Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Q
(Hendon)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Department for Transport
Electric Scooters: Safety
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on public safety of e-scooters used on the public highway.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Given that electric scooters, and other micromobility devices, are treated like any other motor vehicle under the Road Traffic Act, they are subject to laws requiring them to conform to technical standards and be used safely. This includes requirements for users to have insurance, driving licences, number plates, and helmets. At present, it is difficult for electric scooters to meet these requirements and as such they are illegal to use on a public road. Therefore, the Department has made no assessment of their effect on public safety. Ministers are actively looking at ways to provide a framework for UK leadership in transport technology and innovation, and safe and effective regulation. The Future of Mobility regulatory review will address the challenges of ensuring our transport infrastructure and regulation are fit for the future. This is a broad programme of work, and we expect to publish an initial consultation in autumn this year.

Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Occupational Health
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the findings of the John Lewis Partnership Working Well report, published on 11 June 2019 on the benefits to public services of greater workplace health prevention and early intervention; and what steps he plans to take ensure that taxation incentivises early intervention from employers.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.

Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.

Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.

The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.

This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.

In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.

The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 281710 | 281711 | 281712 | 281713 | 281714 | 281715
Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Occupational Health: Cost Effectiveness
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the potential benefit to the public purse of workers receiving workplace medical treatment at work instead of after 28 consecutive days of absence.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.

Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.

Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.

The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.

This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.

In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.

The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 281709 | 281711 | 281712 | 281713 | 281714 | 281715
Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Occupational Health: Taxation
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect of the taxation of employees with occupational health support on the take-up of those services by low paid workers.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.

Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.

Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.

The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.

This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.

In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.

The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 281709 | 281710 | 281712 | 281713 | 281714 | 281715
Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Occupational Health: Taxation
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the implications for his policies on (a) health prevention and (b) early intervention of the (a) conditions in relation to 28 day consecutive absence and (b)requirement that a health condition must be a direct result of work in the exemption for employer-funded recommended medical treatment under section 320C of the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.

Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.

Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.

The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.

This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.

In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.

The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 281709 | 281710 | 281711 | 281713 | 281714 | 281715
Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Occupational Health: Taxation
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the compatibility of the conditions on tax reliefs for workplace health services with his Department's principles of tax simplification.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.

Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.

Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.

The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.

This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.

In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.

The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 281709 | 281710 | 281711 | 281712 | 281714 | 281715
Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Income Tax
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment he has made of the effect on number of additional workers that would be eligible for the exemption under section 320C of the Income Tax (Earnings and Pensions) Act 2003 of removing the requirement for a 28 consecutive day absence.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.

Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.

Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.

The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.

This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.

In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.

The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 281709 | 281710 | 281711 | 281712 | 281713 | 281715
Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Medical Treatments: Tax Allowances
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what estimate he has made of the cost to the Exchequer of removing the requirement for a 28 consecutive day absence and £500 cap per tax year from the s320C ITEPA 2003 (EIM21774) exemption for employer-funded recommended medical treatment.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the valuable work of employers such as the John Lewis Partnership in providing for the health of their staff.

Employers have a critical role to play in helping disabled people and people with long-term health conditions to remain in work. Keeping more people in work is good for them. But it is good for the economy too, and it reduces spending on out-of-work benefits, and potentially also demand on the NHS. For employers, investing in employee health and wellbeing can lead to increased workforce productivity and help retain key talent in an organisation.

Employers normally incur expenditure on employee healthcare for a business purpose and can already deduct this in full when calculating their taxable profits under the longstanding general rules for business expenses. This means employers already receive full tax relief for these costs. The Government therefore does not believe that the existing tax system for business expenses incurred by employers provides a barrier to those wishing to support employees at work.

The tax system also ensures employees do not pay income tax or National Insurance Contributions (NICs) on several employer-provided, health-related benefits and there is no corresponding Class 1A NICs liability for employers when there is an exemption for income tax. This includes recommended medical treatment of up to £500 intended to help employees return to work.

This particular exemption is targeted at supporting individuals who are expected to reach or who have already reached four weeks of sickness absence. This is because evidence suggests there is an increased likelihood of employees moving on to benefits after an absence lasting four weeks or longer. The £500 cap is in line with the estimated annual cost of the medical treatment that would typically be recommended to help employees return to work.

In July, the Government launched a consultation on measures to reduce ill health-related job loss. The broad focus of this consultation chimes with recommendations in the John Lewis report, including potential financial incentives to encourage more employers to access occupational health services, driving early and supportive employer action and spreading best practice. However, it also notes that there is limited evidence that making the tax treatment more generous is the most effective lever to incentivise more employers to start offering occupational health provision, if the initial cost is the main barrier for them.

The Government will use the evidence and views gathered during this consultation to develop its proposals further, considering an approach which offers the best value for money and is affordable in the context of the next Spending Review.

Grouped Questions: 281709 | 281710 | 281711 | 281712 | 281713 | 281714
Q
(Brighton, Pavilion)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Crimes of Violence: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of reviewing the sentence guidelines for conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Currently, there is no sentencing guideline for conspiracy to commit grievous bodily harm (GBH). This offence is covered by common law and separate to the offences related to causing or inflicting GBH.

It is for the Sentencing Council for England and Wales, which is independent of government, to develop sentencing guidelines and monitor their use. The Sentencing Council are in the process of reviewing the definitive guideline on assault offences, and anticipate issuing a consultation on a revised guideline in early 2020.

The Assault guideline and evaluation are available here:

https://www.sentencingcouncil.org.uk/publications/?type=publications&s=&cat=&topic=assault&year=

Q
Asked by Dan Jarvis
(Barnsley Central)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners: Veterans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 17 July 2019 to Question 276194, how many former armed service personnel who have declared their membership of those services are serving a sentence in each prison in the UK.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Since January 2015, Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service has actively been recording service in the Armed Forces as part of the screening process for newly received prisoners into custody.

Recently published Experimental Statistics (October 2018) have indicated that as of 30 June 2018, there were 1,782 prisoners who had declared themselves as ‘ex-service personnel’ serving a sentence in prisons across England and Wales representing 3% of the total prison population for whom we have data on this matter. The attached table shows a breakdown per establishment. The information requested for Northern Ireland and Scotland is not covered by this department.

The department is due to release the next estimate in October 2019.

The Ministry of Justice remains committed to encouraging individuals to declare service in the Armed Forces, as early as possible or at any point whist serving their sentence. This enables them to access the support available whether in custody or the community.

Data Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 20.83 KB)
Q
(Hayes and Harlington)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Treasury
Tax Havens
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether he has received reports of UK involvement in the tax arrangements disclosed by the Mauritius Leaks in July 2019; and what steps he is taking to tackle the use of tax havens.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

HMRC have reviewed the data disclosed by the Mauritius leaks and identified limited information relating to UK taxpayers. HMRC will investigate any allegations of wrongdoing identified.

The UK Government is at the forefront of the international tax agenda and driving increased collaboration between tax authorities, including through the ground-breaking Common Reporting Standard that is shedding new light on offshore financial accounts around the world. In March 2019, HMRC refreshed their Offshore strategy, called No Safe Havens which sets out how they will continue to help those who try to get it right and tackle those who go overseas in an attempt to pay less than they should. This builds on HMRC’s success in tackling offshore non-compliance which, since 2010, has secured and protected £2.9 billion through offshore disclosure facilities from those who mistakenly believed they could hide money offshore.

HMRC continue to work alongside UK and international partners to identify and tackle tax and economic crime in all its forms.

Q
(Hayes and Harlington)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Treasury
Revenue and Customs: Equal Pay
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the 2016 HMRC Equal Pay Audit provides assurance that HMRC's pay system is free from bias in terms of the protected characteristics defined in the Equality Act 2010.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The purpose of the 2016 Equal Pay Audit has been to give assurance that HMRC’s pay system is free from bias in terms of the protected characteristics and that HMRC continue to comply with the Equality Act 2010 legislation.

Transparency, reporting and monitoring are critical to tackling any inequality revealed through examining pay gaps. HMRC believe that their pay system does not unlawfully discriminate against their people, but they are looking at what is driving pay gaps, considering opportunities to change them and using this as a benchmark to improve.

Q
(Swansea East)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Courts
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps the Government is taking to activate the working group established by the then Lord Chief Justice and then Lord Chancellor in January 2016 to implement the problem-solving court model in England and Wales.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Problem-Solving Courts Working Group was asked to advise on the feasibility of pilot models and its planned work did not include an implementation stage. The group concluded the workstreams set out in its published terms of reference and has not been reconvened.

There remain barriers to testing or applying the problem-solving courts’ approach in a meaningful way, including upfront resource implications and the need for primary legislation to implement some of the models being proposed, as well as gaps in evidence. However, we are testing and applying “problem-solving approaches”, for example in the testbed sites for on the community sentence treatment requirement protocol and through our support for models applied in Family Drug and Alcohol Courts.

Grouped Questions: 284931
Q
Asked by Lesley Laird
(Kirkcaldy and Cowdenbeath)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Legal Aid Scheme: Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what legal aid is available to the families of victims of terrorist attacks.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 09 September 2019

In England and Wales, legal aid can be provided if the matter or issue in question is within scope of the legal aid scheme, as defined in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO).

Legal aid is available for advice and assistance for all inquests, subject to a means and merits test. Legal aid funding for legal representation for a family, during an inquest hearing, is not in scope of LASPO. However, families are supported by coroners who can ask questions on their behalf to help them get the answers they need and we are developing a range of measures to improve this service further.

The Government recognises that for certain inquests, bereaved people may require representation; legal aid may therefore be available, through the Exceptional Case Funding scheme, if certain criteria are met:

(a) if a failure to provide such representation would breach, or likely risk a breach of, the government’s obligations under the European Convention of Human Rights, usually Article 2; or

(b) where the Director of Legal Aid Casework (DLAC) makes a determination that there is a ‘wider public interest’ in legal representation being granted.

All individual case funding decisions are taken by the Legal Aid Agency (LAA). It is important that these decisions are, and are seen to be, free from political and Government influence.

Q
(Arfon)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for Work and Pensions
Children: Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many people have had their (a) driving licence and (b) passport removed as a result of Child Maintenance Service enforcement measures.
A
Answered by: Mims Davies
Answered on: 09 September 2019

This information is not reported. However we do hold clerical data and can advise 15 driving licenses have been removed or suspended and 3 passports have been suspended.

