Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

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Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
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Q
Asked by Keith Vaz
(Leicester East)
Asked on: 13 July 2018
Home Office
Libya: Islamic State
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what recent steps the Government has taken to counter Daesh in Libya.
A
Answered by: Mr Ben Wallace
Answered on: 20 September 2018

Libya is a member of the Global Coalition against Daesh and, in coordination with our international partners, the UK has been working closely with the Libyan Government to tackle violent extremism in Libya and re-build those areas previously under Daesh control.


Daesh is losing in Libya. In December 2016, forces aligned to Libya’s Government of National Accord (GNA), with US Air Support, expelled Daesh from their main area of control – the city of Sirte. However, the group still remains a threat to Libya and was able to carry out a suicide attack on the Higher National Elections Commission in May 2018.


Daesh and other extremist groups will not be defeated completely until there is a strong national Government in Libya. The UK is supporting UN-led efforts to restore effective governance in Libya, which is key to the long term stability of Libya and the region. Last year the Government spent over £10m on stabilisation in Libya, including support to civil society organisations and local municipalities, and countering illegal migration and radicalisation. By supporting stability we are helping combat the drivers of violent extremism and terrorism in Libya.

Q
Asked by Tom Brake
(Carshalton and Wallington)
Asked on: 24 July 2018
Cabinet Office
Tourism: Migrant Workers
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what figures the Government holds on the number of EU citizens working in the UK tourism industry in (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017 and (d) 2018.
A
Answered by: Chloe Smith
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

UKSA response (PDF Document, 88.81 KB)
Grouped Questions: 167841
Q
Asked by Tom Brake
(Carshalton and Wallington)
Asked on: 24 July 2018
Cabinet Office
Tourism: Migrant Workers
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what information the Government holds on the number of non-UK EU citizens working on seasonal work contracts in the UK tourism sector in (a) 2015, (b) 2016, (c) 2017 and (d) 2018 to date.
A
Answered by: Chloe Smith
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The information requested falls within the responsibility of the UK Statistics Authority. I have asked the Authority to reply.

UKSA response (PDF Document, 88.81 KB)
Grouped Questions: 167829
Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 06 September 2018
Ministry of Justice
Offenders: Housing
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether all prisons in England and Wales ensure that those leaving on discharge have plans for suitable and affordable accommodation.
A
Answered by: Lord Keen of Elie
Answered on: 20 September 2018

As part of the reforms to probation in 2015 all offenders, including those sentenced to less than 12 months, now get targeted support from probation providers when they leave prison to help them reintegrate into society. This includes working with local partners to help them find accommodation, which is provided by the local authority.

On 27 July, the MOJ announced our intention to end contracts with Community Rehabilitation Companies in 2020.We will be consulting on introducing changes so that probation services do more to help offenders find accommodation and employment on release from custody. We are investing an additional £22m per annum during the current contract period to ensure that CRCs deliver an enhanced ‘Through the Gate’ service to offenders leaving prison. This will also include sustained support to find accommodation and employment on discharge.

As part of the Government’s Rough Sleeping strategy, MoJ and the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government (MHCLG), will be investing approximately £6m over two years in a pilot scheme to help ex-offenders secure suitable accommodation upon release. The Cabinet Office has also introduced a new Reducing Reoffending Board that will work across government to tackle some of the main causes of reoffending, including the lack of suitable accommodation on release

Asked on: 06 September 2018
The Senior Deputy Speaker
House of Lords: Plastics
Lords
To ask the Senior Deputy Speaker what action is being taken by the House of Lords Administration to reduce its use of plastic.
A
Answered by: Lord Laming
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Senior Deputy Speaker has asked me, as Chairman of the Services Committee, to respond on his behalf.

In April 2018 the Services Committee endorsed a number of measures to reduce the consumption of single-use plastics:

A. Remove water in plastic bottles from sale in catering venues– This will be effective from October 2018, reducing plastic waste immediately.

B. Eliminate the consumption of plastic-lined take-away cups for hot drinks (through substitution) and reduce overall take-away cup waste– This will be effective from October 2018, with plastic-lined disposable cups replaced with a compostable alternative.

In addition, Catering & Retail Services (CRS) will continue to incentivise customers to use china mugs, or their own re-usable cups, when purchasing hot drinks by offering a 10p discount on every purchase. A 25p surcharge on all hot drinks purchased in a disposable take-away cup will be introduced from October 2018 for a twelve-month trial.

