Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019-21 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Glasgow Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Glasgow
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers are accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 29 May 2020

Hotel usage is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts as contingency accommodation. There are currently 350 Service Users being accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.

Of these 299 are being housed under s98, 37 under s4 and 14 being housed under s95. We do not hold data on those being accommodated specifically as a result of the COVID 19 lockdown (the data provided is internal locally held and is subject to change).

It is Home Office policy to move people into suitable Dispersed Accommodation (DA) once their claim for support has been assessed. Mears and the Home Office work closely with Glasgow City Council on procurement of properties and it is our intention, once restrictions on movement are lifted, to move all individuals in contingency accommodation into suitable DA.

Grouped Questions: 45286 | 45287
Q
(Glasgow Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Glasgow
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many and what proportion of asylum seekers in accommodation in hotels in Glasgow are supported under (a) Section 98 and (b) Section 4 of the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999 and of those supported under Section 4 how many were granted that support due to the covid-19 lockdown.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 29 May 2020

Hotel usage is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts as contingency accommodation. There are currently 350 Service Users being accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.

Of these 299 are being housed under s98, 37 under s4 and 14 being housed under s95. We do not hold data on those being accommodated specifically as a result of the COVID 19 lockdown (the data provided is internal locally held and is subject to change).

It is Home Office policy to move people into suitable Dispersed Accommodation (DA) once their claim for support has been assessed. Mears and the Home Office work closely with Glasgow City Council on procurement of properties and it is our intention, once restrictions on movement are lifted, to move all individuals in contingency accommodation into suitable DA.

Grouped Questions: 45285 | 45287
Q
(Glasgow Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Glasgow
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether asylum seekers in accommodation in hotels in Glasgow will be reinstated back into self-contained flats after covid-19 lockdown measures are eased.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 29 May 2020

Hotel usage is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts as contingency accommodation. There are currently 350 Service Users being accommodated in hotels in Glasgow.

Of these 299 are being housed under s98, 37 under s4 and 14 being housed under s95. We do not hold data on those being accommodated specifically as a result of the COVID 19 lockdown (the data provided is internal locally held and is subject to change).

It is Home Office policy to move people into suitable Dispersed Accommodation (DA) once their claim for support has been assessed. Mears and the Home Office work closely with Glasgow City Council on procurement of properties and it is our intention, once restrictions on movement are lifted, to move all individuals in contingency accommodation into suitable DA.

Grouped Questions: 45285 | 45286
Q
(Enfield, Southgate)
Asked on: 13 May 2020
Home Office
Places of Worship Security Funding Scheme
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the £1.5 million to protect vulnerable places of worship through the Places of Worship Protective Security Programme has been distributed to those places of worship.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 29 May 2020

The Places of Worship Protective Security Funding Scheme has awarded funding to 49 places of worship in the 2019/2020 round. Funding for this scheme has been doubled to £3.2 million for 2020/2021.

Asked on: 14 May 2020
Home Office
Airports and Ports: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government when they intend to publish a detailed plan about the quarantine of international travellers arriving in the UK during the COVID-19 pandemic; and whether that scheme will cover ports as well as airports.
Answered on: 29 May 2020

The Government will soon require all international arrivals not on a short list of exemptions to self-isolate in their accommodation for fourteen days on arrival into the UK. The General Aircraft Declaration (GAD) process will now be required for all flights coming to the UK, requiring crew to identify symptomatic passengers before arrival, with a similar process being implemented for maritime and international rail. This will contribute to keeping the overall number of Covid-19 transmissions in the UK as low as possible.

Further details, and guidance, will be set out shortly, and the measures and list of exemptions kept under regular review.

Asked on: 14 May 2020
Home Office
Domestic Abuse: Victim Support Schemes
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 5 May (HL3266), whether local authorities have specifically been told they should offer support to survivors of domestic abuse with a condition of no recourse to public funds; if so, whether it has been advertised so women in communities experiencing such abuse are aware of that.
Answered on: 29 May 2020

Local authorities may already provide basic safety net support, regardless of immigration status, if it is established that there is a genuine care need that does not arise solely from destitution. Local Authorities have been asked to work closely with the domestic abuse services in their area, providing support where they deem it necessary in order to protect victims of domestic abuse, for example by providing crisis funding to safe accommodation services.

The Government has announced £28m of funding to support domestic abuse charities of which £10m has been allocated to support additional refuge bed spaces and specialist support. The Home Office has announced an additional £2 million in funding to help bolster specialist helplines and online services so that victims can continue to seek support.

The Government domestic abuse awareness raising campaign under the hashtag #YouAreNotAlone, signposts victims to sources of advice and support. Details of these services can be found at www.gov.uk/domestic-abuse.

Q
Asked by Lord Lucas
Asked on: 14 May 2020
Home Office
Email: Fraud
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 14 May (HL3707), what is the current status of their Suspicious Emails Reporting Service.
Answered on: 29 May 2020

In April 2020, the NCSC launched the Suspicious Email Reporting Service. This initiative by the NCSC makes a significant contribution to the Government’s aim to make the UK the safest place to live and work online.

As of 14 May, the Suspicious Email Reporting Service has had more than 300,000 emails submitted, leading to over 2,500 unique URLs, which resulted in 600 bogus sites being taken down. Examples of threats the NCSC has removed with the help of the reporting service include:

- Scam web pages that have been flagged include mock-ups of official GOV.uk and TV licencing websites (visitors are lured into giving their billing information to scammers posing as these legitimate organisations).

