Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 12 February 2019
Department for Education
Students: Loans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, if he will make it his policy to change the date for graduates with outstanding loans to the Student Loan Company to return information from the month of December to January.
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 February 2019
Department for Transport
Great Western Railway Line: Electrification
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the effect of the decision to defer electrification of the Filton Bank section of railway on the health of residents along that line.
A
Answered by: Andrew Jones
Answered on: 11 February 2019

Running in diesel mode, the new Class 800 IEP trains are significantly more efficient, producing lower CO₂ and nitrogen oxides than a legacy intercity diesel train. Their engines meet the latest European emissions standards.

The four-tracking project at Filton Bank has already brought performance improvements, increasing capacity and contributing to reducing end-to-end journey times for Cross Country and Bristol to London services.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 31 January 2019
Home Office
Letting Agents
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect on (a) tenants and (b) potential tenants of steps taken by letting agents to establish the right to rent.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 08 February 2019

The Home Office carried out an evaluation of phase one of the Right to Rent scheme in Birmingham, Walsall, Sandwell, Dudley and Wolverhampton in 2015, published at:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/evaluation-of-the-right-to-rent-scheme

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 31 January 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Allergies: Medical Equipment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 10 December 2018 to Question 198805, what progress has been made on increasing the supply of Epipens; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 08 February 2019

Supplies of EpiPen and other adrenaline auto-injectors are currently available in volumes that are sufficient to meet United Kingdom requirements. The Department continues to work very closely with all the manufacturers of adrenaline auto-injectors and can confirm that the supply situation continues to improve going forward with further deliveries expected over the coming weeks. All patients who require an adrenaline auto-injector should now be able to obtain a device from their pharmacy.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 31 January 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Bacteriophages
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential benefits of phage therapy for tackling antimicrobial resistance.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 08 February 2019

The Department and the Wellcome Trust sponsored a strategic pipeline briefing into alternatives to antibiotics in 2015. The briefing reviewed the feasibility and potential clinical impact of alternatives to antibiotics, including bacteriophages, and considered approaches that were most likely to deliver new treatments in the next 10 years. The briefing concluded that bacteriophages were possible therapeutics, but too few were being progressed.

The Government continues to invest in research into new and alternative treatments. While there has been increased investment and unprecedented levels of research collaboration on antimicrobial resistance, there are still relatively few projects looking at the use of bacteriophages.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 31 January 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Antibiotics: Drug Resistance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he has plans to increase the level of investment and funding for training and employing NHS microbiologists on long term contracts to increase diagnostic capacity as part of the government strategy to tackle antimicrobial resistance.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 08 February 2019

‘Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance (2019-2024): the UK’s five-year national action plan’ includes the commitment to assess current and future workforce needs to ensure capability and capacity for strong infection prevention and control and antimicrobial stewardship. The assessment will cover a range of roles, including microbiology. The results of the assessment will be used to develop further workforce targets.

The NHS England Long Term Plan makes the commitment to implement the human health aspects of the national action plan.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 31 January 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Antibiotics: Drug Resistance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps he has taken to establish an evidential basis on the time taken to diagnose disease in the NHS as part of the Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 08 February 2019

‘Tackling Antimicrobial Resistance (2019-2024): the UK’s five-year national action plan’ recognises that stewardship programmes are needed for both therapeutics and diagnostics. Good diagnostic stewardship promotes appropriate and timely testing.

Evidence suggests that a third of prescriptions in primary care do not have an associated diagnosis recorded. The national action plan sets out an ambition to improve the evidence base about diagnoses and prescriptions by linking and analysing clinical data sets.

Through the joint sepsis/Antimicrobial Resistance Commissioning for Quality Innovation data we know that the number of patients being identified with a suspicion of sepsis or severe infection has increased and that a majority of those patients have their treatment reviewed within 24-72 hours, following the confirmation of diagnostic test results.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 31 January 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Antibiotics: Drug Resistance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Government's strategy entitled Tackling antimicrobial resistance 2019–2024: The UK’s five-year national action plan, published in January 2019, what plans his Department has to educate the public on the use and misuse of antimicrobials and their role in tackling antimicrobial resistance.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 08 February 2019

Public Health England has developed a number of initiatives for educating the public which support the Government’s recently published strategy to tackle antimicrobial resistance; including a major national campaign, ‘Keep Antibiotics Working’, following a successful pilot in the North West in October 2017, to alert the general public to the issue of antibiotic resistance, with the aim of reducing patient pressure on general practitioners to prescribe. The multi-media campaign, which features advertising on television, radio, outdoor, digital, social media, public relations and extensive partnership support, has run for a consecutive year in 2018. Further information is available at the following link:

https://antibioticguardian.com/keep-antibiotics-working/

The United Kingdom wide Antibiotic Guardian campaign, now in its fifth year, aims to stimulate behaviour change and increase engagement to tackle antimicrobial resistance by healthcare professionals and engaged members of the public. The e-Bug programme, now celebrating its 10th year, aims to educate children, young people and communities about microbes, hygiene, infections and antibiotics. Further information on the e-Bug programme is available at the following link:

www.e-Bug.eu

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 29 January 2019
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Renewable Energy
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what plans the Government has to support community energy generation after the closure of the feed-in-tariff scheme in March 2019.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 07 February 2019

The Government is considering its future approach and what measures might be taken to support the efforts of community organisations who want to invest in low-carbon energy installations as part of its consultation on a Smart Export Guarantee which was published on 8 January. The consultation is open until 5 March and can be assessed here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/the-future-for-small-scale-low-carbon-generation

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 29 January 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Influenza: Vaccination
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of trends in the level of availability of the 2018-19 seasonal flu vaccine.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 06 February 2019

Public Health England (PHE) provides influenza vaccines centrally for the children’s influenza programme. Centrally purchased influenza vaccines are carefully monitored by PHE to ensure there is equitable distribution across England and sufficient in-date vaccine for patients who present throughout the season.

General practitioners and other providers are directly responsible for the influenza vaccine supplies used to deliver the national influenza programme to the other eligible groups. PHE maintains oversight to help facilitate a constant supply of vaccine, liaising with vaccine manufacturers to ascertain whether there are any manufacturing problems which could impact the running of the programme at a national level.

This winter, eligible adults aged 18-64 were offered a quadrivalent influenza vaccine, and those aged 65 and over were offered a newly licensed adjuvanted trivalent influenza vaccine (aTIV). There were a number of short-term localised shortages of both vaccines reported, particularly for aTIV due to staggered deliveries from the manufacturer between September and November. The NHS managed these shortages locally, but some patients had to wait longer than usual to be vaccinated. However, there was no overall shortage of either vaccine.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 29 January 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Furs: Farms
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what representations his Department has made to foreign Governments on ending the practice of fur farming.
A
Answered by: David Rutley
Answered on: 05 February 2019

Fur farming has been banned in the UK since 2000 making it clear to other countries that that this practice is not consistent with British values on animal welfare.

Once the UK retakes its independent seat on international bodies, such as the World Organisation for Animal Health, we will have an opportunity to promote progressive views on animal welfare and to support improved animal welfare standards internationally.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 31 January 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Letting Agents
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what plans he has to review the practice of letting agencies requiring 12 months' rent in advance from clients who are below a specified minimum income threshold.
A
Answered by: Mrs Heather Wheeler
Answered on: 05 February 2019

Landlords and letting agents are free to ask for rent payments upfront if they wish, but very few ask for 12 months' rent upfront.

The Government is determined to ensure that tenants’ rent money held by agents is protected. We will require letting agents to obtain membership of a Client Money Protection (CMP) scheme and to repay any client money without delay where it is due to the tenant. We intend this protection to be mandatory from 1 April 2019.

We are also developing a new regulatory regime for letting agents. The Regulation of Property Agents working group, led by Lord Best, will make recommendations about a joined-up framework to guide, monitor and police the actions of letting agents. The working group will report in July 2019.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Home Office
Refugees: Welfare State
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effectiveness of the Post Grant Appointment Service in ensuring that refugees are able to access the welfare system following a decision to grant asylum.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 25 January 2019

As described by the British Red Cross in their report ‘Still an ordeal: the move-on period for new refugees’, the Post Grant Appointment Service is effective in setting up an early appointment for the refugees with their local Jobcentre, thus enabling them to make an application for mainstream benefits before they leave the asylum support system.

We will provide more information about the service when we respond to the British Red Cross report in due course

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 14 January 2019
Home Office
Refugees: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the British Red Cross report entitled Still an ordeal: the move-on period for new refugees published in December 2018, if he will increase the period in which refugees continue to receive asylum support after receiving a positive decision on their asylum application to 56 days.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 21 January 2019

Whilst there are currently no plans to extend the period, the Government is working on a number of important initiatives to ensure that refugees are able to access benefits and housing promptly once their Home Office support ends. We are ensuring that this work takes into account the views of the key voluntary sector groups, including the British Red Cross.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 14 January 2019
Department for Education
Apprentices: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps her Department is taking to help employers to ensure that apprenticeships provide an effective route into permanent employment for adults diagnosed with autism.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 21 January 2019

We are improving access to apprenticeships for people with learning difficulties or disabilities. For example, we have introduced legislation which allows the minimum English and maths requirements for apprenticeships to be adjusted to entry level 3 for a defined group of people with a learning difficulty or disability. This change will allow more people to benefit from the opportunities available through apprenticeships and work.

Our Pacesetter project is working with local partners to test our policy approaches and deliver tangible progress towards growing numbers of apprentices with learning difficulties or disabilities. Pacesetters include councils, a school and the learning disability charity Mencap, who have themselves hired a number of apprentices with learning difficulties or disabilities.