C. Substitute the remainder of CRS plastic disposable items– In early 2018 all plastic drinking straws supplied by Catering & Retail Services were replaced with compostable paper straws. Individual condiment sachets have also been replaced with condiment bottles. Remaining plastic catering disposable items used by Catering & Retail Services will be replaced with compostable alternatives from October 2018.

The plastic tumbler cups currently provided in meeting rooms and kitchen facilities will also be replaced with compostable cups.

To capture compostable disposable products (including take-away cups) effectively, 800 compostable waste bins have been purchased and will be deployed across the Estate during the 2018 conference recess.

D. Substitute single-use plastic carrier bags in Retail Services with carrier bags made from paper– The current plastic carrier bag stock is being depleted and alternative bags made from paper (using material from responsibly-managed, FSC-certified forests) have been identified as a replacement.

The following additional measures are being taken:

  • The development of a ‘green’ stationery catalogue, to reduce the consumption of single-use avoidable plastics in stationery purchasing (implementation anticipated for October 2018);
  • The development of a pilot for a re-usable packaging ‘totes’ scheme at the Off-Site Consolidation Centre for all deliveries (implementation anticipated for January 2019); and
  • The development of procedures for incorporating the environmental impact of packaging into the weighting of relevant procurement and tender exercises (implementation anticipated for November 2018).

Asked on: 06 September 2018
Home Office
Counter-terrorism
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether they will conduct an independent review of how the Prevent programme is currently operating before placing any additional responsibilities on local authorities as recommended by the Joint Committee on Human Rights in its report, Counter-Extremism, published on 20 July 2016 (HL Paper 39), and since; and if not, why not.
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Government’s work to counter extremism is distinct from, but complementary to, its work to counter terrorism, which includes work that aims to prevent people from becoming terrorists or supporting terrorism.

Prevent is implemented in a proportionate manner that takes into account the level of risk in any given area or institution. The Prevent programme is continually reviewed and updated to reflect the current threat level and it has taken account of other recent reviews, both internal and independent, across the breadth of our counter-terrorism strategy, CONTEST.

As committed to in CONTEST we will increase the transparency of Prevent delivery and open it to public scrutiny. For example, last November, we published data on Prevent and Channel referrals for the first time to increase transparency of the programme, and we published further data on Prevent and Channel this March. We will continue to publish data on an annual
basis.

We do not believe that an independent review of Prevent is necessary.

Q
Asked by Lord Storey
Asked on: 07 September 2018
Department for Education
Secondary Education: Admissions
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what steps they are taking to meet increasing need for places in secondary schools in England.
A
Answered by: Lord Agnew of Oulton
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The government has committed £7 billion between 2015 and 2021 to deliver new school places. This funding is additional to our investment in the free schools programme.

Basic need funding is provided each year to local authorities to help them meet the demand for school places in their local areas. Allocations are based on the local authorities’ own data, meaning they receive funding for all the places they need. Funding is announced several years ahead, to give local authorities time to plan local provision. Allocations through 2021 have been announced, including secondary places. The number of places funded by local authorities can be found in Table 1 of the basic need allocations, which is attached and also available here: https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/basic-need-allocations.

The free schools programme is also continuing to provide secondary places. There are 131 open mainstream secondary free schools that will provide over 117,000 places when at capacity. 71 mainstream secondary free schools have been approved and are due to open in the next few years, providing more than 79,000 places when at capacity. The department is working collaboratively with local authorities to provide free schools to meet basic need.

The latest data shows overall 825,000 additional places were created between May 2010 and May 2017. 248,000 of these were secondary places (including middle schools and all through schools deemed as secondary, and including full final capacity in free schools), with many more delivered since then and in the pipeline. The department is on track to create one million places this decade, the largest increase in school capacity for at least two generations.

Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 10 September 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Crimes of Violence and Self-harm
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which five prisons in the Male Category C estate reported the highest number of (a) assaults and (b) self-harm incidents occurring in 2017.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 20 September 2018
Holding answer received on 18 September 2018

Reducing levels of assault and self-harm in prisons is a top priority for the Ministry of Justice. We are investing across the prison estate in extra staff, training and security measures so that we can provide full and purposeful regimes, improve staff-prisoner relationships and reduce the impact of drugs.

Prisons with a high absolute number of incidents might not necessarily have the highest relative number or rate of incidents, because the number of prisoners and the nature of the population will vary between establishments. Because of this point, we have provided a list of the top 5 prisons with the highest rate of assault as a better means of comparing across prisons.

