Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-20 out of 78185
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Chris Ruane
(Vale of Clwyd)
Asked on: 01 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Crimes of Violence and Self-harm
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many incidents of (a) self harm, (b) violence against prisoners and (c) violence against prison staff per 100 prisoners there were in each prison in each of the last five years.
A
Corrected answer by: Rory Stewart
Corrected on: 21 November 2018
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 09 November 2018.
The correct answer should have been:

The tables show the numbers of self-harm incidents, assault incidents on prisoners, and assault incidents on staff, per 100 prisoners, for each prison from 2013 to 2017 inclusive.

The Government takes very seriously its responsibility to keep prisoners safe, and we are committed to reducing the incidence of self-harm across the estate. This is why we have established a prison safety programme through which we are taking forward a comprehensive set of actions to improve safety in custody. We have invested in over 3,000 additional staff in order to deliver consistent, purposeful regimes. We have also introduced the new key worker role, under which staff can give prisoners more effective challenge and support.

Our prison staff work incredibly hard and we are under no illusions about the challenges they face. We are taking urgent action to make prisons safer, and assaults on our staff will never be tolerated. That is why we are working with the Police and Crown Prosecution Service to ensure successful prosecutions of those who assault them. It is also why the Government supported the recently passed Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act, which increases sentences for those who attack emergency workers, including prison officers.

PQ 186964 - Tables (Excel SpreadSheet, 75.15 KB)
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 09 November 2018

The tables show the numbers of self-harm incidents, assault incidents on prisoners, and assault incidents on staff, per 100 prisoners, for each prison from 2013 to 2017 inclusive.

The Government takes very seriously its responsibility to keep prisoners safe, and we are committed to reducing the incidence of self-harm across the estate. This is why we have established a prison safety programme through which we are taking forward a comprehensive set of actions to improve safety in custody. We have invested in over 3,000 additional staff in order to deliver consistent, purposeful regimes. We have also introduced the new key worker role, under which staff can give prisoners more effective challenge and support.

Our prison staff work incredibly hard and we are under no illusions about the challenges they face. We are taking urgent action to make prisons safer, and assaults on our staff will never be tolerated. That is why we are working with the Police and Crown Prosecution Service to ensure successful prosecutions of those who assault them. It is also why the Government supported the recently passed Assaults on Emergency Workers (Offences) Act, which increases sentences for those who attack emergency workers, including prison officers.

PQ 186964 - Tables (Excel SpreadSheet, 75.15 KB)
Q
(Leeds East)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 05 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Capital Investment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, to which programmes the £1.3 billion of capital spending on prisons announced following the 2015 spending review has been allocated.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 21 November 2018

As set out on the 26 June at the Justice Select Committee and in the 2017 manifesto, we remain committed to building up to 10,000 modern and decent prison places to replace old, expensive and unsuitable accommodation. We will deliver this through a combination of both new prisons and the reconfiguration of existing establishments, to enable governors to achieve better outcomes.

While our ambition remains the same, the way that we will deliver this programme has changed meaning that a direct comparison to the £1.3 billion figure is not appropriate. As the Chancellor set out in the budget on 30 October, we now intend to build the first two prisons through public capital at Wellingborough, which is due to open in 2021 and Glen Parva, which we expect to open in 2022 and we continue to explore funding options for the remaining prison places. We are planning to launch a competition later this year to establish a framework from which the operators of the new prisons will be chosen.

Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 05 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Probation: Death
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 1 November 2018 to Question 184996 on Probation: Death, if he will provide that information for each year since 2010.
A
Corrected answer by: Rory Stewart
Corrected on: 21 November 2018
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 14 November 2018.
The correct answer should have been:

The information requested is provided in the attached table. As per the answer to PQ 184996, please note that offenders may appear both within the caseload figures of court orders (including community orders and suspended sentence orders), and post-release supervision.

