Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-100 out of 482
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in the UK are in Energy Performance Band E or lower.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 17 October 2018

Latest figures for the number of homes (thousands) in Energy Performance Band D or higher and Band E or lower for England and the Devolved Nations.

England (2016)

Scotland (2016)

Northern Ireland (2016)

Wales (2008)

Band D or higher (thousands)

18,290

2,031

643

558

Band E or lower (thousands)

4,707

422

99

711

Total number of homes (thousands)

22,996

2,452

742

1,268

Figures may not sum to totals due to rounding

Please note, these figures should not be summed to give a UK total, or compared between nations due to the following differences:

(1) The latest data available for Wales is from 2008, 2016 data will be published in November 2018.

(2) Figures for Wales relate to number of dwellings (which includes vacant properties) whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland relate to number of households (excluding vacant properties).

(3) Each nation uses a different methodology for calculating Energy Performance. The main difference being Welsh figures are based on SAP 2005, whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland are based on SAP 2012.

Data sources

MHCLG. (2016). English Housing Survey.

Scottish Government. (2016). Scottish House Condition Survey.

Housing Executive. (2016). Northern Ireland House Condition Survey.

Welsh Government. (2008). Living in Wales Survey.

Grouped Questions: 176378
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many homes in the UK are in Energy Performance Band D or higher.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 17 October 2018

Latest figures for the number of homes (thousands) in Energy Performance Band D or higher and Band E or lower for England and the Devolved Nations.

England (2016)

Scotland (2016)

Northern Ireland (2016)

Wales (2008)

Band D or higher (thousands)

18,290

2,031

643

558

Band E or lower (thousands)

4,707

422

99

711

Total number of homes (thousands)

22,996

2,452

742

1,268

Figures may not sum to totals due to rounding

Please note, these figures should not be summed to give a UK total, or compared between nations due to the following differences:

(1) The latest data available for Wales is from 2008, 2016 data will be published in November 2018.

(2) Figures for Wales relate to number of dwellings (which includes vacant properties) whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland relate to number of households (excluding vacant properties).

(3) Each nation uses a different methodology for calculating Energy Performance. The main difference being Welsh figures are based on SAP 2005, whereas figures for England, Scotland and Northern Ireland are based on SAP 2012.

Data sources

MHCLG. (2016). English Housing Survey.

Scottish Government. (2016). Scottish House Condition Survey.

Housing Executive. (2016). Northern Ireland House Condition Survey.

Welsh Government. (2008). Living in Wales Survey.

Grouped Questions: 176377
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Estate Agents: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of bringing forward legislative proposals to require property management companies to provide tenants with a detailed breakdown of service fees when in advance of increasing fees.
A
Answered by: Mrs Heather Wheeler
Answered on: 16 October 2018

We believe very strongly that service charges should be transparent, communicated effectively and that there should be a clear route to challenge or redress if things go wrong.

That is why on 12 October, we announced a property agent working group to consider options to raise standards across the property agent sector, including looking at how fees such as service charges should be presented to consumers and to explore the best means to challenge fees which are unjustified. The working group will be chaired by Lord Best, along with experts from across the property sector and will report back to Government in summer 2019.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Children: Maintenance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what information her Department holds on the level of successful collections of child maintenance for (a) employed payees and (b) self employed payees.
A
Answered by: Justin Tomlinson
Answered on: 16 October 2018

The Child Maintenance Service includes two service types: ‘Direct Pay’ where payments are arranged and agreed between parents, and ‘Collect & Pay’ where payments are collected and paid to the receiving parent by Child Maintenance Service.

The Department does not record data for direct pay compliance. If the paying parent don't pay they can be moved onto the Collect and Pay at the discretion of the child maintenance service. The department does hold data on the compliance of Collect and Pay arrangements. Please refer to Table 7 of the Child Maintenance Service Statistics.

Data on compliance is recorded separately to data on employment status. Although the department does hold some of the data to answer your question we estimate the cost of complying with your request would exceed the appropriate limit for central government, set by regulation at £600.This represents the estimated cost of one person spending 3 and half working days in determining whether the department holds the information, locating, retrieving and extracting it. We believe it would take longer than 3 and half days to match the compliance of a paying parent with their employment status. As a result, under section 12 of the Freedom of information Act the department is not therefore obliged to comply with your request and we will not be processing it further.

The Child Maintenance Service Statistics which shows overall compliance n be found here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/statistics/child-maintenance-service-august-2013-to-june-2018-experimental

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Estate Agents: Fees and Charges
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, if he will make an assessment of the potential merits of a legal requirement for property companies to provide (a) a breakdown of monies requested from companies operating from their properties, and (b) receipts for expenditure.
A
Answered by: Kelly Tolhurst
Answered on: 16 October 2018

The Government has no current plans to do so.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Home Office
Passports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether he undertook an impact assessment of his decision not to carry over excess validity from previous passports; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 16 October 2018

If the UK leaves the EU without a deal, passport holders would be considered third country nationals and would need to comply with different rules for travel in the Schengen Travel Area. These rules stipulate that passports over ten years old cannot be used for travel within the Area.

Some British passports are valid for more than ten years due to the carryover of validity from a previous passport. The UK was the last country in the world to carryover validity. International guidelines recommend that an adult passport should be valid for a maximum of ten years, and a child passport for a maximum of five years. In light of this, the impact of continuing to carryover validity was considered for all passport holders and was subsequently stopped on 10 September.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 October 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Property: Ownership
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, whether he has made an assessment of the potential merits of establishing a time limit for a property management company to issue a certificate of ownership to a new owner so that the new owner’s solicitor can register them as the legal owner with Land Registry; and if he will make a statement.
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Voting Rights: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what voting rights EU nationals living in the UK will have after the UK has left the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 12 September 2018

I refer the hon. Member to the answer given by my hon. Friend, the Parliamentary Secretary at the Cabinet Office (Chloe Smith) on 28 March to Question 129820 to the hon. Member for Cambridge.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Refugees: Private Rented Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what steps her Department is taking to ensure that refugees are not excluded from the private rented sector as a result of the introduction of the right to rent scheme.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The right to rent scheme has been developed to ensure that those with lawful immigration status, such as refugees, can demonstrate it easily. Refugees are issued with a Biometric Residence Permit which provides confirmation of their status. However, there is a broad range of documents that potential tenants can use to demonstrate their right to rent. These are not based solely around passports or immigration documents. Details of acceptable documents can be found at:

https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/573057/6_1193_HO_NH_Right-to-Rent-Guidance.pdf

Landlords can also use the Home Office Checking Service where a prospective tenant is unable to present documents, because they have submitted them to the Home Office. This is a simple and efficient, case-specific service which can be accessed online, or via a dedicated helpline, to check whether a tenant or prospective tenant has a right to rent.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Visas: Africa
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what Key Performance Indicators his Department has put in place for the performance of commercial visa application centres in African countries.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The contract for providing Visa Application Centres in Africa was awarded to Teleperformance UK Ltd in 2014 initially for a five year period and extended recently for a further two years until 31 March 2021.

Seventeen critical and non-critical service levels are incorporated into the contract which provides provision of Visa Application Centres in Africa.

The service levels are intended to measure whether the supplier is meeting the levels of performance necessary to satisfy the Home Office’s business and regulatory requirements. The service levels are regularly reviewed between the supplier and the Home Office.

The contract awarded to Teleperformance for Visa Application Centres in Africa predates the launch of the current version of Contracts Finder though summary detail has been published for transparency purposes and can be found at

https://data.gov.uk/data/contracts-finder-archive/contract/1394970/

In complying with the Governments transparency agenda, the Home Office will be publishing a redacted version of the Teleperformance contract to Contracts Finder within the next 4 weeks. The detail of the service levels is contained within Schedule 7.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Treasury
Pensions
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, whether the regulations that allow the transfer of a private pension scheme to a Qualifying Recognised Overseas Pension Scheme within the European Economic Area will be exempt from tax after the UK has left the EU.
A
Answered by: John Glen
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The regulations that allow a tax-free transfer of a private pension scheme to a QROP within the EEA are domestic law which currently comply with EU fundamental freedoms. Whether or not these transfers will be exempt from the overseas transfer charge once the UK leaves the EU is dependent upon the terms of future exit agreement between the UK Government and the EU.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Pensions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether her Department has developed proposals for the free movement of capital with in relation to pensions for (a) UK citizens that have accrued pensions in the European Union and (b) for non-UK EU citizens that have accrued pensions in the UK after the UK has left the EU; and will she make a statement.
A
Answered by: Guy Opperman
Answered on: 11 September 2018

UK pensions legislation already ensures that any member of a UK pension scheme has a statutory right to transfer their pension, which includes the option to transfer to any overseas pension scheme where that scheme meets certain requirements. Equally, UK pensions legislation does not prohibit a UK pension scheme from receiving capital from overseas pension schemes.

