Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Neil O'Brien
(Harborough)
Asked on: 24 July 2019
Department of Health and Social Care
Mental Health Services: Children and Young People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, how much each clinical commissioning group has spent on child and adolescent mental health services in each year since 2013.
A
Corrected answer by: Ms Nadine Dorries
Corrected on: 10 September 2019
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 09 September 2019.
The correct answer should have been:

Information on spend on mental health provision for children and young people aged 0-25, by clinical commissioning group is not available prior to 2016/17. Details of spend for 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 is set out in the attached table. This includes spend on eating disorders but excludes spend on learning disabilities.

This information is included in the Mental Health Five Year Forward View Dashboard, published by NHS England, which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/taskforce/imp/mh-dashboard/

CAMHS Spend since 2013 (Excel SpreadSheet, 29.97 KB)
A
Answered by: Ms Nadine Dorries
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Information on spend on mental health provision for children and young people aged 0-25, by clinical commissioning group is not available prior to 2016/17. Details of spend for 2016/17, 2017/18 and 2018/19 is set out in the attached table. This includes spend on eating disorders but excludes spend on learning disabilities.

This information is included in the Mental Health Five Year Forward View Dashboard, published by NHS England, which is available at the following link:

https://www.england.nhs.uk/mental-health/taskforce/imp/mh-dashboard/

CAMHS Spend since 2013 (Excel SpreadSheet, 29.97 KB)
Q
(Dover)
Asked on: 14 February 2019
Home Office
UK-France Migration Committee
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12th February to Question 218262 on UK-France Migration Committee, for what reason the dates and locations of those meetings were not provided in the answer.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 09 September 2019

As previously advised in the response to Question 218262, the UK-France Migration Committee meets on a bi-monthly basis and is hosted alternately by the UK Home Office and French Interior Ministry. It is not Home Office policy to release detailed information on meetings that ministers and/or officials attend


As regards payments to the French Government, no additional payments have been made beyond those detailed in the response to Question 217548, dated 12th February 2019.

Grouped Questions: 221671
Q
(Dover)
Asked on: 14 February 2019
Home Office
Human Trafficking and Immigration: France
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, pursuant to the Answer of 12 February 2019 to Question 217548 on Human Trafficking and Immigration: France, whether any other payments in cash or kind have been made to France in connection with (a) border security, (b) infrastructure and (c) countering organised crime and people trafficking in addition to those set out in that answer.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 09 September 2019

As previously advised in the response to Question 218262, the UK-France Migration Committee meets on a bi-monthly basis and is hosted alternately by the UK Home Office and French Interior Ministry. It is not Home Office policy to release detailed information on meetings that ministers and/or officials attend


As regards payments to the French Government, no additional payments have been made beyond those detailed in the response to Question 217548, dated 12th February 2019.

Grouped Questions: 221662
Q
(Hornsey and Wood Green)
Asked on: 25 February 2019
Home Office
Firearms and Knives: Haringey
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information his Department holds on the number of incidents involving (a) knives and (b) firearms in the London Borough of Haringey for 2018.
A
Corrected answer by: Kit Malthouse
Corrected on: 09 September 2019
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 05 March 2019.
The correct answer should have been:

The information requested is not collected centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of offences involving knives or firearms recorded by the police in England and Wales at the Police Force Area level but not at local authority level.

Information on offences involving knives / sharp instruments or firearms by Police Force Area can be found in the Offences involving the use of weapons data tables published by the Office for National Statistics, available here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/offencesinvolvingtheuseofweaponsdatatables

The information requested is not collected centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of offences involving knives or firearms recorded by the police in England and Wales at the Police Force Area level but not at local authority level.

Information on offences involving knives / sharp instruments or firearms by Police Force Area can be found in the Offences involving the use of weapons data tables published by the Office for National Statistics, available here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/offencesinvolvingtheuseofweaponsdatatables

A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 05 March 2019

The information requested is not collected centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of offences involving knives or firearms recorded by the police in England and Wales at the Police Force Area level but not at local authority level.

Information on offences involving knives / sharp instruments or firearms by Police Force Area can be found in the Offences involving the use of weapons data tables published by the Office for National Statistics, available here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/offencesinvolvingtheuseofweaponsdatatables

The information requested is not collected centrally.