- Scam web pages purporting to sell coronavirus linked bogus products such as testing kits, face makes and even vaccines. (The NCSC noted a rise in cyber crime exploiting the coronavirus pandemic last month.)

This automated email reporting service makes it easier than ever for people to help protect others from falling victim to scams. To use the reporting service, people are asked to simply forward suspect emails to report@phishing.gov.uk. If they are found to link to malicious content, it will be taken down or blocked, helping prevent future victims of crime.

Q
Asked on: 14 May 2020
Home Office
Cybercrime: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of COVID-19 on cybercrime rates; and what plans they have to address any rise in cybercrime linked to COVID-19.
Answered on: 29 May 2020

The Home Office and its operational partners continue to monitor and respond to the cyber crime threat during the COVID-19 pandemic. Current assessments have not indicated an increase in reporting linked to COVID-19. However, cyber criminals are exploiting COVID-19 as an unparalleled opportunity to conduct criminal activity using social engineering, capitalising on people’s anxieties about the pandemic.

On 21 April, the Government launched a revised Cyber Aware campaign to coincide with the launch of the NCSC’s new Suspicious Email Reporting service. The NCA have also launched an advertorial on the popular Games Radar website to deliver PREVENT messaging during the COVID-19 pandemic as the public spend more time online. The advert is designed to deter young people away from becoming involved in cyber-criminality.

We have also recently launched a gov.uk page on coronavirus-related fraud and cybercrime. The page includes easy-to-follow steps for people to better protect themselves and signposts other relevant advice and tips. It can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-fraud-and-cyber-crime.

Q
(Cardiff South and Penarth)
Asked on: 29 April 2020
Home Office
UK Border Force and UK Visas and Immigration: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many (a) UK Border Force and (b) UK Visas and Immigration staff have (i) had to self-isolate due to presenting symptoms and (ii) have tested positive for covid-19 in each week since 1 January 2020.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 28 May 2020

The attached table shows at column C the number of Border Force and UK Visas and Immigration employees who have been recorded as beginning a period of sickness absence due to COVID-19 symptoms.

Column D shows the number of employees recorded as beginning a period of isolation at home on paid special leave either because a member of their household has COVID-19 symptoms or because the employee themselves is vulnerable / extremely vulnerable to infection.

We do not hold data centrally on those employees who have mild symptoms and are well enough to continue to work from home, or who are isolating at home but are able to work from home and therefore do not need to take paid special leave.

We do not hold data centrally on the outcomes of COVID-19 testing of our employees.

Table - PQ 41464 (Excel SpreadSheet, 15.6 KB)
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Human Trafficking: Victim Support Schemes
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what long-term support services they plan to provide to survivors of trafficking to protect them from being re-trafficked and to ensure that they are supported when the COVID-19 lockdown ends.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

This Government is committed to stamping out modern slavery and providing victims with the support they need to rebuild their lives.

The Victim Care Contract aims to lift victims of modern slavery out of exploitation and establish a pathway to rebuild their lives. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) informs a tailored move-on plan for confirmed victims, with the aim of establishing longer-term stability by helping victims transition out of VCC support and back into a community, as appropriate. Where this is not possible, VCC support will continue to meet the victim’s ongoing recovery needs.

The safety and security of those supported through the modern slavery Victim Care Contract (VCC) is a top priority during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We are continually reviewing how essential services can best be maintained and delivered to ensure victims receive and have the means to access the support they need at this time. To ensure our support system remains robust, we have adapted the method by which victims receive financial support. A new card payment solution has been rolled out to allow victims to receive their payments without requiring a cash transaction or a face-to-face meeting with a support worker. These pre-paid cards for users can be used online, in shops or in cash machines.

The policy change announced on 6 April mean individuals who are accommodated in the VCC, will have continued access to this accommodation until at least the 6 July 2020. The policy will be reviewed before the end of June in respect of the Government’s latest covid-19 advice. This change, alongside the existing support mechanisms within the contract will ensure that vulnerable individuals are not left without the essential support they need at this challenging time.

As the public health restrictions are lifted, we are committed as ever, to support victims and protect them from re-trafficking.

Grouped Questions: HL4178
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Slavery: Victims
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they have taken to ensure that the level of subsistence support given to victims of modern slavery during the COVID-19 pandemic is sufficient to meet essential needs.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

This Government is committed to stamping out modern slavery and providing victims with the support they need to rebuild their lives.

The Victim Care Contract aims to lift victims of modern slavery out of exploitation and establish a pathway to rebuild their lives. The Recovery Needs Assessment (RNA) informs a tailored move-on plan for confirmed victims, with the aim of establishing longer-term stability by helping victims transition out of VCC support and back into a community, as appropriate. Where this is not possible, VCC support will continue to meet the victim’s ongoing recovery needs.

The safety and security of those supported through the modern slavery Victim Care Contract (VCC) is a top priority during the COVID-19 pandemic.

We are continually reviewing how essential services can best be maintained and delivered to ensure victims receive and have the means to access the support they need at this time. To ensure our support system remains robust, we have adapted the method by which victims receive financial support. A new card payment solution has been rolled out to allow victims to receive their payments without requiring a cash transaction or a face-to-face meeting with a support worker. These pre-paid cards for users can be used online, in shops or in cash machines.

The policy change announced on 6 April mean individuals who are accommodated in the VCC, will have continued access to this accommodation until at least the 6 July 2020. The policy will be reviewed before the end of June in respect of the Government’s latest covid-19 advice. This change, alongside the existing support mechanisms within the contract will ensure that vulnerable individuals are not left without the essential support they need at this challenging time.