The UK and EU have already agreed the terms of an implementation period lasting until the end of 2020. During this implementation period, access to one another’s markets will remain unchanged and on the current terms, ensuring continuity for consumers and businesses.

Under any other scenario to the rights of members of UK pension schemes to transfer their pension, will not be affected. Whether they are a UK citizen or a non-UK EU citizen, they will continue to be able to transfer their pensions to overseas pension schemes. Equally, UK pension schemes will continue to be able to receive transfers from overseas pension schemes.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what progress his Department has made on a National Alcohol Strategy; and how many specialist health (a) charities and (b) academics are involved in the development of that strategy.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The Government remains committed to tackling harms caused by alcohol, including cancer-related harms. That is why we are developing a new alcohol strategy that will set out targeted action to prevent and reduce harmful drinking, support vulnerable people affected by others’ alcohol misuse and improve the pathways into treatment for people with alcohol dependency.

This is a cross-government strategy announced by the Home Office and the Department for Health and Social Care, who are working closely with a range of stakeholders and have engaged with industry, clinicians, academia and the voluntary sector.

In July 2018, the Minister for Public Health and Primary Care hosted a roundtable with health experts including representation from the Alcohol Health Alliance, Institute of Alcohol Studies, Collective Voice UK, the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of Psychiatrists, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, British Society of Gastroenterology, Alcohol Research UK, Association of Directors of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Association of Mental Health providers, Adfam, Cancer Research UK and the UK Health Forum.

In addition the Minister also hosted an ‘experts by experience’ roundtable in collaboration with the charities Collective Voice and NHS Substance Misuse Providers Alliance, and with families in collaboration with the charity Adfam. Another expert roundtable on Foetal Alcohol Syndrome is scheduled in September 2018, alongside further engagement with experts in the coming months on priority areas for the strategy.

Grouped Questions: 169473
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Home Office
Alcoholic Drinks: Misuse
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what discussions officials in his Department have had with officials in the Department for Health and Social Care on the development of a national alcohol strategy to ensure that the strategy includes the harm caused by alcohol, including cancer.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The Government remains committed to tackling harms caused by alcohol, including cancer-related harms. That is why we are developing a new alcohol strategy that will set out targeted action to prevent and reduce harmful drinking, support vulnerable people affected by others’ alcohol misuse and improve the pathways into treatment for people with alcohol dependency.

This is a cross-government strategy announced by the Home Office and the Department for Health and Social Care, who are working closely with a range of stakeholders and have engaged with industry, clinicians, academia and the voluntary sector.

In July 2018, the Minister for Public Health and Primary Care hosted a roundtable with health experts including representation from the Alcohol Health Alliance, Institute of Alcohol Studies, Collective Voice UK, the Royal College of Physicians, Royal College of Psychiatrists, Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health, British Society of Gastroenterology, Alcohol Research UK, Association of Directors of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Association of Mental Health providers, Adfam, Cancer Research UK and the UK Health Forum.

In addition the Minister also hosted an ‘experts by experience’ roundtable in collaboration with the charities Collective Voice and NHS Substance Misuse Providers Alliance, and with families in collaboration with the charity Adfam. Another expert roundtable on Foetal Alcohol Syndrome is scheduled in September 2018, alongside further engagement with experts in the coming months on priority areas for the strategy.

Grouped Questions: 169472
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Alcoholic Drinks: Minimum Prices
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what progress his Department has made on the review of the evidence for minimum unit pricing for alcohol in England announced on 8 May 2018.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The United Kingdom Government is commissioning Public Health England to carry out a scientific review into the impact of minimum unit pricing following its introduction in Scotland. The precise scope and timing of outputs from the review are still under consideration.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Cancer: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the findings of the recent National Cancer Diagnosis Audit with respect to improving the process for diagnosing cancer in children and young people.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The National Cancer Diagnosis Audit (NCDA) provides useful insight into the process of diagnosis of cancer. This report has been shared with the relevant NHS England Clinical Reference Groups (CRG) and will influence the work of the CRGs in improving clinical pathways and services.

No specific assessment has been made of the NCDA in relation to time taken to diagnose lymphoma and other haematological cancers or with respect to improving the process for diagnosing cancer in children and young people. However, it will be helpful in informing the current work on revising service specifications for children and young people.

Grouped Questions: 169477
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Haematological Cancer: Diagnosis
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the findings of the recent National Cancer Diagnosis Audit with respect to improving the time taken to diagnose (a) lymphoma and (b) other haematological cancers.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The National Cancer Diagnosis Audit (NCDA) provides useful insight into the process of diagnosis of cancer. This report has been shared with the relevant NHS England Clinical Reference Groups (CRG) and will influence the work of the CRGs in improving clinical pathways and services.

No specific assessment has been made of the NCDA in relation to time taken to diagnose lymphoma and other haematological cancers or with respect to improving the process for diagnosing cancer in children and young people. However, it will be helpful in informing the current work on revising service specifications for children and young people.

Grouped Questions: 169476
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Haematological Cancer: Medical Records
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what recent steps have been taken by his Department to ensure accurate and complete collection of cancer registry data for (a) lymphoma and (b) other haematological cancers.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 11 September 2018

The National Cancer Registration and Analysis Service (NCRAS) is part of Public Health England, and collects information on all people diagnosed with cancer in England. This includes all lymphomas and haematological cancers. NCRAS has a comprehensive system of data feedback to hospitals, enabling them to review the data they have submitted and make any corrections. This system is supported by a dedicated Data Liaison team, who visit hospital staff and work with clinical systems providers to help maintain high quality data submissions, while minimising burden on the system.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 September 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
State Retirement Pensions: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, whether the framework for state pensions in respect of work carried out by non-UK EU citizens in the UK will remain in place after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Guy Opperman
Answered on: 10 September 2018

There are no plans to change the conditions of entitlement to UK state pension, which is based on an individual’s national insurance record. The Government has previously reached an agreement with the EU on citizens’ rights in negotiations on the UK’s withdrawal from the EU. Subject to overall agreement and subject to reciprocity, the current structure of the EU social security co-ordination rules will continue to apply to EU and UK nationals covered by the Withdrawal Agreement.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 July 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Lyme Disease
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, pursuant to the Answer of 4 July 2018 to Question 159060 on the systematic reviews on the diagnosis, treatment, transmission and prevention of Lyme disease, if his Department will publish a response to those reviews identifying which of the recommendations of those reviews the Government is taking forward; what steps the Government is taking to implement those recommendations; and what the timetable is for the implementation of those recommendations.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 24 July 2018

The Department commissioned four independent separate systematic reviews of all relevant literature on the diagnosis, treatment, transmission and prevention of Lyme disease.

The four systematic reviews were completed and published in December 2017 which assessed the existing evidence. They do not make recommendations and the Department is not planning to publish a response. The Department is aware of the findings which were intended to clarify the existing evidence base on Lyme disease and are publicly available to the research community, all research funders and the public.

We are investing over £1 billion a year in health research through the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR). The usual practice of the NIHR is not to ring-fence funds for expenditure on particular topics: research proposals in all areas compete for the funding available. The NIHR welcomes funding applications for research on Lyme disease including those that reflect the conclusions of the systematic reviews as part of its regular processes. All applications are subject to peer review and judged in open competition, with awards being made on the basis of the importance of the topic to patients and health and care services, value for money and scientific quality.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for International Trade
Wind Power: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what recent assessment he has made of the export value potential of the UK offshore wind industry.
A
Answered by: Graham Stuart
Answered on: 16 July 2018

The Department for International Trade (DIT) makes regular assessments of the export potential for offshore wind and actively supports UK suppliers to access identified opportunities.

Our most recent estimate suggests an opportunity of between £1 and £2 billion up to 2020, mainly in European markets but increasingly from Asia and other geographies.

DIT works with key UK suppliers, foreign Governments, sector focussed trade associations and procuring authorities to increase exports in the offshore wind sector.

