Written questions and answers

Written questions allow Members of Parliament to ask government ministers for information on the work, policy and activities of government departments.

Historical written answers can be found in Hansard.

Find the latest written questions and answers for the 2017-19 session below. We welcome your feedback on this service.

Show
by:
Find by:
Close

UIN

Unique Identifying Number – Every written question in the House of Commons has a UIN per Parliament. In the House of Lords each written questions has a UIN per parliamentary session.
Showing 1-20 out of 65946
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100
Expand all answers
Print selected
Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 30 April 2018
Ministry of Justice
Probation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, how many and what proportion of offenders who have been taken to court for breaching their post-sentence supervision were (a) fined, (b) given a Supervision Default Order, (c) committed to prison and (d) had no action taken against them in the latest year for which information is available.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 17 August 2018

We closely monitor and robustly manage providers to make sure they maintain service delivery, reduce reoffending, protect the public and provide value for money to the taxpayer.

The information requested, where possible, has been provided in the table below.

Post Sentence Supervision (PSS) Breaches Outcomes at Court in 2017[1]

Fine

2,136

22.7%

Supervision Default Order

1,023

10.9%

Committal to Custody

3,307

35.1%

No Action Taken

1,072

11.4%

Other Outcome[2]

686

7.3%

Invalid Outcome Recorded[3]

1,196

12.7%

Public protection is our highest priority and any offender caught breaching their licence faces being immediately recalled to prison.

[1] Breaches that were withdrawn or did not have a recorded outcome when data were extracted are not included in this count.

[2] Other Outcomes include Breach Not Proven, Breach active at sentence expiry and the addition of an Attendance Centre Requirement to the PSS period.

[3] Invalid Outcomes are outcomes that don’t apply to the type of breach being heard. In the case of PSS Breaches, the Invalid Outcomes are ‘Amended and Continued’ and ‘Revoked and Resentenced’; these breaches are usually used for Suspended Sentence and Community Order Breaches.

Q
(Leeds East)
Asked on: 30 April 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prison Officers: Redundancy Pay
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, what the average severance package was for a prison officer taking voluntary early departure in each year since 2010.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 17 August 2018

Due to the way in which the information is held by the pensions administrator, the average annual severance package for Band 3 to 5 officers taking Voluntary Exit or Voluntary Redundancy cannot be separately identified.

Q
Asked by Philip Davies
(Shipley)
Asked on: 28 June 2018
Ministry of Justice
Prison Sentences
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Justice, for which offence or offences each current prisoner serving a sentence of 12 months or less was imprisoned.
A
Answered by: Rory Stewart
Answered on: 17 August 2018
Holding answer received on 06 July 2018

The offence(s) for which each prisoner serving a sentence of less than 12 months was imprisoned, as at 31 March 2018, can be viewed in the table.

Sentencing is a matter for our independent courts, who take into account all circumstances of the case, including any aggravating and mitigating factors.

Whilst there is persuasive evidence that short custodial sentences of less than 12 months do not help some offenders turn their backs on crime, protecting the public will always be our top priority. Under this government, the most serious offenders are more likely to go to prison, and for longer, helping protect the public and keep communities safe.

Table for PQ 158712 (Excel SpreadSheet, 14.77 KB)
Q
(Tottenham)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 April 2018
Home Office
Immigration: Personal Records
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many landing cards have been destroyed in each of the last eight years.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 15 August 2018

There are two different types of landing cards, “non-controlled” or “controlled”. Non-controlled cards (which account for c.95% of all non-EEA arrivals in 2016) are kept for a maximum of 28 days before they are destroyed.

Controlled cards relate mainly to those passengers who arrive in the UK for non-visit purposes such as settlement and this data is retained for 15 years.

We do not record centrally the number of landing cards destroyed.

The available published information on the number of non-EEA nationals entering the UK is published in Home Office’s Immigration Statistics, year ending March 2018, Admission table ad_01 available from https://www.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/709292/admissions-mar-2018-tables.ods

During the period 2010 to 2017 the number of non-EEA passengers granted leave to enter the UK was more than 118 million.