The information regarding committal orders, or sanctions as they are called in the Child Maintenance Service, are reported in our published statistics and can be on found table 11 of the tables document on the attached link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-maintenance-service-august-2013-to-march-2019-experimental

We reported enforcement activities in our CSA statistics until September 2017 when we reduced the number of tables published because most CSA cases had been closed or had begun the Case Closure process. The last publication including the enforcement activities can be found on table 22 of the attached link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-support-agency-quarterly-summary-of-statistics-june-2017

Q
Asked by Paul Farrelly
(Newcastle-under-Lyme)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prison Accommodation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to reduce the prison population.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, which take into account the circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors. We are clear that sentencing must match the severity of a crime.

Prison numbers can fluctuate, which is why we have a robust set of plans in place to ensure we will always have enough places for offenders sent to custody by the courts. The Prime Minister recently announced his ambition to transform the prison estate with an additional investment of £2.5 billion which will deliver 10,000 additional prison places.

Q
Asked by John Lamont
(Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for International Trade
Free Zones: Scotland
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, whether she has plans to establish areas that are outside the UK’s customs territory in Scotland.
A
Answered by: Conor Burns
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Secretary of State for International Trade recently announced the creation of new UK Freeports that will boost trade, attract inward investment and drive economic growth after Brexit.

Whilst we develop the policy, it is important that we consider a Freeport model that works in the best interests of the whole of the UK. Once a model has been decided, a selection process will take place where specific locations for UK Freeports will be chosen.

Q
(Feltham and Heston)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Electric Vehicles
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what incentive schemes the Government has established to encourage the take-up of electric vehicles; and what assessment her Department has made of the outcomes of each of those schemes.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 09 September 2019

We are investing nearly £1.5bn‎ between April 2015 and March 2021 to support the transition to zero emission motoring. Grants are available for ultra-Low emission vehicles, including cars, vans, lorries and taxis. We also provide schemes to support the installation of charge points in homes, workplaces and on residential streets for those without off-street parking. This represents one of the most comprehensive support packages in the world for the transition to zero emission vehicles. In 2013 we published Driving the Future Today A strategy for ultra low emission vehicles in the UK, in which we projected Ultra Low Emission Vehicles would be between 3% – 7% of the market, we remain on track to meet this target.

Q
Asked by Chris Elmore
(Ogmore)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Probation: Wales
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to improve the provision of probation services in rural locations in Wales.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government set out its response to the consultation ‘Strengthening probation, building confidence’ on 16th May 2019.

This consultation response confirmed that we intend to bring the supervision of medium and low risk offenders, currently supervised by the Community Rehabilitation Company, into the National Probation Service across England and Wales. Recognising the unique circumstances of Wales, we are seeking to achieve this by the end of 2019 so that advice to court, risk and need assessments, sentence planning and managing enforcement and recall will all sit within a single organisation.

A number of market engagement events have been held in Wales to help inform the design of the future services and we are keen to work with a range of providers including both the private and voluntary sector. HMPPS in Wales work closely with the Welsh Government, the PCCs and other key stakeholders in Wales to ensure we capture how our services can best meet our shared objectives and align with existing arrangements. We are taking into account the landscape in Wales, including consideration of Welsh legislation, Welsh language and other priorities identified in our design work to date. In doing this, we will seek to reduce duplication in existing services and encourage partners to design, develop, commission and deliver in an integrated way.

NPS in Wales covers the whole of Wales, which has a mix of urban and rural areas creating different challenges and opportunities. There are five geographical local delivery units that are configured in a way to ensure that there is local oversight of issues such as rurality and an ability to respond to local challenges that may arise.

Q
(Morley and Outwood)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Telemedicine
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to improve the (a) range and (b) quality of digital NHS healthcare services offered to patients.
A
Answered by: Ms Nadine Dorries
Answered on: 09 September 2019

We have established a new unit – NHSX – to drive forward the digital transformation of health and social care, and give patients the tools to access online information and services safely and effectively.

We are providing a coreset of national digital services for people to transact with the health and care system and find information.

Innovators can build onto these services for a consistent, trusted and joined up digital experience.

NHSX will also define and mandate technology and design standards for digital services used within the NHS and social care, ensuring all publicly-funded source code is open by default.

Q
Asked by Dr Rupa Huq
(Ealing Central and Acton)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Legal Aid Scheme: Terrorism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment the Government has made of the potential merits of automatically providing legal aid funding for (a) coroner's inquests and (b) other legal proceedings for British citizens who are victims of terrorist attacks.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Legal aid can be provided if the matter or issue in question is within scope of the legal aid scheme, as defined in the Legal Aid, Sentencing and Punishment of Offenders Act 2012 (LASPO).

Legal aid is available for advice and assistance for all inquests, subject to a means and merits test. Legal aid funding for legal representation for a family, during an inquest hearing, is not in scope of LASPO. However, families are supported by coroners who can ask questions on their behalf to help them get the answers they need and we are developing a range of measures to improve this service further.

The Government recognises that for certain inquests, bereaved people may require representation; legal aid may therefore be available, through the Exceptional Case Funding scheme, if certain criteria are met:

(a) if a failure to provide such representation would breach, or likely risk a breach of, the government’s obligations under the European Convention of Human Rights; or

(b) where the Director of Legal Aid Casework (DLAC) makes a determination that there is a ‘wider public interest’ in legal representation being granted.

All individual case funding decisions are taken by the Legal Aid Agency (LAA). It is important that these decisions are, and are seen to be, free from political and Government influence.

Q
Asked by Tom Brake
(Carshalton and Wallington)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what criteria his Department uses to allocate European Council of Ministers for Transport international driving permits to UK road hauliers that have applied for them.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The criteria used for allocating international road haulage permits are set out in the International Road Transport Permits (EU Exit) Regulations 2018 (SI 2018/1204) and were designed to deliver on the principles of obtaining the greatest economic benefit from the permits, protecting the interests of UK hauliers, and applying a fair and consistent process.

Q
(Swansea East)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Courts
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether the working group established by the then Lord Chief Justice and then Lord Chancellor in January 2016 on problem solving courts has been stood down and its membership retired.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Problem-Solving Courts Working Group was asked to advise on the feasibility of pilot models and its planned work did not include an implementation stage. The group concluded the workstreams set out in its published terms of reference and has not been reconvened.

There remain barriers to testing or applying the problem-solving courts’ approach in a meaningful way, including upfront resource implications and the need for primary legislation to implement some of the models being proposed, as well as gaps in evidence. However, we are testing and applying “problem-solving approaches”, for example in the testbed sites for on the community sentence treatment requirement protocol and through our support for models applied in Family Drug and Alcohol Courts.

Grouped Questions: 284209
Q
Asked by Liz McInnes
(Heywood and Middleton)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Somalia: al Shabaab
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what assessment he has made of the presence of al-Shabaab in Somalia; and what support his Department is providing to the Somali Government to counter the threat of al-Shabaab.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Al-Shabaab represents a serious threat to security and stability in Somalia. The UK provides support to countering that threat through the provision of stipends and training to the African Union Mission in Somalia, which has been successful in driving al-Shabaab out of key urban centres. The UK also has an extensive programme of support to Somalia's security sector reform, which is helping Somalia take responsibility for its own national security, and ensuring it is threatened less by al-Shabaab. The UK also plays a leading role in upholding and strengthening the UN's Somalia sanctions regime that takes measures against those who seek to prevent a peaceful political process and threaten regional stability.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for International Development
Angola: Droughts
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps his Department is taking to support people affected by recent droughts in Angola.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 09 September 2019

DFID is concerned about the effects of drought and food insecurity on people across Southern Africa and in Angola. Over one million Angolans are affected. Angola is a lower middle-income country, in sub-Saharan Africa it has the third largest economy and is the second largest oil producer. DFID does not have a bilateral programme in Angola, but we do support the people of Angola through centrally managed programmes and contributions to multilateral agencies. For example, in 2018 the UK provided over £300 million in core humanitarian funding to United Nations specialised agencies, the Red Cross movement and NGOs. As a result, the UK’s contribution is approximately 20 percent of the UN Central Emergency Response Fund that has been activated this year in Angola.

The UK is fully committed to tackling climate change and is playing a leading role in driving change around the world. Our regional programmes have supported the identification and planning of water infrastructure and livelihoods programmes to reduce vulnerability to drought including the preliminary design of water supply and sanitation projects that would build water security for more than 20,000 rural people in the Angolan Calai District.

Q
Asked by Luke Pollard
(Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Defence
Game: Gun Sports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Defence, if he will list any UK military establishments where driven grouse shooting has been permitted in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Anne-Marie Trevelyan
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Grouse shooting is permitted on the Defence Estate only when a licence has been granted by the Defence Infrastructure Organisation. Grouse shooting licences have been issued at RAF Fylingdales and at Warcop and Catterick training areas, in the last 12 months.

Q
Asked by Helen Hayes
(Dulwich and West Norwood)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Treasury
Housing: Energy
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what plans he has to provide financial incentives to encourage the retrofitting of existing homes and improve energy efficiency.
A
Answered by: Mr Simon Clarke
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Support for energy efficiency is available now through the Energy Company Obligation (ECO) scheme, which requires energy companies to deliver heating and energy efficiency measures. This improves the ability of low income, fuel poor and vulnerable households to heat their homes.

In 2017 Government committed to extending support for home energy efficiency to 2028 at least at the current level of ECO funding. This will drive more than £6 billion of investment to improve home energy efficiency over the next decade.

Supplier obligations such as ECO have driven the installation of 2.5 million energy efficiency measures in around 2 million homes since 2013.

Q
Asked by Tom Brake
(Carshalton and Wallington)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles: EU Countries
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, how many applications his Department has received from UK hauliers for European Council of Ministers for Transport international driving permits; how many of those licences are available; and how many of those licences have been issued.
A
Answered by: Chris Heaton-Harris
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The UK had an allocation of 1,610 annual European Conference of Minister of Transport (ECMT) permits and 4,824 short-term permits available for hauliers to use in 2019.

In preparation for leaving the EU in March 2019, 2,145 UK goods vehicle operator licence holders applied for 11,976 ECMT annual permits. 774 annual permits were subsequently issued, with many hauliers declining to take up their allocation. As of 30 August 2019, ECMT permits for use in November and December 2019 are available to purchase.