In addition, UK Export Finance (UKEF) support is available for UK exporters for all of the renewable energy sector and welcomes new applications for support. Since 2015, UKEF has provided support on contracts worth over £200m to UK exporters in the offshore wind sector.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for International Trade
Trade Remedies Authority
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Trade, what criteria his Department used for its decision to base the UK Trade Remedies Authority in Reading.
A
Answered by: George Hollingbery
Answered on: 12 July 2018

A number of factors were taken into account in deciding the location of the Trade Remedies Authority and a full assessment was carried out, according to Cabinet Office guidance. The availability of candidates with the required qualifications and experience was critical in deciding where to locate the Trade Remedies Authority. Reading has one of the highest concentrations of relevant qualifications and experience in the country. Another important criterion was transport links. This was balanced with the requirement to adhere to the 2017 Conservative Party Manifesto Commitment to locate arm’s length bodies out of London.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 03 July 2018
Department for Education
Pupils: Personal Records
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, whether he is taking steps with Cabinet colleagues to ensure that no Government Departments distribute pupil data to commercial companies and journalists.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 11 July 2018

The Department is the main data controller responsible for the appropriate use of centrally held pupil data.

Before any data can be shared it has to go through a strict governance process. Officials, including legal experts and senior civil servants with data expertise, assess the application for public benefit, legal underpinning, proportionality (ensuring the minimum amount of data is used to meet the purpose), and that strict information security standards have been satisfied.

Commercial companies (such as those who provide systems that schools utilise to reflect and benchmark detailed areas of performance) may occasionally receive extracts of pupil data, subject to the strict governance and security measures in place. Similarly, if a suitably skilled researcher working for a media organisation can satisfy all aspects of the governance process, they may be able to undertake a research project.

The Department is working to provide ways for researchers to access centrally held data rather than distributing the data to them.

The Government publishes information about all of its data sharing as part of its commitment to transparency.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, how many houses in the UK have an Energy Performance Certificate of (a) E or lower and (b) D or higher.
A
Answered by: Mrs Heather Wheeler
Answered on: 10 July 2018

The following data has been taken from Table D1 in the Energy Performance of Buildings Certificates in England and Wales: 2008 to March 2018 statistical release. https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/energy-performance-of-buildings-certificates

  • Domestic England and Wales properties with D rating or higher – 13,167,000
  • Domestic England and Wales properties with E Rating or lower – 4,280,000

The data is for the period up to and including March 2018.

Scottish and Northern Ireland figures will be available from the Scottish and Northern Ireland Governments.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Yemen: Armed Conflict
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what recent discussions his Department has had with parties to the conflict in Yemen on steps to ensure that there is accountability for civilian casualties in that country.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 10 July 2018

Following the start of military action by Coalition-backed forces to take Hodeidah port back from Houthi militia, the previous Foreign Secretary made a statement on 13 June in which he called on all parties to respect International Humanitarian Law (IHL) and prioritise the protection of civilians. We regularly raise the importance of compliance with IHL with the Saudi-led Coalition at all levels. When allegations of Coalition IHL violations are made, we insist that they are investigated and that any lessons are acted upon. The Coalition Joint Incidents Assessment Team has since announced the findings of a total of 65 investigations, with the most recent being released on 6 June.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
Yemen: Armed Conflict
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs, what steps he is taking to promote a permanent cessation of hostilities in Hodeidah city in Yemen.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 10 July 2018

We continue to support UN Special Envoy for Yemen, Martin Griffiths, in his efforts to negotiate a political settlement and we encourage the partners to engage with his proposals. We are in regular contact with the Coalition about the need to ensure that any military operations in and around Hodeidah are conducted in accordance with international humanitarian law, including on the protection of civilians, and do not disrupt commercial and humanitarian flows through the port.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Transport
Bus Service Operators Grant: Eligibility
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, whether his Department has plans to allow (a) electric battery, (b) hybrid and (c) hydrogen-fuelled buses to be eligible for the Bus Service Operators Grant.
A
Answered by: Ms Nusrat Ghani
Answered on: 10 July 2018

Hybrid buses are eligible for both the bus service operators grant and the low carbon emission bus incentive depending on what fuel is used. The government wishes to increase the uptake of ultra-low and zero emission buses, and will look at possible changes to incentivise this during stage 2 of the bus service operators grant reform process.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Energy: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, how many feed-in tariff applications have been made in respect of houses with an Energy Performance Certificate of (a) D or higher and (b) E or lower in the most recent 12 months for which data are available.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

In the period June 2017 to June 2018, 13,428 applications for the Feed-in-Tariff scheme were made in respect of premises where Ofgem know that it had an Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) of level D or above. Ofgem does not hold data in relation to premises with FIT installations which have an EPC of level E or below

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Solar Power: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what the feed-in tariff rate for solar PV is for (a) houses with Energy Performance Certificates (EPCs) of D or higher and (b) houses with EPCs of E or lower.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The Feed-In Tariff rates are published by Ofgem at https://www.ofgem.gov.uk/environmental-programmes/fit/fit-tariff-rates. The current higher PV tariff of 3.93p per kWh is available for houses with EPCs of D or higher. The lower tariff of 0.25p per kWh is available for houses with EPCs of E or lower and those houses with an EPC of level D or above that was not issued before the commissioning date of the installation.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for International Development
Yemen: Ports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what steps her Department is taking to improve the effectiveness of the UN Verification and Inspection Mechanism for Yemen.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The UK is providing £1.3 million to help the UN’s Verification and Inspection Mechanism (UNVIM) facilitate commercial imports of food and fuel through the Red Sea ports of Hodeidah and Saleef by giving the Saudi-led Coalition confidence that weapons are not coming into Yemen on commercial ships.

Alongside this financial support, we have also deployed UK experts to support the inspections of ships in Djibouti, increasing the proportion of physical inspections ten-fold.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Home Office
Visas: Maladministration
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information his Department holds on the number of errors made in the processing of visas that have resulted in a delay in the issue of visas in each visa application centre.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The information requested is not included in statistics published by the Home Office. When we are informed of errors we work promptly to rectify them.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Wind Power: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what his policy is on support for the UK offshore wind industry’s ambition to produce one third of UK electricity from offshore wind by 2030; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The UK has the largest installed offshore wind capacity in the world, with around 7GW operational. This will rise to around 10GW by 2020.

As set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, the Government is working with industry as they develop an ambitious Sector Deal for offshore wind, which could result in 10 gigawatts of new capacity, with the opportunity for additional deployment if this is cost effective, built in the 2020s.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Wind Power: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment he has made of the potential for offshore wind to deliver significant electricity system cost reductions by 2030.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Offshore wind costs have fallen significantly over the last few years. The cheapest offshore wind projects in the 2017 Contract for Difference Allocation Round cleared 50% lower than the cheapest offshore wind project in the 2015 Contract for Difference Allocation Round. Going forward, the industry expects offshore wind costs to continue to fall.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Carbon Budgets
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, with reference to the Climate Change Act 2008, what assessment he has made of the potential performance of the UK in relation to the (i) third, (ii) fourth and (iii) fifth carbon budget.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

The UK is projected to overachieve against the third carbon budget. Current projections for the fourth and fifth carbon budgets suggest that we could deliver 97 per cent and 95 per cent of our required performance against 1990 levels, and we are working to implement the ambitious policies and proposals set out in our Clean Growth Strategy to enable us to meet our future carbon budgets.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Fracking: Carbon Budgets
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of fracking on the UK meeting the targets of the (a) fourth carbon budget for 2023-2027 and (b) fifth carbon budget for 2028-2032.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Our approach to meeting the fourth and fifth Carbon Budgets is set out in the Clean Growth Strategy. Continued use of natural gas from offshore and onshore sources is compatible with meeting our carbon budgets, and innovations in technologies such as Carbon Capture Usage and Storage have the potential to decarbonise this energy supply still further.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Data Protection: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether he has held discussions with the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union on his policy priorities after the UK leaves the EU in relation to (a) the requirement of the General Data Protection Regulation that children merit specific protection and (b) the regulation's other requirements; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Ministers from DCMS and DExEU have held regular discussions about departmental policy priorities, including with respect to the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), as the UK leaves the EU.

The EU and the UK both have an ambition to achieve high data protection standards globally. The UK demonstrated this commitment with the successful passage of the new Data Protection Act 2018, which implements and transposes the GDPR and Law Enforcement Directive respectively in UK law.

The Act received Royal Assent on 23 May. It further strengthens UK data protection standards, ensuring they are fit for the modern age, and implements in full the EU’s new data protection framework in UK domestic law. Our data protection laws will therefore be fully aligned with the EU’s at our point of exit.

In May 2018 the government published a presentation setting out this position. The presentation is available at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/framework-for-the-uk-eu-partnership-data-protection.