Q
Asked by Toby Perkins
(Chesterfield)
Asked on: 24 May 2018
Home Office
Immigration: Windrush Generation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what representations he has received from the Equality and Human Rights Commission on the immigration status of members of the Windrush generation in the last 12 months.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 15 August 2018

The Secretary of State has not received representations from the Equality and Human Rights Commission on the immigration status of members of the Windrush generation in the last 12 months.

Q
(Newcastle upon Tyne North)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 23 May 2018
Home Office
Immigration: Windrush Generation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what information his Department holds on the number of members of the Windrush generation who are (a) sleeping rough and (b) staying in temporary accommodation while waiting for a decision on their legal right to remain in the UK.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 14 August 2018

Information about members of the Windrush generation who are sleeping rough or staying in temporary accommodation is not automatically reported to the Home Office.

Where any member of the Windrush generation does not have the documents they need to show their status the Government continues to urge them to come forward to the Taskforce so that we can help them. If people are homeless the Home Office can work with Local Authorities to secure temporary accommodation.

Q
(Lewisham, Deptford)
Asked on: 13 April 2018
Home Office
Visas: Applications
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many out-of-time visa applications were (a) processed within the standard service time (b) processed after six months and (c) processed after twelve months in each of the last seven years.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 13 August 2018

The available information relating to processing of all out of country visa (and in-country visa) applications against service standards, is published in the transparency data at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

Q
Asked by Stephen Kerr
(Stirling)
Asked on: 13 April 2018
Home Office
Visas: Overseas Students
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what proportion of tier 4 visa applications for students have been processed within the service level agreement timescales in the latest period for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 13 August 2018

The available information on processing of Tier 4 out of country visa (and in-country visa) applications against service standards is published in the transparency data at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

The latest available data indicates the vast majority, 98.1% (and 99.8%) of straightforward cases were dealt with within service standards.

Information on students who may have missed their university start date is not collated for publication on Home Office visa case-working systems.

Grouped Questions: 135756
Q
Asked by Stephen Kerr
(Stirling)
Asked on: 13 April 2018
Home Office
Visas: Overseas Students
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, how many tier 4 applications that have not been processed within the timescale set out in the service level agreement for processing such applications have caused students to miss university start dates in the latest academic for year for which figures are available.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 13 August 2018

The available information on processing of Tier 4 out of country visa (and in-country visa) applications against service standards is published in the transparency data at https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/migration-transparency-data#uk-visas-and-immigration

The latest available data indicates the vast majority, 98.1% (and 99.8%) of straightforward cases were dealt with within service standards.

Information on students who may have missed their university start date is not collated for publication on Home Office visa case-working systems.

Grouped Questions: 135755
Q
Asked by Ben Lake
(Ceredigion)
Asked on: 11 May 2018
Home Office
Undocumented Migrants: Deportation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, when his Department first implemented a policy for imposing targets for deportation of illegal immigrants; and whether the Home Secretary had discussions with Cabinet colleagues on that policy at that time.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 13 August 2018

The background to targets for removals and my Department’s current approach is set out in Sir Philip Rutnam’s letters to the Rt Hon Yvette Cooper MP, dated 14 May and 25 June 2018 that are deposited in the House Library.

Q
Asked by David Linden
(Glasgow East)
Asked on: 25 June 2018
Home Office
Asylum
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, if he will make an assessment on the implications for his Department's polices of the report A Hostile Environment, published by Refugee Rights Europe in Feburary 2018.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 13 August 2018

The Home Office and its accommodation providers are committed to protecting the rights of asylum seekers and providing them with safe, secure and suitable accommodation whilst asylum claims are considered. We have a range of policies and procedures to ensure that this is the case and we will continue to thoroughly inspect, investigate and resolve any allegation that standards of accommodation and service are not being delivered in accordance with the contract, when specific information is received.

We remain in regular discussion with Providers, service users, non-governmental organisations and other stakeholders about ways to improve the services provided and we will be making a number of improvements to the design of the future contracted services as a direct result of such feedback. The Refugee Rights Europe report was not formally shared with the Home Office but we have retrospectively considered the recommendations made and will ensure that they continue to be taken into consideration as part of our ongoing engagement and improvement plans.

Q
Asked by Julie Elliott
(Sunderland Central)
Asked on: 25 June 2018
Home Office
Migrant Workers: Conditions of Employment
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, whether the Government has received representations on (a) Tier 2 and (b) other migrant migrant workers' days of industrial action being classified as unpaid leave.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 13 August 2018

The Home Office has previously received a number of representations on the general principle of Tier 2 and other migrant workers' days of industrial action being classified as unpaid leave.