The National Probation Service and Community Rehabilitation Companies work closely with other agencies to support offenders in the community. When an offender being supervised by Probation dies, the Probation provider must examine the circumstances of the death and identify areas to improve practice. While we work extremely closely with each offender before and after release to help them find the support they need, we do not have sole responsibility for caring for these offenders. We are clear, however, that they should receive the same level of care as other members of the public.

PQ188194 - Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 14.51 KB)
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 14 November 2018

The information requested is provided in the attached table. As per the answer to PQ 184996, please note that offenders may appear both within the caseload figures of court orders (including community orders and suspended sentence orders), and post-release supervision.

The National Probation Service and Community Rehabilitation Companies work closely with other agencies to support offenders in the community. When an offender being supervised by Probation dies, the Probation provider must examine the circumstances of the death and identify areas to improve practice. While we work extremely closely with each offender before and after release to help them find the support they need, we do not have sole responsibility for caring for these offenders. We are clear, however, that they should receive the same level of care as other members of the public.

PQ188194 - Table (Excel SpreadSheet, 14.51 KB)
Q
(Ealing, Southall)
Asked on: 05 November 2018
Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy
Fossil Fuels
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy, what recent assessment his Department has made of the viability of removing fossil fuels from the UK's energy generation mix.
A
Answered by: Claire Perry
Answered on: 21 November 2018

Our Clean Growth Strategy set out the Government’s ambition for a diverse electricity system that supplies our homes and businesses with secure, affordable and clean power.[1]

We have already committed to phasing out generating power from coal by 2025[2] and recognise that reducing emissions in the power sector means developing low carbon sources of electricity that are both cheap and clean.

There is a number of decarbonisation pathways that balance the role of clean power sources with the use of fossil fuel generation such as from gas. These include those outlined in our Clean Growth Strategy[3], and the latest BEIS Energy and Emissions Projections.[4]

[1] See: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/clean-growth-strategy

[2] See: https://www.gov.uk/government/consultations/coal-generation-in-great-britain-the-pathway-to-a-low-carbon-future

[3] See: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/clean-growth-strategy

[4] See: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/updated-energy-and-emissions-projections-2017

Q
Asked on: 05 November 2018
Treasury
Overseas Loans: Republic of Ireland
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how much they have loaned to the Republic of Ireland during the past decade; and of those loans, (1) what capital has been repaid, and (2) how much interest has been received.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 21 November 2018

I refer the noble Lord to the most recent statutory report under section 2 of the Loans to Ireland Act 2010, which was laid in Parliament on 15 October 2018. The report shows that the outstanding principal is £3,226,960,000, with repayments due in tranches from 15 April 2019 until 26 March 2021. Interest payments have been paid twice-yearly since 15 December 2011 and payments received so far total £483,359,983.93. The government expects the loan to be repaid on time and in full.

[1] The statutory report is available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/report-under-section-2-of-the-loans-to-ireland-act-2010-1-april-2018-to-30-september-2018

Loans to Ireland (PDF Document, 249.13 KB)
Q
Asked by Royston Smith
(Southampton, Itchen)
Asked on: 07 November 2018
Department for Exiting the European Union
Boats
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, what assessment his Department has made of the areas in EU waters in which UK boats will be able to sail after the UK leaves the EU.
A
Answered by: Mr Robin Walker
Answered on: 21 November 2018

Negotiations on the future relationship between the EU and the UK are ongoing. To ensure that citizens and businesses in the UK and across the EU can plan for life after our withdrawal with confidence. We have agreed an implementation period that will last for 21 months beginning on exit day until 31 December 2020. During the implementation period, UK boats will have the same access to EU waters as they do now.

The UK Government sees no reason why pleasure vessels used for recreational purposes should see any change as a result of the UK’s exit from the EU. For the most part, it is the rules and regulations of coastal states that apply rather than EU legislation, and maritime transport is liberalised at the international level.

We understand that other matters will be relevant to the owners of boats such as the right to the land, dock and refuel and these will be covered by our negotiations on the future relationship.