If we leave the EU without a deal on 31 October 2019, most journeys will be allowed until at least 31 December 2019 under an EU contingency regulation. A small proportion of journeys are not covered by the regulation. The European Commission has on 4 September 2019 published a proposal to extend the regulation until 31 July 2020. The proposal, when combined with the ECMT system, would ensure that 99% of trips to the EU could continue to operate as they currently do for the first four months of the Regulation.

UK hauliers who need to transit the EU/EEA to third countries or who carry out three cross-trade movements within seven days can now apply for short-term permits via the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency’s digital service for journeys during November and December 2019.

The UK also has historic bilateral agreements and it is our view that the majority of them would revive in an absence of an EU wide measure.

Q
(Motherwell and Wishaw)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department for Work and Pensions
Children: Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many (a) passports and (b) driving licenses have been revoked as a result of a non-resident parent not paying Child Maintenance in each month since the Child Maintenance Service were given those powers.
A
Answered by: Mims Davies
Answered on: 09 September 2019

This information is not reported. However we do hold clerical data and can advise 15 driving licenses have been removed or suspended and 3 passports have been suspended.

The information regarding committal orders, or sanctions as they are called in the Child Maintenance Service, are reported in our published statistics and can be on found table 11 of the tables document on the attached link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-maintenance-service-august-2013-to-march-2019-experimental

We reported enforcement activities in our CSA statistics until September 2017 when we reduced the number of tables published because most CSA cases had been closed or had begun the Case Closure process. The last publication including the enforcement activities can be found on table 22 of the attached link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-support-agency-quarterly-summary-of-statistics-june-2017

Q
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Domestic Abuse: Sentencing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that victims of domestic violence, following the sentencing of an offender, receive (1) the precise sentence outcome, (2) accurate and relevant information about the possible impact of a sentence, and (3) the date of an offenders bail and prison release, to ensure that safeguarding mechanisms can be put in place; and what plans they have to enable victims of such violence to appeal sentencing decisions.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Under the Code of Practice for Victim’s of Crime, all victims have the right to be notified of the offender’s sentence and receive a short explanation about the meaning and effect of the sentence. We committed in the Victims Strategy published last year to review the process for informing victims of offenders’ sentences and what they mean and we are currently consulting on proposals for revising the code, which will be followed by a consultation on a draft revised code.

The statutory National Probation Service Victim Contact Scheme is available to victims of violent and sexual offences, where the offender receives a sentence of 12 months or more. The Scheme provides victims with information and advice about the criminal justice process – including explaining the sentence to them and ensuring that they are informed of the offender’s release.

In such cases, victims also have the statutory right to request conditions that can be attached to the offender's release licence. These can include a no contact condition, and an exclusion zone covering areas where the victim lives, works, or travels too frequently. The offender risks being recalled to prison should they breach any of their licence conditions.

Offenders who have committed an eligible sexual or violent offence and sentenced to 12 months or more imprisonment will be managed under the Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA). Under MAPPA, the Prison, Probation and Police Services are required to work together to assess and manage the risks presented by such offenders. Thus, the MAPPA plan for managing the risk to such offenders must include measures to protect previous victims from further harm.

Additionally, Multi Agency Risk Assessment Conferences (MARACs) develop strategies to help and protect domestic abuse victims at high risk of murder or serious harm. Agencies including the Police, providers of probation services, health and child protection, as well as Independent Domestic Violence Advisers, share information and develop actions to protect the victim.

In respect of appealing sentencing decisions, the Unduly Lenient Sentence scheme enables anyone, including victims, the ability to ask the Attorney General to consider referring sentences for certain offences which he believes to be unduly lenient, to the Court of Appeal. The offences covered by the scheme are indictable only offences that are heard in the Crown Court, and certain triable either way offences when heard in the Crown Court. The scheme has a statutory 28-day time limit for referrals to be made. The scheme ensures there is a route for victims, their families, and the public, to question sentences imposed by the court for certain cases.

If a case is referred, it will be a matter for the Court of Appeal to determine whether the sentence should remain as it is, be increased, or whether guidance should be issued for future cases.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Tommy Robinson
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Lord Keen of Elie on 30 July (HL17224), which Department was responsible for reaching the decision that Stephen Yaxley-Lennon should be imprisoned in HMP Belmarsh; whether a Minister was involved in that decision; and if so, which.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Judiciary oversee the Courts and Tribunal Services (CTS) in England and Wales and it is their responsibility to hand down sentencing following a successful conviction. Mr Yaxley-Lennon appeared before the Central Criminal Court (CCC) on 12 July 2019, where he was sentenced to 19 week imprisonment for committing contempt of court. It is the responsibility of HMP Belmarsh to serve the CCC in its function as a Core Local Prison and therefore in line with Court Committal Directions Mr Yaxley-Lennon was allocated to HMP Belmarsh.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Retail Trade
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have, if any, to increase footfall in high street stores.
A
Answered on: 09 September 2019

As referred to in the answer to the recent similar question (HL16284), the Retail Sector is changing, we are committed to helping communities adapt and support the retail sector during this change. The Government and the retail sector recognise that action is needed to ensure the sector thrives. The creation of the Retail Sector Council demonstrates this commitment to the sector’s continued success.

My Rt hon Friend the Prime Minister recently announced an additional 50 towns will benefit from the £1 billion Future High Streets Fund, taking the total to over 100. The extension to the shortlist comes on the back of the £3.6 billion Towns Fund announced last month, which included an additional £325 million for the Future High Streets Fund, taking the overall Fund to £1 billion as the Government looks to drive forward local growth.

A number of other measures have already been taken to support our high streets, including the creation of the High Streets Task Force to support local leaders in delivering ambitious plans.

Through the planning system we are helping to support changes to high streets, making it easier for them to adapt, with a wider range of retail, residential and other uses. The Open Doors pilot in five town centres is bringing empty shops back into use, by opening these to community groups who are offering services to the most vulnerable in our communities.

Q
Asked by Chris Ruane
(Vale of Clwyd)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Prisoners: Mental Illness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social care, what proportion of (a) children and young adults and (b) adults who have received custodial sentences have been diagnosed as having mental health problems in the latest period for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Ms Nadine Dorries
Answered on: 09 September 2019

This information is not held in the format requested.

Q
Asked by Laura Smith
(Crewe and Nantwich)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Landlords: Registration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment has he made of the potential merits of introducing a national landlord register for the private rented sector in England.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government has no current plans to introduce a national landlord register, which could place an additional regulatory burden on landlords. The case would need to be made that such a register would drive up standards in the private rented sector. The Government is instead committed to improving the private rented sector by driving out criminal landlords and landlords who consistently neglect their responsibilities to provide safe and decent accommodation.

Local authorities already have a wide range of powers available to them including banning orders for the very worst offenders, civil penalties of up to £30,000 and a database of rogue landlords and property agents targeted at persistent and criminal offenders. To support the powers that local authorities already have we have provided £2.3 million in grant funding for local authorities to develop self-sustaining enforcement, released refreshed guidance for landlords, tenants and local authorities on their rights and responsibilities and carried out a review of selective licensing.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Remand in Custody: Long Term Unemployed People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of placements for people on short-term remand that have been in long-term unemployment.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Prisoners on remand are permitted to work while in prison. However, we do not collect data centrally relating to the number of prisoners remanded in custody who are in employment while in prison, or who were unemployed prior to being imprisoned. Sentenced prisoners can be released on temporary licence to attend places of work, provided they meet certain criteria.

Prisons must be places of rehabilitation, which will ultimately reduce reoffending. Our Education and Employment strategy sets out how we will transform our approach to ensure prisoners develop the skills they need to secure employment on release. We are engaging with employers to take on ex-prisoners via the New Futures Network (NFN) and have consulted on proposals to increase the opportunities available to prisoners to gain experience in real workplaces through Release on Temporary Licence.

Q
Asked by Laura Smith
(Crewe and Nantwich)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Waiting Lists
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps the Government has taken to reduce NHS waiting times.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 09 September 2019

NHS England’s Operational and Planning Guidance for 2019/20 sets out deliverables against key performance areas, including referral-to-treatment and urgent care, and the Government expects the National Health Service to deliver these actions set– in full – as key steps towards fully recovering performance against access standards.

In addition to this, under the NHS Long Term Plan, an extra £33.9 billion a year is being provided to improve and transform urgent and emergency care services, expand the amount of planned surgery year on year, cut long waits and reduce the waiting list.

The additional funding will support the NHS in achieving performance standards. More than that, it will also drive the reforms that deliver a better and more sustainable NHS with improved care for patients.

Q
Asked by David Hanson
(Delyn)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Sentencing: Females
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many women received an immediate custodial sentence for (a) less than six months and (b) six months or more in each of the four Police Force areas in Wales in (i) 2014, (ii) 2015, (iii) 2016, (iv) 2017 and (v) 2018 in each offence category.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Ministry of Justice has published information on the number of adult females sentenced to immediate custody broken down by custodial sentence length, by Police Force Area and by offence group in the Court Outcomes by Police Force area data tool available here:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/804509/court-outcomes-by-PFA-2018.xlsx

Select ‘All’ in the Court Type filter.

Select ’02: Female’ in the Sex filter and ’03: Adults’ in the Age Group filter.

Select ’15: Immediate Custody’ in the Outcome filter.

In the pivot table, filter Police Force Area to Dyfed-Powys, Gwent, North Wales and South Wales.

In the pivot table field list, drag ‘Offence Group’ from Filters to Rows, beneath ‘Police Force Area’.

Custodial sentence lengths can be selected using the Custodial Sentence Length filter.

Police Force Areas provide breakdowns of where offences were dealt with (not where they were committed).

Q
Asked by Mr Steve Reed
(Croydon North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Fire Prevention
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he plans to bring forward legislative proposals on fire safety.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 09 September 2019

This Government is committed to making sure that high-rise buildings are safe, and that residents feel safe in them, now and in the future. On 5 September, the Secretary of State for Communities and Local Government announced a series of measures to drive progress, including: £10 million per year to fund tailored building checks and inspections on all high risk residential buildings in England by 2021; a consultation on changes to the Building Regulations guidance on fire safety, primarily lowering the height threshold for sprinklers; and confirmation that the private sector remediation fund will open on 12 September, to fund the removal of Aluminium Composite Material cladding from eligible buildings in the private residential sector.

Our consultation, Building a Safer Future: proposals for reform of the building safety regulatory system closed on Wednesday 31 July 2019. We are now analysing the responses and will respond by the end of this year. We will then introduce legislation at the earliest opportunity, when parliamentary time allows.