As the public health restrictions are lifted, we are committed as ever, to support victims and protect them from re-trafficking.

Grouped Questions: HL4177
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Slavery: Victims
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what progress they have made in their proposal to provide places of safety for victims of modern slavery.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

Places of safety’ would provide support to adult victims of modern slavery leaving situations of immediate exploitation. They would receive accommodation, assistance and advice for up to 3 working days, allowing them time to consider if they wish to be referred to the National Referral Mechanism. A provision for Places of Safety has been included in the tender for The Modern Slavery Victim Care Contract (MSVCC) which will replace the current contract. We are nearing the end of the tender process, and the contract will be awarded in due course.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Immigrants: Detainees
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people were detained in each immigration removal centre on (1) 2 March, (2) 21 April, and (3) 7 May.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

The Home Office publishes data on people in detention in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of people detained under immigration powers at the end of each quarter, by location are published in table Det_D02 of the immigration detention detailed datasets.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook. The latest data relates to those in detention as at 31 December 2019, which show that there were 1,256 people detained in immigration removal centres, 24 in short term holding facilities in the detention estate, with a further 359 detained under immigration powers in prison. Additionally, the Home Office publishes a high-level overview of the data in the 'summary tables'. The ‘contents’ sheet contains an overview of all available data on detention.

Figures covering the first quarter of 2020, including those detained as at 31 March 2020 will be released on 21st May 2020. Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar.'

Q
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Domestic Abuse: Ethnic Groups
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to ensure that women from BAME communities who have (1) experienced, and (2) reported, domestic abuse receive adequate advice, support and counselling and, where necessary, emergency housing and financial assistance.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

We are in frequent contact with the domestic abuse sector, including specialist BAME organisations, as well as the Domestic Abuse Commissioner, to understand the impact of covid-19 on BAME communities.

Following increases in calls to domestic abuse helplines and online services, the Home Secretary announced an additional £2m to bolster organisations’ capacity on April 11. This is currently being allocated.

This is in addition to £28m of Government funding for domestic abuse charities to help survivors of domestic abuse and their children by providing more safe spaces, accommodation and access to support services during the coronavirus outbreak.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Slavery and Forced Labour
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the impact of COVID-19 on (1) labour exploitation, and (2) modern slavery.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

Modern slavery is a harmful and hidden crime and its victims may be especially isolated and vulnerable during the COVID-19 pandemic. We are committed to protecting those who may be subject to exploitation and modern slavery, during this time.

We are working closely with the police, the National Crime Agency, the Gangmasters and Labour Abuse Authority, the Employment Agency Standards Inspectorate and Her Majesty’s Revenues and Customs - National Minimum Wage Team to monitor and assess any emerging changes to the threat of modern slavery during the COVID-19 pandemic, to ensure law enforcement activity can respond to the changing environment. We are confident that law enforcement agencies continue to pursue high risk modern slavery cases where there is a risk of harm or detriment to individuals.

In addition, we have taken clear steps to ensure that we continue to support some of the most vulnerable people in our society. To ensure victims continue to feel supported and safe, we announced on 6 April 2020, that all individuals in accommodation provided by the government-funded specialist Modern Slavery Victim Care Contract, will not be required to move on from their accommodation for the next three months.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Windrush Generation: Compensation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many people who claimed compensation under the Windrush Compensation Scheme have died before their claims had been settled.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

In unfortunate cases when the claimant passes away after submitting a compensation claim but before the claim is fully resolved, we work with the families to ensure the compensation payment is made to the appropriate person on the claimant’s behalf. We have had three such cases so far and are working closely with the fami-lies and legal representatives in all of these cases to determine the right person to whom the compensation can be paid.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Windrush Generation: Compensation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they have publicised the Windrush Compensation Scheme (1) in the UK, and (2) overseas.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

There has been significant outreach and communication activity to publicise the Windrush Compensation Scheme. Evidence has shown the importance of face-to-face communications and prior to the Covid-19 pandemic outbreak, over 30 outreach events were delivered across the UK with community partners. These events have been promoted by stakeholders and on local and social media. We are now continuing events online: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/windrush-online-engagement-events. We also work with MPs, local councils and stakeholders to raise awareness, and materials on the scheme are available on Gov.uk and have been provided to community groups. In March, the Home Secretary announced a national advertising campaign to raise awareness, and a community fund to help organisations encourage applications among their communities. These will be complemented by new activity with specialist diverse media outlets and partnerships with community leaders.

To publicise the scheme overseas, we hosted an event for High Commissioners, and working with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, we provided materials and a briefing to British Embassies and High Commissions overseas to enable them to promote the scheme locally. Plans are in development for additional activity overseas in priority countries.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Windrush Generation: Compensation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how they have liaised with British High Commissions to deal with the claims of people who are currently overseas to compensation under the Windrush Compensation Scheme.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

There has been significant outreach and communication activity to publicise the Windrush Compensation Scheme. Evidence has shown the importance of face-to-face communications and prior to the Covid-19 pandemic outbreak, over 30 outreach events were delivered across the UK with community partners. These events have been promoted by stakeholders and on local and social media. We are now continuing events online: https://www.gov.uk/government/news/windrush-online-engagement-events. We also work with MPs, local councils and stakeholders to raise awareness, and materials on the scheme are available on Gov.uk and have been provided to community groups. In March, the Home Secretary announced a national advertising campaign to raise awareness, and a community fund to help organisations encourage applications among their communities. These will be complemented by new activity with specialist diverse media outlets and partnerships with community leaders.