Asked on: 12 November 2018
Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs
Water Voles: Conservation
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what action they are taking to prevent further decline in the population of water voles in the UK.
A
Answered on: 21 November 2018

The water vole is a protected species, listed under Schedule 5 of the Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 and a species identified as being of principal importance under the Natural Environment and Rural Communities Act 2006. As part of this, the species has a number of priority actions assigned to it, and as this is a devolved matter, the following information refers to actions in England.

Natural England is committed to the actions set out in the Species Action Plan for water voles, alongside partner organisations noted within the plan, and recently published ‘A Review of the Population and Conservation Status of British Mammals’, which identifies and confirms areas of work where continued resource should be placed to conserve and enhance water vole populations. Natural England is working with Sussex University, Brighton University, the Wildlife Trusts and People’s Trust for Endangered Species to undertake a habitat suitability mapping exercise to maximise conservation gain using a landscape scale approach. Dependent on these findings and the results of another project, with WildCru (Oxford University) and specialist water vole consultants assessing mitigation techniques used in development, Natural England is considering adapting its licensing policies with the aim of maximising conservation gain for the species at a landscape scale.

Since 2010 the Environment Agency has delivered 328 projects that included habitat creation or improvement for the benefit of water voles. It has restored 6,725 hectares and created 6,330 hectares of priority habitat in rivers, lakes and coastal waters. The Environment Agency has delivered training to relevant staff across its organisation to raise awareness of water voles and their protection, and screens its activities to ensure water voles and their habitats are protected from damage.

Agri-environment schemes such as Countryside Stewardship provide suitable habitat for wildlife including water voles and other small mammals. Scheme options that benefit water voles include buffer strips alongside ponds, ditches, and other watercourses and fencing alongside watercourses to protect bankside vegetation.

In addition, the Forestry Commission is currently undertaking a flagship project for water voles in Kielder Forest. Having eradicated the mink there, the Forestry Commission is working with the Tyne Rivers Trust, Northumberland Wildlife Trust and the University of Aberdeen on the restoration of water voles and their habitats across the North Tyne catchment, and has already released hundreds of water voles into the area.

Asked on: 12 November 2018
Department for International Development
Jordan: Floods
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assistance they have offered to the Jordanian authorities following the recent flash floods in southern Jordan; and whether they have offered any practical assistance in the protection of the UNESCO World Heritage site of Petra.
A
Answered by: Lord Bates
Answered on: 21 November 2018

The UK is monitoring the flash flooding in Jordan closely, and our thoughts are with those affected. The Jordanian Government is currently leading the response in providing assistance.

DFID has provided £18.9m to support UNESCO initiatives in 2018. This includes the UNESCO World Heritage International Assistance Fund from which Petra has received aid in the past. The Jordanian Government has not requested support in relation to the recent flooding, and we are not aware of any requests for assistance from UNESCO.

Q
Asked on: 12 November 2018
Department for Transport
Ports
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government, further to the Written Answer by Baroness Sugg on 25 October (HL10562), what is their forecast for the level of growth in (1) the UK’s port unit load traffic, and (2) port productivity for each of the next five years; and what is their forecast in the event of a no-deal outcome to the Brexit negotiations.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 21 November 2018

The Department for Transport is currently preparing port freight demand forecasts, and will publish these once complete. The Government does not produce forecasts of port productivity.

The Government expects to complete a withdrawal deal, but our aim in the event of a no-deal outcome is to ensure that unit-load traffic can continue to flow as expeditiously and efficiently as possible so that the volume of trade in aggregate can be maintained.

Q
Asked by Alex Burghart
(Brentwood and Ongar)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 12 November 2018
Department for International Trade
Exports
Commons
What progress the Government has made on its export strategy.
A
Answered by: Graham Stuart
Answered on: 21 November 2018

The Export Strategy, launched in August this year, sets out a new offer to business that provides the support and finance to help UK businesses export. This was created in consultation with business and business organisations to help maximise our exports across the whole of the UK.