The five prisons in the Male Category C estate with the highest rate of assaults during 2017 were:

Prison (Incidents per 1,000 population)

  • HMP/YOI Portland – (626 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP & YOI Parc – (546 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Hindley – (541 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP & YOI Swinfen Hall - (500 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP & YOI Isis - (441 incidents per 1,000 population)

The five prisons in the Male Category C estate with the highest rate of self-harm during 2017 were:

Prison (Incidents per 1,000 population)

  • HMP & YOI Parc (913 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Haverigg (691 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP & YOI Swinfen Hall (668 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Moorland (604 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Buckley Hall (603 incidents per 1,000 population)

Note:

HMP & YOI Parc’s assault and self-harm incident numbers include incidents which occurred in the designated places for young people (aged 15-18 years old): this data cannot currently be separated from data attributable to adults.

Q
(Dwyfor Meirionnydd)
Asked on: 10 September 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prisons: Crimes of Violence and Self-harm
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, which five prisons in the male local estate reported the highest number of (a) assaults and (b) self-harm incidents occurring in 2017.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 20 September 2018
Holding answer received on 18 September 2018

Reducing levels of assault and self-harm in prisons is a top priority for the Ministry of Justice. We are investing across the prison estate in extra staff, training and security measures so that we can provide full and purposeful regimes, improve staff-prisoner relationships and reduce the impact of drugs.

Prisons with a high absolute number of incidents might not necessarily have the highest relative number or rate of incidents, because the number of prisoners and the nature of the population will vary between establishments. Because of this point, we have provided a list of the top 5 prisons with the highest rate of assault as a better means of comparing across prisons.

The five prisons in the male local estate with the highest reported rate of assaults during 2017 were:

Prison (Incidents per 1,000 population)

  • HMP Birmingham – (928 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Bristol – (841 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Leicester – (772 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Bedford – (756 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP & YOI Chelmsford – (727 incidents per 1,000 population)

The five prisons in the male local estate with the highest rate of self-harm incidents during 2017 were:

Prison (Incidents per 1,000 population)

  • HMP Exeter – (1041 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Woodhill – (945 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Peterborough Male – (893 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Leicester – (892 incidents per 1,000 population)
  • HMP Bristol – (820 incidents per 1,000 population)
Q
Asked by Giles Watling
(Clacton)
Asked on: 10 September 2018
Women and Equalities
Candidates: Females
Commons
To ask the Minister for Women and Equalities, what steps she is taking to encourage more women to stand for public office.
A
Answered by: Victoria Atkins
Answered on: 20 September 2018

Further to my previous answer on 2 July 2018, I can confirm that this year the Government Equalities Office has been funding several projects, through the Government’s £5m Suffrage Centenary Fund, that help deliver our aim to increase women’s participation in politics across the country. Some of these projects are providing practical training to women who want an active role in politics. For example, we are supporting a political leadership programme for women in Bradford and Birmingham, and a project training women in the East Midlands, West Midlands and London in public speaking and media relations.

Also, in July this year the Centenary Fund supported an Ask Her to Stand event in London where 350 women interested in elected office heard from women politicians across the political spectrum encouraging them to stand, engaged with women’s political organisations and took part in workshops providing practical advice on getting into politics and public life.

Q
(Easington)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 10 September 2018
Ministry of Justice
Social Security Benefits: Appeals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average waiting time is for a social security tribunal hearing in each of the last five years for people living in the Easington constituency.
A
Answered by: Lucy Frazer
Answered on: 20 September 2018
Holding answer received on 13 September 2018

The information requested is set out in the table below:

Average waiting time1 at the Sunderland2 Social Security Tribunal Venue

April – March3

2013/14

19 weeks

2014/15

22 weeks

2015/16

18 weeks

2016/17

18 weeks

2017/184

26 weeks

1. Waiting Time is interpreted as average clearance time - time taken for appeal receipt to outcome

2. Social Security and Child Support (SSCS) data are normally registered to the venue nearest to the appellant’s home address. We cannot retrieve data based on the appellant’s actual address, but can produce reports detailing the numbers of cases that were dealt with at one of our Regional centres or heard at a specific venue. Appeals within the Easington constituency are heard in the Sunderland venue. Data include cases cleared at a tribunal hearing including paper, oral and domiciliary.
3. Financial year - April – March.
4. Data April 17 to March 18 are provisional and subject to change.

Although care is taken when processing and analysing the data, the details are subject to inaccuracies inherent in any large-scale case management system and are the best data that are available.