The Apprenticeship Diversity Champions Network has been developed to provide insight and guidance on best practice in how to make sure that apprenticeships are undertaken by people from a diverse range of backgrounds, and all members make a commitment themselves to increasing diversity when they join. The network aims to inspire and influence the behaviour of other employers to attract, recruit and support more people from underrepresented groups into apprenticeships. This includes people with disabilities, people who identify as LGBT+, women in science, technology, engineering and maths and members of black, Asian and minority ethnic communities. For example, Health Education England, working with members including Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, have a supported apprenticeship scheme focussing particularly on learners with autism. The National Autistic Society has been invited to attend the network’s next meeting.

Our funding system is intended to encourage the take-up and likely completion of apprenticeships by particular groups, including people with learning difficulties or disabilities. The system is also intended to recognise where additional support is necessary, through extra funding where the costs of supporting an apprentice are higher, and making sure that these costs are met by government and not by the employer.

Our communications and guidance products aim to encourage employers to hire apprentices with a learning difficulty or disability and to demonstrate to people with learning difficulties or disabilities, such as autism, that apprenticeships are an option for them.

We have integrated the Department for Work and Pensions’ Disability Confident campaign into the apprenticeship recruitment service so that the Disability Confident logo is displayed on apprenticeship vacancies for campaign-registered employers.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 14 January 2019
Department for Education
Work Experience: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the supported internships scheme in helping young people diagnosed with autism achieve sustainable paid employment.
A
Answered by: Nadhim Zahawi
Answered on: 21 January 2019

Supported internships offer young people with learning difficulties and/or disabilities a clear pathway into employment.

A Department for Education led trial of supported internships in 2012 to 2013 was formally evaluated and found that of the 190 young people who completed a supported internship and participated in the research, 36% gained paid employment, including apprenticeships (5%).

Good practice examples of supported internships are also gathered by our delivery partner, the National Development Team for Inclusion, and published on the Preparing for Adulthood website.

We are keen to do more to increase the uptake of supported internships and are considering how we can build the evidence base further.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 14 January 2019
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether it remains his Department's policy to consider an asylum-seeker's claim for asylum less favourably if that person did not claim asylum in the first safe country they reached; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 17 January 2019

The United Kingdom has a proud tradition of providing sanctuary to those in need of protection. Where we are responsible for deciding asylum claims we will consider all cases on their individual merits.

Our domestic legislation and Immigration Rules underline the importance of claiming asylum in the first safe country, which is reflected in section 8 of the Asylum and Immigration (Treatment of claimants etc.,) Act 2004. This clearly states that a failure to take advantage of a reasonable opportunity to claim asylum in a safe country shall be taken into account in assessing the individual’s credibility.

In light of the recent sharp increase in the number of migrants attempting perilous Channel crossings to the UK in small boats, I have asked my officials to look at what more we can do to deter asylum seekers from travelling to the UK – often dangerously – from other safe countries in the first place.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Jobcentre Plus: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans she has to make an assessment of the effectiveness of the Autism and Hidden Impairment training for Jobcentre Plus staff in reducing the gap between national employment rates and rates of employment for people on the autistic spectrum.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 08 January 2019

There are currently no robust statistics on employment rates among autistic people, so we have not been able to make any assessment of the effectiveness of the Autism and Hidden Impairment training for Jobcentre Plus staff on employment levels among autistic people.

We are considering how to robustly measure the employment rate among autistic people, including whether it might be possible to collect this information through the Labour Force Survey.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Universal Credit: Refugees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what support her Department provides to refugees granted asylum that have made an application for universal credit.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 28 December 2018

Asylum Support is available to newly recognised refugees through the Home Office whilst their status is under consideration. This support continues for 28 days after refugee status is granted. A claim to Universal Credit can be made immediately once refugee status is granted and Asylum Support is not deducted from their Universal Credit award during the 28 days run on period. Work coaches receive training to help them identify and support vulnerable claimants, including refugees, and build supportive relationships with claimants to encourage them to openly discuss any barriers, concerns or problems as they emerge.

Provided the eligibility criteria for Universal Credit is met, we will always offer an advance payment to a refugee when making a new claim, and staff have access to information on a range of services and support available in their local area for vulnerable claimants, including refugees. This includes Universal Support, which provides help with using online services and budgeting advice. We also have access to a range of translation services to assist, should a claimant need support to overcome any language barriers.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Universal Credit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what plans her Department has to increase the number of languages available on the the universal credit online portal.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 28 December 2018

There are not currently any plans to increase the number of languages available on the online portal above English and Welsh.

When we need to communicate with a claimant who cannot communicate adequately in English or Welsh we use interpreters: this can be a customer’s own interpreter; a local community based interpreting service; a telephone interpretation service or a contracted face to face interpretation service.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Department for Education
Apprentices: Photography
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to increase promote photography apprenticeships.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 21 December 2018

To promote apprenticeships across all sectors, we are first and foremost ensuring that apprenticeships are a quality product recognised by individuals and employers. Our communications campaign aims to help increase the number of vacancies created by employers and to encourage young people to choose an apprenticeship as a high quality career route, signposting them to new vacancies on offer. We target potential apprentices, employers, parents and teachers using channels such as video adverts for TV, cinema and online channels, a national billboard campaign, digital advertising and social media, as well as through face-to-face engagement activities and events. Our communication continues to support employers to create new vacancies and to publicise them on the Find An Apprenticeship website.

New apprenticeship standards across all levels are being designed and driven by industry; creating higher quality training that will lead to a more skilled and productive economy. All starts will be on the new, high quality standards by the beginning of the 2020-21 academic year.

A level 3 Photographic Assistant standard is currently in development. Employers involved in creating the standard include Defence School of Photography, ScreenSkills, Creative Pioneers and Warwickshire College.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Department for Education
Apprentices: Photography
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what estimate his Department has made of the number of photography apprenticeships.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 21 December 2018

​​There is no apprenticeship framework or standard called ‘photography’. The most relevant framework found was the ‘Photo imaging for Staff Photographers’ framework which is the only apprenticeship framework or standard to contain ‘photo’ or ‘image’ in its title. There were no starts on this framework in the 2017/18 academic year compared to 20 in each of the previous two academic years (2016/17 and 2015/16).

The table below shows apprenticeship starts in the Arts, Media and Publishing sector subject area, along with further subject area breakdowns for the 2017/18 academic year. This sector is most likely to contain frameworks or standards with an element of photography within them. The data is taken from the Individualised Learner Record, available at: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/761151/Monthly-apprenticeship-starts_SSA-Fwk-Std-Age-Level-Fund_Nov2018.xlsx.

Apprenticeship starts in the 2017/18 academic year (August 2017 – July 2018) in the Arts, Media and Publishing sector subject area

Apprenticeship starts in 2017/18 (Aug 2017 – July 2018)

Total starts in Arts, Media and Publishing sector subject area

950

of which Crafts, Creative Arts and Design

380

of which Media and Communication

550

of which Performing Arts

-

of which Publishing and Information Services

20

Notes

  1. Data are based on full final year figures for the 2017/18 academic year (August 2017 to July 2018).

  1. ​Figures have been rounded to the nearest 10, ‘-’ indicates a value of less than 5 starts.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Department for Transport
Large Goods Vehicles
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department has plans to legalise longer heavier vehicles.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 20 December 2018

The Department has no plans to increase the maximum length or weight of vehicles allowed in general circulation. The Department is running a trial of longer semi-trailers, which have the same maximum weight as a standard articulated lorry, but are longer. The Department has published annual evaluations of the trial, most recently in September 2018.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 18 December 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Video Games: Prizes
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether his Department has plans to regulate paid-for random prizes in computer and video games.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 20 December 2018

We remain committed to ensuring that consumers are properly protected and not exploited by aggressive commercial practices. Game purchasers are protected by general consumer law such as the Consumer Protection from Unfair Trading Regulations 2008. This includes a requirement on businesses not to subject anyone to misleading or aggressive marketing practices, or, for example, direct exhortation to buy products, including in-game purchases of paid-for random prizes.

The Government is aware of concerns surrounding this issue and will continue to gather and look closely at any evidence. We also welcome the recent introduction by the VSC Ratings Board and PEGI of a new label for video games to warn parents where they include the opportunity to make in-game purchases.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Drugs: Festivals and Special Occasions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent steps his Department has taken to provide police forces with guidance on the legality of drug safety testing at music festivals.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 19 December 2018

Drugs are controlled where there is scientific and medical evidence that they are harmful to health and society. The possession of any amount of a controlled drug is a criminal offence and the supply of a controlled drug is an even more serious offence. No illegal drug-taking can be assumed to be safe and there is no safe way to take them.

The Government’s approach remains clear: we must prevent illicit drug use in our communities and help those dependent on drugs to recover while ensuring our drug laws are enforced. In relation to drug testing at events, chief constables are responsible for operational decisions in their local area and we are not standing in their way.

The National Policing Lead for Drugs provided updated advice in the summer to all Chief Constables to make them aware of matters that they should consider if working with event organisers who may wish to use drug testing services. He is currently considering this issue further in conjunction with forces and will produce further advice for police forces in the spring.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Detainees: Medical Examinations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people were referred for assessment under Rule 35 of the Detention Centre Rules 2001 in each month of 2018 up to 2 July 2018.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 19 December 2018

The Home Office do not hold central records of the number of individuals in Immigration detention that are referred for, or that self-refer for Rule 35 assessments.

Medical records for individuals in Immigration detention are confidential and are not routinely shared with the Home Office unless the individual has consented to share this information. This includes appointments and assessments with a medical practitioner. Notification of Rule 35 assessments, which are carried out by Doctors, are therefore not routinely shared with the Home Office.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 reports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001. This information is published quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018.