The government recognises children need particular protection when their personal data is collected and processed as they may be less aware of the risks involved. The GDPR offers clear protection of children’s privacy and privacy notices must be written in a way that children are able to understand. Organisations that process children’s data must ensure that they use a data protection by design and default approach.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Data Protection: EU Law
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, whether an assessment will be made of the extent to which Government database processes meet the General Data Protection Regulation requirement of data protection by design and default; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 09 July 2018

Government takes the protection of personal data and the right to privacy extremely seriously, and we are determined to lead the way and set the gold standard for data protection. As part of our preparations, we have been working closely with the Information Commissioner’s Office and departments to support compliance preparations across government.

Each department, as a data controller, is responsible for its own compliance with the new data protection law, including the requirement under Article 25 GDPR to implement appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure data protection by design and default.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Housing: Construction
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, whether the Government plans to assess the environmental effect of new housing using the DEFRA biodiversity metric; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Dominic Raab
Answered on: 06 July 2018

National planning policy continues to emphasise the role of planning in protecting and enhancing our natural environment, and helping to improve biodiversity. The National Planning Policy Framework is being revised, and during the recent consultation we received many responses regarding the importance of biodiversity and other environmental issues. We have considered all the consultation responses carefully. However, the Defra biodiversity metric is not for application at national level. Planning decisions about new housing and its location are for local planning authorities to make. They should determine each planning proposal in the light of the Local Plan and any other considerations they find material to the case, including the strong environmental policies set out in the National Planning Policy Framework.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 July 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Mink: USA
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will make an assessment of the potential merits of implementing an (a) regional and (b) national species control scheme for the American mink.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 06 July 2018

The Government has no plans to assess the potential merits of a national control scheme in England but will continue to work in partnership on local and regional projects. There are examples of successful regional projects to control American mink led by NGOs and volunteer groups, such as the Norfolk Mink Project. The Government’s approach is that individuals should be free to manage wildlife within the law and the Government should only intervene when there is good reason to do so. In the first instance, dealing with problem wildlife is the responsibility of the owner or occupier of the property where the problem occurs.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether his Department has carried out a risk assessment of the planned registration scheme for EU citizens after the UK leaves the EU; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 27 June 2018

As is standard for government’s approach to delivery of programmes, we have in place project management tools designed to detect and mitigate risks, provide additional confidence and ensure safe delivery of the registration scheme for EU citizens after the UK leaves the EU

We will be providing further detail on the scheme in due course.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Breast Cancer: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether his Department is monitoring the (a) number, (b) nature and (c) outcomes of calls to the breast cancer screening helpline; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

Public Health England has provided regular updates to Ministers on the helpline and the latest number of calls to the helpline at 20 June 2018 is 53,167. Some calls have required a range of different follow-up actions including conversations with clinical specialists, details of previous screens to be checked and arrangements for a further screen to be made.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Breast Cancer: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what qualifications are required of the staff answering calls to the breast cancer screening helpline.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

The staff who answer the initial calls to the helpline are part of a call handling service with specific training for this issue. When specialist input is required, the call-handler arranges for a follow-up call from a professionally qualified person who is usually a nurse.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Breast Cancer: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assistance his Department has provided for the relatives of women who died after not being called for mammograms under the national screening programme.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

Some relatives of women who have died have contacted Public Health England and they have been offered advice and support. A clinical assessment of the women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer and did not receive a final invitation for screening between 2009 and 2018 has commenced and for the women who have died, the next of kin will be contacted and offered the chance to have the outcome of the assessment explained.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Breast Cancer: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what support has been provided for women contacting the breast cancer screening helpline who should have been offered screening appointments under the national mammogram programme but were not and have since developed breast cancer.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

The women who have contacted the helpline are offered a range of information and support, including access to a conversation with a health professional that can provide further advice.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Breast Cancer: Screening
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the reasons for the computer failure in the breast cancer screening programme.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

On 2 May my Rt. hon. Friend the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care reported to Parliament a serious failure in the national breast screening programme in England and announced an independent review to investigate and report on the circumstances of the breast screening failure, which will include establishing the timeline of relevant events from 2009 to 2018 of the Age X trial and the national programme, including their administration and governance. The review will also assess the governance, assurance and accountability processes.

Lynda Thomas, chief executive of Macmillan Cancer Support, and Professor Martin Gore, consultant medical oncologist and professor of cancer medicine at the Royal Marsden, have been appointed as independent chairs and Peter Wyman from the Care Quality Commission has been appointed as the Vice Chair.

The terms of reference have been published with the Written Ministerial Statement (HCWCS731) on 4 June 2018, and the review is due to report in November 2018.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Cervical Cancer
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, with reference to Cancer Research UK's campaign on cervical screening announced on 11 June 2018, what assessment his Department has made of the ability of people to identify whether they have a cervix.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

Public Health England (PHE) has not made an assessment of the extent to which people can identify whether they have a cervix, prostate gland or ovaries.

In July 2017, PHE published a leaflet that explains the National Health Service population screening programmes available to transgender and non-binary people in England; this can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nhs-population-screening-information-for-transgender-people

Grouped Questions: 155848 | 155849
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Prostate Cancer
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the extent to which people know whether they have a prostate gland.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

Public Health England (PHE) has not made an assessment of the extent to which people can identify whether they have a cervix, prostate gland or ovaries.

In July 2017, PHE published a leaflet that explains the National Health Service population screening programmes available to transgender and non-binary people in England; this can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nhs-population-screening-information-for-transgender-people

Grouped Questions: 155847 | 155849
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 20 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Ovarian Cancer
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the extent to which people are able to identify whether they have ovaries.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 27 June 2018

Public Health England (PHE) has not made an assessment of the extent to which people can identify whether they have a cervix, prostate gland or ovaries.

In July 2017, PHE published a leaflet that explains the National Health Service population screening programmes available to transgender and non-binary people in England; this can be accessed at the following link:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/nhs-population-screening-information-for-transgender-people

Grouped Questions: 155847 | 155848
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 12 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
National Probation Service for England and Wales: Bristol
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether Eden House women’s centre in Bristol has been sold.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 18 June 2018

Eden House was placed on the open market in June 2016 and sold at auction on 28 February 2017. The sale to Says Court Properties Limited was completed on 12 May 2017.

The property was sold subject to the existing Community Rehabilitation Company (CRC) lease which runs until 2022. This protects the CRC’s interest in this property until the end of their contract.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Music: Licensed Premises
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, pursuant to the Answer of 25 April 2018 to Question 136076, how many live music venues have closed in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 11 June 2018

This data is not collected by DCMS. We continue working with industry and Whitehall colleagues on a range of issues affecting the live music industry, including announcing last year that the Agent of Change principle will now be included in the National Planning Policy Framework, helping to protect music venues when new housing is built.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for Transport
Outdoor Recreation: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, if his Department will publish further guidance to local authorities advising them of the benefits of street play for children and of the powers that local authorities have to permit road closures in residential areas for that purpose.
A
Answered by: Jesse Norman
Answered on: 11 June 2018

The Department for Transport has no plans to publish guidance on Play Streets. It is for local authorities to decide whether or not to implement road closures.

Specific legislation covering Play Streets is provided in section 29 of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984. This enables local authorities to close roads for the purposes of street play, through a Traffic Regulation Order. This must be indicated on street with appropriate traffic signs.

Local authorities may also close roads under Section 16a of the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984, but this legislation covers special events, rather than specifically street play. An order under this section may only be made three times a year. Any subsequent orders must be approved by the Secretary of State.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Access to Work Programme
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, for how long her Department has required Access to Work claimants to provide invoices for the services of their self-employed support workers; and what guidance and notification was given to Access to Work claimants about that change of practice.
A
Answered by: Sarah Newton
Answered on: 11 June 2018

Access to Work grant funding is awarded and claimed in arrears with the customer being responsible for ensuring claim forms and the appropriate documentation is attached. This is either receipts, invoices or appropriate documentation demonstrating the support costs that have been incurred. This is a requirement of verification and assurance that the public funds are issued for the purpose for which they were intended. There has been no change to the requirements of supporting information when claiming and as such there is no guidance or notification given to the Access to Work claimants.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for Education
Apprentices: Agriculture
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to increase the number of places for agricultural apprenticeships.
A
Answered by: Anne Milton
Answered on: 08 June 2018

Apprenticeship standards are now available across a broad range of sectors including in agriculture. A standard for both a Land based service engineer and Arborist have been approved as an apprenticeship standard. There are a number of further standards in development including crop technician, farrier, poultry technician and stockperson.