To publicise the scheme overseas, we hosted an event for High Commissioners, and working with the Foreign and Commonwealth Office, we provided materials and a briefing to British Embassies and High Commissions overseas to enable them to promote the scheme locally. Plans are in development for additional activity overseas in priority countries.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Offences Against Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 21 January (HL158), whether they published their national strategy to tackle all forms of child sexual abuse; and if so, where it can be found.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

The government is committed to publishing a first of its kind national strategy on tackling all forms of child sexual abuse, outlining our long-term ambition to drive a whole system response to tackle this horrific crime. However, we must respond to the threats raised by Covid-19 and our priority is to tackle offending, protect children and support victims and survivors during this challenging time.

We have responded swiftly to the risks posed by COVID-19. We are working with Law Enforcement, the UK Intelligence Community, safeguarding partners and the third sector to assess the threat and ensure they have the resources they need to tackle offending and provide the greatest protection for vulnerable children.

The Government has made £1.6 million available immediately for the NSPCC to expand and promote its national helpline for adults. We have also launched a £1.2 million funding competition for organisations providing support for victims and survivors of child sexual abuse at a national level, including through support lines, online resources and remote counselling. We have further driven forward work to respond to the increased risk of children coming to harm online, by working across government, with the NCA and industry to ensure that teachers, parents and carers have access to the support they need to help keep children safe online.

The Home Office will further distribute £7.8 million in emergency support for charities helping vulnerable children who have been impacted by the coronavirus outbreak. The Home Office is working closely with other government departments to ensure that this funding is prioritised and that charities who need this support receive it as soon as possible.

On Thursday 21st May, the Prime Minister hosted a virtual summit focused on ‘hidden harms’, including child sexual abuse. The virtual summit brought key decision makers together to share insight, best practice and agree an approach for tackling these crimes as we move towards easing lockdown measures.

Ahead of the summit, the Home Secretary announced that £9.86 million is being allocated to the National Crime Agency to improve its ability to tackle perpetrators seeking to offend against children via the Dark Web. An additional £3.36 million is being committed to further improve our understanding and tackle all aspects of the child sexual abuse threat. We will also launch a £2.8 million transformation fund to promote and embed best practice in Child Sexual Abuse victim support.

Asked on: 13 May 2020
Home Office
Offences against Children
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 21 January (HL158), whether they have made any recent estimate of the number of women and girls raped by Muslim men involved in grooming gangs since 1997.
Answered on: 28 May 2020

Government does not hold data on the religious beliefs of perpetrators of rape and there is no data that delineates sexual offences which might be described as “grooming gang” offending from other forms of sexual offending.

The Government has estimated that there were approximately 6,850 victims of organised child sexual exploitation in the UK in 2015. This estimate includes all forms of child sexual exploitation and does not distinguish between rape and other sexual offences. It includes organised child sexual exploitation committed by groups and gangs within a range of contexts.

The Government is developing a first of its kind national Child Sexual Abuse Strategy which will set out our long-term ambition in tackling all forms of child sexual abuse.

Our new strategy, which will be published this year, will set out our whole system response to tackling child sexual abuse and how we will work across government, law enforcement, safeguarding partners and industry to root out offending, protect victims and help victims and survivors rebuild their lives. We will work tirelessly to end these heinous crimes; there will be no no-go areas

Q
Asked by Greg Clark
(Tunbridge Wells)
Asked on: 18 May 2020
Home Office
Home Office: Chief Scientific Advisers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many meetings she had with her Department’s Chief Scientific Adviser (a) from 1 September to 30 November 2019 and (b) from 1 December 2019 to 29 February 2020.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 28 May 2020

Ministers meet with Professor John Aston, the Home Office Chief Scientific Adviser, as necessary during the process of policy development and delivery. During the periods in question, I met with him on numerous occasions.

Q
Asked by Tracey Crouch
(Chatham and Aylesford)
Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many migrants have crossed the English Channel to enter the UK in (a) January, (b) February and (c) March 2020; and what the countries of origin were for those migrants.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The data showing the number of migrants intercepted crossing the English Channel to enter the UK for the months of January, February and March is shown in the table below, including the claimed nationalities for those migrants:

(a) January 2020 – 94; (b) February 2020 – 182 and (c) March 2020 – 187.

By nationality:

Jan

Feb

March

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

53

109

104

Iraq

16

40

63

Syria Arab Republic

16

18

13

Afghanistan

5

3

5

Kuwait Bidoun

1

Yemen

5

1

Pakistan

4

1

Mali

2

Cote D'Ivoire (Ivory Coast)

1

Senegal

1

Egypt

1

Guinea

1

Grand Total

94

182

187

The total number of migrants for the April period cannot yet be released as the figures have not passed through a data quality check and cannot be assured. The figures will be published at a later date, once they have been

Grouped Questions: 37582
Q
Asked by Tracey Crouch
(Chatham and Aylesford)
Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate she has made of the number of illegal migrants who have crossed the English Channel to enter the UK since 1 April 2020.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The data showing the number of migrants intercepted crossing the English Channel to enter the UK for the months of January, February and March is shown in the table below, including the claimed nationalities for those migrants:

(a) January 2020 – 94; (b) February 2020 – 182 and (c) March 2020 – 187.