Much has already been achieved, like the expansion of finance-led Supplier Fairs delivered by UK Export Finance and an enhanced digital service linking businesses with thousands of export opportunities on great.gov.uk. Preparations to implement further commitments are also well developed, with a view to these being rolled out over coming months.

Q
Asked by John Healey
(Wentworth and Dearne)
Asked on: 12 November 2018
Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government
Leasehold: Ground Rent
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Housing, Communities and Local Government, pursuant to the Answer of 7 November 2018 to Question 186951 on Leasehold: Ground Rent, what the average ground rent paid was in each region based on the the latest English Housing Survey data.
A
Answered by: James Brokenshire
Answered on: 21 November 2018

I refer the Rt Hon Member to my answer to Question UIN 186951 on 7 November 2018.

Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 12 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Private Sector
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 18 September 2018 to Question 172523 on Prisons: Private Sector, when his Department stopped holding data on the number of staff certified under Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 21 November 2018

With regards to when the Ministry of Justice stopped holding data on the number of certified staff and the reasons for doing so, it may help if I explain that the MoJ has never collected this information. Whilst Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 confirms that a Prison Custody Officer (PCO) is approved by the Secretary of State for the purpose of performing escort and custodial duties, it does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish the information requested.

The Secretary of State approves PCOs for the purpose of performing escort functions or custodial duties or both and PCO’s are accordingly authorised to perform them. However, there is not a process in place whereby the Secretary of State formally issues certificates to new PCOs, and as mentioned previously, Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish such information.

All staffing matters, including the responsibility for ensuring the availability of sufficiently trained and experienced staff to maintain safe and decent prisons, lies with contractors. There is no requirement in the contracts to agree staffing levels with the Ministry of Justice. Therefore, all staff working in privately managed prisons are fully certified and, as such, the figures we hold, and have provided on several occasions, include the funded posts for fully certified staff.

As you know, each privately managed prison has a full-time on-site Controller employed by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). The Controller has regular review meetings with the contractor against a range of performance indicators that will reflect numbers of staff in post, recruitment, training, sickness, and attrition. Any concerns in relation to these performance indicators are discussed at these meetings. Where action is needed, progress is monitored by the Controller and escalated within HMPPS where appropriate action can be taken in accordance with the contract. This may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions.

Grouped Questions: 190557 | 190560 | 190561 | 190939
Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 12 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Private Sector
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, pursuant to the Answer of 18 September 2018 to Question 172523 on Prisons: Private Sector, for what reason his Department stopped holding data on the number of staff at each privately operated prison certified under Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 21 November 2018

With regards to when the Ministry of Justice stopped holding data on the number of certified staff and the reasons for doing so, it may help if I explain that the MoJ has never collected this information. Whilst Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 confirms that a Prison Custody Officer (PCO) is approved by the Secretary of State for the purpose of performing escort and custodial duties, it does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish the information requested.

The Secretary of State approves PCOs for the purpose of performing escort functions or custodial duties or both and PCO’s are accordingly authorised to perform them. However, there is not a process in place whereby the Secretary of State formally issues certificates to new PCOs, and as mentioned previously, Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish such information.

All staffing matters, including the responsibility for ensuring the availability of sufficiently trained and experienced staff to maintain safe and decent prisons, lies with contractors. There is no requirement in the contracts to agree staffing levels with the Ministry of Justice. Therefore, all staff working in privately managed prisons are fully certified and, as such, the figures we hold, and have provided on several occasions, include the funded posts for fully certified staff.

As you know, each privately managed prison has a full-time on-site Controller employed by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). The Controller has regular review meetings with the contractor against a range of performance indicators that will reflect numbers of staff in post, recruitment, training, sickness, and attrition. Any concerns in relation to these performance indicators are discussed at these meetings. Where action is needed, progress is monitored by the Controller and escalated within HMPPS where appropriate action can be taken in accordance with the contract. This may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions.