The Home Office collects data on the number of offences involving knives or firearms recorded by the police in England and Wales at the Police Force Area level but not at local authority level.

Information on offences involving knives / sharp instruments or firearms by Police Force Area can be found in the Offences involving the use of weapons data tables published by the Office for National Statistics, available here:

https://www.ons.gov.uk/peoplepopulationandcommunity/crimeandjustice/datasets/offencesinvolvingtheuseofweaponsdatatables

Q
(Liverpool, Wavertree)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 29 April 2019
Home Office
Surveillance: Cameras
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, by what date the updated guidelines for the Surveillance Camera Code of Conduct will be published.
A
Answered by: Kit Malthouse
Answered on: 09 September 2019

The Government committed in the Home Office Biometrics Strategy 2018 to review the Surveillance Camera Code of Practice and it will be updated in due course.

Q
Asked by Chi Onwurah
(Newcastle upon Tyne Central)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 June 2019
Home Office
Visas: Africa
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, which UK visa application centres in Africa were closed between 2017 and 2019.
A
Answered by: Seema Kennedy
Answered on: 09 September 2019

UK Visas & Immigration closed no Visa Application Centres in Africa between 2017 and 2019. However, in the same period we opened additional centres in Kenya (Mombasa), Morocco (Casablanca) and Algeria (Oran). We have also introduced an annual Visa Application Centre in the Seychelles for our customers applying for student visas.

Q
Asked by Jon Trickett
(Hemsworth)
Asked on: 03 July 2019
Home Office
Home Office: Overtime
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the amount of unpaid overtime worked by staff in his Department in the last 24 months.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Information about additional hours worked by staff is not held centrally and could only be provided at disproportionate cost. Flexible work arrangements are available for staff to work outside core hours when necessary, e.g. flexi time, time off in lieu or for operational units Annualised Hours Work as an alternative to overtime. However, these arrangements are processed and monitored locally.

Q
Asked by Paul Farrelly
(Newcastle-under-Lyme)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 16 July 2019
Department for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport
ICT: Training
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Digital, Culture, Media and Sport, what recent steps his Department has taken to increase levels of IT literacy to help prevent the spread of malware and ransomware.
A
Answered by: Matt Warman
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Government is supporting increased levels of IT literacy through the refresh of the Essential Digital Skills (EDS) Framework, which sets out the skills learners require to be safe, legal and confident online, and find, manage, and store digital information securely, thereby helping them guard against malware and ransomware. The EDS framework is the basis of the training delivered through the £18m ‘Future Digital Inclusion’ programme. Delivered by a network of 5,000 Online Centres, which are primarily based in libraries and other community spaces, this programme has supported over 1 million adult learners since 2014 to develop essential digital skills.

Government is also supporting IT literacy through the introduction of a national entitlement to basic digital skills courses from 2020, similar to the existing legal entitlements for English and Maths. This will provide adults of any age the opportunity to undertake improved qualifications, based on the EDS framework, free of charge.

Government is also supporting cyber security through Cyber Aware; a campaign which aims to increase UK citizens’ and businesses’ resilience to cyber crime by encouraging the adoption of secure online behaviours. Key promoted advice includes, to always install your e-device’s latest app and software updates to make it less vulnerable to cyber threats.

In addition, the flagship skills programme GDS Academy teaches civil servants the digital skills, awareness and knowledge they need to transform and build the best public services. It offers training in subjects including agile project delivery and user-centred design. The GDS Academy runs across the country, with courses in Leeds, London, Manchester and Newcastle, as well as a partnership with the Scottish Government. More than 10,000 civil servants have been trained since it was set up in 2014.

Departments have built their digital professionalism and capability, with over 10,000 civil servants now having been trained by the GDS Academy; new standards have made services across government consistent, accessible and intuitive; and departments have delivered exemplar digital services.

Q
(Fareham)
Asked on: 16 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Welfare Assistance Schemes: Finance
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what assessment he has made of the adequacy of funding allocated to local councils for the provision of (a) support and (b) advice to families and young people in a financial crisis.
A
Answered by: Luke Hall
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
Asked by Frank Field
(Birkenhead)
Asked on: 16 July 2019
Home Office
Stop and Search: Merseyside
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent assessment he has made of the adequacy of the stop and search powers available to Merseyside Police officers who suspect an individual of carrying a knife.
A
Answered by: Mr Nick Hurd
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Stop and search is a vital policing tool when used correctly and officers have the Government's full support to use these powers in a way that is fair, lawful and effective.