By nationality:

Jan

Feb

March

Iran (Islamic Republic of)

53

109

104

Iraq

16

40

63

Syria Arab Republic

16

18

13

Afghanistan

5

3

5

Kuwait Bidoun

1

Yemen

5

1

Pakistan

4

1

Mali

2

Cote D'Ivoire (Ivory Coast)

1

Senegal

1

Egypt

1

Guinea

1

Grand Total

94

182

187

The total number of migrants for the April period cannot yet be released as the figures have not passed through a data quality check and cannot be assured. The figures will be published at a later date, once they have been

Grouped Questions: 37575
Q
(Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Glasgow
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when her Department was notified by Mears Group of plans to move some 300 asylum seekers from self-contained accommodation into hotels in Glasgow.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The moves that took place in Glasgow were moves from contingency accommodation (serviced apartments) to contingency accommodation (hotels). Contingency use is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts.

Where a provider needs to move an Initial Accommodation (IA) or Dispersed Accommodation (DA) service user they may have to do so as a matter of urgency and in such circumstances there is no contractual requirement to notify the Home Office in advance, but rather within one day of such a move taking place. A provider may only move an IA Service User once.

All accommodation providers are required to undertake risk assessments for the activities and services they perform and risk is formally managed on a monthly basis at formal contract government meetings, the most recent of which updated the risk register in relation to the use of hotel contingency across the AASC contracts held by Mears.

Risk assessment of the suitability of a property for use for supported asylum seekers would normally form part of the engagement with a Local Authority on the use of a particular hotel contingency.

The AASC Contract does not require service users in receipt of S98 support to be given 7 days-notice of moves and there may be times when service users need to be moved quickly, as a matter of urgency. In all cases relating to the moves in Glasgow, Mears have confirmed that the moves were discussed with service users in advance which included discussing requirements, assistance with packing belongings and arranging transport.

Grouped Questions: 45265 | 45266 | 45267
Q
(Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Glasgow
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether her Department gave approval to Mears Group for plans to move some 300 asylum seekers from self-contained accommodation into hotels in Glasgow in April.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The moves that took place in Glasgow were moves from contingency accommodation (serviced apartments) to contingency accommodation (hotels). Contingency use is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts.

Where a provider needs to move an Initial Accommodation (IA) or Dispersed Accommodation (DA) service user they may have to do so as a matter of urgency and in such circumstances there is no contractual requirement to notify the Home Office in advance, but rather within one day of such a move taking place. A provider may only move an IA Service User once.

All accommodation providers are required to undertake risk assessments for the activities and services they perform and risk is formally managed on a monthly basis at formal contract government meetings, the most recent of which updated the risk register in relation to the use of hotel contingency across the AASC contracts held by Mears.

Risk assessment of the suitability of a property for use for supported asylum seekers would normally form part of the engagement with a Local Authority on the use of a particular hotel contingency.

The AASC Contract does not require service users in receipt of S98 support to be given 7 days-notice of moves and there may be times when service users need to be moved quickly, as a matter of urgency. In all cases relating to the moves in Glasgow, Mears have confirmed that the moves were discussed with service users in advance which included discussing requirements, assistance with packing belongings and arranging transport.

Grouped Questions: 45264 | 45266 | 45267
Q
(Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Glasgow
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what risk assessments her Department have (a) requested, (b) conducted and (c) received in relation to the move by Mears Group of asylum seekers from self-contained accommodation into hotels in Glasgow in April 2020.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The moves that took place in Glasgow were moves from contingency accommodation (serviced apartments) to contingency accommodation (hotels). Contingency use is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts.

Where a provider needs to move an Initial Accommodation (IA) or Dispersed Accommodation (DA) service user they may have to do so as a matter of urgency and in such circumstances there is no contractual requirement to notify the Home Office in advance, but rather within one day of such a move taking place. A provider may only move an IA Service User once.

All accommodation providers are required to undertake risk assessments for the activities and services they perform and risk is formally managed on a monthly basis at formal contract government meetings, the most recent of which updated the risk register in relation to the use of hotel contingency across the AASC contracts held by Mears.

Risk assessment of the suitability of a property for use for supported asylum seekers would normally form part of the engagement with a Local Authority on the use of a particular hotel contingency.

The AASC Contract does not require service users in receipt of S98 support to be given 7 days-notice of moves and there may be times when service users need to be moved quickly, as a matter of urgency. In all cases relating to the moves in Glasgow, Mears have confirmed that the moves were discussed with service users in advance which included discussing requirements, assistance with packing belongings and arranging transport.

Grouped Questions: 45264 | 45265 | 45267
Q
(Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 11 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Glasgow
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what (a) consultation with, (b) engagement with and (c) notification of relevant (i) individuals and (ii) organisations her Department undertook prior to the Mears Group moving asylum seekers from self-contained accommodation into hotels in Glasgow in April 2020.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The moves that took place in Glasgow were moves from contingency accommodation (serviced apartments) to contingency accommodation (hotels). Contingency use is permitted under the Asylum Accommodation and Support Contracts.

Where a provider needs to move an Initial Accommodation (IA) or Dispersed Accommodation (DA) service user they may have to do so as a matter of urgency and in such circumstances there is no contractual requirement to notify the Home Office in advance, but rather within one day of such a move taking place. A provider may only move an IA Service User once.

All accommodation providers are required to undertake risk assessments for the activities and services they perform and risk is formally managed on a monthly basis at formal contract government meetings, the most recent of which updated the risk register in relation to the use of hotel contingency across the AASC contracts held by Mears.