Grouped Questions: 190556 | 190560 | 190561 | 190939
Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 12 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prison Officers: Recruitment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many new Officer Certificates under Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 have been issued by his Department in each month since January 2018.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 21 November 2018

With regards to when the Ministry of Justice stopped holding data on the number of certified staff and the reasons for doing so, it may help if I explain that the MoJ has never collected this information. Whilst Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 confirms that a Prison Custody Officer (PCO) is approved by the Secretary of State for the purpose of performing escort and custodial duties, it does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish the information requested.

The Secretary of State approves PCOs for the purpose of performing escort functions or custodial duties or both and PCO’s are accordingly authorised to perform them. However, there is not a process in place whereby the Secretary of State formally issues certificates to new PCOs, and as mentioned previously, Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish such information.

All staffing matters, including the responsibility for ensuring the availability of sufficiently trained and experienced staff to maintain safe and decent prisons, lies with contractors. There is no requirement in the contracts to agree staffing levels with the Ministry of Justice. Therefore, all staff working in privately managed prisons are fully certified and, as such, the figures we hold, and have provided on several occasions, include the funded posts for fully certified staff.

As you know, each privately managed prison has a full-time on-site Controller employed by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). The Controller has regular review meetings with the contractor against a range of performance indicators that will reflect numbers of staff in post, recruitment, training, sickness, and attrition. Any concerns in relation to these performance indicators are discussed at these meetings. Where action is needed, progress is monitored by the Controller and escalated within HMPPS where appropriate action can be taken in accordance with the contract. This may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions.

Grouped Questions: 190556 | 190557 | 190561 | 190939
Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 12 November 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prison Officers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many officer certificates under Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 have been withdrawn by his Department in each month since January 2018.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 21 November 2018

With regards to when the Ministry of Justice stopped holding data on the number of certified staff and the reasons for doing so, it may help if I explain that the MoJ has never collected this information. Whilst Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 confirms that a Prison Custody Officer (PCO) is approved by the Secretary of State for the purpose of performing escort and custodial duties, it does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish the information requested.

The Secretary of State approves PCOs for the purpose of performing escort functions or custodial duties or both and PCO’s are accordingly authorised to perform them. However, there is not a process in place whereby the Secretary of State formally issues certificates to new PCOs, and as mentioned previously, Section 89 of the Criminal Justice Act 1991 does not oblige the Secretary of State to collect or publish such information.

All staffing matters, including the responsibility for ensuring the availability of sufficiently trained and experienced staff to maintain safe and decent prisons, lies with contractors. There is no requirement in the contracts to agree staffing levels with the Ministry of Justice. Therefore, all staff working in privately managed prisons are fully certified and, as such, the figures we hold, and have provided on several occasions, include the funded posts for fully certified staff.

As you know, each privately managed prison has a full-time on-site Controller employed by HM Prison and Probation Service (HMPPS). The Controller has regular review meetings with the contractor against a range of performance indicators that will reflect numbers of staff in post, recruitment, training, sickness, and attrition. Any concerns in relation to these performance indicators are discussed at these meetings. Where action is needed, progress is monitored by the Controller and escalated within HMPPS where appropriate action can be taken in accordance with the contract. This may include a requirement for urgent improvement and/or financial deductions.

Grouped Questions: 190556 | 190557 | 190560 | 190939
Q
(Hendon)
Asked on: 12 November 2018
Department for Education
Teachers
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Education, what steps his Department is taking to ensure that teaching is an attractive and fulfilling profession.
A
Answered by: Nick Gibb
Answered on: 21 November 2018
Holding answer received on 20 November 2018

The Government is delivering a pay rise of up to 3.5% for classroom teachers on the main pay range, 2% for those on the upper pay range and 1.5% for those in leadership positions. This is being supported by a Teachers Pay Grant of over £500 million covering the difference between the first 1% that schools would have been anticipating under the previous public sector pay cap and the 2018 award.