The new apprenticeship standards across all levels are being designed and driven by industry; creating higher quality training that will lead to a more productive economy and give employers, like those in the agricultural sector the skills they need to grow and succeed. The department does not limit the number of places for agricultural apprenticeships. It is for the employers to decide how many apprentices they wish to employ.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Alcoholic Drinks: Labelling
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment he has made of the potential merits of requiring the labelling of alcoholic drinks to include information on calorie content, Chief Medical Officer low-risk drinking guidelines or other health information.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 06 June 2018

Public Health England’s evidence review on the public health burden of alcohol found that alcohol health warning labels on alcoholic products can raise awareness of the messages they contain and inclusion of nutritional information, guidelines and health warnings may increase the effectiveness of the effects a label has on a person’s drinking. The review was published in December 2016 and is available online at the following link:

www.gov.uk/government/publications/the-public-health-burden-of-alcohol-evidence-review

The Government continues to work with the alcohol industry and other partners to build on the actions to date on consumer information; enabling people to make decisions about when and how much they drink and helping to reduce alcohol-related health harms.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Agriculture: Subsidies
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, if his Department will take steps to introduce grants to support small-scale local food producers.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 06 June 2018

Large and small scale local food producers play an important role in supporting the rural economy and the farmed environment. The Government’s consultation, “Health and Harmony: the future for food, farming and the environment in a Green Brexit” which set out the policy framework for agriculture in England after the UK leaves the EU closed on 8 May. In this consultation we provided a clear direction for future farm support – public money for public goods. As part of this, we asked for views from those in the industry to make sure future agricultural policy reflects the reality of life for farmers and food producers. All responses received are being analysed and will be used to inform future policy.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for Transport
Railways: Bristol
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Transport, pursuant to his oral contribution of 16 May 2018, Official Report, column 303, what plans his Department has to fund the first phase of the Metro West project, and (a) reopening of (b) the Portishead to Bristol line.
A
Answered by: Joseph Johnson
Answered on: 06 June 2018

MetroWest is a third party promoted scheme in development by Network Rail. The Government has provided funding for the West of England Growth Deal which includes £53m for Metro West Phase 1. The Department will continue to work closely with the local councils in developing the scheme.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for Education
Music: Education
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, pursuant to the Answer of 8 January 2018 to Question 120514 on music education, if he will hold a public consultation on whether to change or extend the National Plan for Music Education.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 06 June 2018

The current National Plan for Music Education runs until 2020. Any proposals for a review, including consultation, will be announced later in 2018.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 01 June 2018
Department for International Development
Yemen: Ports
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for International Development, what recent steps her Department has taken to help ensure humanitarian and commercial access to all sea and air ports in Yemen.
A
Answered by: Alistair Burt
Answered on: 06 June 2018

The UK has continuously led the call for unhindered humanitarian and commercial access throughout Yemen, including through the UK-coordinated Security Council Statement of 15 March, the Secretary of State’s visit to Riyadh in December and lobbying from the Prime Minister. The UK is also providing expertise and funding to the UN Verification and Inspection Mechanism (UNVIM) to facilitate import flows into northern Yemen. We are lobbying other donors to support UNVIM to facilitate imports of vital goods into the country.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 25 May 2018
Department for Education
Apprentices: Agriculture
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps he is taking to increase the number of places for agricultural apprenticeships.
 
Withdrawn
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 May 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Incontinence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what steps his Department is taking to monitor the implementation of NHS England’s Excellence in Continence Care guidelines.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 10 May 2018

NHS England published the Excellence in Continence Care guidance in 2015 in order to help support best practice in continence care, and the Department would expect local commissioners to both draw on the guidance and monitor progress in improving continence care.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 May 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Incontinence: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the availability of Level 1 paediatric continence services for (a) school nurses, (b) health visitors and (c) GPs to provide preventative early treatment for (i) bladder and (ii) bowel problems in children.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 10 May 2018

Clinical commissioning groups (CCGs) are responsible for commissioning continence services and work with local partners to ensure the appropriate level of services are provided dependent upon local need.

CCGs may choose to commission the health visiting and school nursing service to deliver continence services. Public Health England (PHE) has developed commissioning guidance to support local public health delivery; the guidance also clarifies the commissioning responsibilities for continence services. Further information is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/healthy-child-programme-0-to-19-health-visitor-and-school-nurse-commissioning

Continence services are not included in the public health grant and PHE has not undertaken a national assessment of continence services.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 May 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Incontinence
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect of the Paediatric Continence Commissioning Guide published in 2014 and accredited by NICE.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 10 May 2018

No national assessment of the effect of the guidance has been made. The paediatric continence commissioning guide sets out a clear set of specifications for commissioners to follow, including for paediatric incontinence services. The Department expects local commissioners to draw on the guide in commissioning services and to keep their incontinence services under review.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 01 May 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Incontinence: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on paediatric continence services of the transfer of public health commissioning responsibilities from NHS England to local authorities in 2015.
A
Answered by: Steve Brine
Answered on: 10 May 2018

No such assessment has been made.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 02 May 2018
Home Office
Immigration: Biometrics
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the timetable is for all Biometric Residence Permits to include national insurance numbers.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 09 May 2018

The Home Office and Department for Work and Pensions began work in 2016 to issue Biometric Residence Permits featuring the holder’s national insurance number where they are entitled to work in the UK. This has been implemented for all refugees and most Tier 2 skilled migrants. It will be extended to other relevant immigration categories in due course.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 April 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Music: Licensed Premises
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to monitor the number of closures of live music venues in the UK.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 25 April 2018

The live music industry is a vital part of the UK’s music ecosystem, contributing £1bn to the economy in 2016 and it must be allowed to continue to thrive.

We have reformed entertainment licensing and last year announced that the Agent of Change principle will now be included in the National Planning Policy Framework, helping to protect music venues when new housing is built. We will continue working with industry and Whitehall colleagues on a range of issues affecting the live music industry.

Grouped Questions: 136077
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 April 2018
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
Music: Licensed Premises
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what steps he is taking to support live music venues in the UK; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Margot James
Answered on: 25 April 2018

The live music industry is a vital part of the UK’s music ecosystem, contributing £1bn to the economy in 2016 and it must be allowed to continue to thrive.

We have reformed entertainment licensing and last year announced that the Agent of Change principle will now be included in the National Planning Policy Framework, helping to protect music venues when new housing is built. We will continue working with industry and Whitehall colleagues on a range of issues affecting the live music industry.

Grouped Questions: 136076
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 April 2018
Home Office
Fires: Death
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many fire-related fatalities there have been in (a) the UK and (b) Bristol in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 24 April 2018

The total number of fire-related fatalities in Great Britain can be found in table FIRE0501 here

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679602/fire-statistics-data-tables-fire0501.xlsx

Figures for Northern Ireland are not available on a consistent basis.

The total number of fire-related fatalities in Avon can be found in table FIRE0502 here

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/679603/fire-statistics-data-tables-fire0502.xlsx

Figures are not available at a lower level of geography.

The number of fire-related fatalities in Great Britain and Avon can fluctuate due to the relatively small numbers involved.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 April 2018
Treasury
Ordnance Survey: Databases
Commons
To ask Mr Chancellor of the Exchequer, what assessment his Department has made of the potential economic effect on booksellers of his recent proposal on Ordinance Survey MasterMap data.
A
Answered by: Elizabeth Truss
Answered on: 24 April 2018

At Autumn Budget 2017, the government committed to work with Ordnance Survey (OS) and the new Geospatial Commission to establish by May 2018 how to open up freely OS’s MasterMap data to UK-based small businesses in particular. This work is underway and we will provide further updates in due course.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 17 April 2018
Home Office
Avon Fire and Rescue Service: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent discussions she has had with Avon Fire Authority on the funding for Avon Fire and Rescue Service.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 23 April 2018

Home Office Ministers regularly engage with fire and rescue authorities on a number of issues. In 2018/19 Avon Fire Authority will have a core spending power of £42.4m, an increase of 1.6% (£0.6m) compared with 2017/18.

At March 2017, Avon Fire Authority held £9m in reserves, an increase of £2.3m (34%) compared with March 2011.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 21 March 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Business: UK Trade With EU
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what guidance has been issued to businesses to help them prepare for the effect on their ability to trade with the EU of changes to the regulatory system in the EU after the UK has left the EU.
A
Answered by: Andrew Griffiths
Answered on: 04 April 2018

Since the referendum, the Department has engaged with over 2500 businesses and representative organisations across sectors, both here and in Europe, to deepen our understanding of the key business priorities and opportunities after our withdrawal; including on important issues such as the need for an Implementation Period.