Grouped Questions: 201161
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Detainees: Medical Examinations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people have been referred for assessment under Rule 35 of the Detention Centre Rules 2001 in each month in 2018 since 2 July 2018.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 19 December 2018

The Home Office do not hold central records of the number of individuals in Immigration detention that are referred for, or that self-refer for Rule 35 assessments.

Medical records for individuals in Immigration detention are confidential and are not routinely shared with the Home Office unless the individual has consented to share this information. This includes appointments and assessments with a medical practitioner. Notification of Rule 35 assessments, which are carried out by Doctors, are therefore not routinely shared with the Home Office.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 reports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001. This information is published quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018.

Grouped Questions: 201160
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Detainees: Medical Examinations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people referred for assessment under Rule 35 of Detention Centre Rules 2001 during each of the first six months in 2018 were identified as victims of torture by a Rule 35 report.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 19 December 2018

The Home Office do not hold central records of the number of individuals in Immigration detention that are referred for, or that self-refer for Rule 35 assessments. Medical records for individuals in Immigration detention are confidential and are not routinely shared with the Home Office unless the individual has consented to share this information. This includes appointments and assessments with a medical practitioner. Notification of Rule 35 assessments, which are carried out by Doctors, are therefore not routinely shared with the Home Office.

The Home Office also do not hold central records which make the distinc-tion between those accepted/not accepted as being victims of torture within the Rule 35 process under the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

We therefore cannot currently report on the number of individuals referred for a Rule 35 assessment that were identified as victims of torture, or the number of individuals identified as victims of torture that were released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report without reviewing individual cases. In any event, it cannot be said that those released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report were released solely because of a claim of torture.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 re-ports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001 and the number of those who were released as a result. This information is pub-lished quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018.

Grouped Questions: 201221 | 201222 | 201223
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Detainees: Medical Examinations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people identified as a victim of torture by a Rule 35 report were subsequently released within 28 days of that report being made in each of the first six months of 2018.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 19 December 2018

The Home Office do not hold central records of the number of individuals in Immigration detention that are referred for, or that self-refer for Rule 35 assessments. Medical records for individuals in Immigration detention are confidential and are not routinely shared with the Home Office unless the individual has consented to share this information. This includes appointments and assessments with a medical practitioner. Notification of Rule 35 assessments, which are carried out by Doctors, are therefore not routinely shared with the Home Office.

The Home Office also do not hold central records which make the distinc-tion between those accepted/not accepted as being victims of torture within the Rule 35 process under the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

We therefore cannot currently report on the number of individuals referred for a Rule 35 assessment that were identified as victims of torture, or the number of individuals identified as victims of torture that were released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report without reviewing individual cases. In any event, it cannot be said that those released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report were released solely because of a claim of torture.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 re-ports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001 and the number of those who were released as a result. This information is pub-lished quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018.

Grouped Questions: 201220 | 201222 | 201223
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Detainees: Medical Examinations
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people referred for assessment under Rule 35 of the Detention Centre Rules 2001 as amended by Detention Centre Rules (Amendment) 2018 were identified as being victims of torture in each month since 2 July 2018.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 19 December 2018

The Home Office do not hold central records of the number of individuals in Immigration detention that are referred for, or that self-refer for Rule 35 assessments. Medical records for individuals in Immigration detention are confidential and are not routinely shared with the Home Office unless the individual has consented to share this information. This includes appointments and assessments with a medical practitioner. Notification of Rule 35 assessments, which are carried out by Doctors, are therefore not routinely shared with the Home Office.

The Home Office also do not hold central records which make the distinc-tion between those accepted/not accepted as being victims of torture within the Rule 35 process under the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

We therefore cannot currently report on the number of individuals referred for a Rule 35 assessment that were identified as victims of torture, or the number of individuals identified as victims of torture that were released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report without reviewing individual cases. In any event, it cannot be said that those released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report were released solely because of a claim of torture.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 re-ports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001 and the number of those who were released as a result. This information is pub-lished quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018.

Grouped Questions: 201220 | 201221 | 201223
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Immigrants: Detainees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people in immigration detention identified as a victim of torture by an assessment under Rule 35 of Detention Centre Rules 2001 as amended by the Detention Centre Rules (Amendment) 2018 were subsequently released within 28 days of the Rule 35 report being made in each month since 2 July 2018.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 19 December 2018

The Home Office do not hold central records of the number of individuals in Immigration detention that are referred for, or that self-refer for Rule 35 assessments. Medical records for individuals in Immigration detention are confidential and are not routinely shared with the Home Office unless the individual has consented to share this information. This includes appointments and assessments with a medical practitioner. Notification of Rule 35 assessments, which are carried out by Doctors, are therefore not routinely shared with the Home Office.

The Home Office also do not hold central records which make the distinc-tion between those accepted/not accepted as being victims of torture within the Rule 35 process under the Detention Centre Rules 2001.

We therefore cannot currently report on the number of individuals referred for a Rule 35 assessment that were identified as victims of torture, or the number of individuals identified as victims of torture that were released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report without reviewing individual cases. In any event, it cannot be said that those released within 28 days of a Rule 35 report were released solely because of a claim of torture.

The Home Office do however, centrally record the number of Rule 35 re-ports raised by Doctors under the Detention Centre Rules 2001 and the number of those who were released as a result. This information is pub-lished quarterly in Immigration Enforcement Transparency data found at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/immigration-enforcement-data-november-2018.

Grouped Questions: 201220 | 201221 | 201222
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Home Office
Immigrants: Detainees
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans he has to assess the effect of the Detention Centre Rules (Amendment) 2018 on victims of torture in immigration detention centres.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 19 December 2018

The Home Office keeps its policies and processes relating to immigration detention and the detention of vulnerable persons under regular review to ensure they are both appropriate and effective.

As part of the Government’s response to Stephen Shaw’s review into the welfare of vulnerable people in detention, the Home Office is looking at improvements to the rule 35 consideration process to ensure that the most vulnerable and complex cases get the attention they need, while preventing abuse of this important safeguard.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Access to Work Programme: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Access to Work Hidden Impairment Specialist Team in (a) advising employers on supporting employees diagnosed with autism, (b) offering autistic people an assessment of their needs at work and (c) helping to develop support plans for those people.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 18 December 2018

Last year, the Access to Work Hidden Impairment Specialist team helped 2,150 people, which includes people with Autism. This number has been continually increasing since the team was introduced in 2014/2015, when 1,160 people were helped.

People with hidden impairments are offered an Access to Work holistic workplace assessment to identify the type of help they require in the workplace. Following this assessment, the Access to Work adviser will work with both the employer and customer to develop support plans where appropriate

In November, we published Access to Work: Qualitative research with applicants, employers and delivery staff, which found that workplace assessment experiences tended to be very positive. Although we don’t have separate findings for autistic people, employers and applicants felt that assessments were comprehensive and appropriate, and conducted sensitively. Many applicants talked about how the recommendations and advice given during the assessment alone had enlightened them about the support available for their condition and small changes they could make in the workplace which went a long way in improving their workplace experience. Applicants that were previously too nervous to ask their employer for (even ‘light touch’) adjustments felt the expert ‘stamp of approval’ via the assessment helped them to approach their employer and empowered them to ask for changes.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 11 December 2018
Department for Transport
Taxis: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, with reference to the report entitled Taxi and private hire vehicle licensing: recommendations for a safer and more robust system, published on gov.uk on 24 September 2018, what the timetable is for implementing the recommendations of that report.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 18 December 2018

Ministers are considering the recommendations made by the Chair of the Task and Finish Group on Taxi and Private Hire Vehicle Licensing. A Government response will be issued in due course.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 December 2018
Department for Education
Schools: Finance
Commons
What assessment he has made of the sustainability of the current level of funding for schools.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 17 December 2018

With the additional £1.3 billion the Government has invested across this year and next, the core schools and high needs budget will increase from almost £41 billion in 2017-18 to £43.5 billion by 2019-20. The Government is committed to securing the right deal for education in the upcoming Spending Review.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 22 November 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 9 July 2018 to Question 159646 on Energy: Housing, how many applications for feed-in tariffs were (a) made and (b) approved for of properties with an energy performance certificate of D and above between June 2016 and June 2017.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 03 December 2018

The central Feed-In Tariffs (FIT) register does not record the number of applications made. Between 1 June 2016 and 31 May 2017 there were 17,132 installations with an energy performance certificate of D and above accredited under the scheme.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 22 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Public Health: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much funding has been allocated to local authorities for the local authority public health grant in each year between 2014 and 2020.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 30 November 2018

The information requested is shown in the following table.

Year

Public Health Grant Allocation (£ billion)

2013/14

2.663

2014/15

2.795

2015/161

3.031

2016/17

3.387

2017/182

3.304

2018/19

3.219

Notes:

1Funding public health services for children aged 0-5 was transferred from the NHS to local authorities from October 2015.

2Includes funding retained by the Greater Manchester local authority as part of a business rate retention pilot not allocated as grant.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 22 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Legal Aid Scheme: Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, if he will make an assessment of the effect of the Legal Aid Scheme on the right to a family life for people seeking asylum.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 30 November 2018

Legal aid has always been and will continue to be available for asylum cases. For matters not within the scope of scheme, Exceptional Case Funding (ECF) may be available where there is a breach or risk of breach of ECHR rights, subject to means and merits tests.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Fracking: Carbon Emissions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment he has made of the potential effect on the level of UK carbon emissions of fugitive emissions from fracking.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 29 November 2018

Management of fugitive emissions is covered by the Environment Agency permit. As part of the permit application, the operator will need to describe the management of fugitive emissions in an ‘emissions management plan’.

During operations the operator will be required to undertake environmental monitoring, including emissions monitoring, to demonstrate compliance with their permits. In some cases, depending on the risks presented by a site or community concerns, the Environment Agency may carry out extra monitoring themselves.