The Department has put in place a range of measures, including generous bursaries, worth up to £26,000 for priority subjects, to encourage trainees to take key subjects such as mathematics and physics. The Department is also testing new financial incentives for priority subject teachers. These include early-career payments for new maths teachers and a student loan reimbursement scheme for languages and science teachers.

The Department invests in a range of programmes to help teachers develop the knowledge and skills required to be successful in moving into school leadership positions. These include the recently strengthened National Professional Qualifications (NPQs), with over £10m made available to help schools in priority areas benefit from this high-quality professional development.

Earlier this year the Department announced the development of a new strategy to drive recruitment and boost retention of teachers. The strategy will cover a wide range of areas including professional development, workload, career progression, flexible working and entry routes into teaching.

Q
(Oxford East)
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Hospitals: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what evidence his Department holds on the effect on the quality of care of fines levied as a result of hospitals breaching targets; and whether he is taking steps to ensure that such fines do not detract from the provision of care to potentially affected populations.
A
Answered by: Stephen Hammond
Answered on: 21 November 2018

All providers of National Health Service-funded healthcare services are expected to meet a range of national standards, other operational standards and quality requirements. These are set out in the NHS Standard Contract along with the consequences of breaches of these. In many cases, the consequence would be a financial sanction.

Since April 2016, most NHS providers agreeing to meet financial control targets as part of the sustainability funding programme are exempt from such sanctions. However, any revenue withheld is reinvested in the local healthcare system.

Q
(Oxford East)
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Health Services: Standards
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, what assessment his Department has made of the potential effectiveness of quality incentive schemes in improving the quality of care to patients.
A
Answered by: Caroline Dinenage
Answered on: 21 November 2018

Several different quality incentive schemes operate in the National Health Service.

The Quality and Outcomes Framework is a voluntary pay for performance scheme within the general practitioner contract. It focuses upon improving the care of patients with one or more of 25 long term conditions. In 2018, NHS England undertook and published a Review of the Quality and Outcomes Framework which drew upon published evidence to evaluate its effectiveness and identify opportunities for reform. The recommendations made in the report are the subject of ongoing discussions with the General Practitioners Committee of the British Medical Association.

The Commissioning for Quality and Innovation (CQUIN) and Quality Premium schemes are intended to drive improvement by providers, and are administered by clinical commissioning groups and NHS England. The indicators in both are routinely reviewed as part of the NHS Planning Round to ensure that the schemes reflect the latest clinical priorities.

CQUIN has demonstrably helped secure improvements in certain areas: e.g. sepsis and venous thromboembolism management, hepatitis C treatment and staff flu vaccinations. However, we are also aware that some indicators have been less impactful, for example where we have pursued complex service changes or goals without a standard implementation method. The schemes are being reviewed with a view to changes in 2019/20.

Q
(Oxford East)
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Integrated Care Systems
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether he is taking steps to ensure that the proposed whole population annual budget for Integrated Care Provider contracts does not create (a) incentives to underbid to obtain contracts and (b) other perverse incentives.
A
Answered by: Stephen Hammond
Answered on: 21 November 2018

NHS England launched a 12 week public consultation on the proposed contracting arrangements for integrated care providers (ICPs) on 3 August 2018 which concluded on 26 October. More information is available at the following link:

https://www.engage.england.nhs.uk/consultation/proposed-contracting-arrangements-for-icps/

NHS England will publish a response to the consultation following full consideration of responses and feedback.

The consultation documents provide more detail about NHS England’s current proposals for ICPs, including the proposed integrated budget.

Q
Asked by Jim Shannon
(Strangford)
Asked on: 13 November 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Prescription Drugs
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, whether the Government has provided guidance to manufacturers on communicating the potential health benefits of their products to consumers.
A
Answered by: Stephen Hammond
Answered on: 21 November 2018

The Government has not provided guidance to manufacturers on communicating the potential health benefits of their products provided through the NHS Supply Chain to consumers.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-20 out of 78185
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100