Our agreement on the Implementation Period gives business the clarity and confidence that market access and common regulatory rules will remain in place until the end of 2020, meaning businesses will be able to trade on the same terms as now.

The Government recognises the importance of minimising disruption to businesses and will continue to engage on these issues as we progress to negotiating our deep and ambitious future economic partnership with the EU.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 27 March 2018
Ministry of Justice
Gender Recognition: Sentencing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what sentencing guidelines have been put in place to provide for the consideration of the specific needs of transgender people.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 04 April 2018

An HMPPS instruction (PSI 17/2016) advises Pre-sentence report (PSR) writers must consider requesting a full adjournment for the preparation of a PSR where a custodial sentence outcome appears likely, and an offender discloses that they are transgender, on the basis that transgender people may have more complex needs. This guidance is included in the Equal Treatment Bench Book chapter on transgender, published by the Judicial Office. Additionally, a local Transgender Case Board should be convened, either during pre-sentence report preparation or within three working days of reception into custody, to assess and determine the most appropriate location and initial care and management plan for the transgender individual in custody.

Regardless of where a transgender individual is being held, we expect that they will be respected and addressed in the gender with which they identify; and we are committed to ensuring that they are treated fairly, lawfully and decently.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 21 March 2018
Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority
Members' Constituency Work
Commons
To ask the hon. Member for Broxbourne, representing the Speaker's Committee for the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority, if the Committee will make representations to the Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority on the need for additional financial provision to cover the increase in Members' constituency caseloads as a result of preparations for the UK leaving the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Charles Walker
Answered on: 28 March 2018

The Independent Parliamentary Standards Authority (IPSA) regulates and funds MPs’ business costs and expenses. As part of this role, IPSA sets a maximum budget from which MPs can fund their staffing costs. This is based on an average of four full-time-equivalent staff members, although each MP can choose to deploy this budget to suit their own staffing needs.

MPs’ budgets are reviewed each year. In 2012, the staffing budget was increased by 25% for London Area MPs and by 19% for non-London Area MPs, in part to allow MPs to employ more staff to support their work with constituents. In April 2018, the staffing budget will increase by a further 1.8% to allow for staff pay rises.

In addition, MPs may request to increase their budget if they provide evidence of having incurred unforeseen, exceptional costs. Such requests for contingency funding are considered on a case-by-case basis. If any MP finds that their constituency caseload has increased to an unmanageable level as a result of preparations for the UK leaving the EU (or another exceptional issue), they may apply for an increase to their staffing budget in this way.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 21 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what estimate he has made of the number of individual pieces of delegated legislation Parliament will be required to consider as a result of the UK leaving the EU in the twelve months between 29 March 2018 and 29 March 2019.
A
Answered by: Suella Fernandes
Answered on: 26 March 2018

The Government expects to make between 800-1,000 Statutory Instruments to ensure a fully functioning statute book when the UK leaves the EU. While the exact number of Statutory Instruments required will vary, the Government is committed to bringing forward the legislation necessary.

Grouped Questions: 133716
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 21 March 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Brexit
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what estimate he has made of the number of individual pieces of delegated legislation Parliament will be required to consider as a result of the UK leaving the EU in the twelve months between 29 March 2019 and 29 March 2020.
A
Answered by: Suella Fernandes
Answered on: 26 March 2018

The Government expects to make between 800-1,000 Statutory Instruments to ensure a fully functioning statute book when the UK leaves the EU. While the exact number of Statutory Instruments required will vary, the Government is committed to bringing forward the legislation necessary.

Grouped Questions: 133715
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 15 March 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Occupational Pensions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, if she will take steps to review the regulatory framework for occupational pension schemes including the Universities Superannuation Scheme.
A
Answered by: Guy Opperman
Answered on: 21 March 2018

On Monday we published our White Paper; Protecting Defined Benefit Pension Schemes, which sets out our proposals for strengthening the regulatory framework following a thorough review of the current system of pension protection.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 05 March 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Private Rented Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what recent representations his Department has received on the advertising of private property lettings explicitly to exclude people in receipt of housing benefit.
A
Answered by: Mrs Heather Wheeler
Answered on: 13 March 2018

The Department has received correspondence on this issue. The Government appreciates the problems that some housing benefit claimants can face in finding accommodation in the private rented sector.

We strongly encourage landlords and agents to look at all potential and existing tenants in receipt of housing benefit on an individual basis. We will shortly be publishing a new How to Let guide to help landlords better understand their responsibilities.

Legislation exists to prohibit acts of discrimination against individuals in terms of age, disability, gender reassignment, race, religion or belief, sex, sexual orientation, marriage and civil partnership and pregnancy and maternity.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 06 March 2018
Home Office
Refugees: Children
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what her policy is on the resettlement of disabled refugees under the Dubs scheme.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 13 March 2018

Under section 67 of the Immigration Act 2016 (‘Dubs Amendment’), the Government has invited referrals of eligible children from France, Greece and Italy. In line with our published policy statement, each child will have an individual Best Interests Determination. It is the responsibility of participating States to refer eligible children. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/policy-statement-section-67-of-the-immigration-act-2016.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Department for Education
Teachers: Pensions
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what contingency plans his Department has made to manage the teachers' pensions scheme in the event of Capita being unable to fulfil its contractual obligations.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 09 March 2018

The contractual arrangements covering the administration of the Teachers’ Pension Scheme include a requirement to maintain an exit transition ready for use at any point during the contract term, regardless of the reasons for the contract ending. A plan is in place and its effectiveness is reviewed on a regular basis to ensure that it remains fit for purpose. The plan includes a range of options, including transferring responsibility to a new service provider as nominated by the Department or transferring the service to the Department to operate.

The contract includes additional provisions under which, if Capita is unable to continue to fulfil its contractual obligations, the Department could use existing IT systems, premises and staff resources to maintain service delivery.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Ministry of Justice
Rape: Victim Support Schemes
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what steps he is taking to ensure that rape crisis centres are adequately funded.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 09 March 2018

The Government is committed to making sure that victims of crime have access to a broad range of support services, to help them cope with and, as far as possible, recover from the effects of crime.

We have made a commitment in the 2016–2020 Violence and Women and Girls strategy, to maintain funding for rape support services at 2016/17 levels for the remainder of the spending review period. We continue to meet that commitment.

This year we are providing £12.5m funding for services for victims of sexual violence, which includes £7.2m funding for rape support services.

This is part of the £96m we are spending in 2017/18 to fund support services for victims of crime across England and Wales, including £68m allocated to Police and Crime Commissioners to locally commission or provide support services for victims of crime, including victims of sexual violence.

This year we provided a 4.1% uplift in core funding for rape support centres to help meet increased demand. In Bristol, uplifts were provided to The Green House, Somerset and Avon Rape and Sexual Abuse Support (SARSAS) and Kinergy.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Department for Work and Pensions
Employment Support Allowance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Work and Pensions, what steps she is taking to ensure that recipients of employment support allowance with the severe disability premium do not have payments reduced when they move to an area where universal credit has been implemented.
A
Answered by: Alok Sharma
Answered on: 09 March 2018

We have always said that claimants who move over to Universal Credit as part of the managed migration process will not see a cash loss as a result of the change. This is provided that their circumstances remain the same.

Claimants who naturally move to Universal Credit will do so because they have had a change of circumstances. In such cases claimants will continue to have their new welfare support entitlement calculated on the rules of their new benefit.

DWP continue to evaluate this policy as it is delivered.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Tidal Power: South West
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to support the wave and tidal energy sector in the South West.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 08 March 2018

In October 2017, the Government confirmed that up to £557 million of annual support would be available for further Contracts for Difference (including projects such as wave and tidal stream) with the next competitive allocation round planned for Spring 2019. In addition, the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy also provides grant funding for the wave and tidal stream sector through the BEIS Energy Entrepreneurs’ Fund.

The Government is currently assessing the Hendry Review into tidal lagoons and is considering how this technology delivers against its priorities, as set out in the Clean Growth Strategy and the Industrial Strategy. This will ensure that the response to the Hendry Review takes into account the best interests of the UK as a whole and represents value for money for the UK taxpayer and the consumer.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 February 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Prisoners: HIV Infection
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) availability, (b) quality and (c) effectiveness of HIV testing and treatment in prisons.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 05 March 2018

HIV testing is available in all prisons in England through healthcare services commissioned by NHS England, through both primary care and genitourinary medicine services. Additionally, all adult prisons in England will provide HIV testing through an ‘opt-out’ testing programme at or near reception by the end of the current financial year as part of a wider blood-borne virus opt-out testing programme being delivered in partnership between Public Health England, NHS England and Her Majesty’s Prison and Probation Service.