Risk assessment of the suitability of a property for use for supported asylum seekers would normally form part of the engagement with a Local Authority on the use of a particular hotel contingency.

The AASC Contract does not require service users in receipt of S98 support to be given 7 days-notice of moves and there may be times when service users need to be moved quickly, as a matter of urgency. In all cases relating to the moves in Glasgow, Mears have confirmed that the moves were discussed with service users in advance which included discussing requirements, assistance with packing belongings and arranging transport.

Grouped Questions: 45264 | 45265 | 45266
Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Cybercrime
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he has made additional resources available to the police to help tackle online crime during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The Government is determined to prevent criminals from taking advantage of people spending more time online during the current period of public health restrictions.

To support police forces, £84 million of the Police Uplift grant has been reallocated specifically for COVID-19 expenses and recruitment. We continue to work closely with the sector to monitor any additional pressures.

We recently launched a gov.uk page on coronavirus-related fraud and cybercrime. The page includes easy-to-follow steps for people to better protect themselves and signposts other relevant advice and tips.

It can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-fraud-and-cyber-crime.

We have continued to work across the online threats to boost funding to tackle online crime. For example, the Government in September 2019 announced an additional £30m funding for this financial year to ensure offenders are no longer able to hide in the shadows on the dark web and prey on our society’s most vulnerable while they are at home.

Police forces continue to assess threats, the impact of COVID-19, and deploy resources accordingly including on online crimes. The National Crime Agency, the lead on tackling the online threat of child sexual abuse, has already disseminated over 1,000 cases to policing and continues to prioritise safeguarding children during these difficult times.

We have also launched guidance for parents and carers to keep children safe online during the coronavirus pandemic, which can be found here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/coronavirus-covid-19-keeping-children-safe-online.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Finance
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the answer by Baroness Williams of Trafford on 6 May (HL Deb, col 441), when the current review of asylum support commenced; when that review is due to be completed; and whether that review will take additional costs into account, such as those associated with hygiene needs, resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The current review of the level of the cash allowances began with the publication of the latest Family Spending data by the Office of National Statistics on 19 March, as that data is one of the main sources of information used to assess the appropriate level of the allowances. The review also takes account of research into the actual costs of purchasing essential items and whether Covid 19 has impacted on these costs.

The outcome of the review will be published in due course.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Immigrants: Detainees
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what financial and other support they provided to those released from immigration removal centres as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

Asylum seekers who would otherwise be unable to support themselves are provided with accommodation and financial assistance to meet their essential living needs.

We remain committed to providing support and accommodation to those who need it. In light of the pandemic, we have introduced temporary measures to continue supporting those who would normally have had their accommodation and financial assistance stopped until at least the end of June when we will review the situation.

We are ensuring local authorities are supported, with £3.2 million in targeted funding to help support individuals who are sleeping rough off the streets, and an additional £3.2 billion provided to local authorities as part of the wider government response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need.

The legal position on those with no recourse to public funds has not been amended. People granted refugee status in the United Kingdom are able to access the mainstream benefits in the same way as a British Citizen.

Individuals released from immigration detention will usually be subject to certain conditions which may require a person to report to a Home Office reporting centre at regular intervals or to remain living at the same address.

Grouped Questions: HL4209 | HL4210
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Immigrants: Detainees
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they hold the current address of each person released from an immigration removal centre as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

Asylum seekers who would otherwise be unable to support themselves are provided with accommodation and financial assistance to meet their essential living needs.

We remain committed to providing support and accommodation to those who need it. In light of the pandemic, we have introduced temporary measures to continue supporting those who would normally have had their accommodation and financial assistance stopped until at least the end of June when we will review the situation.

We are ensuring local authorities are supported, with £3.2 million in targeted funding to help support individuals who are sleeping rough off the streets, and an additional £3.2 billion provided to local authorities as part of the wider government response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need.

The legal position on those with no recourse to public funds has not been amended. People granted refugee status in the United Kingdom are able to access the mainstream benefits in the same way as a British Citizen.

Individuals released from immigration detention will usually be subject to certain conditions which may require a person to report to a Home Office reporting centre at regular intervals or to remain living at the same address.

Grouped Questions: HL4208 | HL4210
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Immigrants: Detainees
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they provided long-term accommodation to those released from immigration removal centres as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

Asylum seekers who would otherwise be unable to support themselves are provided with accommodation and financial assistance to meet their essential living needs.

We remain committed to providing support and accommodation to those who need it. In light of the pandemic, we have introduced temporary measures to continue supporting those who would normally have had their accommodation and financial assistance stopped until at least the end of June when we will review the situation.

We are ensuring local authorities are supported, with £3.2 million in targeted funding to help support individuals who are sleeping rough off the streets, and an additional £3.2 billion provided to local authorities as part of the wider government response to the COVID-19 pandemic. This funding has been provided to help local authorities to reduce risks to public health and to support individuals on the basis of need.

The legal position on those with no recourse to public funds has not been amended. People granted refugee status in the United Kingdom are able to access the mainstream benefits in the same way as a British Citizen.

Individuals released from immigration detention will usually be subject to certain conditions which may require a person to report to a Home Office reporting centre at regular intervals or to remain living at the same address.

Grouped Questions: HL4208 | HL4209
Q
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Finance
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to increase the level of asylum support in line with the COVID-19 related uplift for Universal Credit.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

We are currently reviewing the level of the cash allowances, as we do each year, to ensure that they remain capable of meeting the essential living needs of asylum seekers. The level of the cash allowances is not linked to Universal Credit.