Under Section 1 of the Police and Criminal Evidence Act 1984, the police in England and Wales have the power to stop and search someone if they have reasonable grounds to suspect they are in possession of an offensive weapon, including a bladed article - such as a knife.

Under Section 60 of the Criminal Justice and Public Order Act 1994, the police in England and Wales have the power to put in place temporary “no-suspicion” stop and search zones – if they reasonably believe that incidents involving serious violence may take place in that locality during that time period. When this power is authorised, police can search anyone within that area without requiring reasonable grounds to search each person.

In March 2019, the Government announced that it would roll back additional controls on the use of Section 60 powers to make it easier for officers in seven forces, including Merseyside Police, to authorise this power – to help forces further target the recent increases in serious violence.

Whilst it is important for the police to have the right powers, they also need the resources to use them. This is why we are also supporting police with additional funding. On 13 March 2019 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced a £100 million fund to tackle serious violence. £63.4 million of this funding has already been allocated to 18 police forces, including Merseyside Police which received £4.2 million, to support surge operational activity, such as increased patrols.

This money is already being put to good use. The BBC recently reported that Merseyside had recovered 14 knives in a single week following stop and searches.

Q
(Peterborough)
Asked on: 17 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Welfare Assistance Schemes
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to protect Local Welfare Assistance schemes in England.
A
Answered by: Luke Hall
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 17 July 2019
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Debts
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that families and young people have access to the help they need when faced with a financial crisis.
A
Answered by: Luke Hall
Answered on: 09 September 2019
Holding answer received on 22 July 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
Asked by Jo Stevens
(Cardiff Central)
Asked on: 18 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Sheep Meat: UK Trade with EU
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what contingency funding he has allocated for the (a) slaughter, (b) burial and (c) disposal of lamb carcasses in the event that there is a decrease in the export of lamb if the UK leaves the EU without an agreement.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
Asked by Jo Swinson
(East Dunbartonshire)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Home Office
Drugs: Organised Crime
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many people involved in the criminal exploitation of vulnerable young people in county lines operations have been charged with modern slavery offences.
A
Corrected answer by: Victoria Atkins
Corrected on: 09 September 2019
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 09 September 2019.
The correct answer should have been:

It is important that the police and local agencies have the powers they need to tackle local issues quickly and effectively. That is why we reformed the tools and powers available to tackle Anti-Social behaviour through the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.In 2019/20 Lancashire Police are receiving £285.1 million of funding, an increase of £18.4 million, on 2018/19. Funding for 2020-21 for individual forces will be announced as part of the provisional police settlement later this year. Decisions about the allocation of police resources are for Chief Constables and democratically accountable Police and Crime Commissioners, who are best placed to meet the needs of their local community.

The police and Crown Prosecution Services (CPS) are responsible for charging decisions with regards to county lines related criminality. The key is that prosecutions are brought, and the charges should cover the full range of criminality involved including Modern Slavery offences.We are working with the police and the CPS to take full advantage of powers in the Modern Slavery Act when making charging decisions against county line gang members. The CPS have issued an overview of the approach to be taken in criminal investigations and prosecutions linked to ‘county lines’ offending, with a particular focus on the relevance of the Modern Slavery Act.

A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It is important that the police and local agencies have the powers they need to tackle local issues quickly and effectively. That is why we reformed the tools and powers available to tackle Anti-Social behaviour through the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014.In 2019/20 Lancashire Police are receiving £285.1 million of funding, an increase of £18.4 million, on 2018/19. Funding for 2020-21 for individual forces will be announced as part of the provisional police settlement later this year. Decisions about the allocation of police resources are for Chief Constables and democratically accountable Police and Crime Commissioners, who are best placed to meet the needs of their local community.

The police and Crown Prosecution Services (CPS) are responsible for charging decisions with regards to county lines related criminality. The key is that prosecutions are brought, and the charges should cover the full range of criminality involved including Modern Slavery offences.We are working with the police and the CPS to take full advantage of powers in the Modern Slavery Act when making charging decisions against county line gang members. The CPS have issued an overview of the approach to be taken in criminal investigations and prosecutions linked to ‘county lines’ offending, with a particular focus on the relevance of the Modern Slavery Act.