As a further safeguard, the Infrastructure Act 2015 makes it clear that hydraulic fracturing activities cannot take place unless appropriate arrangements have been made for monitoring emissions of methane into the air.

In addition, the Government is grant funding an environmental monitoring programme led by the British Geological Survey (BGS) in the Fylde (Lancashire) and Kirby Misperton (North Yorkshire), where applications for shale gas wells have been made.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 22 November 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, pursuant to the Answer of 9 July 2018 to Question 159646 on Energy: Housing, how many applications for feed-in tariffs were (a) made and (b) approved in respect of properties with an energy performance certificate of D and above between June 2015 and June 2016.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 29 November 2018

The central Feed-In Tariffs (FIT) register does not record the number of applications made. Between 1 June 2015 and 31 May 2016 there were 140,014 installations with an energy performance certificate of D and above accredited under the scheme.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Energy Performance Certificates
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many houses in the UK have an energy performance certificate of (a) E or lower and (b) D or higher.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 28 November 2018

At the end of September 2018, the number of houses in England and Wales which had a valid energy performance certificate (EPC) rated at E or lower was 3,177,158 and D or higher was 8,169,369. Additionally, other types of domestic dwellings, including flats, bungalows and maisonettes, which had a valid EPC rated at E or lower was 1,229,051 and D or higher was 5,584,059.

This information is available at: https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-performance-of-buildings-certificates

EPCs for domestic dwellings in Scotland and Northern Ireland are a devolved matter.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Transport
Severn Beach Railway Line: Electrification
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of the electrification of the Severn Beach line.
A
Answered by: Andrew Jones
Answered on: 28 November 2018

Network Rail have not currently considered electrification of the line. However, the upgrade work from Dr Days Junction to Filton Abbey Wood, recently completed successfully, will directly benefit the service on the Severn Beach line. In particular, the separation of local stopping services from the faster Intercity trains will relieve a bottleneck outside Bristol Temple Meads.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Climate Change: EU Action
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether the Government plans to maintain alignment with EU climate change policy after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 28 November 2018

UK government’s action to tackle climate change is framed by the Climate Change Act. This is domestic legislation and is therefore unaffected by exiting the EU.

The UK is committed to international cooperation, including with the EU, on issues of shared interest including climate change.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Public Health: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what the percentage change has been in (a) total funding for NHS England and (b) the local authority public health grant in each year since 2014.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 28 November 2018

The local authority public health grant provides funding for health services delivered through local authorities. However it is not the entirety of the funding nor spend for public health services. For example, in addition to the grant there is circa £1.2 billion ringfenced for NHS national public health services within the NHS mandate figures, as well as other Departmental expenditure on vaccines and on grant in aid to Public Health England.

The following table shows the percentage change in total funding for NHS England and the local authority public health grant in each year since 2014:

NHS England funding increase %

Public health grant increase %

2014-15

3.6%

5.0%

2015-16

3.3%

24%*

2016-17

5.4%

-2.2%

2017-18

3.6%

-2.5%**

2018-19

4.6%

-2.6%


Notes:

* End year allocation for 2015-16 including the transfer in October 2015 of funding from NHS England to local authorities for commissioning services for children aged 0 - 5.

** Figures from 2017-18 includes funding retained by 10 Greater Manchester local authorities as part of a business rate pilot, not allocated via a grant.

The total Department of Health and Social Care Departmental Expenditure Limit for 2018-19 was £128.4 billion. 2.5 % was allocated to the local authority public health grant in 2018-19.

Grouped Questions: 193487
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Public Health: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what proportion of the health and social care budget was allocated to the local authority public health grant in 2018-19.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 28 November 2018

The local authority public health grant provides funding for health services delivered through local authorities. However it is not the entirety of the funding nor spend for public health services. For example, in addition to the grant there is circa £1.2 billion ringfenced for NHS national public health services within the NHS mandate figures, as well as other Departmental expenditure on vaccines and on grant in aid to Public Health England.

The following table shows the percentage change in total funding for NHS England and the local authority public health grant in each year since 2014:

NHS England funding increase %

Public health grant increase %

2014-15

3.6%

5.0%

2015-16

3.3%

24%*

2016-17

5.4%

-2.2%

2017-18

3.6%

-2.5%**

2018-19

4.6%

-2.6%


Notes:

* End year allocation for 2015-16 including the transfer in October 2015 of funding from NHS England to local authorities for commissioning services for children aged 0 - 5.

** Figures from 2017-18 includes funding retained by 10 Greater Manchester local authorities as part of a business rate pilot, not allocated via a grant.

The total Department of Health and Social Care Departmental Expenditure Limit for 2018-19 was £128.4 billion. 2.5 % was allocated to the local authority public health grant in 2018-19.

Grouped Questions: 193486
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the Disability Confident scheme on the gap between the number of people in employment (a) with autism and (b) in the general population.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 28 November 2018

We have not made any assessment of Disability Confident on the autism employment gap.

Disability Confident promotes to employers the many benefits of employing disabled people, including individuals with Autism and Neuro-diverse conditions. The scheme provides free information, advice and guidance to help them to do this. Over 10,000 businesses have signed up to the disability Confident scheme since it was launched in November 2016.

The Disability Confident Autism and Neurodiversity Toolkit was developed with support from disabled people with neuro-diverse conditions, medical professionals and disability organisations such as Autism Alliance UK and Autism Plus. It is designed to help to raise awareness and understanding, within DWP and across the wider Civil Service, about Autism Spectrum Disorders and neuro-diverse conditions.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to increase the rate of retention in employment of people with autism.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 28 November 2018

The Government is strongly committed to increasing employment opportunities for disabled people, including those with autism, and improving employment retention rates. We are working across Government and with local authorities, voluntary organisations and employers in the public and private sectors to achieve this. Help and support for people with autism includes:

  • Disability Confident scheme, through which DWP is engaging with employers and helping to promote the skills, talents and abilities of people with autism and associated hidden impairment conditions. Disability Confident offers advice and support, to help employers feel more confident about employing disabled people. Over 10,000 businesses have signed up to the disability Confident scheme since it was launched in November 2016

  • Access to Work, which has a Hidden Impairment Specialist Team that gives advice and guidance to help employers support employees with conditions such as Autism, Learning Disability and/or Mental Health conditions. It also offers eligible people an assessment to find out their needs at work and help to develop a support plan.
  • The Disability Passport ‘About Me’ which aims to encourage disabled claimants, including individuals with autism, to disclose their disability/ health conditions at the earliest stage to their Adviser, to improve communication and ensure reasonable adjustments are put in place. The passport is hosted on Autism Alliance’s website.

The Civil Service has committed to support the Autism Exchange Programme, and my Department is working with Ambitious about Autism to provide work placement opportunities for young people.

The number of working age disabled people in employment in the UK reached around 3.9 million in Q3 2018. This was an increase of 123,000 since Q3 2017, and an overall increase of 973,000 since Q3 2013, the earliest comparable figure.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the steps that her Department has taken to provide employers with the opportunity to acquire the skills and knowledge necessary to employ people with autism.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 28 November 2018

The Government is strongly committed to working with employers to improve their approach to employing disabled people, including those with autism. For example:

  • The Disability Confident scheme is engaging with employers, offering advice and support to help employers feel more confident about employing disabled people. Over 10,000 businesses have signed up to the Disability Confident scheme since it was launched in November 2016

  • Access to Work has a Hidden Impairment Specialist Team that gives advice and guidance to help employers support employees with conditions such as Autism, Learning Disability and/or Mental Health conditions. It also offers eligible people an assessment to find out their needs at work and help to develop a support plan.

  • The Disability Passport ‘About Me’ aims to encourage disabled claimants, including individuals with autism, to disclose their disability/ health conditions at the earliest stage to their Adviser, to improve communication and ensure reasonable adjustments are put in place. The passport is hosted on Autism Alliance’s website.

  • The Disability Confident Autism and Neurodiversity Toolkit was developed with support from disabled people with neuro-diverse conditions, medical professionals and disability organisations such as Autism Alliance UK and Autism Plus. It is designed to help to raise awareness and understanding, within DWP and across the wider Civil Service, about Autism Spectrum Disorders and neuro-diverse conditions.

We have not made any assessment of the effect of these policies and initiatives on employers’ skills and knowledge in respect of employing people with autism in particular.

Overall, the number of working age disabled people in employment in the UK reached around 3.9 million in Q3 2018. This was an increase of 123,000 since Q3 2017, and an overall increase of 973,000 since Q3 2013, the earliest comparable figure.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment Schemes: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effectiveness of the Work Choice support programme in helping autistic people to (a) find, (b) keep and (c) make progress in a job.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 28 November 2018

Work Choice was designed to help individuals whose needs cannot be met through other DWP employment programmes and who need more specialised support to find employment or to keep a job once they have started work. Work Choice referrals have now ended in all parts of England and Wales, and service delivery will end by 31 March 2019. The Work & Health Programme, which rolled out in England and Wales between November 2017 and March 2018, builds on lessons learnt from both Work Choice and the Work Programme.

Work Choice performance data allows us to monitor both short job outcomes (employment lasting at least 13 weeks) and sustained job outcomes (employment lasting at least 26 weeks) where the tailored support assists participants in achieving these. Work Choice official statistics are published here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/work-choice-referrals-starts-and-job-outcomes-to-june-2018.

Since 25th October 2015, Work Choice participants could voluntarily declare to their Work Coach that they had an Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), to allow providers to recognise their support requirements. A declaration of autism was recorded separately from individuals’ primary health condition. As these declarations are voluntary, we cannot be sure that they account for all Work Choice participants with ASD.

For participants who have declared this information, the below data table shows the number of starts per year and the proportion of these starts that have since achieved a short job outcome (employment lasting at least 13 weeks) and a sustained job outcome (employment lasting at least 26 weeks). These data are a subset of the official Work Choice statistics.