Q
(Motherwell and Wishaw)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicle Drivers: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what the (a) average and (b) median waiting time is for a person whose heavy goods vehicle licence is subject to a medical review in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The table below shows (a) the average time and (b) the median time it took the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency to issue a driving licence to Group 2 (lorry or bus) drivers who were subject to a medical investigation. Information on the median time for 2015 to 2017 is not available.

2015-16

2016-17

2017-18

2018-19

2019-20 (to 3 Sept)

(a) Average time days

61

43

37

33

34

(b)Median time

n/a

n/a

15

17

16

Q
(Motherwell and Wishaw)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicle Drivers: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, in what circumstances would the DVLA seek a medical review of a person’s heavy goods vehicle license.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

All drivers are required by law to notify the Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency (DVLA) at any time about the onset or worsening of a medical condition affecting safe driving. When a driver first applies for a Group 2 (lorry or bus) licence they must submit a medical report regarding their fitness to drive which must be completed by a doctor.

Group 2 licences are valid for five years. At each renewal, drivers under the age of 45 must make a declaration about whether or not they suffer from a medical condition that may affect their fitness to drive. Drivers renewing their driving entitlement at the age of 45 and over must include a medical report completed by a doctor. At the age of 65, renewals are required annually and must be supported by a doctor.

The DVLA will investigate a person’s fitness to drive if an application, report or a third party notification indicates that they may have a medical condition that affects safe driving.

Q
(Motherwell and Wishaw)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Post Office: Income
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how much income has been generated by Post Office Ltd through the provision of (a) driving licences, (b) vehicle registration, (c) excise duty collection and (d) international driving permits for each year in which information is available.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government recognises the critical role that post offices play in communities and for small businesses across the UK. This is why the Government committed to safeguard the post office network and protect existing rural services. The overall number of post offices across the UK remains at its most stable in decades with over 11,500 branches thanks to significant Government investment of over £2 billion since 2010.

While the Government sets the strategic direction for the Post Office, it allows the company the commercial freedom to deliver this strategy as an independent business. The income generated for specific services is an operational matter for the Post Office Limited. I have therefore asked Nick Read, Chief Executive of Post Office Limited, to write to the hon Member on this matter. A copy of his reply will be placed in the libraries of the House.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Police: Cameras
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will ensure that courts view any body worn footage available in cases (a) of assaulting an emergency worker and (b) involving a police officer before the offender is sentenced; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government is committed to ensuring that emergency workers on the front line have the full protection of the law.

Evidence obtained from body worn video footage is admissible in court and, where available, can be used to support the prosecution’s case during trial.

If a defendant enters a guilty plea, the prosecution can invite the court to view footage taken from a body worn camera, alongside any victim impact statements, before sentencing. The court would have full discretion in determining whether to accept or reject the request.

The Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act 2018 doubled the maximum penalty for those who assault emergency workers from six to 12 months in prison. Under the Act a court must also consider, for a range of offences, the fact that the offence was committed against an emergency worker as an aggravating factor meriting a more severe sentence.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Remand in Custody
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in (a) how many and (b) what proportion of cases involving common assault was a defendant remanded in custody prior to their trial in each year since 2013.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Information on the number of defendants dealt with for common assault and their remand status at different points of court proceedings can be found in the “Remands: Magistrates’ Court data tool” and the “Remands: Crown Court data tool” at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

To obtain the requested data, carry out the following steps:

  • In both tools filter ‘Offence’ for: “105 Common assault and battery”
  • In both tools filter ‘Remand status’ as required – for remand status prior to trial in the magistrates’ court, use the “Remand status with Police” variable
  • In both tools filter ‘Convicted / not convicted’ as required
  • In both tolls filter ‘Sentenced / not sentenced’ as required
  • In the Crown Court tool filter ‘Plea’ as required (plea is only available at Crown Court)
  • In both tools filter ‘Outcome’ for “Immediate custody” as required
  • For calculations for defendants dealt with entirely at the magistrates’ court, filter ‘Outcome’ to exclude the following: “Failure to appear”, “Committed for trial” and “Committed for sentence”
  • For calculations for defendants dealt with at the Crown Court, filter ‘Outcome’ to exclude: “Failure to appear”.
Grouped Questions: 286164 | 286165
Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Remand in Custody
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in (a) how many and (b) what proportion of cases involving common assault was a defendant found guilty or pleaded guilty after being remanded in custody prior to their trial in each year since 2013.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Information on the number of defendants dealt with for common assault and their remand status at different points of court proceedings can be found in the “Remands: Magistrates’ Court data tool” and the “Remands: Crown Court data tool” at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

To obtain the requested data, carry out the following steps:

  • In both tools filter ‘Offence’ for: “105 Common assault and battery”
  • In both tools filter ‘Remand status’ as required – for remand status prior to trial in the magistrates’ court, use the “Remand status with Police” variable
  • In both tools filter ‘Convicted / not convicted’ as required
  • In both tolls filter ‘Sentenced / not sentenced’ as required
  • In the Crown Court tool filter ‘Plea’ as required (plea is only available at Crown Court)
  • In both tools filter ‘Outcome’ for “Immediate custody” as required
  • For calculations for defendants dealt with entirely at the magistrates’ court, filter ‘Outcome’ to exclude the following: “Failure to appear”, “Committed for trial” and “Committed for sentence”
  • For calculations for defendants dealt with at the Crown Court, filter ‘Outcome’ to exclude: “Failure to appear”.
Grouped Questions: 286163 | 286165
Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Crimes against the Person: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in (a) how many and (b) what proportion of cases involving common assault was a defendant sentenced to a term of imprisonment after being remanded in custody prior to their trial in each year since 2013.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Information on the number of defendants dealt with for common assault and their remand status at different points of court proceedings can be found in the “Remands: Magistrates’ Court data tool” and the “Remands: Crown Court data tool” at: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

To obtain the requested data, carry out the following steps:

  • In both tools filter ‘Offence’ for: “105 Common assault and battery”
  • In both tools filter ‘Remand status’ as required – for remand status prior to trial in the magistrates’ court, use the “Remand status with Police” variable
  • In both tools filter ‘Convicted / not convicted’ as required
  • In both tolls filter ‘Sentenced / not sentenced’ as required
  • In the Crown Court tool filter ‘Plea’ as required (plea is only available at Crown Court)
  • In both tools filter ‘Outcome’ for “Immediate custody” as required
  • For calculations for defendants dealt with entirely at the magistrates’ court, filter ‘Outcome’ to exclude the following: “Failure to appear”, “Committed for trial” and “Committed for sentence”
  • For calculations for defendants dealt with at the Crown Court, filter ‘Outcome’ to exclude: “Failure to appear”.
Grouped Questions: 286163 | 286164
Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 03 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, in what proportion of adjudications additional days were added to a prisoner's sentence; how many days were added and for what reasons, in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The prisoner discipline system upholds justice in prisons and ensures incidents of prisoner rule-breaking have consequences. In cases which the prison governor deems the rule-breaking to be sufficiently serious an Independent Adjudicator, appointed by the Chief Magistrate, can attend a prison to award additional days to the prisoner’s custodial time left to serve.

Information on the number of occasions on which additional days were awarded to prisoners by offence is publicly available at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/offender-management-statistics-quarterly

For ease, both the number of awards and the number of days that were added to a prisoner’s custodial time, in each year since 2011 is shown in the table below. The information requested for 2010 is not provided due to data quality issues:

The Number of awards where additional days were given and total number of days of additional days, 2011 – 2018, England and Wales Can be found in the attached Table.

Table (Image, 90.49 KB)
Q
(North East Hampshire)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 03 September 2019
Attorney General
Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, if he will extend the unduly lenient sentence scheme to cover (a) all serious crime cases and (b) cases tried at magistrates' courts.
A
Answered by: Mr Geoffrey Cox
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The ULS scheme remains an important avenue for victims, family members and the public to ensure justice is delivered in the most serious cases.

Since its inception in 1989, the ULS scheme has been extended to include additional offences, including some sexual offences, and offences involving child cruelty and modern slavery. In 2017 the Government re-committed in our manifesto to look at further extension and, as a result, the scheme was extended in 2017, and again in 2018, to include a number of terror-related offences.

We continue to look carefully at the ambit of the scheme.

Q
(Motherwell and Wishaw)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department for Work and Pensions
Children: Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, how many times the Child Maintenance Service has used its power to disqualify non-compliant paying parents from holding or obtaining a (a) passport and (b) driving licence.
A
Answered by: Mims Davies
Answered on: 09 September 2019

This information is not reported. However we do hold clerical data and can advise 15 driving licenses have been removed or suspended and 3 passports have been suspended.

The information regarding committal orders, or sanctions as they are called in the Child Maintenance Service, are reported in our published statistics and can be on found table 11 of the tables document on the attached link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-maintenance-service-august-2013-to-march-2019-experimental

We reported enforcement activities in our CSA statistics until September 2017 when we reduced the number of tables published because most CSA cases had been closed or had begun the Case Closure process. The last publication including the enforcement activities can be found on table 22 of the attached link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-support-agency-quarterly-summary-of-statistics-june-2017

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
General Practitioners: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent estimate he has made of the average waiting time for an appointment to see a GP in (a) England and Wales and (b) Coventry.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The most recent data on the time between booking an appointment with a general practice and having the appointment (in days) for Coventry and Rugby Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) as well as for England are presented in the following table as the average over the 12 months from August 2018 to July 2019.

The data is taken from the NHS Digital publication ‘Appointments in General Practice’. This is a new experimental data collection which is still being refined and improved.

It should be noted that the ‘time from booking to appointment’ refers only to the time elapsed between the successful booking of an appointment and the appointment actually taking place. The data does not take into consideration that many patients will be appropriately booking ahead as part of the continuity of care they receive for long-term conditions.