Home Office has put in place a range of measures to support those in the asylum system who are affected by the covid-19 outbreak. We continue to monitor the situation closely and are making adjustments to our processes and procedures where necessary and appropriate

Q
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Quarantine: Coronavirus
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what the arrangements are for requiring foreign persons who enter the United Kingdom via the Republic of Ireland to comply with a quarantine.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

In order to keep overall levels of infection down and in line with many other countries, the Government will introduce a series of measures and restrictions at the UK border.

Firstly, the Government will require all international arrivals to supply their contact and accommodation information. They will also be strongly advised to download and use the NHS contact tracing app. The Government will also require all international arrivals not on a short list of exemptions to self-isolate in their accommodation for fourteen days on arrival into the UK.

Recognising the unique nature of the Common Travel Area, as well as the unique position of Northern Ireland, journeys within the Common Travel Area will be exempt from these measures.

We will continue to work closely with Ireland and the Crown Dependencies on our response to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Q
Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Enforcement: Disease Control
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the means by which police forces are enforcing the lockdown, particularly in regard to police on horseback questioning people in parks; what representations they have received about the behaviour of the police when carrying out such enforcement; and what guidance they have provided to police to ensure adherence with Government guidelines.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

Our police forces face unprecedented challenges as they play the critical role of maintaining public order during this public health emergency. The police response has and will follow the four-step escalation principles – engaging, explaining, encouraging, and then enforcing as a last resort.

I welcome the conclusions of the Home Affairs Select Committee report on police preparedness, which was published on 17 April. The report concluded that the overall police response to the current crisis has been proportionate and effective.

We have and will continue to work closely with our policing partners to ensure there is clear guidance to officers on any changes to the Health Protection Regulations and the powers available to them.

Asked on: 12 May 2020
Home Office
Immigration
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the number of people who have come into the UK by (1) boat, and (2) Eurostar, since 1 April.
Answered on: 27 May 2020

The Home Office is due to publish the next quarterly Immigration Statistics on 21 May. In addition, an ad hoc statistical release ‘Statistics relating to Covid-19 and the immigration system, May 2020’ will be published on the 28 May - https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/announcements/statistics-relating-to-covid-19-and-the-immigration-system-may-2020.

Q
(North West Leicestershire)
Asked on: 13 May 2020
Home Office
Firearms: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Office, how many UK companies have a licence to supply firearms.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 27 May 2020

Data on how many UK companies have a licence to supply firearms is not available. The Home Office publishes statistics on the number of firearm dealers that are registered with the police in England and Wales. The latest figures on the number of firearm dealers is available from table 6 of the Firearm and Shotgun Certificates in England and Wales Statistics - Financial Year 2018/19publication.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Statistics on Firearm Certificates on issue in Scotland are published by Police Scotland.

The Police Service of Northern Ireland lists its statistical outputs on the Statistics page of its website, but there are no series that are directly comparable to those for England and Wales.

Q
(Romford)
Asked on: 18 May 2020
Home Office
Hamas: Proscribed Organisations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of a potential increase in the activity of Hamas in the UK as a result of the economic downturn during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 27 May 2020

We do not comment on intelligence matters.

Q
(Romford)
Asked on: 18 May 2020
Home Office
Hezbollah: Proscribed Organisations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of a potential increase in the activity of Hezbollah in the UK as a result of the economic downturn during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 27 May 2020

We do not comment on intelligence matters.

Q
(Romford)
Asked on: 18 May 2020
Home Office
Travel: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when she plans to implement the 14 day quarantine for people arriving into the UK.
A
Answered by: Kevin Foster
Answered on: 27 May 2020

On 22 May, the Home Secretary announced the details of new measures at the UK border to guard against a second wave of coronavirus infections, including the requirement for arrivals to the UK to self-isolate for 14 days. The arrangements are due to come into effect on 8 June.

As the UK moves to a situation where domestic transmission is much lower, imported cases may become a higher proportion of the overall number of infections. The requirement to self-isolate will reduce the risk of transmission from this group.

Q
Asked by Dawn Butler
(Brent Central)
Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Detention Centres: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the feasibility of releasing detainees from immigration detention centres to (a) prevent and (b) contain the transmission of covid-19 in those centres.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The safety and health of those in immigration removal centres is of the utmost importance but we remain committed to removing foreign national offenders or those who violate our immigration rules. Detention plays a key role in securing our borders and maintaining effective immigration control.

Decisions to detain an individual are made on a case by case basis and are based on all of the information known at the time of the review. As circumstances of the case change, detention is reviewed in light of these changes and release may then become appropriate.

The Home Office is following all Public Health England guidance and have robust contingency plans in place including measures such as protective isolation to minimise the risk of COVID-19 spreading in the immigration detention estate. Further measures including shielding, single occupancy rooms and the cessation of social visits have been introduced in line with the Government direction on social distancing.

There are currently no cases of Covid-19 in the immigration detention estate.

Q
(Huddersfield)
Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that asylum seeker accommodation adheres to social distancing measures introduced during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The Home Office has been working with a Public Health England embed during the current crisis and we have put in place a number of measures to support people in the asylum system who are affected by the COVID-19 outbreak, including working closely with providers to make sure the most vulnerable people within the system receive the support they need. There are currently no cases of Covid-19 in the immigration detention estate

Q
Asked by Tracey Crouch
(Chatham and Aylesford)
Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans her Department has for the deportation of illegal migrants who have crossed the English Channel to enter the UK during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

It is the policy of this Government to return those not in need of protection.