Individuals who declared autism

Number of starts

Of which have achieved a short job outcome

Of which have achieved a sustained job outcome

Latest year available:

Jul-17 to Jun-18 (for starts)

670

Jul-16 to Jun-17 (for short job outcomes)

1,120

430

38%

Jul-15 to Jun-16 (for sustained)

530

140

26%

Financial years:

2015/16 (Nov to Mar)

290

120

44%

80

27%

2016/17

1,090

420

38%

2017/18

940

Source: Provider Referrals and Payments system (PRaP)

Notes:

- Work Choice performance data for a particular cohort of starts are only comparable once we have given sufficient time from the end of that period for all of the starts to have received the tailored support from the programme and to have achieved the job outcomes. This means that the latest available data for numbers of starts is July 2017 to June 2018, for short job outcome rates is July 2016 to June 2017, and for sustained job outcome rates is July 2015 to June 2016.

- The definition of short job outcomes changed slightly in November 2015. Therefore, short job outcome rates are not available for the July 2015 to June 2016 cohort and for the 2015/16 financial year they are only available from November 2015 to March 2016.

- Figures are rounded to the nearest ten.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment Schemes: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect of the Specialist Employability Support programme on the employment outcomes of autistic people.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 28 November 2018

Specialist Employability Support (SES) is a pan-disability employment programme providing specialist personalised employment support for around 1,700 participants with complex barriers to employment, including Autism Spectrum Disorders, each year. Individuals with autism may request that specific referral opportunities are used for their referral to SES, to allow providers to recognise their support requirements.

The Government confirmed in ‘Improving Lives, The Future of Work, Health and Disability’, published in December 2017, that it is currently exploring the best policy options for continuing to support those with greatest needs and most complex situations, once the SES contracts come to an end.

We have not made any formal assessment of SES programme including on the employment outcomes of autistic people but we continue to gather information and evidence including lessons learnt for developing our future support.

DWP has recently completed negotiations with SES providers to extend referrals to the programme to end 2019 to ensure continuous provision for this customer group whilst future support is put in place.

The number of working age disabled people in employment in the UK reached around 3.9 million in Q3 2018. This was an increase of 123,000 since Q3 2017, and an overall increase of 973,000 since Q3 2013, the earliest comparable figure.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment Schemes: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to help young people diagnosed with autism into work in (a) Bristol and (b) the UK.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 28 November 2018

Jobcentre Plus partnership managers work with a range of organisations across Bristol to ensure we can hear the voice of the customer and to work collaboratively to address and remove barriers to employment.

Throughout the country, Jobcentre Plus Work Coaches offer people with disabilities and health conditions, including autism, tailored support to reduce barriers to work and help them into work. Work Coaches are trained in dealing with customers with a range of conditions, including autism, and have access to a range of resources, including an autism learning toolkit, free online courses, training for managers, guidance on reasonable adjustments, and employer guides. Work Coaches are supported by Disability Employment Advisers and DWP Work Psychologists, who can also directly support customers, and advised by Community Partners, who have a lived experience or expert knowledge of disability.

Nationally, there is a range of support available for young people with autism, including:

  • The Work and Health Programme, which offers a personalised local approach to supporting people, overcome barriers to employment, by targeting specialist support to those who are likely to be able to find work within 12 months.

  • Access to Work, which has a Hidden Impairment Specialist Team offers advice and guidance to help employers support employees with conditions such as Autism, Learning Disability and/or Mental Health conditions.

  • Young people who start a work placement with an employer as part of the Department for Education supported internship programme or a Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy traineeship are eligible to apply for Access to Work support for the period of the work placement. Supported internships are for young people aged 16—24 with learning difficulties or learning disabilities, who want to get a job and need extra support to do this.

  • The Disability Confident scheme, though which DWP is engaging with employers and helping to promote the skills, talents and abilities of people with autism and associated conditions. Over 10,000 businesses have signed up to Disability Confident since it was launched in November 2016.

  • The Disability Passport ‘About Me’, developed to encourage disabled claimants, including individuals with autism, to disclose their disability/ health conditions at the earliest stage to their Adviser, to improve communication and ensure reasonable adjustments are put in place. The passport was launched in March 2017 and is hosted on Autism Alliance’s website

  • The Local Supported Employment Proof of Concept, which is being delivered with nine local authorities and will support those with a learning disability or autism who are known to adult social care, or those in contact with secondary mental health services.

We are also improving access to apprenticeships for people with learning disabilities and difficulties. For example, the government has introduced legislation which adjusts the minimum English and Maths requirements for apprenticeships for people with a learning difficulty or disability to entry Level 3. This change allows more people to benefit from the opportunities available through apprenticeships and work.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Home Office
Asylum: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what plans he has to review the restriction on the ability of unaccompanied asylum-seeking children to sponsor the visas of adult relatives for the purposes of family reunion.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 28 November 2018

There is currently no provision in the Immigration Rules for children with refugee status in the UK to sponsor family members to join them. Allowing children to sponsor parents risks creating further incentives for more children to be encouraged, or even forced, to leave their family and risk hazardous journeys to the UK to sponsor relatives. This plays into the hands of criminal gangs who exploit vulnerable people and goes against our safeguarding responsibilities.

The Government believes the best interests of children is reflected in staying with their families, claiming asylum in the first safe country they reach – that is the fastest route to safety – and relying on safe and legal routes under the Immigration Rules or through resettlement schemes.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Home Office
Asylum: Employment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what assessment he has made of the effect of the restriction on asylum seekers' right to work on dependent children during the 12-month waiting period.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 27 November 2018

The UK has a proud history of providing protection to those who need it and this Government is committed to delivering a fair and humane asylum system.

Whilst the Government has not made such an assessment, our current policy is consistent with EU law and permits asylum seekers to work, in jobs on the Shortage Occupation List, if they have been waiting for a decision on their claim for 12 months or more and the delay is through no fault of their own. We are tackling delays in decision-making and have plans in place to improve the speed at which outstanding claims are decided.

The Government is considering recent calls to change the policy. However, our current approach aims to protect the resident labour market so that any employment meets our needs for skilled labour and distinguishes between those who need protection and those who want to work in the UK, who can apply for a work visa under the Immigration Rules. We need to avoid creating further incentives for migrants, particularly children or those with children, to come here illegally, risking their lives in the process, instead of claiming asylum in the first safe country they reach.

It is also important to focus on providing support for those who are recognised as refugees, to help them to integrate and find employment, so that they can rebuild their lives here.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment she has made of the effect on the autism employment gap of the Access to Work scheme.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 27 November 2018

We have made no assessment of the effect of Access to Work on the employment rate of people with autism.

Data on people with Autism Spectrum Disorders is not routinely disaggregated within Access to Work statistics. The primary medical condition categories used in Access to Work are consistent with the categories used in the Labour Force Survey. This is so we can compare our data to the disability employment rate.

When a person with autism applies to Access to Work for support, it will be for particular conditions, such as difficulty in speaking, learning difficulties, etc., rather than ‘autism’.

This will be recorded as the individual’s primary medical condition in the Access to Work database, even if it’s linked to their autism

Access to Work has a specialist Hidden Impairments team who receive upskilling and awareness from organisations who have expertise of autism to ensure that advisors have a broad understanding of the barriers individuals with autism face.

The official statistics published on 30th October 2018 provide the latest information on the Access to Work scheme, including breakdowns by customer characteristics such as primary medical condition. They may be accessed here: https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/access-to-work-statistics-april-2007-to-march-2018

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 November 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment: Autism
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what assessment has she made of the effect on the autism employment gap of the Disability Confident Autism and Neurodiversity Toolkit.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 27 November 2018

We have not made any assessment of the effect the Disability Confident Autism and Neurodiversity Toolkit has had on the autism employment gap.

The toolkit was developed with support from disabled people with neuro-diverse conditions, medical professionals and disability organisations such as Autism Alliance UK and Autism Plus. It is designed to help to raise awareness and understanding, within DWP and across the wider Civil Service, about Autism Spectrum Disorders and neuro-diverse conditions.

Disability Confident promotes the many benefits of employing disabled people including individuals with autism and neuro-diverse conditions. The scheme provides free information, advice and guidance for employers.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 09 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Antibiotics: Drug Resistance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to paragraph 6.10 of the UK Five Year Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy 2013 to 2018, published in September 2013, when he plans to publish the evaluation report.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 20 November 2018

The United Kingdom Five Year Antimicrobial Resistance Strategy (2013-18) contained a commitment to assess the effectiveness of its implementation plan at the end of the five-year period. The Department commissioned the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine to undertake a full evaluation of the strategy’s implementation.

The evaluation is nearing completion. A final draft report will be submitted to the Department shortly and will be sent out for independent peer-review. The completed report will be put in the public domain next year.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 05 November 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Democratic Republic of Congo: Torture
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions he has had with the Government of the Democratic Republic of Congo on the the use of torture in that country.
A
Answered by: Harriett Baldwin
Answered on: 14 November 2018

The Foreign Secretary met Foreign Minister Okitundu in October. I met with him during the United Nations General Assembly in September and with a range of government contacts when I visited the DRC in April. We made clear that we have zero tolerance for any human rights abuses or violations of international humanitarian law. The UK played a key role at the June 2018 Human Rights Council, which mandated the UN Joint Human Rights Office to document and profile human rights violations in DRC.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 05 November 2018
Department for Transport
Bus Services: Concessions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, what research his Department has undertaken on the effect of recent reductions to funding for concessionary bus passes on adults with (a) learning difficulties and (b) autism.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 13 November 2018

Funding to local authorities for concessionary travel is not provided in isolation, but as part of their Local Government Finance Settlement. This Formula Grant funding is not ring-fenced, which enables authorities to make spending decisions that more closely match local needs and circumstances.