Coventry and Rugby CCG

England

Distribution of average time elapsed between booking an appointment and the appointment taking place, August 2018 to July 2019

Same Day

47%

42%

1 Day

7%

7%

2 to 7 Days

21%

20%

8 to 14 Days

12%

14%

15 to 21 Days

6%

8%

22 or more

7%

10%

Total

100.0%

100.0%


Notes:

  1. There are several factors that drive the time from a booking to an appointment. This includes appointment availability at the practice, patient availability, the urgency of the appointment and general practitioner (GP) advice.
  2. The data does not differentiate between emergency and routine appointments in general practice.
  3. The data does not include any information about the patients or clinical information.
  4. The data in the response includes appointments with all healthcare professional types, including GPs and other practice staff.
  5. Not all practices in England are included in the appointments in general practice publication, meaning the total number of appointments is not known.
  6. Same day and next day bookings are of particular interest so are presented here separately. Further bookings are presented grouped by weeks.
  7. The number of appointments that have already happened is provided as recorded in participating practices in England. The data presented only contains information which was captured on the GP practice systems. This limits the activity reported on and does not represent all work happening within a primary care setting.

Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 04 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Dangerous Driving: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether he plans to (a) create an offence of causing serious injury by careless driving and (b) increase the maximum penalties for causing death by dangerous driving.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 09 September 2019

I refer the honourable member to my response of 3 September to Question 282465.

Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department for Transport
Driving: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of people who have failed the DVLA sight test in each year since 2014.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost, each individual case would need to be manually interrogated to retrieve the information.

Grouped Questions: 286823
Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department for Transport
Driving: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what estimate he has made of the number of people who failed and subsequently passed DVLA sight tests; and what proportion of the total number of people taking sight tests that represents.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The information requested is not readily available and could only be provided at disproportionate cost, each individual case would need to be manually interrogated to retrieve the information.

Grouped Questions: 286822
Q
(Barnsley East)
Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department for Transport
Driving: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what criteria the Government used to decide which company was awarded the contract to undertake sight tests for the DVLA.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Driver and Vehicle Licensing Agency’s current eyesight test contract was awarded on 5 March 2014. The evaluation criteria used to award the contract were cost and quality. The detailed quality criteria were:

  • nationwide coverage

  • sub-contracting/recruitment process

  • vision testing and process requirements

  • process improvements

  • testing improvements

  • management information

Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
NHS: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how many additional (a) nursing and (b) clinical positions will be funded in the Bristol, North Somerset and South Gloucestershire Clinical Commissioning Group as a result of Spending Round 2019.
A
Answered by: Chris Skidmore
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Spending Round 2019 did not determine the number of posts at clinical commissioning groups or healthcare providers. Staffing levels are not determined centrally; it is for autonomous NHS employers to determine the workforce numbers required to meet their local NHS service requirements. The National Health Service settlement that was confirmed in January 2019 secured additional funding for clinical commissioning groups to commission the services their populations need. Healthcare providers determine the staffing levels they require in order to provide the services they have been commissioned.

The Chancellor of the Exchequer (Rt. hon. Sajid Javid MP) announced through the Spending Round a £210 million package specifically to support the NHS workforce. This is additional funding investment in training and professional development for our NHS staff. This is part of a wider drive to improve recruitment, retention and staff morale through the development of the first ever NHS People Plan, led by NHS Improvement Chair Dido Harding and NHS Chief People Officer, Prerana Issar.

In January 2019 Government confirmed a £33.9 billion cash terms increase in the NHS budget by 2023/24, compared to 2018/19. This Spending Round reaffirms that commitment, which includes a £6.2 billion increase in NHS funding next year.

Q
Asked by Jack Lopresti
(Filton and Bradley Stoke)
Asked on: 04 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Health Services: Artificial Intelligence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what discussions officials in his Department have had with representatives of (a) businesses and (b) academia on the introduction of artificial intelligence for the provision of clinical services.
A
Answered by: Ms Nadine Dorries
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Officials started formally engaging with business and academia on the topic of the introduction of Artificial Intelligence (AI) for the provision of clinical services in January 2018 when the programme of work for developing the NHS Code of Conduct for Data-Driven Health and Care Technologies began. Since then there has been an open dialogue between the Department, NHSX, academia and both large and small businesses to support the National Health Service to become the world leader in AI for healthcare.

Q
(Hornsey and Wood Green)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 04 September 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Cameroon: Schools
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what representations he has made to his Cameroonian counterpart on reports of attacks on school children in Ambazonia state; and what support the Government provides to schools in that region.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The British Government is deeply concerned about the situation in the North-West and South-West (Anglophone) regions of Cameroon, which continue to suffer from high levels of violence that is driving thousands of people from their homes and involving attacks on infrastructure, including hospitals and schools. Children are suffering in these attacks, from kidnappings and as a result of school closures. All children have the right to learn in safe environments. We continue to raise our concerns at the highest levels, including with the Government of Cameroon and at the UN, calling for an end to violence and pressing the Government of Cameroon to investigate all incidents of human rights violations and abuses. Through our High Commission in Yaoundé, we have supported the efforts of local partners in their campaigns and lobbying on the resumption of school activities. The British Government is also providing lifesaving assistance to thousands of people in the Anglophone regions through a £2.5m contribution to the UN's humanitarian response plan.

Q
Asked by Steve McCabe
(Birmingham, Selly Oak)
Asked on: 04 September 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Council Tax: Non-payment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether he has plans to remove the ability to issue a prison sentence for people that have not paid their council tax.
A
Answered by: Luke Hall
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government does not have any plans to remove the sanction of imprisonment for non-payment of council tax. However, committal to prison should only ever be the last resort in the collection of council tax arrears. Magistrates courts can only commit someone to prison for non-payment of council tax where they are satisfied that the failure to pay is due to their wilful refusal or culpable neglect. The number of committal warrants has been decreasing, with 34 issued in England in 2017-18.

Grouped Questions: 286630
Q
Asked by Luke Pollard
(Plymouth, Sutton and Devonport)
Asked on: 05 September 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what the timetable is for the conclusion of the Animal Welfare (Sentencing) Bill.
A
Answered by: Zac Goldsmith
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Asked on: 05 September 2019
Department for Transport
Driving under Influence
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to reduce deaths and injuries (1) caused by driving under the influence of alcohol, and (2) where driving under the influence of alcohol was a contributing factor.
A
Answered on: 09 September 2019

In 2017, an estimated 250 people were killed in accidents where at least one driver or rider was above the drink-drive limit. Drink driving is involved in around 5% of reported road casualties and 14% of fatalities.

The Government is committed to tackling drivers under the influence of alcohol and all dangerous drivers and is determined that all such drivers are caught and punished. We employ a combined approach of tough penalties and rigorous enforcement along with our highly respected and effective THINK! campaigns to reinforce the social unacceptability of drink driving, and to remind people of the serious ramifications that drinking and driving can have on themselves and others.

The Department has also taken some important steps to tighten drink driving legislation. We have made it a requirement for high risk offenders to undertake medical tests before they are allowed to drive again, and we have also made sure that drivers over the breath limit cannot escape a conviction by demanding a further blood or urine test.

Q
Asked by Lord Bradley
Asked on: 05 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Pre-sentence Reports: Females
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many women sentenced in (1) the magistrates courts, and (2) the Crown Courts, in England and Wales did not have a pre-sentence report prepared for them in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to this question in the time available before Prorogation. Ministers will correspond directly with the Member.

Q
(Hyndburn)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Home Office
Police: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether she plans to allocate the funding for 20,000 extra police officers to local forces according to how many police officers each force has lost since 2010.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 06 September 2019

We recognise that demand on the police is changing and we are acting. We are committed to recruiting 20,000 additional police officers over the next three years to tackle the rise in crime. This is the start of a new relationship between the Government and the police, and we will work even more closely together to protect the public.

The National Policing Board has been set up to provide strong leadership and deliver on our commitment to recruit 20,000 more police officers. Following the first meeting, the government and police will move at pace to drive forward our plans to bolster the police’s ranks.

All force-level funding allocations will be set out in the usual way at the pro-visional police funding settlement in December. The Government is working with the sector through a number of important details, including on allocating officers between different functions and activities to ensure maximum value from this additional resource.

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Home Office
Young Offenders: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether children in secure care or detention are eligible to apply to the EU Settlement Scheme.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 06 September 2019

A person’s continuity of residence in the UK for the purposes of eligibility under the EU Settlement Scheme is broken when they serve a sentence of imprisonment. They will not generally be eligible to apply to the scheme while they are serving that sentence.

This is consistent with EU law on free movement, as currently given effect in the UK by the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. This provision applies to children in detention as it does for all applicants to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Grouped Questions: 282340
Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Home Office
Young Offenders: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether a period of imprisonment will be included in an assessment of a child's (a) eligibility and (b) continuous residence criteria under the EU settlement scheme.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 06 September 2019

A person’s continuity of residence in the UK for the purposes of eligibility under the EU Settlement Scheme is broken when they serve a sentence of imprisonment. They will not generally be eligible to apply to the scheme while they are serving that sentence.

This is consistent with EU law on free movement, as currently given effect in the UK by the Immigration (European Economic Area) Regulations 2016. This provision applies to children in detention as it does for all applicants to the EU Settlement Scheme.

Grouped Questions: 282339
Q
(Totnes)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Agriculture: Subsidies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government has taken to reduce the complexity of environmental schemes for land holders.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Rural Payments Agency (RPA) took on responsibility for Environmental Stewardship and Countryside Stewardship schemes in October 2018, and has introduced a number of measures on agri-environment schemes to make it easier for farmers and land managers to apply and make it simpler for them to administer.

The RPA has made improvements to the online service, including making more offers available to apply for online and allowing applicants to download application packs. It has simplified both the rules regarding the evidence we require and the guidance manuals. In addition the RPA has made changes to the processing cycle which has reduced completion times for applications, agreements, claims and payments.

Looking forward we are considering ways to drive further online uptake, make improvements to the information on GOV.UK, and whether there are further simplifications we can make to the scheme to support the transition to a new Environmental Land Management Scheme, subject to exit negotiations and funding.

Q
(South Holland and The Deepings)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Treasury
Wealth
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Exchequer, what steps he is taking to narrow wealth differentials between the richest and poorest (a) individuals, (b) regions, (c) counties and (d) constituencies.
A
Answered by: Rishi Sunak
Answered on: 05 September 2019

Addressing inequalities is an important consideration for this Government, and steps have already been taken to ensure those with the broadest shoulders bear the greatest burden. That is why we have introduced reforms to dividend taxation and capital gains tax, and ended permanent non-domicile status – to ensure the rich pay their fair share. This has led to the top 1% of income taxpayers paying 29% of income tax – a record high.

This Government is also committed to ensuring opportunities are shared in every part of the country. People across all regions are benefitting from investments the Government is making. For example, since 2015, £12bn from the Local Growth Fund has been provided to local enterprise partnerships for projects that benefit the local area and economy. In addition to this, our new £3.6 billion Towns Fund will level up opportunity and create places across the UK where people want to live and thrive – supporting an initial 100 towns.

