Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2019 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked on: 20 February 2019
Home Office
British Nationality
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they have a policy in place for whether any nation takes precedence over another when determining when someone with dual nationality is to be deprived of citizenship.
Answered on: 06 March 2019

There is no policy for prioritising nationality when deciding whether to deprive an individual with dual nationality of their British citizenship.

When making a decision to deprive an individual of British citizenship, the law requires that such a decision may not be made if it would make the individual stateless. This is compatible with the UK’s international obligations under the UN Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. The Government cannot comment on the use of deprivation by other countries.

Grouped Questions: HL13945
Q
Asked on: 20 February 2019
Home Office
British Nationality
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is ever their policy to make an individual stateless by depriving them of their citizenship; what assessment they have made of the impact on an individual with dual nationality of being deprived of their citizenship of both countries; whether they provide guidance to officials for such a scenario; and if so, what is that guidance.
Answered on: 06 March 2019

There is no policy for prioritising nationality when deciding whether to deprive an individual with dual nationality of their British citizenship.

When making a decision to deprive an individual of British citizenship, the law requires that such a decision may not be made if it would make the individual stateless. This is compatible with the UK’s international obligations under the UN Convention on the Reduction of Statelessness. The Government cannot comment on the use of deprivation by other countries.

Grouped Questions: HL13944
Q
Asked on: 12 February 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Regeneration: Cornwall
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to support the regeneration of the economy of Cornwall; and whether they will list the specific projects they will undertake for that purpose.
Answered on: 26 February 2019

The Government’s ambitious, modern Industrial Strategy sets out a long-term plan to boost the productivity and earning power of people throughout the UK.

We are working with areas across the UK who are developing Local Industrial Strategies, including Cornwall, and we hope to deliver these everywhere by 2020. These strategies will be developed locally through Local Enterprise Partnerships (LEP) and agreed with the Government.

Cornwall and Isles of Scilly Local Enterprise Partnership (LEP) has been allocated £78.23 million as part of their growth deal to support economic growth in the area.

There are also two Enterprise Zones in Cornwall. Aerohub+, a split site covering Newquay airport and Goonhilly Earth Station with a focus on Aerospace and Space, and Marine Hub which has a focus on marine technology. They are both progressing well and the site at Newquay airport has attracted several companies including CIS UK Ltd and Apple Aviation.

Q
Asked on: 11 February 2019
Home Office
Proceeds of Crime
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government under which circumstances, if any, they intervene to block requests for assets to be remitted to foreign government organisations either from the UK or British overseas territories.
Answered on: 25 February 2019

Under proceeds of crime legislation, asset sharing and repatriation is ultimately the Government’s decision following the recovery of assets/money under a court order it is a matter of how to then dispose of those recovered moneys. In confiscation cases, the UN Convention Against Corruption requires a full return to victim States and the EU Framework Decision on confiscation orders requires a 50% share in cases in excess of 10,000 Euros.

There are other bilateral and multilateral international agreements that encourage the sharing of recovered assets. The UK does not require an international agreement to share or repatriate assets and does so on request on an ad hoc basis. The presumption is that 50% is shared with the requesting country. There are few cases so far, but none have been refused.


The Government does not intervene with similar cases involving the Overseas Territories or Crown Dependencies.

Q
Asked on: 06 February 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: INF Treaty
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Statement on the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 5 February (HL Deb, cols 1495–9), what is their response to the government of Russia's non-compliance with that Treaty; and what assessment they have made of reports of INF Treaty non-compliant launchers being moved onto Europe's eastern borders with Russia.
A
Answered on: 15 February 2019

NATO first expressed concerns about Russian non-compliance with its Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty obligations in 2014. We now fully support the assessment that Russia's covert testing, production and fielding of the 9M729 ground-launched cruise missile system is a material breach of the INF Treaty.

We, along with NATO Allies, support the US decision to suspend its participation in the INF Treaty and start the treaty's formal withdrawal process. A situation whereby the US was fully aiding by the INF Treaty and Russia was not, was not sustainable. Following the US announcement, NATO issued a statement declaring full support for US action and urging Russia to use the six month withdrawal period to return to full and verifiable compliance to preserve the INF Treaty.

Q
Asked on: 06 February 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
INF Treaty
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Statement on the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty by Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon on 5 February (HL Deb, cols 1495–9), what assessment they have made of whether (1) Germany, (2) Hungary, (3) Poland, (4) Bulgaria, (5) Slovakia, and (6) the Czech Republic have destroyed or dismantled any INF Treaty missiles they hold; and if so, whether they are concerned by those countries' actions in that regard.
A
Answered on: 15 February 2019

Only the US, Russia and a small number of other Soviet successor states are bound by the Intermediate-range Nuclear Forces (INF) Treaty. The Treaty initially eliminated all of their intermediate-range (500km-5,500km) ground-launched cruise and ballistic missiles. By 1991, all US and Soviet Union missiles covered by the Treaty had been eliminated.