Eligibility for the statutory concession on medical grounds is assessed by local authorities on a case by case basis, using the seven criteria set down in legislation and supported by the Department’s published guidance.

Local authorities also have the powers to offer concessions over and above the statutory minimum, for instance by extending the concession to residents who may not qualify under the statutory criteria.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Children: Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the level of successful collections of child maintenance for (a) employed payees and (b) self employed payees.
A
Corrected answer by: Justin Tomlinson
Corrected on: 12 November 2018
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 16 October 2018.
The correct answer should have been:

The Child Maintenance Service includes two service types: ‘Direct Pay’ where payments are arranged and agreed between parents, and ‘Collect & Pay’ where payments are collected and paid to the receiving parent by Child Maintenance Service.

The Department does not record data for direct pay compliance. If the paying parent does notdon't pay they can be moved onto the Collect and Pay at the discretion of the child maintenance service. The department does hold data on the compliance of Collect and Pay arrangements. Please refer to Table 7 of the Child Maintenance Service Statistics.

Data on compliance is recorded separately to data on employment status and cannot be easily linked. The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost. Although the department does hold some of the data to answer your question we estimate the cost of complying with your request would exceed the appropriate limit for central government, set by regulation at £600.This represents the estimated cost of one person spending 3 and half working days in determining whether the department holds the information, locating, retrieving and extracting it. We believe it would take longer than 3 and half days to match the compliance of a paying parent with their employment status. As a result, under section 12 of the Freedom of information Act the department is not therefore obliged to comply with your request and we will not be processing it further.

The Child Maintenance Service Statistics which shows overall compliance can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-maintenance-service-august-2013-to-june-2018-experimental

A
Answered by: Justin Tomlinson
Answered on: 16 October 2018

The Child Maintenance Service includes two service types: ‘Direct Pay’ where payments are arranged and agreed between parents, and ‘Collect & Pay’ where payments are collected and paid to the receiving parent by Child Maintenance Service.

The Department does not record data for direct pay compliance. If the paying parent does notdon't pay they can be moved onto the Collect and Pay at the discretion of the child maintenance service. The department does hold data on the compliance of Collect and Pay arrangements. Please refer to Table 7 of the Child Maintenance Service Statistics.

Data on compliance is recorded separately to data on employment status and cannot be easily linked. The information requested is not readily available and to provide it would incur disproportionate cost. Although the department does hold some of the data to answer your question we estimate the cost of complying with your request would exceed the appropriate limit for central government, set by regulation at £600.This represents the estimated cost of one person spending 3 and half working days in determining whether the department holds the information, locating, retrieving and extracting it. We believe it would take longer than 3 and half days to match the compliance of a paying parent with their employment status. As a result, under section 12 of the Freedom of information Act the department is not therefore obliged to comply with your request and we will not be processing it further.

The Child Maintenance Service Statistics which shows overall compliance can be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-maintenance-service-august-2013-to-june-2018-experimental

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 29 October 2018
Home Office
Refugees: Families
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to his Oral contribution of 25 October 2015 on Immigration: DNA Tests, Official Report, column 467. whether he plans to reinstate funding for DNA tests in refugee family reunion applications.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 06 November 2018

Those applying for refugee family reunion are not required to provide DNA evidence to prove their family relationship and can rely on other evidence to support their application. However, if they wish to do so, they can voluntarily provide DNA evidence at their own expense and this will be considered alongside all other supporting evidence provided.

Our guidance on considering family reunion applications highlights the challenges that applicants may face in obtaining documents to support their application and makes clear the types of evidence that can be provided. This is available on Gov.UK at: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/family-reunion-instruction.

We have no current plans to change the policy, but we will keep our approach to DNA evidence in refugee family reunion cases under review.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in the UK are in Energy Performance Band E or lower.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 17 October 2018

Latest figures for the number of homes (thousands) in Energy Performance Band D or higher and Band E or lower for England and the Devolved Nations.

England (2016)

Scotland (2016)

Northern Ireland (2016)

Wales (2008)

Band D or higher (thousands)

18,290

2,031

643

558

Band E or lower (thousands)

4,707

422

99

711

Total number of homes (thousands)

22,996

2,452

742

1,268

Figures may not sum to totals due to rounding

Please note, these figures should not be summed to give a UK total, or compared between nations due to the following differences:

(1) The latest data available for Wales is from 2008, 2016 data will be published in November 2018.

(2) Figures for Wales relate to number of dwellings (which includes vacant properties) whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland relate to number of households (excluding vacant properties).

(3) Each nation uses a different methodology for calculating Energy Performance. The main difference being Welsh figures are based on SAP 2005, whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland are based on SAP 2012.

Data sources

MHCLG. (2016). English Housing Survey.

Scottish Government. (2016). Scottish House Condition Survey.

Housing Executive. (2016). Northern Ireland House Condition Survey.

Welsh Government. (2008). Living in Wales Survey.

Grouped Questions: 176378
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in the UK are in Energy Performance Band D or higher.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 17 October 2018

Latest figures for the number of homes (thousands) in Energy Performance Band D or higher and Band E or lower for England and the Devolved Nations.

England (2016)

Scotland (2016)

Northern Ireland (2016)

Wales (2008)

Band D or higher (thousands)

18,290

2,031

643

558

Band E or lower (thousands)

4,707

422

99

711

Total number of homes (thousands)

22,996

2,452

742

1,268

Figures may not sum to totals due to rounding

Please note, these figures should not be summed to give a UK total, or compared between nations due to the following differences:

(1) The latest data available for Wales is from 2008, 2016 data will be published in November 2018.

(2) Figures for Wales relate to number of dwellings (which includes vacant properties) whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland relate to number of households (excluding vacant properties).

(3) Each nation uses a different methodology for calculating Energy Performance. The main difference being Welsh figures are based on SAP 2005, whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland are based on SAP 2012.

Data sources

MHCLG. (2016). English Housing Survey.

Scottish Government. (2016). Scottish House Condition Survey.

Housing Executive. (2016). Northern Ireland House Condition Survey.

Welsh Government. (2008). Living in Wales Survey.

Grouped Questions: 176377
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Estate Agents: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to require property management companies to provide tenants with a detailed breakdown of service fees when in advance of increasing fees.
A
Answered by: Mrs Heather Wheeler
Answered on: 16 October 2018

We believe very strongly that service charges should be transparent, communicated effectively and that there should be a clear route to challenge or redress if things go wrong.

That is why on 12 October, we announced a property agent working group to consider options to raise standards across the property agent sector, including looking at how fees such as service charges should be presented to consumers and to explore the best means to challenge fees which are unjustified. The working group will be chaired by Lord Best, along with experts from across the property sector and will report back to Government in summer 2019.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Estate Agents: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of a legal requirement for property companies to provide (a) a breakdown of monies requested from companies operating from their properties, and (b) receipts for expenditure.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 16 October 2018

The Government has no current plans to do so.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Home Office
Passports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he undertook an impact assessment of his decision not to carry over excess validity from previous passports; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 16 October 2018

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, passport holders would be considered third country nationals and would need to comply with different rules for travel in the Schengen Travel Area. These rules stipulate that passports over ten years old cannot be used for travel within the Area.

Some British passports are valid for more than ten years due to the carryover of validity from a previous passport. The UK was the last country in the world to carryover validity. International guidelines recommend that an adult passport should be valid for a maximum of ten years, and a child passport for a maximum of five years. In light of this, the impact of continuing to carryover validity was considered for all passport holders and was subsequently stopped on 10 September.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Property: Ownership
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of establishing a time limit for a property management company to issue a certificate of ownership to a new owner so that the new owner’s solicitor can register them as the legal owner with Land Registry; and if he will make a statement.
 
Withdrawn
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Voting Rights: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what voting rights EU nationals living in the UK will have after the UK has left the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 12 September 2018

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend, the Parliamentary Secretary at the Cabinet Office (Chloe Smith) on 28 March to Question 129820 to the hon. Member for Cambridge.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Refugees: Private Rented Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that refugees are not excluded from the private rented sector as a result of the introduction of the right to rent scheme.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The right to rent scheme has been developed to ensure that those with lawful immigration status, such as refugees, can demonstrate it easily. Refugees are issued with a Biometric Residence Permit which provides confirmation of their status. However, there is a broad range of documents that potential tenants can use to demonstrate their right to rent. These are not based solely around passports or immigration documents. Details of acceptable documents can be found at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/573057/6_1193_HO_NH_Right-to-Rent-Guidance.pdf

Landlords can also use the Home Office Checking Service where a prospective tenant is unable to present documents, because they have submitted them to the Home Office. This is a simple and efficient, case-specific service which can be accessed online, or via a dedicated helpline, to check whether a tenant or prospective tenant has a right to rent.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Visas: Africa
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what Key Performance Indicators his Department has put in place for the performance of commercial visa application centres in African countries.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The contract for providing Visa Application Centres in Africa was awarded to Teleperformance UK Ltd in 2014 initially for a five year period and extended recently for a further two years until 31 March 2021.

Seventeen critical and non-critical service levels are incorporated into the contract which provides provision of Visa Application Centres in Africa.

The service levels are intended to measure whether the supplier is meeting the levels of performance necessary to satisfy the Home Office’s business and regulatory requirements. The service levels are regularly reviewed between the supplier and the Home Office.