The majority of countries who are signatories to the Dublin Regulations which governs the return of those seeking asylum in the UK to a third country have announced temporary suspension of transfers to and from all EU Member States due to the Corona virus.

Returns to third-countries can still take place where there is a suitable route of return.

We are ready to resume Dublin returns as soon as travel restrictions are lifted

Q
Asked by Tracey Crouch
(Chatham and Aylesford)
Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Undocumented Migrants: English Channel
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether illegal migrants who have crossed the English Channel to enter the UK are being tested for covid-19; and how many illegal migrants have been so tested since the start of the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The processes to manage clandestine arrivals are kept under regular review. In line with Public Health Guidance we are not currently providing routine testing for clandestine arrivals to the UK. In line with established processes, those arriving across the Channel are immediately assessed to establish whether there are any medical requirements. Those showing symptoms of COVID-19 are provided with suitable accommodation in which to self-isolate. There are currently no cases of Covid-19 in the immigration detention estate.

Q
(Tewkesbury)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Asylum: Applications
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people are waiting for a decision on their asylum application as at 20 April 2020.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The Home Office publishes data on asylum applications awaiting a decision in the ‘Immigration Statistics Quarterly Release’. Data on the number of people who are awaiting a decision on their asylum application are published in the asylum applications awaiting a decision data table in Asy_D03 of the asylum and resettlement detailed datasets.

The latest data is as at December 31st 2019 and an update, covering data up to the end of March 2020, is due to be released on 21st May 2020 as part of the Immigration Statistics Quarterly release.

Information on how to use the dataset can be found in the ‘Notes’ page of the workbook.

Information on future Home Office statistical release dates can be found in the ‘Research and statistics calendar’.

Q
(Edinburgh West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Detention Centres: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps she is taking to ensure that all people in immigration removal centres have access to soap and sanitiser during the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The safety and health of people in the detention estate is of the utmost importance. The Home Office is following all Public Health England guidance on coronavirus and have robust contingency plans in place, including measures such as protective isolation and use of personal protective equipment.

Handwashing facilities are available in all immigration removal centres and we are working closely with suppliers to ensure we have a continuous supply of soap and cleaning materials. In addition, each centre has posters and leaflets to inform detainees about the importance of handwashing and social distancing to minimise the risk from Covid-19. Detainees are also able to speak to staff directly for advice on the measures in place.

The Home Office is working closely with NHS England health and justice teams and regional commissioning teams to support their planning and delivery of healthcare services in immigration removal centres during the COVID-19 outbreak, which includes testing.

On 26 March, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and Coronavirus was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place.

There are currently no cases of Covid-19 in the immigration detention estate.

Grouped Questions: 37982
Q
(Edinburgh West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 20 April 2020
Home Office
Detention Centres: Coronavirus
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her policy is on testing (a) staff and (b) detainees in immigration removal centres for covid-19.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The safety and health of people in the detention estate is of the utmost importance. The Home Office is following all Public Health England guidance on coronavirus and have robust contingency plans in place, including measures such as protective isolation and use of personal protective equipment.

Handwashing facilities are available in all immigration removal centres and we are working closely with suppliers to ensure we have a continuous supply of soap and cleaning materials. In addition, each centre has posters and leaflets to inform detainees about the importance of handwashing and social distancing to minimise the risk from Covid-19. Detainees are also able to speak to staff directly for advice on the measures in place.

The Home Office is working closely with NHS England health and justice teams and regional commissioning teams to support their planning and delivery of healthcare services in immigration removal centres during the COVID-19 outbreak, which includes testing.

On 26 March, the High Court ruled that our approach to detention and Coronavirus was sensible, with the appropriate precautionary measures in place.

There are currently no cases of Covid-19 in the immigration detention estate.

Grouped Questions: 37981
Q
(Hornsey and Wood Green)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 21 April 2020
Home Office
Refugees: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to bring to the UK child refugees that have been granted permission to join their families following the cancellation of their flights as a result of the covid-19 outbreak.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The UK remains fully committed to meeting our obligations under the Dublin III Regulation. The Regulation makes it very clear that once a take charge request has been accepted for an unaccompanied child, the transfer is the responsibility of the requesting State.

Despite covid-19 restrictions the UK remains ready to accept transfers under Dublin whenever Member States are in a position to make those arrangements. We are continuing to liaise with our counterparts in Member States on what actions can be taken during this period and to effect transfers as soon as it is safe and practical to do so.

Q
(Torfaen)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 April 2020
Home Office
Airports: Travel Requirements
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps have been taken by Border Force to ensure that people returning to the UK from abroad are aware of the latest Government guidelines on covid-19.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The health response at ports is a cross-government responsibility as is the work to protect critical supply chains. Border Force are working closely with DHSC, PHE, Devolved Administrations, port operators and carriers to ensure arriving passengers have access to the latest advice on arrival.

Q
(Torfaen)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 22 April 2020
Home Office
Aviation: Disease Control
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps Border Force officials are taking to establish whether social distancing is taking place on aircraft arriving in the UK.
A
Answered by: Chris Philp
Answered on: 26 May 2020

The health response at ports is a cross-government responsibility as is the work to protect critical supply chains. While Border Force are working closely with PHE, DHSC, DfT, Devolved Administrations, port operators and carriers to ensure arriving passengers have access to the latest PHE and government advice on arrival. The safety of passengers, including implementing any social distancing measures while on an aircraft, is the responsibility of the carrier.

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