The quality of services is assessed by NHS England on a quarterly basis through the collection of data via the Health and Justice Indicators of Performance (HJIPs), which includes information on the number of people offered HIV tests, those tested and the number of people newly diagnosed with HIV referred for treatment within two weeks of diagnosis.

For quarter one of financial year 2017/18, 10,574 prisoners were tested for HIV, and 197 cases of HIV were diagnosed in this cohort. Of those, 39 were seen by specialist service providers within two weeks of diagnosis. Further information is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/666850/BBV_bulletin_Dec_2017.pdf

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 February 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Prisons: Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the (a) quality, (b) availability and (c) effectiveness of drug treatment services in prisons.
A
Answered by: Jackie Doyle-Price
Answered on: 05 March 2018

Drug treatment services in prisons have been systematically reviewed over the past 18 months, as a part of the development of a new service specification. NHS England and their partners support development of a new commissioning service specification as part of a quality improvement programme for prison health services. The NHS England teams that commission these assessments also hold quarterly performance review meetings with drug treatment providers, and recommission the services as a part of a three to five year cycle (or earlier if required).

On average, there was no wait for drug treatment services and nearly all (95%) people started their first treatment intervention within three weeks of being assessed but would start immediately if it was clinically appropriate to do so. Regular needs assessments are undertaken by NHS England to identify specific establishment-level needs.

Effectiveness is measured by Public Health England through the National Drug Treatment Monitoring System. In total, 37,330 individuals left treatment between 1 April 2016 and 31 March 2017. Of the individuals that left treatment in the year, 10,066 (27%) were discharged as ‘treatment completed’, up from 23% in 2015-16. Further information is available here:

https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/677500/OFFICIAL-SENSITIVE_secure_setting_annual_report_2016-17FINAL-v1.2.pdf

Q
(Bristol West)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 23 February 2018
Ministry of Justice
Domestic Violence: Reoffenders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what types of specific domestic violence perpetrator programmes are available in prisons for men convicted of crimes involving physical violence against their partner or ex-partner to prevent those offenders from re-offending.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 05 March 2018

We are committed to reducing reoffending and addressing the needs of those individuals convicted of an offence involving Intimate Partner Violence (IPV). We keep treatment programmes under constant review to reduce reoffending and protect the public.

Individuals convicted of an offence involving IPV will be assessed for suitability to participate in programmes based on the principles of risk, need and responsivity. Programmes will be offered to individuals on the basis that they meet the selection criteria, and that participating in a programme can support them to reduce their risk of recidivism.

The accredited programmes available for those men convicted of an offence involving IPV are:

  • Building Better Relationships (BBR)
  • Healthy Relationships Programme (HRP)
  • Kaizen (IPV Strand)
  • Specialist programmes for men with learning disabilities are also available.
Q
(Bristol West)
[R]
Close

Registered Interest

Indicates that a relevant interest has been declared.

Asked on: 23 February 2018
Ministry of Justice
Domestic Violence: Reoffenders
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment his Department has made of the effect on rates of re-offending of programmes aimed at perpetrators of domestic violence who are serving prison sentences.
A
Answered by: Dr Phillip Lee
Answered on: 05 March 2018

Tackling domestic violence and abuse is a key priority for this Government. The programme for men convicted of domestic violence replaces and builds on the success of two programmes that achieved a 13 per cent reduction in overall reoffending of participants. The current programme is designed in line with the latest international evidence of the most effective way to tackle reoffending in domestic violence cases, and has been accredited by a panel of independent, international experts. An evaluation of its effectiveness is planned.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 February 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners: Rehabilitation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what programmes are provided in prisons to prevent men convicted of rape from re-offending.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 05 March 2018

The accredited programmes available in prison for those men convicted of a sexual offence with an element of rape are:

  • Horizon
  • Kaizen (Sexual Offence Strand)
  • Healthy Sex Programme (HSP)
  • Specialist programmes for men with learning disabilities are also available.

Programmes will be offered to individuals on the basis that they meet the selection criteria, and that participating in a programme can support them to reduce their risk of recidivism.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 February 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners' Release: Rape
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what assessment tools and processes are used to assess the risk presented by men convicted of rape when due for release from prison.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 05 March 2018

Evidence-based tools are used to assess the risk presented by men who have been convicted of rape. These include statistically- derived measures which indicate the risk of reconviction for a sexual offence and more individualised assessments of the relevant risk which the offender presents and any “protective factors” which will help mitigate those risks. The assessment of risk will include the extent to which offenders can demonstrate insight into their motivations for offending and their ability to manage future risk. Using these various assessments, a probation offender manager, working closely with local police under the statutory Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA), will draw up a risk management plan, to supervise the offender on release and so protect the public.

For offenders who are not released automatically, the Parole Board may direct release of a prisoner only if it is satisfied that it is no longer necessary for the protection of the public that the prisoner should remain detained. When making its decision, the Parole Board will consider all evidence presented to it and take into account the nature of the index offence, the prisoner’s offending history, the prisoner’s progress in prison, any statement made by the victim(s), reports by offender managers and prison officers, and all risk assessments provided. Before release is directed, the Parole Board will also satisfy itself that a comprehensive resettlement and risk management plan is in place.

Grouped Questions: 129424
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 February 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners' Release: Rape
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what criteria are used to assess the future risk of sexual offending by men convicted of rape when due for release from prison.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 05 March 2018

Evidence-based tools are used to assess the risk presented by men who have been convicted of rape. These include statistically- derived measures which indicate the risk of reconviction for a sexual offence and more individualised assessments of the relevant risk which the offender presents and any “protective factors” which will help mitigate those risks. The assessment of risk will include the extent to which offenders can demonstrate insight into their motivations for offending and their ability to manage future risk. Using these various assessments, a probation offender manager, working closely with local police under the statutory Multi-Agency Public Protection Arrangements (MAPPA), will draw up a risk management plan, to supervise the offender on release and so protect the public.

For offenders who are not released automatically, the Parole Board may direct release of a prisoner only if it is satisfied that it is no longer necessary for the protection of the public that the prisoner should remain detained. When making its decision, the Parole Board will consider all evidence presented to it and take into account the nature of the index offence, the prisoner’s offending history, the prisoner’s progress in prison, any statement made by the victim(s), reports by offender managers and prison officers, and all risk assessments provided. Before release is directed, the Parole Board will also satisfy itself that a comprehensive resettlement and risk management plan is in place.

Grouped Questions: 129423
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 23 February 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisoners: Sexual Offences
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, whether his Department has made an assessment of the level of unmet need for specialist programmes to address sexual offending for men convicted of sexual violence who are serving sentences in prison; and if he will make a statement.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 05 March 2018

We are absolutely committed to reducing reoffending and addressing the needs of those individuals convicted of a sexual offence.

A range of accredited programmes are available in custody for men who have been convicted of a sexual offence. Individual suitability for each of these programmes depends on the risk, need and responsivity of the individual. This is assessed locally in each establishment and individuals assessed as suitable and ready to engage with the programmes. Places are prioritised according to the individual’s tariff expiry or release date.

We continue to make every effort to maintain investment in sex offender treatment programmes and commission against offender need. Adjustments to the volume and type of sex offender treatment programmes delivered are agreed (between providers and commissioners) where evidence indicates a change in need.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 28 February 2018
Attorney General
Trials: Disclosure of Information
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, what steps he is taking to improve the system of evidence disclosure in criminal justice cases.
A
Answered by: Jeremy Wright
Answered on: 07 March 2018

Towards the end of last year I launched a review of disclosure procedures in the criminal justice system. This followed a comprehensive joint inspection of disclosure in volume Crown Court cases by Her Majesty’s Crown Prosecution Service Inspectorate and Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary which concluded earlier in 2017, and the recommendations of the project to review our response to economic crime commissioned by the Prime Minister.

The scope of my review is wide, covering cases in the Magistrates’ Courts as well as more complex Crown Court cases and specialist types of cases, including economic crime and sexual offences. The review will examine existing Codes of Practice, Protocols, Guidelines and legislation as well as case management initiatives and capabilities across the criminal justice system, including how digital technology is used.