The contract awarded to Teleperformance for Visa Application Centres in Africa predates the launch of the current version of Contracts Finder though summary detail has been published for transparency purposes and can be found at

https://data.gov.uk/data/contracts-finder-archive/contract/1394970/

In complying with the Governments transparency agenda, the Home Office will be publishing a redacted version of the Teleperformance contract to Contracts Finder within the next 4 weeks. The detail of the service levels is contained within Schedule 7.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Treasury
Pensions
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the regulations that allow the transfer of a private pension scheme to a Qualifying Recognised Overseas Pension Scheme within the European Economic Area will be exempt from tax after the UK has left the EU.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The regulations that allow a tax-free transfer of a private pension scheme to a QROP within the EEA are domestic law which currently comply with EU fundamental freedoms. Whether or not these transfers will be exempt from the overseas transfer charge once the UK leaves the EU is dependent upon the terms of future exit agreement between the UK Government and the EU.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Pensions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has developed proposals for the free movement of capital with in relation to pensions for (a) UK citizens that have accrued pensions in the European Union and (b) for non-UK EU citizens that have accrued pensions in the UK after the UK has left the EU; and will she make a statement.
A
Answered by: Guy Opperman
Answered on: 11 September 2018

UK pensions legislation already ensures that any member of a UK pension scheme has a statutory right to transfer their pension, which includes the option to transfer to any overseas pension scheme where that scheme meets certain requirements. Equally, UK pensions legislation does not prohibit a UK pension scheme from receiving capital from overseas pension schemes.

The UK and EU have already agreed the terms of an implementation period lasting until the end of 2020. During this implementation period, access to one another’s markets will remain unchanged and on the current terms, ensuring continuity for consumers and businesses.

Under any other scenario to the rights of members of UK pension schemes to transfer their pension, will not be affected. Whether they are a UK citizen or a non-UK EU citizen, they will continue to be able to transfer their pensions to overseas pension schemes. Equally, UK pension schemes will continue to be able to receive transfers from overseas pension schemes.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress his Department has made on a National Alcohol Strategy; and how many specialist health (a) charities and (b) academics are involved in the development of that strategy.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The Government remains committed to tackling harms caused by alcohol, including cancer-related harms. That is why we are developing a new alcohol strategy that will set out targeted action to prevent and reduce harmful drinking, support vulnerable people affected by others’ alcohol misuse and improve the pathways into treatment for people with alcohol dependency.

This is a cross-government strategy announced by the Home Office and the Department for Health and Social Care, who are working closely with a range of stakeholders and have engaged with industry, clinicians, academia and the voluntary sector.

In July 2018, the Minister for Public Health and Primary Care hosted a roundtable with health experts including representation from the Alcohol Health Alliance, Institute of Alcohol Studies, Collective Voice UK, the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of Psychiatrists, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, British Society of Gastroenterology, Alcohol Research UK, Association of Directors of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Association of Mental Health providers, Adfam, Cancer Research UK and the UK Health Forum.

In addition the Minister also hosted an ‘experts by experience’ roundtable in collaboration with the charities Collective Voice and NHS Substance Misuse Providers Alliance, and with families in collaboration with the charity Adfam. Another expert roundtable on Foetal Alcohol Syndrome is scheduled in September 2018, alongside further engagement with experts in the coming months on priority areas for the strategy.

Grouped Questions: 169473
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions officials in his Department have had with officials in the Department for Health and Social Care on the development of a national alcohol strategy to ensure that the strategy includes the harm caused by alcohol, including cancer.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The Government remains committed to tackling harms caused by alcohol, including cancer-related harms. That is why we are developing a new alcohol strategy that will set out targeted action to prevent and reduce harmful drinking, support vulnerable people affected by others’ alcohol misuse and improve the pathways into treatment for people with alcohol dependency.

This is a cross-government strategy announced by the Home Office and the Department for Health and Social Care, who are working closely with a range of stakeholders and have engaged with industry, clinicians, academia and the voluntary sector.

In July 2018, the Minister for Public Health and Primary Care hosted a roundtable with health experts including representation from the Alcohol Health Alliance, Institute of Alcohol Studies, Collective Voice UK, the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of Psychiatrists, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, British Society of Gastroenterology, Alcohol Research UK, Association of Directors of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Association of Mental Health providers, Adfam, Cancer Research UK and the UK Health Forum.

In addition the Minister also hosted an ‘experts by experience’ roundtable in collaboration with the charities Collective Voice and NHS Substance Misuse Providers Alliance, and with families in collaboration with the charity Adfam. Another expert roundtable on Foetal Alcohol Syndrome is scheduled in September 2018, alongside further engagement with experts in the coming months on priority areas for the strategy.

Grouped Questions: 169472
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Alcoholic Drinks: Minimum Prices
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on the review of the evidence for minimum unit pricing for alcohol in England announced on 8 May 2018.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The United Kingdom Government is commissioning Public Health England to carry out a scientific review into the impact of minimum unit pricing following its introduction in Scotland. The precise scope and timing of outputs from the review are still under consideration.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Cancer: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the findings of the recent National Cancer Diagnosis Audit with respect to improving the process for diagnosing cancer in children and young people.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The National Cancer Diagnosis Audit (NCDA) provides useful insight into the process of diagnosis of cancer. This report has been shared with the relevant NHS England Clinical Reference Groups (CRG) and will influence the work of the CRGs in improving clinical pathways and services.

No specific assessment has been made of the NCDA in relation to time taken to diagnose lymphoma and other haematological cancers or with respect to improving the process for diagnosing cancer in children and young people. However, it will be helpful in informing the current work on revising service specifications for children and young people.

Grouped Questions: 169477
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Haematological Cancer: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the findings of the recent National Cancer Diagnosis Audit with respect to improving the time taken to diagnose (a) lymphoma and (b) other haematological cancers.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The National Cancer Diagnosis Audit (NCDA) provides useful insight into the process of diagnosis of cancer. This report has been shared with the relevant NHS England Clinical Reference Groups (CRG) and will influence the work of the CRGs in improving clinical pathways and services.

No specific assessment has been made of the NCDA in relation to time taken to diagnose lymphoma and other haematological cancers or with respect to improving the process for diagnosing cancer in children and young people. However, it will be helpful in informing the current work on revising service specifications for children and young people.

Grouped Questions: 169476
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Haematological Cancer: Medical Records
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps have been taken by his Department to ensure accurate and complete collection of cancer registry data for (a) lymphoma and (b) other haematological cancers.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (NCRAS) is part of Public Health England, and collects information on all people diagnosed with cancer in England. This includes all lymphomas and haematological cancers. NCRAS has a comprehensive system of data feedback to hospitals, enabling them to review the data they have submitted and make any corrections. This system is supported by a dedicated Data Liaison team, who visit hospital staff and work with clinical systems providers to help maintain high quality data submissions, while minimising burden on the system.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
State Retirement Pensions: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the framework for state pensions in respect of work carried out by non-UK EU citizens in the UK will remain in place after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Guy Opperman
Answered on: 10 September 2018

There are no plans to change the conditions of entitlement to UK state pension, which is based on an individual’s national insurance record. The Government has previously reached an agreement with the EU on citizens’ rights in negotiations on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. Subject to overall agreement and subject to reciprocity, the current structure of the EU social security co-ordination rules will continue to apply to EU and UK nationals covered by the Withdrawal Agreement.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Lyme Disease
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 4 July 2018 to Question 159060 on the systematic reviews on the diagnosis, treatment, transmission and prevention of Lyme disease, if his Department will publish a response to those reviews identifying which of the recommendations of those reviews the Government is taking forward; what steps the Government is taking to implement those recommendations; and what the timetable is for the implementation of those recommendations.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 24 July 2018

The Department commissioned four independent separate systematic reviews of all relevant literature on the diagnosis, treatment, transmission and prevention of Lyme disease.

The four systematic reviews were completed and published in December 2017 which assessed the existing evidence. They do not make recommendations and the Department is not planning to publish a response. The Department is aware of the findings which were intended to clarify the existing evidence base on Lyme disease and are publicly available to the research community, all research funders and the public.

We are investing over £1 billion a year in health research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The usual practice of the NIHR is not to ring-fence funds for expenditure on particular topics: research proposals in all areas compete for the funding available. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research on Lyme disease including those that reflect the conclusions of the systematic reviews as part of its regular processes. All applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for International Trade
Wind Power: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent assessment he has made of the export value potential of the UK offshore wind industry.
A
Answered by: Graham Stuart
Answered on: 16 July 2018

The Department for International Trade (DIT) makes regular assessments of the export potential for offshore wind and actively supports UK suppliers to access identified opportunities.

Our most recent estimate suggests an opportunity of between £1 and £2 billion up to 2020, mainly in European markets but increasingly from Asia and other geographies.

DIT works with key UK suppliers, foreign Governments, sector focussed trade associations and procuring authorities to increase exports in the offshore wind sector.

In addition, UK Export Finance (UKEF) support is available for UK exporters for all of the renewable energy sector and welcomes new applications for support. Since 2015, UKEF has provided support on contracts worth over £200m to UK exporters in the offshore wind sector.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for International Trade
Trade Remedies Authority
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what criteria his Department used for its decision to base the UK Trade Remedies Authority in Reading.
A
Answered by: George Hollingbery
Answered on: 12 July 2018

A number of factors were taken into account in deciding the location of the Trade Remedies Authority and a full assessment was carried out, according to Cabinet Office guidance. The availability of candidates with the required qualifications and experience was critical in deciding where to locate the Trade Remedies Authority. Reading has one of the highest concentrations of relevant qualifications and experience in the country. Another important criterion was transport links. This was balanced with the requirement to adhere to the 2017 Conservative Party Manifesto Commitment to locate arm’s length bodies out of London.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 July 2018
Department for Education
Pupils: Personal Records
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he is taking steps with Cabinet colleagues to ensure that no Government Departments distribute pupil data to commercial companies and journalists.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 11 July 2018

The Department is the main data controller responsible for the appropriate use of centrally held pupil data.

Before any data can be shared it has to go through a strict governance process. Officials, including legal experts and senior civil servants with data expertise, assess the application for public benefit, legal underpinning, proportionality (ensuring the minimum amount of data is used to meet the purpose), and that strict information security standards have been satisfied.

