit all children in the classroom;

b) Support ambitious system reform which helps teachers succeed and keeps children safe; and

c) Provide targeted support to disadvantaged girls, children with disabilities and those affected by conflict and crisis.

We use our leadership on the world stage to shine a spotlight on the needs of the most marginalised and strengthen the multilateral system of support for education.

Grouped Questions: 278887 | 278889
Q
Asked by Stephen Twigg
(Liverpool, West Derby)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for International Development
Developing Countries: Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what assessment he has made of the implications for his Department's policies of the findings of UNSECO in its report, Global education monitoring report 2019 – gender report: Building bridges for gender equality.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 23 July 2019

We welcome the recent UNESCO reports focusing on how to achieve SDG 4 on Global Education by 2030. These reports resonate well with DFID’s Education Policy: Get Children Learning. The UK will continue to support 12 years of quality education for girls and boys, starting with the basics of literacy and numeracy.

To achieve this, we:

a) Drive improvements in teaching which benefit all children in the classroom;

b) Support ambitious system reform which helps teachers succeed and keeps children safe; and

c) Provide targeted support to disadvantaged girls, children with disabilities and those affected by conflict and crisis.

We use our leadership on the world stage to shine a spotlight on the needs of the most marginalised and strengthen the multilateral system of support for education.

Grouped Questions: 278887 | 278888
Q
(Motherwell and Wishaw)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if her Department will offer people with autistic spectrum conditions of working age access to interview training designed and delivered by individuals with extensive knowledge of autism spectrum conditions through Jobcentres.
A
Answered by: Justin Tomlinson
Answered on: 23 July 2019

The new Health and Work Conversation allows work coaches to build engagement with claimants with disabilities and health issues. Work Coaches are given comprehensive training to build their empathy skills and help them to actively listen to claimants. In addition, two new specialist job roles were introduced into Jobcentres from April 2019 - a revised Disability Employment Adviser role, bringing together the current role and incorporating elements of the Community Partner and Small Employer Adviser roles, and a new Disability Employment Adviser Leader role. These new roles will be instrumental in driving the government’s commitment to providing high quality support to disabled people and those with health conditions, including autism spectrum conditions. In total, more than 800 people will be employed in these new roles.

Work Coaches can refer individuals to a range of personalised support, which can include specialist interview training, through programmes like The Work and Health Programme. Work and Health Programme providers have links to organisations with extensive knowledge of autism spectrum conditions, including Autism Plus, Triple A (All About Autism), Autism Anglia, Autism Spectrum Connections CYMRU (ASCC), Gwent Integrated Autism Service, and The Autism Directory.

By the end of 2019 we will have rolled out our new Intensive Personalised Employment Support Programme, which will provide highly personalised packages of employment support for disabled people, including people with autism spectrum conditions, who are at least a year away from moving into work.

Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners: Childbirth
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women in prison gave birth in 2018.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 23 July 2019

The information is not centrally held and could only be obtained only at disproportionate cost. However, all pregnant women in custody have an individual care and management plan that is communicated to all staff and all pregnant women are seen by a mid-wife at least fortnightly or as required.

Healthcare in prisons is provided by trained medics and nurses, but we have also made training on dealing with pregnant women available to all prison officers.

We know it is extremely rare for a woman to give birth in prison - because every step is taken to get them to hospital - but those unique cases are invariably down to the unpredictability of labour.

Our Female Offender Strategy made clear that we want fewer women serving short sentences in custody and more remaining in the community, making use of women’s centres to address needs such as substance misuse and mental health problems.

Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Manufacturing Industries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the consequences of the October 31 deadline for the UK leaving the EU on (a) stockpiling and (b) cashflows in the manufacturing sector.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 23 July 2019

On 28th November 2018, the Government laid before Parliament the document entitled, “EU Exit: Long-term economic analysis” which was intended to facilitate parliamentary scrutiny ahead of the Meaningful Vote on the final deal. The purpose of this analysis was to illustrate high level impacts on the UK from different EU Exit scenarios. It included associated costs for five broad sector groups across the economy, including manufactured goods, which together cover the majority of the UK economy and all traded goods and services.