By supporting all places to reach their potential, we can drive growth at a national level and readily share the benefits of a more prosperous United Kingdom.

Q
Asked by Kate Green
(Stretford and Urmston)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Young Offenders: EEA Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Justice, what processes his Department has put in place to ensure that children that are EEA nationals who come into contact with the criminal justice system can be identified for the purposes of providing advice and support.
A
Answered by: Wendy Morton
Answered on: 05 September 2019

Youth Offending Services (YOS) were established in the Crime and Disorder Act 1998, which introduced a statutory duty for all local authorities to establish a multi-agency team, with members from police, social services, probation and education, to deliver youth justice services. YOS have a statutory duty to:

    • provide appropriate adults for children detained or being interviewed at the police station and provide support for children on bail;
    • help young people and their families through court proceedings;
    • write pre-sentence reports for the courts advising on appropriate interventions;
    • supervise young people serving a community sentence;
    • stay in touch with a young person if they’re sentenced to custody; and
    • assist in the child’s resettlement post-custody.

All children who come into contact with the YOS (including EEA nationals) will have their individual circumstances and needs assessed and will receive interventions and support accordingly.

Q
Asked by John Lamont
(Berwickshire, Roxburgh and Selkirk)
Asked on: 02 September 2019
Cabinet Office
Civil Servants
Commons
To ask the Chancellor of the Duchy of Lancaster and Minister for the Cabinet Office, whether he plans to increase the number of Civil Service roles outside of London.
A
Answered by: Simon Hart
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Government has committed to ensure that the administration of government, including civil service roles and public bodies are located in the regions and nations of the United Kingdom. The Cabinet Office is co-ordinating this activity through the Places for Growth programme.

To date the Programme has identified over three thousand roles for relocation over a phased timetable and it is working with all departments and public bodies to drive location and workforce planning ahead of the next Spending Review.

Q
(Leicester South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to report Neuro Patience: Still Waiting for Improvements in Treatment and Care published by the Kings Fund on 9 July 2019, what steps the Government is taking to improve support for people with neurological conditions who have unmet health, social care and mental health needs.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Neuro Patience report, published by the Neurological Alliance, presents the findings of an online survey of the experiences of people with neurological conditions in engaging with health and social care. Patient insights can provide useful intelligence to commissioners and service planners when delivering or reviewing service provision, highlighting areas where improvements can be made.

NHS England works to provides tailored national support, enabling local commissioners and providers to drive improvement and ensure services best reflect the needs of individual communities. NHS England also works with patient organisations such as the Neurological Alliance to raise awareness and support improved outcomes for people living with neurological conditions. This includes reflecting on intelligence and insights, such as those provided by the survey report, to drive improvements in care.

NHS England established the National Neurology Advisory Group (NNAG) with the Neurological Alliance, which led the development of a national collaborative clinical leadership model, bringing together key stakeholders, a range of national clinical leaders and patient groups. The NNAG, which is co-chaired by Professor Adrian Williams (who serves as chair for NHS England’s neurosciences Clinical Reference Group), aims to support alignment between neurology improvement programmes in NHS England, arm’s length bodies and system partners; and to guide the strategic development of work to improve outcomes for people living with neurological conditions.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Hearing Aids: Research
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he is taking to support research and development of new hearing aid technology.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The Department funds research mainly through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The usual practice of the NIHR and other research funders is not to ring-fence funds for expenditure on particular topics. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research into any aspect of human health, including hearing aid technology.

In 2017-18 the NIHR was supporting four studies related to hearing aid technology and improving the use of hearing aids through its research infrastructure in the National Health Service. Between 2017 and 2019, the NIHR Clinical Research Network supported eight clinical studies related to hearing aid technology.

The NIHR funds three Biomedical Research Centres (BRCs) which have research themes related to hearing loss, deafness and hearing health. The total NIHR investment in these three BRC research themes over the five years from 1 April 2017 is £10.9 million. This includes the Manchester BRC that has established the United Kingdom’s only Hearing Device Research Centre to drive innovation in interventions for hearing loss and to accelerate the translation of new hearing technologies into the NHS.

Q
(Thirsk and Malton)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 September 2019
Ministry of Justice
Repossession Orders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to her Department's publication, Mortgage and landlord possession statistics in England and Wales, April to June 2019 (provisional), published on 8 August 2019, which large mortgage provider has driven up the number of home repossessions to their highest level since 2014.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 05 September 2019

The organisation was required to provide its details to enable the court to process its possession claims. It would be inappropriate to release such information where it would be likely to prejudice an organisation’s commercial interests.

Q
(Dunfermline and West Fife)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 05 September 2019
Department for Transport
Driving Instruction: Electric Vehicles
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department provides incentives for driving instructors to use electric vehicles.
Q
Asked by Angela Rayner
(Ashton-under-Lyne)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Education
Schools: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what his policy is on increasing (a) overall school funding and (b) the minimum level of funding per pupil; and when those policies will be implemented.
A
Answered by: Gavin Williamson
Answered on: 04 September 2019
Holding answer received on 28 August 2019

On Friday 30 August the department announced an over £14 billion, 3 year settlement for primary and secondary schools.

This funding package builds on the government reforms which have seen education standards in England increase, with more primary school children on track to become fluent readers, more 19 year olds leaving education with English and mathematics GCSEs, and almost one million school places created.

This funding package builds on the reform agenda that we have pursued since 2010 which has driven better standards, rigour, discipline and outcomes for pupils in England.

This settlement includes cash increases of £2.6 billion for 2020-21, £4.8 billion for 2021-22 and £7.1 billion for 2022-23 compared with 2019-20. Part of this settlement includes over £700 million more for the special educational needs and disabilities budget in 2020-21 compared to this year, which is equivalent to an increase of over 11%.

In addition, the settlement also includes £1.5 billion in each of the next 3 years for teachers’ pensions. This is on top of the £14 billion overall increase.

The £14 billion means the department can ‘level up’ school funding by raising the minimum per pupil funding to all secondary schools to £5,000 next year, and the minimum per pupil funding for primary schools to £3,750 in 2020-21 and £4,000 in 2021-22.

This will bring the schools budget to £52.2 billion by 2022-3 and will deliver on my right hon. Friend, the Prime Minister’s pledge to deliver the following:

  • increase school funding by £4.6 billion a year above inflation;
  • delivering minimum secondary school funding of £5,000 per pupil; and
  • delivering minimum primary school funding of £4,000 per pupil by 2022-23.

In doing so, the government is giving all young people the same opportunities to succeed — regardless of where they grow up or go to school— and providing for a real terms increase in per pupil funding in all schools next year. The funding formula will ensure that all parts of the UK will receive significant funding uplifts.

Q
Asked by Tim Farron
(Westmorland and Lonsdale)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Carbon Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to the BRE Code for Sustainable Homes data that 107,000 homes have been built in England to the zero carbon homes standard, if he will include in the forthcoming review of Building Regulations a proposal to reinstate that standard from 2020.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 03 September 2019

The recent UK Green Building Council report on new homes ( https://www.ukgbc.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Driving-sustainability-in-new-homes-UKGBC-resource-July-2018-v4.pdf ) stated that 107,000 homes have been built to the Code Level 4 standard. Code Level 4 represents a 19 per cent uplift on current Part L energy efficiency standards across the build mix.


We have noted these findings and are preparing to consult on options to deliver the government’s ambitious commitments for future housing. In the Government’s Clean Growth Strategy, we committed to reviewing the Part L standards, including consulting on improving energy efficiency requirements in new and existing buildings where the evidence suggests it is cost effective, affordable, practical and safe to do so. In the Spring Statement, government committed to introduce a Future Homes Standard by 2025 for new build homes to be future-proofed with low carbon heating and world-leading levels of energy efficiency, to create healthy homes that are fit for the future, have low energy bills, and are better for the environment.

Q
Asked by Jo Stevens
(Cardiff Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Education
Universities: Mental Health Services
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps the Office for Students has taken since its establishment to assess the adequacy of provision of mental health services and student support at universities.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 03 September 2019

In our latest guidance to the Office for Students (OfS), we asked that it continue its work to support student experience, with a focus on wellbeing and mental health.

Where a provider has significant gaps in outcomes between students with a declared mental health condition and their peers, the OfS require providers to set out an ambitious strategy to narrow these gaps and promote equality of opportunity, as part of their access and participation plans.

The OfS also regulates at a sector level to share evidence and examples of effective and innovative practice. On 5 June 2019, the OfS announced the award of almost £6 million for 10 large-scale projects through a challenge competition, encouraging higher education providers to find new ways of combating student mental health issues. The OfS has commissioned a programme-level evaluation to gather what works most effectively and to disseminate learning across the sector.

On 17 June 2019, the government announced a £1 million fund for a further OfS challenge competition to find innovative proposals that drive improvements in mental health support for higher education students.

Q
(Newcastle upon Tyne North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Home Office
Money Laundering: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, for what reason the UK has not opted into EU Directive 2018/1673 on combating money laundering by criminal law.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 September 2019

As set out in the Eighth Annual Report to Parliament on the Application of Protocols 19 and 21 to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Union (TFEU) in Relation to EU Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) Matters (1 December 2016 – 30 November 2017) (Cm 9580), the UK Government decided not to opt into the EU Directive on combating money laundering by criminal law as our domestic legislation is already largely compliant with the Directive’s measures, and in relation to the offences and sentences set out in the Directive, the UK already goes much further. Therefore, it was not considered that opting in would enhance the UK’s approach to tackling money laundering.

Q
(Newcastle upon Tyne North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Home Office
Money Laundering: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the equivalence of the UK's corporate liability regime achieve with article 7 (the liability of legal persons) of EU Directive 2018/1673 on combating money laundering by criminal law.
A
Answered by: Brandon Lewis
Answered on: 03 September 2019

As set out in the Eighth Annual Report to Parliament on the Application of Protocols 19 and 21 to the Treaty on European Union (TEU) and the Treaty on the Functioning of the Union (TFEU) in Relation to EU Justice and Home Affairs (JHA) Matters (1 December 2016 – 30 November 2017) (Cm 9580), the UK Government decided not to opt into the EU Directive on combating money laundering by criminal law as our domestic legislation is already largely compliant with the Directive’s measures, and in relation to the offences and sentences set out in the Directive, the UK already goes much further. Therefore, it was not considered that opting in would enhance the UK’s approach to tackling money laundering.

Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Private Sector
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to Written Statement of 22 July 2019 on Prisons and Probation, HCWS1783, what assessment he has made of how partnering with the private sector to operate prisons offers value for money.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 03 September 2019

A balanced estate, with a mix of public, voluntary and private sector involvement has been shown to introduce improvements and deliver value for money for the taxpayer. The private sector has an important role to play in our system; it has led the way in driving innovation in areas such as in-cell technology and family support services.

Some privately run prisons are among the best performing across the estate. For example, HM Inspectorate of Prisons said in July 2018 that Oakwood is an “impressive prison” and found it to be reasonably good or better on all four healthy prison tests (safety, respect, purposeful activity, and rehabilitation and release planning). General living conditions, staff-prisoner relationships and prisoner consultation were reported to be very good or excellent.

To manage the performance indicators set out in the contracts, each privately managed prison has a full-time on-site Controller, Deputy Controller and Assistant Controller, all employed by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). The Controller has regular review meetings with the contractor against a range of performance indicators that will reflect numbers of staff in post, recruitment, training, sickness, and attrition. Where action is needed, progress is monitored by the Controller and escalated within HMPPS where appropriate action can be taken in accordance with the contract. This may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions.

The Prison Operator Framework will increase the diversity and resilience of the custodial services market in England and Wales, by creating a pool of prison operators who can provide high quality, value for money, custodial services and enable us to effectively and efficiently manage a pipeline of competition over the next six years. The MoJ sets out very clearly the standards that all private prison operators are required to deliver. Bids will be subject to value for money and affordability tests. Contracts will not be awarded if bids do not meet quality or value for money thresholds based on a public sector benchmark, and in this scenario, HMPPS would act as the provider.

Although privately managed prisons do face many of the same challenges encountered in public sector prisons, by providing good quality custodial and rehabilitation services, private operators are helping us to reduce reoffending and deliver long term savings to the taxpayer.

Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 24 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Staff
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment he has made of the effect of (a) prison violence and (b) exposure to new psychoactive substances on the (i) physical and (ii) mental health of prison staff.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 03 September 2019

The physical, emotional and social wellbeing of our staff is paramount. All HMPPS staff have access to an occupational health service, and employee assistance programme. This includes 24-hour, 365 days a year access to signposting and counselling, and trauma support services.

Violence against our hard-working staff will never be tolerated. The Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act came into force in November and doubled sentences for those who attack emergency workers, including prison officers. Post-incident care teams, occupational health support, counselling and clinical treatment are available for those who experience trauma while doing their jobs.

We are investing £100 million investment to boost security and combat crime in prisons. Tough airport-style security, including x-ray scanners and metal detectors, will be put into prisons across the estate to clamp down on the drugs, weapons and mobile phones that fuel violence – increasing the risk to our officers and hindering rehabilitation.

Psychoactive substances have presented a particular challenge and in September 2016, we became the first prison service in the world to introduce innovative mandatory drug tests for these substances, a significant step in tackling the supply and use of them.

Following reports from staff of the effects of secondary inhalation Her Majesty's Prison & Probation Service commenced work with unions, independent scientists and clinicians to assess the impact of reported secondary exposure to psychoactive substances. A programme of voluntary post-exposure biological testing of staff is now being expanded and will enable an assessment of the biological effects on staff to be made.

Q
(Birmingham, Edgbaston)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for International Development
Department for International Development: Cost Effectiveness
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, pursuant to his Department's Main Estimates memorandum for 2019-20, if he will publish an impact assessment of the efficiency savings made by his Department since 2015.
A
Answered by: Andrew Stephenson
Answered on: 03 September 2019

DFID has introduced tough reforms to deliver good value for money for UK taxpayers. DFID is on track to deliver almost £500m in efficiency savings by 2019-20, higher than the £400m target set in the 2015 Spending Review.

The majority of these savings have been driven by more effective procurement practices.

DFID’s Annual Procurement and Commercial Report, which was published in July 2019, outlines some of the steps taken to deliver value for money.

These efficiency savings have been used to deliver further aid programming, meaning that DFID delivers the maximum impact for UK Aid, continues to lead the fight against global poverty and contribute toward the global goals.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Radicalism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Justice, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the system for collating statistics on extremist behaviours in prisons.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 03 September 2019

Extremist behaviours in prison are identified and monitored through a robust case management process reviewing Terrorism Act (TACT) and TACT-related prisoners throughout their sentence. Information and statistics relating to extremist behaviours are routinely collected at local, regional and national levels. Related statistics for persons in custody and released from custody are routinely provide as part of Home Office Official Counter Terrorism statistics, published quarterly as statistical bulletins [see link below]. These statistics present details regarding the number of persons in custody for terrorism-related offences in Great Britain, including details of ethnicity, nationality, ideology and religion.

The latest statistics can be found at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/counter-terrorism-statistics

Q
(Barnsley East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Dangerous Driving: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, with reference to the oral contribution of the Leader of the House of Commons of 25 July 2019, when he plans to bring forward legislative proposals to increase the maximum penalty for causing death by dangerous driving.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 03 September 2019

We are focused on getting the law right, to ensure the changes we make are comprehensive, proportionate and, crucially, practical.

We will bring forward proposals for changes in the law to increase the maximum penalties for causing death by dangerous driving and careless driving under the influence of drink or drugs to life imprisonment, and create a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving as soon as possible. These proposals will take account of other government proposals for safer roads.

Q
(Peterborough)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Dangerous Driving: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 23 July 2019 to Question 277861, whether his Department has begun drafting legislative proposals to increase the maximum penalties for causing death by dangerous driving and careless driving under the influence of drink or drugs to life imprisonment and create a new offence of causing serious injury by careless driving; and whether he plans to publish those proposals by October 2019.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 03 September 2019

We will bring forward proposals for changes in the law as soon as possible.

Q
Asked by Mike Kane
(Wythenshawe and Sale East)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for Education
Teachers: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment his Department have made of the quality of training for primary teachers in religious education; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 03 September 2019

Providing the best possible initial teacher training (ITT) is the focus of the Department’s drive to improve teaching standards. In order to be awarded qualified teacher status (QTS), trainees must demonstrate that they have met the Teachers’ Standards, which includes a requirement that they demonstrate good subject and curriculum knowledge. Ofsted is responsible for testing the quality of teacher training and at their most recent inspection, 99% of all teacher training providers were rated good or outstanding.

The amount of time that primary trainees spend in training on each of the subjects in the national curriculum is not specified by the Government. It is for ITT providers to use their professional judgement to determine the content and structure of courses, but they must be designed so that trainees can demonstrate that they meet all the required standards at the appropriate level by the end of their training. This includes religious education.

In July 2016, the Department published a ‘framework of core content for initial teacher training’, further guidance which states that ‘trainees must be conversant with a range of effective subject-specific pedagogical approaches’. The framework also outlines providers’ responsibility to audit trainees’ subject knowledge early in their training and make provision to ensure that trainees have sufficient subject knowledge to satisfy the standard by the end of their training.

Q
(Hendon)
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Cabinet Office
Public Sector: Artificial Intelligence
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment the Government has made of the ability of artificial intelligence and new technologies to save money and improve services in the public sector.
A
Answered by: Oliver Dowden
Answered on: 03 September 2019

In June this year, the Government Technology Innovation Strategy was published which sets out how government will use emerging technologies to build better public services. In order to develop this, Ministers and officials conducted significant research across government and the wider public sector to understand the opportunities and challenges of wider deployment of emerging technologies in our public service delivery.

Alongside it, the Government Digital Service and Office for Artificial Intelligence published ‘A guide to using artificial intelligence in the public sector’ which provides guidance on how to build and use AI in the public sector. This was produced as part of the Al Review which identified opportunities for using Al in the public sector to drive productivity and efficiency.

The Review focused on central departments and identified opportunities for using AI in the public sector to drive productivity and efficiency. The Review also identified key barriers and enablers to AI adoption, and a number of key areas where the application of AI across
government could improve services and make them more efficient.

Q
Asked by Chris Ruane
(Vale of Clwyd)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Cabinet Office
Electoral Register: Students
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of (a) the University of Sheffield's initiative on voter registration for students and (b) mandating universities to promote students to register to vote.
A
Answered by: Kevin Foster
Answered on: 03 September 2019

The Government is encouraged by the University of Sheffield’s experience but has no plans to mandate a single approach across the country.

The Government is, however, committed to ensuring the electoral registration system is responsive to the needs of students. Ministerial Guidance was issued to the Office for Students (OfS) in February 2018 acting on a commitment made in Parliament during the
passage of the Higher Education and Research Act (2017), directing that they require Higher Education providers to comply with Electoral Registration Officer (ERO) requests for data and they be encouraged to work with Local Authorities to promote electoral registration amongst their student populations. The merits of working closely with EROs have been demonstrated by a number of Higher Education providers across the country.

Yet, the Government does not believe that one size fits all and instead favours an approach which allows innovation.

The Ministerial Guidance has since been used by the OfS to produce their own guidance to Higher Education providers, which advises them how they might best implement, and abide by, the requirements placed on them. The OfS guidance came into force in August. The Government is committed to ensuring everyone who is eligible to register to vote is able to do so and, in 2014, introduced online registration for the first time. Statistics show young people aged between 14 and 24 are more likely than average to use this as a means of registering to vote.

The Government believes these measures will drive up the number of applications to register from students – improving both the completeness and accuracy of the electoral register – as well as further improve the relationships between Higher Education provider and Local Authorities.

Q
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department for International Trade
Overseas Trade
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to publish their Regional Trade Plans.
A
Answered by: Lord Young of Cookham
Answered on: 16 August 2019

Regional Trade Plans (RTPs), set out an overseas region’s overarching strategy, key objectives and priorities, which will drive the delivery of Her Majesty’s Government’s trade objectives overseas. Currently, the RTPs are internal documents, but the Department for International Trade intends to publish executive summaries of the RTPs in due course.

Q
(Coventry South)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 19 July 2019
Department for Education
Teachers: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to improve the provision of mental heath training for teachers and lecturers at universities.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 08 August 2019
Holding answer received on 24 July 2019

Higher education providers have legal responsibilities under the Equality Act (2010) to support students, including those with mental health conditions. As independent and autonomous institutions it is for providers to determine the precise nature of any mental health training they offer to staff.