Waiting times are calculated from receipt of the appeal to its final disposal. An appeal is not necessarily disposed of at its first hearing. The final disposal decision on the appeal may be reached after an earlier hearing had been adjourned (which may be directed by the judge for a variety of reasons, such as to seek further evidence), or after an earlier hearing date had been postponed (again, for a variety of reasons, often at the request of the appellant). An appeal may also have been decided at an earlier date by the First-tier Tribunal, only for the case to have gone on to the Upper Tribunal, to be returned once again to the First-tier, for its final disposal.

Waiting times can fluctuate temporarily and geographically, owing to a number of variable factors, including volumes of benefit decisions made locally, availability of medical/disability members, venue capacity and the complexity of the issue in dispute. Any disparity in waiting times is monitored and investigated locally.

In order to respond to a general increase in appeal receipts, HM Courts & Tribunals Service has been working with the Tribunal’s judiciary both to appoint additional judges and panel members, and to take forward initiatives with the potential to increase the capacity and performance of the Tribunal. We have recruited extra fee-paid judicial office holders: 250 judges across the First-tier Tribunal, 125 disability-qualified members, and up to 230 medical members. In addition, we are reviewing - with the Judiciary - current listing practices to increase the number of cases listed on a Tribunal session, and introducing case-management “triage” sessions, with the aim of reducing the time taken for appeals to reach final determination. All these measures will increase the capacity of the Tribunal, with the aim of reducing waiting times for appellants.

Q
(Easington)
Asked on: 10 September 2018
Cabinet Office
Voting Behaviour
Commons
To ask the Minister for the Cabinet Office, what steps he is taking to increase the level of participation in elections.
A
Answered by: Chloe Smith
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Government is committed to building a democracy that works for everyone. To promote democratic engagement, National Democracy Week was held in July 2018 and the Cabinet Office is leading on three projects funded by the Suffrage Centenary Fund Programme. These are the Democracy Ambassadors Scheme to recruit and train youth democracy ambassadors, the development and publication of a toolkit for parliamentarians to engage young people, and a new secondary schools resource which will be released later this year.

More widely, on 30 August 2018 the Government published the response to its Call for Evidence on Access to Elections. This includes a series of actions to be taken forward to remove identified barriers to further support disabled people to participate in elections.

We also expect to boost democratic participation through work on voter identification and the measures proposed in the Government’s consultation “Protecting the Debate: Intimidation, Influence and Information.” Democratic participation is more likely when citizens can cast their vote in confidence. Proposed measures to tackle intimidation will help ensure voters can make a free choice at the ballot box, based on an informed discussion focused on policy and principle, rather than on misinformation or abuse.

Q
(Ellesmere Port and Neston)
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Ministry of Justice
Ministry of Justice: Sick Leave
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what estimate he has made of the number of days of sick leave taken by staff in his Department for mental health reasons in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 20 September 2018
Holding answer received on 18 September 2018

The number of staff recorded on a leave of absence from work for mental health reasons in each 12-month period of the last eight years is tabled below.

Sickness absence in MOJ staff due to mental and behavioural disorders1, 12 months to March 2013 to 12 months to 31 March 2018

Date:

Total working days2 lost due to mental & behavioural disorders

12 months to 31 March 20113

Not available

12 months to 31 March 20123

Not available

12 months to 31 March 2013

41,090

12 months to 31 March 2014

47,928

12 months to 31 March 2015

43,538

12 months to 31 March 2016

41,659

12 months to 31 March 20174

36,623

12 months to 31 March 2018

38,430

Includes stress related absences.

  1. Working days lost are calculated by taking the number of working days only between the start and the end of the sick leave within the 12-month period stated. Additional adjustments are made to take account of annual leave and bank holidays.
  2. Data between 01/04/2010 to 31/03/2012 is not available as file types are no longer supported. So far, no technical solution found. Manual sickness records for MoJ are not held beyond this point.
  3. Between January and March 2017, during migration of data to the Single Operating Platform, an under-recording of sickness absence records occurred. There is therefore likely to be an undercount of working days lost for the 12 months to 31 March 2017 and subsequent under-estimate of average working days lost.

This data includes staff employed by the Ministry of Justice (MoJ) Headquarters, HM Courts and Tribunals Service, HM Prison and Probation Service, Legal Aid Agency, Criminal Injuries Compensation Authority and Office of the Public Guardian. Individuals are included if they were absent for any part of the month. Where an absence straddles more than one month, it is included in each.

The MoJ is committed to supporting the health and wellbeing of all of its employees and to reducing sickness absence levels. The department’s wellbeing strategy is designed specifically to reflect the primary causes of sickness absence including mental health, and highlights support available to both employees and managers.