Q
(Brighton, Pavilion)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Dutch Elm Disease: Disease Control
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what steps the Government is taking to (a) support local authorities managing and tackling elm disease and (b) ensure that Brighton and Hove City Council has adequate support to protect the National Elm Collection in the city.
A
Answered by: Zac Goldsmith
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Landowners are responsible for managing the trees on their land. All Local Authorities, including Brighton and Hove, have been provided with the legislative powers necessary to safeguard the nation’s elm population and prevent the spread of elm disease. These powers are set out in the Dutch Elm Disease (Local Authorities) Order 1984. They allow officers (appointed by the Local Authority) who suspect the presence of this disease to enter any land to inspect trees and take samples, and where disease is present, to take action to eradicate it. Government has a strong risk-based biosecurity response to reduce the pest and disease risk to trees involving comprehensive international and domestic surveillance, stringent border biosecurity, robust contingency plans and world leading research. Government invests over £30million per year on our plant health service.

Q
(Brighton, Pavilion)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Climate Change
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the July 2019 Progress Report to Parliament published by the Committee on Climate Change, for what reasons 21 of the 56 risks and opportunities identified in the UK’s Climate Change Risk Assessment have no formal actions in the National Adaptation Programme.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
Asked by Chuka Umunna
(Streatham)
Asked on: 22 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Veterinary Medicine: ICT
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, what parts of the Government’s plan for accessing animal medicine IT systems in the event of a no deal Brexit have been implemented.
A
Answered by: George Eustice
Answered on: 09 September 2019

It has not proved possible to respond to the hon. Member in the time available before Prorogation.

Q
Asked by Angela Smith
(Penistone and Stocksbridge)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Animal Welfare: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, how many local authorities in England have submitted data for 2019 on the number of licences they have issued under the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018.
A
Answered by: Zac Goldsmith
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Under regulation 29 of The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 it is a requirement for local authorities in England to submit specified information relating to licensable activities in their respective areas. Such information should be submitted to the Secretary of State by 31 May for each preceding year 1 April to 31 March. Local authorities have submitted information to the Secretary of State for this year and Defra is analysing the data. We aim to publish the information later this year.

Grouped Questions: 280992 | 280993
Q
Asked by Angela Smith
(Penistone and Stocksbridge)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Animal Welfare: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to the Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018, how many licences have been issued under those regulations in 2019 for (a) breeding dogs, (b) providing or arranging for the provision of boarding for cats, (c) providing or arranging for the provision of boarding for dogs in kennels, (d) providing or arranging for the provision of day care for dogs, (e) hiring out horses, (f) selling animals as pets and (g) keeping or training animals for exhibition.
A
Answered by: Zac Goldsmith
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Under regulation 29 of The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 it is a requirement for local authorities in England to submit specified information relating to licensable activities in their respective areas. Such information should be submitted to the Secretary of State by 31 May for each preceding year 1 April to 31 March. Local authorities have submitted information to the Secretary of State for this year and Defra is analysing the data. We aim to publish the information later this year.

Grouped Questions: 280991 | 280993
Q
Asked by Angela Smith
(Penistone and Stocksbridge)
Asked on: 23 July 2019
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Animal Welfare: Licensing
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs, with reference to The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018, what the (a) average fee and (b) lowest and highest charges for licences issued in England in 2019 to date across all local authorities was for (i) breeding dogs, (ii) providing or arranging for the provision of boarding for cats, (iii) providing or arranging for the provision of boarding for dogs in kennels, (iv) providing or arranging for the provision of day care for dogs, (v) hiring out horses, (vi) selling animals as pets and (vii) keeping or training animals for exhibition.
A
Answered by: Zac Goldsmith
Answered on: 09 September 2019

Under regulation 29 of The Animal Welfare (Licensing of Activities Involving Animals) (England) Regulations 2018 it is a requirement for local authorities in England to submit specified information relating to licensable activities in their respective areas. Such information should be submitted to the Secretary of State by 31 May for each preceding year 1 April to 31 March. Local authorities have submitted information to the Secretary of State for this year and Defra is analysing the data. We aim to publish the information later this year.

Grouped Questions: 280991 | 280992
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