Mental health service provision is a priority for the government, which is why the former Prime Minister (Theresa May), my right. Hon friend for Maidenhead recently announced measures on 17 June which overhaul the government’s approach to preventing mental illness. These measures included providing £1 million to the Office of Students (OfS) for a competition to find innovative new ways to support mental health at universities and colleges. The OfS is currently working with students, sector representatives, experts and relevant government departments to develop priorities. They aim to publish further details by the end of the year.

The department is also working closely with Universities UK on embedding the Step Change programme. This calls on higher education leaders to adopt mental health service provision as a strategic priority and take a whole-institution approach to embed a culture of good mental health practice.

The University Mental Health Charter, which was announced in June 2018, is also expected to drive up standards in promoting mental health and wellbeing, positive working environments and excellent support for both students and staff.

The former Minister for Universities, Science, Research and Innovation (Chris Skidmore), my hon. Friend for Kingswood gave a speech on 7 May 2019 that focused on early career researcher contracts and employment conditions. The Independent Review of the Concordat to Support the Career Development of Researchers, led by Professor Julia Buckingham, has recognised issues of wellbeing and poor mental health as a significant challenge faced by early career academics and researchers. Recommendations to address these challenges are currently under review and a revised concordat is expected in September.

We hope future joint work by the OfS and Research England into the mental health and wellbeing of doctoral researchers can identify good practice to take forward in this area.

Asked on: 25 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Health Services and Social Services: Departmental Responsibilities
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the benefits to date of bringing health and social care together in one political portfolio, and (2) the benefits that will arise in future years of bringing the two areas together.
Answered on: 07 August 2019

The Department was renamed the Department of Health and Social Care in January 2018 and took on responsibility for the Social Care Green Paper.

Whilst we have made no specific assessment, the Department has been working on bringing health and social care together to achieve whole-person, integrated care with the National Health Service and social care systems operating in a joined-up way. The Better Care Fund continues to drive forward the integration of health and social care in England.

Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of the implementation of the guidance on Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 to 2018.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280421 | 280422 | 280423
Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to the document entitled Guidance – Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 – 2018, published by NHS England in October 2015, how many commissioners have identified a local senior or executive champion to drive local work on nutrition and hydration and to make improvements.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280420 | 280422 | 280423
Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what estimate he has made of the number of commissioners that (a) reviewed existing service provision and (b) agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the NHS England Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015 to 2018 guidance.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280420 | 280421 | 280423
Q
Asked by Eleanor Smith
(Wolverhampton South West)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Nutrition
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to update the Commissioning Excellent Nutrition and Hydration 2015-2018 NHS England guidance.
A
Answered by: Jo Churchill
Answered on: 06 August 2019

The importance of good quality food for patients, visitor and staff is recognised both in terms of improving health and for their overall experience of services. Patients have the right to receive tasty, nutritious and free food as part of their National Health Service treatment.

Data is not collected centrally on the number of local senior or executive champions to drive local work on nutrition, the number of commissioners that reviewed existing service provision or agreed improvement trajectories as set out in the guidance.

In July 2018 the Healthcare Food Standards and Strategy Group started a review of the national standards for Healthcare Food for patients, staff and visitors. This work is building on the Hospital Food Panel report of 2014 and is focusing on marking out the way in which organisations need to comply with the five core standards and bringing in a wealth of tools, resources and examples of good practice to help them achieve the standards.

Grouped Questions: 280420 | 280421 | 280422
Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Nabeel Rajab
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to Written Answer by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 4 July (HL16567), why they were not aware of Nabeel Rajab’s application, and subsequent rejection, for alternative sentencing, given (1) reports by international news outlets, and (2) their close monitoring of his case; and what mechanisms they use to assess Bahrain’s provision of alternative sentences.
A
Answered on: 06 August 2019

We are not privy to individual applications for alternative sentencing. We assess information that is publically released through official channels. The decision making process of the application of alternative sentencing is subject to meeting qualifying conditions and remains the responsibility of the Bahraini judicial system. We are closely monitoring the trials of Mr Rajab with officials from the Embassy regularly attending court hearings. We have raised the case as part of the UK's ongoing open dialogue with Bahrain at senior levels. We continue to urge the Government of Bahrain to protect freedom of expression for all its citizens in line with its international commitments.

Q
Asked by Lord Scriven
Asked on: 25 July 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Bahrain: Sentencing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Instagram post by the British Embassy in Manama on 22 July stating that Prosecutor Ali Al Showaikh revealed that 586 individuals in Bahrain have benefited from non-custodial sentences since the new legislation on alternative sentencing was implemented in May 2018, whether they know the names of those individuals; and what representations they have made to the government of Bahrain about discrimination in the implementation of that law.
A
Answered on: 06 August 2019

Bahrain has brought in new legislation related to alternative sentencing and has already started to implement provisions under this new legal framework. We welcome this positive move in reforming the judicial system. UK expertise has supported this process. The names of the 586 individuals that have benefited from non-custodial sentences have not been published.

Q
Asked by Scott Mann
(North Cornwall)
Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Transport
Electric Vehicles: North Cornwall
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what steps he is taking to increase the number of electric car charging points in North Cornwall.
A
Answered by: George Freeman
Answered on: 05 August 2019

We want to encourage private sector investment to build and operate a self-sustaining public network that is affordable, reliable and accessible. In many cases, the market is best placed to identify the right locations for chargepoints and make improvements to the network and it is essential that viable commercial models are in place.

The Government is also providing support through a number of schemes, which can be accessed across the country, including in North Cornwall. This includes schemes to help fund chargepoint infrastructure at people’s homes and workplaces and on residential streets. The Government’s on-street residential charging scheme offers grants to local authorities to help support this investment at local level. In February 2019, Cornwall County Council were awarded £94,000 through the Government’s Ultra Low Emission Taxi Infrastructure competition, to deliver five chargepoints dedicated to charging electric taxis and private hire vehicles.

In conjunction with the Energy Savings Trust, this year the Office for Low Emission Vehicles has been running a series of roadshows for local authorities and public bodies across the UK, on best practice approaches to driving the uptake of ultra-low emission vehicles. The event in Bristol was well attended including local authority and public sector representatives from across the south west.

Q
Asked by Tim Farron
(Westmorland and Lonsdale)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Social Rented Housing: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, with reference to recent English Housing Survey statistics which show that four per cent of local authority housing and 13 per cent of social housing fail to meet the Decent Homes Standard, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of restoring central Government funding for housing providers to enable the remaining non-decent homes to be improved.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 05 August 2019

The Decent Homes Standard has driven improvements to the quality of social housing. Between 2011 and 2016 Government provided a total of £1.76 billion to 45 councils across England to tackle the backlog of non-decent homes, making over 158,000 homes decent.

Local Authority Housing Statistics show that the proportion of non-decent local authority dwellings was 4 per cent 1 April 2018. The English Housing Survey shows that, in 2017, 13 per cent of social rented homes overall (516,000) were considered non-decent, down from 20 per cent (759,000) in 2010. This is lower than the proportion of private rented (25 per cent) and owner occupied (19 per cent) homes.

The Social Housing Green Paper asks if there are any changes to what constitutes a decent home that we should consider, and whether we need additional measures to make sure homes are safe and decent. We are currently considering the responses to the consultation.

Q
(Stockton North)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of (a) incentivising or requiring housebuilders to monitor and collect data on the performance of homes post-occupancy and (b) requiring housebuilders to publish that information.
A
Answered by: Esther McVey
Answered on: 05 August 2019

The Government is taking action to raise the quality of new build homes. We are reforming the building safety system, reviewing the Approved Documents to the Building Regulations including the conservation of fuel and power, and working with industry to improve productivity and skills, all of which will raise building performance and standards. We are also currently consulting on the design and delivery of a New Homes Ombudsman, including their role in driving up the quality of new build homes.

Q
Asked by Ruth Jones
(Newport West)
Asked on: 17 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Young Offender Institutions: Ethnic Groups
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many BAME young people were held in young offender institutions and secure units in (a) Wales, (b) Northern Ireland, (c) England and (d) Scotland in the most recent period for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Edward Argar
Answered on: 02 August 2019

Figures published on 12th July 2019 showed that in May of this year, out of a total of 830 children, the ethnicity was known for 811 children, out of which the number of children from a Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic background held within the youth custodial estate was 408 in England and 7 in Wales. Overall, this represents 51% of the youth custodial estate population for which the ethnicity was known across England and Wales. These figures are provisional, and might change as more data is reported.

Snapshots of the youth custody data are published monthly, showing the percentage of children in custody who are from a Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic background. Although there are monthly fluctuations, over the year 2018/19 an average of 48% of children in custody in England and Wales were from a Black, Asian, and Minority Ethnic background.

The MoJ does not hold figures for Northern Ireland and Scotland.

We accepted every recommendation made in David Lammy’s review of racial disparities in the criminal justice system and have since been reviewing fairness of sentence outcomes and working to improve understanding of legal advice and options for Black, Asian and ethnic minority children.

Q
Asked by Lord Dholakia
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Young Offenders
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 10 and 11 year olds received a youth caution or criminal conviction in each of the past five years; and what proportion of those children were in care at the time of the caution or criminal conviction.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 02 August 2019
20142015201620172018
Cautions issued450359309218159
Convicted7686717037

The table above shows the total number of cautions and convictions issued to 10-11 year olds over the past five calendar years. Published figures do not allow us to distil the number of individuals but instead only the number of cautions/sentences. This is the latest annual data available from the ‘Criminal Justice Statistics quarterly: December 2018 – Outcomes by Offence data tool’: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

Data on looked after children is not held centrally by the Ministry of Justice. However, children supervised by the local Youth Offending Team or in custody will have their needs, including identifying whether they are looked after, assessed and appropriate measures will be put in place to ensure their individual needs are met.

Q
Asked by Lord Dholakia
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Ministry of Justice
Youth Custody
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many 10 and 11 year olds received a custodial sentence in each of the past 10 years.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 02 August 2019

Custody should always be a last resort for children. The table below sets out the number of 10 and 11 year olds who have received a custodial sentence since 2009:

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

2015

2016

2017

2018

Total Immediate Custody

1

1

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

This is the latest annual data available from the ‘Criminal Justice Statistics quarterly: December 2018 – Outcomes by Offence data tool’:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/criminal-justice-system-statistics-quarterly-december-2018

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