To support the strategy, Directors General in HMPPS and HMCTS were appointed as senior advocates for attendance management and wellbeing in MoJ. In addition, an MoJ Mental Health Allies Network has been initiated to offer support and signposting to staff on mental health issues.

Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Attorney General
Attorney General: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the Real Living Wage.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Attorney General’s Office does not currently have any staff that are paid below the Real Living Wage or the London Living Wage.

Grouped Questions: 173665
Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Attorney General
Attorney General: Living Wage
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff in his Department that work (a) inside and (b) outside Greater London are paid at a rate below the London Living Wage.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The Attorney General’s Office does not currently have any staff that are paid below the Real Living Wage or the London Living Wage.

Grouped Questions: 173664
Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Attorney General
Attorney General: Working Hours
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, what the weekly contracted hours are for the highest paid member of staff in his Department.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 20 September 2018

The highest paid member of staff in the Attorney General’s Office is contracted to work 41 hours a week (including lunch breaks).

Q
Asked by Gareth Snell
(Stoke-on-Trent Central)
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Attorney General
Attorney General: Staff
Commons
To ask the Attorney General, how many staff are (a) employed directly by, (b) seconded to and (c) work under contract to his Department.
A
Answered by: Robert Buckland
Answered on: 20 September 2018

As at 31st August 2018, the Attorney General’s Office had 40 staff on payroll, 3 on Secondment in & 1 Contractor (agency). The staff on payroll can be broken down as follows:

Payroll staff

Count

Fixed Term - Fair & Open

2

Loan In

29

Permanent

8

Secondment Out

1

Total

40

Q
Asked by Lord Berkeley
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department for Transport
High Speed 2 Railway Line
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government how many (1) permanent employees, (2) agency staff, (3) consultants, and (4) contractors are employed on the HS2 Phase 1 project.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

HS2 Ltd currently employ 1,255 permanent employees. 427 individuals directly work in the Phase One Directorate. The remaining workforce includes those working on Phase 2, in addition to employees in enabling teams that support the delivery of the new railway.

There are 4 agency staff also working in the Phase One Directorate. HS2 Ltd does not hold information on the number of consultants and contractors working on Phase 1, as services are contracted through third party companies.

The Department for Transport also employs 28 permanent employees and 1 contractor working in the HS2 Phase One Directorate.

Both HS2 Ltd and the Department for Transport are committed to transparency and publish information about our workforce in the respective Annual Report and Accounts.

All numbers are based on headcount.

Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department for Transport
Convention on Offences and Certain Other Acts Committed on Board Aircraft
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what plans they have to ratify the 2014 Montreal Protocol to help to ensure that they have the appropriate enforcement powers against disruptive air passengers.
A
Answered by: Baroness Sugg
Answered on: 20 September 2018

During this legislative cycle, the Government does not intend to complete the ratification of the International Civil Aviation Organisation (ICAO) Montreal Protocol 2014 on disruptive passengers. The majority of the provisions within this protocol are already part of UK law, and we are confident we can take necessary action in regard to disruptive passengers. For example, the UK already has “state of landing” and “state of operator jurisdiction”, which means that disruptive passengers on any flight that touches down within the UK can be charged and, if necessary, prosecuted. No other European Union countries have ratified the 2014 Montreal Protocol.

Q
Asked by Lord Hylton
Asked on: 11 September 2018
Department of Health and Social Care
Psychiatry
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether consultant psychiatrists who have assessed or treated patients with mental illnesses remain responsible for those patients when they are moved to other hospitals or discharged; and if so, for how long.
A
Answered by: Lord O'Shaughnessy
Answered on: 20 September 2018

In general, when patients are moved to other hospitals the referring consultant psychiatrist transfers responsibility to the receiving consultant. When a patient is discharged from hospital, they are either followed up by a community mental health service or by their general practitioner (GP) in primary care. When a patient is transferred to a community mental health service, responsibility generally transfers to the consultant in that service.

There are some exceptions, including:

- Patients detained under the Mental Health Act (MHA) 1983 may be given ‘leave of absence’ to another hospital as part of their discharge plan. The transferring consultant, who has ‘Responsible Clinician’ status under the MHA, remains responsible for that patient during the authorised leave period and may recall the patient if necessary; and

- When a patient is followed up under a shared care arrangement between their GP and the secondary care consultant. This is normally managed under a locally agreed protocol.

There are no time limits ascribed to these responsibilities.

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