Alongside the review, on 26 January 2018 the Crown Prosecution Service and National Police Chiefs’ Council published their joint National Disclosure Improvement Plan, a package of measures to improve how the criminal justice system deals with disclosure. This joint plan sets out what they have already done to improve the disclosure process and the further steps they will take. The Government will continue to monitor progress, to ensure that the police and Crown Prosecution Service deliver on the actions they have committed to undertake.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 19 February 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Air Pollution: Monitoring
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what plans he has to extend the air pollution alert system to ensure that notifications about high pollution levels are disseminated as widely as possible.
A
Answered by: Dr Thérèse Coffey
Answered on: 26 February 2018

I refer the hon. Member to the answer I gave to the hon. Member for Stockton North on 12 February 2018, PQ 126644 and 126645.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 February 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Wind Power: Seas and Oceans
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what steps his Department is taking to increase the production of electricity from offshore wind.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 23 February 2018

The UK is providing more support for offshore wind than any other country in the world. The last Contracts for Difference auction, with results announced on 11 September 2017, will bring forward 3.2GW of new capacity in the UK. This is more than the Netherlands and Denmark will bring forward through their last five combined auctions.

As set out in the Clean Growth Strategy, the Government will improve the route to market for renewable technologies such as offshore wind through:

  • Up to £557 million for further Pot 2 Contract for Difference auctions with the next one planned for spring 2019;
  • Working with industry as they develop an ambitious Sector Deal for offshore wind, which could result in 10 gigawatts of new capacity, with the opportunity for additional deployment if this is cost effective, built in the 2020s.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 19 February 2018
Home Office
Doctors: Migrant Workers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will review the system for determining the number of points required for a certificate of sponsorship for overseas doctors seeking work in UK hospitals.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 23 February 2018

The independent Migration Advisory Committee (MAC) has determined that a number of doctors, including consultants specialising in clinical radiology and emergency medicine, are in national shortage and they appear on the published Shortage Occupation List (SOL) which sits under Tier 2, our main immigration route for non-EEA workers.

Applications for jobs on the SOL receive the highest priority – and the highest number of points – when allocating a Tier 2 (General) place.

The SOL is kept under regular review, with the most recent changes made to it last April.

Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 February 2018
Home Office
Asylum: English Language
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers do not have access to free classes in English as a second language.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 21 February 2018

The Home Office recognises the importance of English language for refugee integration. Refugees are able to access English language classes through the Department for Education’s Adult Education Budget, in the same way as someone from the UK. An additional £10m was provided to provide more English language classes for refugees resettled under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme.

Not all those who make their own way to the UK to seek asylum will be found to be refugees and nearly all will have travelled through other safe countries to get to the UK. This is why support towards integration is offered only when asylum seekers are granted refugee status.

The Home Office does not fund English classes for asylum seekers. Asylum seekers aged 19 or over become eligible for a 50% contribution to the costs of English language classes through the Adult Education Budget, when they have been legally in the UK for longer than six months and are awaiting a decision on their asylum claim or have failed in their claim but have been granted support under the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. No data is held nationally on the numbers of asylum seekers accessing free English classes. Those learning English as a second language, including asylum seekers and refugees, are individuals with different starting points of English language proficiency who will learn English at different rates, meaning the number of teaching hours to progress English language capability will vary considerably.

The level of English required to enable refugee integration will also vary by individual, however, the Home Office considers ESOL entry level three to be the standard to aim for, as employment opportunities are greater for those with this level of English language capability.

Grouped Questions: 127587 | 127588 | 127589
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 February 2018
Home Office
Asylum: English Language
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Home Department, how many asylum seekers have access to 10 hours a week of free classes in English as a second language.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 21 February 2018

The Home Office recognises the importance of English language for refugee integration. Refugees are able to access English language classes through the Department for Education’s Adult Education Budget, in the same way as someone from the UK. An additional £10m was provided to provide more English language classes for refugees resettled under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme.

Not all those who make their own way to the UK to seek asylum will be found to be refugees and nearly all will have travelled through other safe countries to get to the UK. This is why support towards integration is offered only when asylum seekers are granted refugee status.

The Home Office does not fund English classes for asylum seekers. Asylum seekers aged 19 or over become eligible for a 50% contribution to the costs of English language classes through the Adult Education Budget, when they have been legally in the UK for longer than six months and are awaiting a decision on their asylum claim or have failed in their claim but have been granted support under the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. No data is held nationally on the numbers of asylum seekers accessing free English classes. Those learning English as a second language, including asylum seekers and refugees, are individuals with different starting points of English language proficiency who will learn English at different rates, meaning the number of teaching hours to progress English language capability will vary considerably.

The level of English required to enable refugee integration will also vary by individual, however, the Home Office considers ESOL entry level three to be the standard to aim for, as employment opportunities are greater for those with this level of English language capability.

Grouped Questions: 127586 | 127588 | 127589
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 February 2018
Home Office
Asylum: English Language
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Home Department, what assessment she has made of the minimum necessary standard of spoken and written English for a refugee to integrate in the UK.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 21 February 2018

The Home Office recognises the importance of English language for refugee integration. Refugees are able to access English language classes through the Department for Education’s Adult Education Budget, in the same way as someone from the UK. An additional £10m was provided to provide more English language classes for refugees resettled under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme.

Not all those who make their own way to the UK to seek asylum will be found to be refugees and nearly all will have travelled through other safe countries to get to the UK. This is why support towards integration is offered only when asylum seekers are granted refugee status.

The Home Office does not fund English classes for asylum seekers. Asylum seekers aged 19 or over become eligible for a 50% contribution to the costs of English language classes through the Adult Education Budget, when they have been legally in the UK for longer than six months and are awaiting a decision on their asylum claim or have failed in their claim but have been granted support under the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. No data is held nationally on the numbers of asylum seekers accessing free English classes. Those learning English as a second language, including asylum seekers and refugees, are individuals with different starting points of English language proficiency who will learn English at different rates, meaning the number of teaching hours to progress English language capability will vary considerably.

The level of English required to enable refugee integration will also vary by individual, however, the Home Office considers ESOL entry level three to be the standard to aim for, as employment opportunities are greater for those with this level of English language capability.

Grouped Questions: 127586 | 127587 | 127589
Q
(Bristol West)
Asked on: 08 February 2018
Home Office
Asylum: English Language
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Home Department, what assessment her Department has made of the minimum total teaching time in English as a second language that is required to allow asylum seekers to achieve adequate standards of spoken and written English.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 21 February 2018

The Home Office recognises the importance of English language for refugee integration. Refugees are able to access English language classes through the Department for Education’s Adult Education Budget, in the same way as someone from the UK. An additional £10m was provided to provide more English language classes for refugees resettled under the Vulnerable Persons Resettlement Scheme.

Not all those who make their own way to the UK to seek asylum will be found to be refugees and nearly all will have travelled through other safe countries to get to the UK. This is why support towards integration is offered only when asylum seekers are granted refugee status.

The Home Office does not fund English classes for asylum seekers. Asylum seekers aged 19 or over become eligible for a 50% contribution to the costs of English language classes through the Adult Education Budget, when they have been legally in the UK for longer than six months and are awaiting a decision on their asylum claim or have failed in their claim but have been granted support under the Immigration and Asylum Act 1999. No data is held nationally on the numbers of asylum seekers accessing free English classes. Those learning English as a second language, including asylum seekers and refugees, are individuals with different starting points of English language proficiency who will learn English at different rates, meaning the number of teaching hours to progress English language capability will vary considerably.

The level of English required to enable refugee integration will also vary by individual, however, the Home Office considers ESOL entry level three to be the standard to aim for, as employment opportunities are greater for those with this level of English language capability.

Grouped Questions: 127586 | 127587 | 127588
Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 February 2018
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will publish the data held by her Department on the average length of time taken to make a decision on an asylum support application.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 20 February 2018

The Home Office monitors closely the performance of asylum support application decision making and has a range of targets for processing support applications depending on the nature of the application being made. However information on processing times is not recorded in a format suitable for publication and there are no plans to publish such statistics at this time.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 February 2018
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if she will make it her policy to publishing data on length of time taken for decisions to be made on applications for asylum support on a quarterly basis.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 20 February 2018

The Home Office monitors closely the performance of asylum support application decision making and has a range of targets for processing support applications depending on the nature of the application being made. However information on processing times is not recorded in a format suitable for publication and there are no plans to publish such statistics at this time.

Q
(Bristol West)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 07 February 2018
Home Office
Asylum: Housing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information her Department collects on the length of stay in initial accommodation for people applying for Section 95, non-emergency, asylum support.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 20 February 2018

The Home Office closely monitors the length of stay of asylum seekers in Initial Accommodation and aims to move people to Dispersed Accommodation within 19 days. However, some stay in Initial Accommodation for shorter or longer periods depending on their individual needs. Information on the length of stay of people in Initial Accommodation is not currently recorded in a format suitable for publication.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-100 out of 482
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100