All NATO Allies support the finding of the US that Russia is now in material breach of the Treaty, citing its covert testing, production and fielding of 9M729 ground-launched cruise missile systems. We are working closely with Allies to review the security implications of Russian intermediate-range missiles and will continue to take the necessary steps to ensure the credibility and effectiveness of the Alliance's overall deterrence and defence posture.

Q
Asked on: 30 January 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Venezuela: Politics and Government
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what support they are providing to enable Juan Guaidó to become the interim President of Venezuela.
A
Answered on: 13 February 2019

We are working closely with EU partners, regional organisations such as the Lima Group and like-minded international partners to ensure a peaceful resolution to the current crisis and a return to democracy. We urge all Venezuelans to recognise Juan Guaido as the constitutional interim President of Venezuela until new presidential elections that are free and in accordance with international democratic standards are held.

Q
Asked on: 30 January 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Venezuela: Politics and Government
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether the Prime Minister has received a letter dated 26 January from Juan Guaidó, President of the National Assembly of Venezuela, relating to a request to halt financial transactions from the Bank of England to Venezuela; and if so, what will be their response.
A
Answered on: 13 February 2019

I can confirm that Mr Guaido wrote to the Prime Minister and the Governor of the Bank of England on 26 January. The Bank of England is an independent institution. Decisions about such issues are a matter for the Bank of England.

Q
Asked on: 30 January 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Cross Border Cooperation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Memorandum of Understanding signed by the Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency and the State Institute of Drugs and Good Practices of the Ministry of Industry and Trade of the Russian Federation, whether they plan to cooperate with the government of Russia on other issues in the future; and if so, what are those plans.
A
Answered on: 13 February 2019

Although planned high-level contact with Russia has been suspended, it remains important that we continue to engage with Russia; avoid misunderstandings; push for change where we disagree; and cooperate where it is in the UK national interest.

Q
Asked on: 30 January 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Russia: Cross Border Cooperation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they are currently collaborating with the government of Russia on any projects or programmes; and if so, what are those projects or programmes.
A
Answered on: 11 February 2019

The only joint project between the two governments is the UK-Russia Year of Music, which will be delivered by the British Council. The Russian Government is not a partner in any other project activity.

Q
Asked on: 30 January 2019
The Senior Deputy Speaker
Parliamentary Estate: Proof of Identity
Lords
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what consideration has been given to requiring all visitors to the Parliamentary estate to present photo identification before entry.
A
Answered on: 07 February 2019

There are over one million visitors to Parliament each year. Visitors access the estate for many reasons. These include: to meet with a Member or a member of staff; to attend a Member-sponsored meeting or meetings at official level; to give evidence to a Committee; to lobby; to attend debates in both Houses (in the Chambers and Committees); to attend functions and banqueting events; to take a tour (both paid-for and democratic free tours); or as part of an Education Service visit. Many visits do not need to be pre-booked. In order to promote open access to Parliament controls are kept proportionate to the security risk. Photo identification by visitors is not currently deemed proportionate and if introduced would need to be verified, significantly delaying the admission of visitors to Parliament and resulting in lengthy queues at peak times.

All non-passholders are subject to search and screening measures before entering the estate. The Parliamentary Security Department do not comment publicly on the details of security measures.

The Director of Security for Parliament is content to meet with any members who wish to discuss specific concerns.

Q
Asked on: 15 January 2019
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Zimbabwe: Politics and Government
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of (1) the current protests in Harare, (2) the police tactics used in response to those protests, and (3) the potential impact on the stability of that country of the government of Zimbabwe’s decision to increase fuel prices by 150 per cent.
A
Answered on: 29 January 2019

While we condemn the violent behaviour of some protestors, and unlawful acts such as arson and looting, we are deeply concerned that Zimbabwe’s security forces have acted disproportionately in response. In particular, there are disturbing reports of use of live ammunition, intimidation and excessive force. On 17 January the Minister for Africa summoned the Zimbabwean Ambassador to highlight our concern at the ongoing situation in Zimbabwe.

Comprehensive and difficult economic reforms are necessary to address Zimbabwe’s economic challenges. However, the Government must implement these as part of a broad strategy, seeking the advice of the International Monetary Fund.

Q
Asked on: 09 January 2019
Department for International Trade
Trade Promotion
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Fairhead on 20 September 2018 (HL10343), whether they have now received the regional trade plan of each of Her Majesty's Trade Commissioners; and if so, whether they will publish those plans.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 23 January 2019

All of Her Majesty’s nine Trade Commissioners have completed their first Regional Trade Plans, which set out how each region will meet the Department’s objectives overseas. These have all been discussed at the Departmental Board. Over the coming months, Trade Commissioners will be refreshing their plans to ensure they remain fully updated.

The Department for International Trade does not intend to publish Regional Trade Plans at present, as they are internal documents. However, for the future, we are considering what information may be appropriate to publish and when.