We understand the impact that continued uncertainty has on firms and the disruption in the event of no deal and continue to discuss the situation with manufacturers and industry bodies, including Make UK. We are also aware that factories are stockpiling essential parts to try to minimise disruption in a no deal scenario, and we acknowledge that this has an impact on costs. The best way to deliver the certainty that our manufacturers need is to agree a deal that delivers on our commitment to leaving the European Union.

The Government is committed to leaving the European Union in a way that underpins prosperity and avoids unnecessary disruption for people and businesses across the UK and therefore has been preparing to minimise any disruption in the event of no deal. Since the extension was agreed, departments have advanced their no deal preparations so that we are ready to implement necessary work in the lead-up to 31 October if needed.

HMRC has written three times to over 145,000 VAT-registered UK businesses who currently trade only with the EU, setting out the actions they need to take, and the changes they need to be prepared for in the event of no deal.

We have advised hundreds of ports, traders, pharmaceutical firms and other organisations that use the borders about potential disruption, so that they can engage proactively with their supply chains. We have published a leaflet for SMEs, that contains advice on actions to take, provides sources of support, and outlines the changes that may affect businesses when the UK leaves the EU.

The Government recognises that the manufacturing sector remains a vital contributor to the economy of the UK, driving innovation, exports, job creation, and productivity growth and we are committed to supporting the sector as the UK exits Europe. Through our modern Industrial Strategy and Made Smarter – our key national industrial digitalisation programme – we are building an economy fit for the future. As the 9th largest global manufacturing economy, we are, and will continue to be, a major manufacturing nation.

Grouped Questions: 278996 | 278997 | 278998
Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Manufacturing Industries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the adequacy manufacturing businesses' preparations for the UK leaving the EU without an agreement.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 23 July 2019

On 28th November 2018, the Government laid before Parliament the document entitled, “EU Exit: Long-term economic analysis” which was intended to facilitate parliamentary scrutiny ahead of the Meaningful Vote on the final deal. The purpose of this analysis was to illustrate high level impacts on the UK from different EU Exit scenarios. It included associated costs for five broad sector groups across the economy, including manufactured goods, which together cover the majority of the UK economy and all traded goods and services.

We understand the impact that continued uncertainty has on firms and the disruption in the event of no deal and continue to discuss the situation with manufacturers and industry bodies, including Make UK. We are also aware that factories are stockpiling essential parts to try to minimise disruption in a no deal scenario, and we acknowledge that this has an impact on costs. The best way to deliver the certainty that our manufacturers need is to agree a deal that delivers on our commitment to leaving the European Union.

The Government is committed to leaving the European Union in a way that underpins prosperity and avoids unnecessary disruption for people and businesses across the UK and therefore has been preparing to minimise any disruption in the event of no deal. Since the extension was agreed, departments have advanced their no deal preparations so that we are ready to implement necessary work in the lead-up to 31 October if needed.

HMRC has written three times to over 145,000 VAT-registered UK businesses who currently trade only with the EU, setting out the actions they need to take, and the changes they need to be prepared for in the event of no deal.

We have advised hundreds of ports, traders, pharmaceutical firms and other organisations that use the borders about potential disruption, so that they can engage proactively with their supply chains. We have published a leaflet for SMEs, that contains advice on actions to take, provides sources of support, and outlines the changes that may affect businesses when the UK leaves the EU.

The Government recognises that the manufacturing sector remains a vital contributor to the economy of the UK, driving innovation, exports, job creation, and productivity growth and we are committed to supporting the sector as the UK exits Europe. Through our modern Industrial Strategy and Made Smarter – our key national industrial digitalisation programme – we are building an economy fit for the future. As the 9th largest global manufacturing economy, we are, and will continue to be, a major manufacturing nation.

Grouped Questions: 278995 | 278997 | 278998
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