Commercial companies (such as those who provide systems that schools utilise to reflect and benchmark detailed areas of performance) may occasionally receive extracts of pupil data, subject to the strict governance and security measures in place. Similarly, if a suitably skilled researcher working for a media organisation can satisfy all aspects of the governance process, they may be able to undertake a research project.

The Department is working to provide ways for researchers to access centrally held data rather than distributing the data to them.

The Government publishes information about all of its data sharing as part of its commitment to transparency.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Energy Performance Certificates
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many houses in the UK have an Energy Performance Certificate of (a) E or lower and (b) D or higher.
A
Answered by: Mrs Heather Wheeler
Answered on: 10 July 2018

The following data has been taken from Table D1 in the Energy Performance of Buildings Certificates in England and Wales: 2008 to March 2018 statistical release. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-performance-of-buildings-certificates

  • Domestic England and Wales properties with D rating or higher – 13,167,000
  • Domestic England and Wales properties with E Rating or lower – 4,280,000

The data is for the period up to and including March 2018.

Scottish and Northern Ireland figures will be available from the Scottish and Northern Ireland Governments.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Yemen: Armed Conflict
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions his Department has had with parties to the conflict in Yemen on steps to ensure that there is accountability for civilian casualties in that country.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 10 July 2018

Following the start of military action by Coalition-backed forces to take Hodeidah port back from Houthi militia, the previous Foreign Secretary made a statement on 13 June in which he called on all parties to respect International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and prioritise the protection of civilians. We regularly raise the importance of compliance with IHL with the Saudi-led Coalition at all levels. When allegations of Coalition IHL violations are made, we insist that they are investigated and that any lessons are acted upon. The Coalition Joint Incidents Assessment Team has since announced the findings of a total of 65 investigations, with the most recent being released on 6 June.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Yemen: Armed Conflict
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to promote a permanent cessation of hostilities in Hodeidah city in Yemen.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 10 July 2018

We continue to support UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, in his efforts to negotiate a political settlement and we encourage the partners to engage with his proposals. We are in regular contact with the Coalition about the need to ensure that any military operations in and around Hodeidah are conducted in accordance with international humanitarian law, including on the protection of civilians, and do not disrupt commercial and humanitarian flows through the port.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Transport
Bus Service Operators Grant: Eligibility
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has plans to allow (a) electric battery, (b) hybrid and (c) hydrogen-fuelled buses to be eligible for the Bus Service Operators Grant.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 10 July 2018

Hybrid buses are eligible for both the bus service operators grant and the low carbon emission bus incentive depending on what fuel is used. The government wishes to increase the uptake of ultra-low and zero emission buses, and will look at possible changes to incentivise this during stage 2 of the bus service operators grant reform process.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many feed-in tariff applications have been made in respect of houses with an Energy Performance Certificate of (a) D or higher and (b) E or lower in the most recent 12 months for which data are available.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

In the period June 2017 to June 2018, 13,428 applications for the Feed-in-Tariff scheme were made in respect of premises where Ofgem know that it had an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) of level D or above. Ofgem does not hold data in relation to premises with FIT installations which have an EPC of level E or below

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Solar Power: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the feed-in tariff rate for solar PV is for (a) houses with Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) of D or higher and (b) houses with EPCs of E or lower.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The Feed-In Tariff rates are published by Ofgem at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-programmes/fit/fit-tariff-rates. The current higher PV tariff of 3.93p per kWh is available for houses with EPCs of D or higher. The lower tariff of 0.25p per kWh is available for houses with EPCs of E or lower and those houses with an EPC of level D or above that was not issued before the commissioning date of the installation.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for International Development
Yemen: Ports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to improve the effectiveness of the UN Verification and Inspection Mechanism for Yemen.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The UK is providing £1.3 million to help the UN’s Verification and Inspection Mechanism (UNVIM) facilitate commercial imports of food and fuel through the Red Sea ports of Hodeidah and Saleef by giving the Saudi-led Coalition confidence that weapons are not coming into Yemen on commercial ships.

Alongside this financial support, we have also deployed UK experts to support the inspections of ships in Djibouti, increasing the proportion of physical inspections ten-fold.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Home Office
Visas: Maladministration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information his Department holds on the number of errors made in the processing of visas that have resulted in a delay in the issue of visas in each visa application centre.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The information requested is not included in statistics published by the Home Office. When we are informed of errors we work promptly to rectify them.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Wind Power: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on support for the UK offshore wind industry’s ambition to produce one third of UK electricity from offshore wind by 2030; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The UK has the largest installed offshore wind capacity in the world, with around 7GW operational. This will rise to around 10GW by 2020.

As set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, the Government is working with industry as they develop an ambitious Sector Deal for offshore wind, which could result in 10 gigawatts of new capacity, with the opportunity for additional deployment if this is cost effective, built in the 2020s.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Wind Power: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the potential for offshore wind to deliver significant electricity system cost reductions by 2030.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Offshore wind costs have fallen significantly over the last few years. The cheapest offshore wind projects in the 2017 Contract for Difference Allocation Round cleared 50% lower than the cheapest offshore wind project in the 2015 Contract for Difference Allocation Round. Going forward, the industry expects offshore wind costs to continue to fall.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Carbon Budgets
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Climate Change Act 2008, what assessment he has made of the potential performance of the UK in relation to the (i) third, (ii) fourth and (iii) fifth carbon budget.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The UK is projected to overachieve against the third carbon budget. Current projections for the fourth and fifth carbon budgets suggest that we could deliver 97 per cent and 95 per cent of our required performance against 1990 levels, and we are working to implement the ambitious policies and proposals set out in our Clean Growth Strategy to enable us to meet our future carbon budgets.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Fracking: Carbon Budgets
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of fracking on the UK meeting the targets of the (a) fourth carbon budget for 2023-2027 and (b) fifth carbon budget for 2028-2032.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Our approach to meeting the fourth and fifth Carbon Budgets is set out in the Clean Growth Strategy. Continued use of natural gas from offshore and onshore sources is compatible with meeting our carbon budgets, and innovations in technologies such as Carbon Capture Usage and Storage have the potential to decarbonise this energy supply still further.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Data Protection: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has held discussions with the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union on his policy priorities after the UK leaves the EU in relation to (a) the requirement of the General Data Protection Regulation that children merit specific protection and (b) the regulation's other requirements; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Ministers from DCMS and DExEU have held regular discussions about departmental policy priorities, including with respect to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), as the UK leaves the EU.

The EU and the UK both have an ambition to achieve high data protection standards globally. The UK demonstrated this commitment with the successful passage of the new Data Protection Act 2018, which implements and transposes the GDPR and Law Enforcement Directive respectively in UK law.

The Act received Royal Assent on 23 May. It further strengthens UK data protection standards, ensuring they are fit for the modern age, and implements in full the EU’s new data protection framework in UK domestic law. Our data protection laws will therefore be fully aligned with the EU’s at our point of exit.

In May 2018 the government published a presentation setting out this position. The presentation is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/framework-for-the-uk-eu-partnership-data-protection.

The government recognises children need particular protection when their personal data is collected and processed as they may be less aware of the risks involved. The GDPR offers clear protection of children’s privacy and privacy notices must be written in a way that children are able to understand. Organisations that process children’s data must ensure that they use a data protection by design and default approach.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Data Protection: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether an assessment will be made of the extent to which Government database processes meet the General Data Protection Regulation requirement of data protection by design and default; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Government takes the protection of personal data and the right to privacy extremely seriously, and we are determined to lead the way and set the gold standard for data protection. As part of our preparations, we have been working closely with the Information Commissioner’s Office and departments to support compliance preparations across government.

Each department, as a data controller, is responsible for its own compliance with the new data protection law, including the requirement under Article 25 GDPR to implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure data protection by design and default.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Government plans to assess the environmental effect of new housing using the DEFRA biodiversity metric; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Dominic Raab
Answered on: 06 July 2018

National planning policy continues to emphasise the role of planning in protecting and enhancing our natural environment, and helping to improve biodiversity. The National Planning Policy Framework is being revised, and during the recent consultation we received many responses regarding the importance of biodiversity and other environmental issues. We have considered all the consultation responses carefully. However, the Defra biodiversity metric is not for application at national level. Planning decisions about new housing and its location are for local planning authorities to make. They should determine each planning proposal in the light of the Local Plan and any other considerations they find material to the case, including the strong environmental policies set out in the National Planning Policy Framework.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Mink: USA
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of implementing an (a) regional and (b) national species control scheme for the American mink.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 06 July 2018

The Government has no plans to assess the potential merits of a national control scheme in England but will continue to work in partnership on local and regional projects. There are examples of successful regional projects to control American mink led by NGOs and volunteer groups, such as the Norfolk Mink Project. The Government’s approach is that individuals should be free to manage wildlife within the law and the Government should only intervene when there is good reason to do so. In the first instance, dealing with problem wildlife is the responsibility of the owner or occupier of the property where the problem occurs.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether his Department has carried out a risk assessment of the planned registration scheme for EU citizens after the UK leaves the EU; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 27 June 2018

As is standard for government’s approach to delivery of programmes, we have in place project management tools designed to detect and mitigate risks, provide additional confidence and ensure safe delivery of the registration scheme for EU citizens after the UK leaves the EU

We will be providing further detail on the scheme in due course.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Breast Cancer: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department is monitoring the (a) number, (b) nature and (c) outcomes of calls to the breast cancer screening helpline; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

Public Health England has provided regular updates to Ministers on the helpline and the latest number of calls to the helpline at 20 June 2018 is 53,167. Some calls have required a range of different follow-up actions including conversations with clinical specialists, details of previous screens to be checked and arrangements for a further screen to be made.

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