Grouped Questions: HL12727
Q
Asked on: 09 January 2019
Department for International Trade
Trade Promotion
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Fairhead on 20 September 2018 (HL10343), which Trade Commissioners, if any, have not yet submitted their regional trade plan.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 23 January 2019

All of Her Majesty’s nine Trade Commissioners have completed their first Regional Trade Plans, which set out how each region will meet the Department’s objectives overseas. These have all been discussed at the Departmental Board. Over the coming months, Trade Commissioners will be refreshing their plans to ensure they remain fully updated.

The Department for International Trade does not intend to publish Regional Trade Plans at present, as they are internal documents. However, for the future, we are considering what information may be appropriate to publish and when.

Grouped Questions: HL12726
Q
Asked on: 15 January 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Religion: Educational Institutions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the case for a specific educational institute in the UK to promote religious inclusiveness and the awareness of all faiths.
Answered on: 23 January 2019

In the Integrated Communities Strategy Green Paper, published last year, the Government set out its commitment to building strong, integrated communities where people – whatever their background – live, learn, work and socialise together based on shared rights, responsibilities and opportunities. All schools are required to promote Fundamental British Values, which include mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs, and there are a range of existing sources of advice and guidance for schools on religious awareness.

Q
Asked on: 07 January 2019
Home Office
Overseas Visitors: Visas
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether it is normal practice to request biometric procedures to be conducted before final approval for permission to enter the UK on a visitor's visa; and if so, whether they plan to consider approving such applications before an appointment to collect biometric data is made.
Answered on: 21 January 2019

The Government uses biographic and biometric information to conduct iden-tity and suitability checks on visa applicants before deciding whether to issue an applicant with a visa. If we did not complete these checks before approv-ing a visa application, we risk granting entry clearance to individuals who have an adverse immigration history and exposing the UK to harm from criminals who seek to come to the UK.

Q
Asked on: 12 December 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
EU Countries: British Nationals Abroad
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will encourage UK ambassadors to the 27 EU member states to request a meeting between a delegation of UK citizens resident in those countries and the respective governments of those countries to express their concerns and discuss future plans for their residency arrangements after Brexit.
A
Answered on: 28 December 2018

Since the EU Referendum our Overseas Posts in the 27 EU Member States have been engaging regularly with UK Nationals living in those countries on a range of issues from the UK's EU Exit, including around residency. In many Member States, our Posts have already involved host governments and others have plans to do so in the coming months. Engagement with UK Nationals, and host governments will continue regularly in the run up to the UK's EU Exit, ensuring UK Nationals have the most up to date information on residency rights and other issues.

Q
Asked on: 04 December 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Cameroon: Armed Conflict
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether genocide is being perpetrated in southern Cameroon; and if so what action, if any, they plan to take in response.
A
Answered on: 13 December 2018

Government policy is that any judgment on whether war crimes or crimes against humanity or genocide has occurred is a matter for judicial decision, rather than for governments or non-judicial bodies. The UK is deeply concerned about the situation in Cameroon and the deteriorating security situation in the Anglophone regions of the country. We continue to call for all parties in Cameroon to engage in a peaceful and structured process leading to constitutional reforms, as previously set out by the President, and to avoid excessive use of force. The UK will continue to work alongside the international community to encourage and support efforts to resolve the worsening Anglophone crisis.

Q
Asked on: 04 December 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Cameroon: Armed Conflict
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment, if any, they have made of who may be responsible for killings and burning down of villages in southern Cameroon during the current conflict.
A
Answered on: 12 December 2018

We remain deeply concerned about the deteriorating situation in the Anglophone regions, which continue to suffer from high levels of violence and human rights abuses and violations perpetrated by both security forces and armed separatists. The British Government is equally concerned by the razing of villages. We have raised our concerns with the Cameroonian authorities and we continue to call for restraint and an end to violence from all sides. We are working closely with the wider international community, including the UN, to build as full and accurate a picture as possible. The complex and deep-rooted historical nature of the situation reinforces the urgent and imperative need to tackle the underlying issues in the Anglophone regions. This is why we continue to encourage efforts to pursue an inclusive dialogue to address the root causes of the crisis - the only means through which long-term stability in the region can be achieved.

Q
Asked on: 04 December 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Cameroon: Armed Conflict
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what representations they have made to the governments of Cameroon and France in relation to the violence being perpetrated in southern Cameroon.
A
Answered on: 12 December 2018

The UK is deeply concerned about the situation in Cameroon and the deteriorating security situation in the Anglophone regions of the country. Minister Baldwin visited Cameroon in February 2018 when she met the Prime Minister and other cabinet ministers and reinforced the importance of respecting human rights in a challenging security environment. In her statement following elections in Cameroon, Minister Baldwin called for all parties to engage in a peaceful and structured process leading to constitutional reforms, as previously set out by the President, and to avoid excessive use of force. Minister Baldwin has discussed the violence in the Anglophone regions with French Minister Lemoyne, who shares UK concerns. The Minister for Africa pressed these points again when she met the Secretary General of the Presidency on Thursday 3 May. The UK will continue to work alongside the international community to encourage and support efforts to resolve the Anglophone crisis.

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