It is not the Government’s policy to prevent migrant workers from engaging in legal strike action; and, to date, I am not aware of any case where a migrant worker has had their leave curtailed or been removed as a result of doing so. To put the matter beyond doubt, however, we amended the guidance for Tier 2 and 5 sponsors on 18 July to make clear that there will be no immigration consequences for any migrant worker who takes part in legal strike action.

We will be making a similar change the relevant Immigration Rules at the next available opportunity in the Autumn.

Q
Asked by Drew Hendry
(Inverness, Nairn, Badenoch and Strathspey)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 02 July 2018
Home Office
Immigration: Families
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what the current average waiting period is for applicants seeking leave to remain under the family and private life route.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 09 August 2018

Information on processing times for In-Country leave to remain applications is available in our published transparency data at the link below. See tab InC_05.

Family and private life applications are included in the Non-Straightforward Workable category but this also includes outside of the rules applications.

https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/in-country-migration-data-may-2018

Q
Asked by Afzal Khan
(Manchester, Gorton)
[N]
Close

Named Day

'Named day' questions only occur in the House of Commons. The MP tabling the question specifies the date on which they should receive an answer. MPs may not table more than five named day questions on a single day.

Asked on: 18 July 2018
Home Office
Immigration: EU Nationals
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, what estimate he has made of the cost to the public purse of compensation paid to EU nationals (a) detained in and (b) deported from the UK in each month between May 2016 and May 2017.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 09 August 2018

Providing the information requested would require a manual check of individual records which could only be done at disproportionate cost.

Q
(East Devon)
Asked on: 19 July 2018
Home Office
Immigration: Windrush Generation
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for the Home Department, with reference to the Prime Minister's oral contribution on 18 July 2018, Official Report, col 408, if he will ensure that the Windrush report commissioned by Sir Alex Allan is published promptly without redactions or deletions and made available to hon. Members.
A
Answered by: Caroline Nokes
Answered on: 09 August 2018

As the Prime Minister said in her answer, my right hon. Friend the Home Secretary is considering this matter very carefully.

Q
Asked on: 18 July 2018
Foreign and Commonwealth Office
British Overseas Territories
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government whether any British Overseas Territory has made representations to them regarding new UK legislation; if so, which Territory; and on what subject.
A
Corrected answer by: Lord Ahmad of Wimbledon
Corrected on: 08 August 2018
An error has been identified in the written answer given on 02 August 2018.
The correct answer should have been:

Those Some Overseas Territories with financial centres, namely Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Gibraltar and Montserrat have expressed concern about new legislation on sanctions and anti-money laundering (the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act), which became law on 23 May 2018; in particular the requirement to establish a publicly accessible register of the beneficial ownership of companies registered in each government's jurisdiction.

Seperately, the aforementioned Territories and Gibraltar have made representations over the potential use of an Order in Council as specified in the Act, believing this to be constitutional overreach by the UK.

The Prime Minister held a conference call with leaders of affected Territories on 24 May to discuss the issue and a further discussion was held at the Joint Ministerial Council in June. Shortly after the passage of this legislation I visited Anguilla, the Cayman Islands and Montserrat, where I held discussions on this topic. Similarly, in late July I visited the British Virgin Islands and met with representatives of the financial services industry and government of BVI. The Government understands the strength of feeling on this issue and is committed to working collaboratively with affected Territories on implementation.

A
Answered on: 02 August 2018

Those Some Overseas Territories with financial centres, namely Anguilla, Bermuda, British Virgin Islands, Cayman Islands, Gibraltar and Montserrat have expressed concern about new legislation on sanctions and anti-money laundering (the Sanctions and Anti-Money Laundering Act), which became law on 23 May 2018; in particular the requirement to establish a publicly accessible register of the beneficial ownership of companies registered in each government's jurisdiction.

Seperately, the aforementioned Territories and Gibraltar have made representations over the potential use of an Order in Council as specified in the Act, believing this to be constitutional overreach by the UK.

The Prime Minister held a conference call with leaders of affected Territories on 24 May to discuss the issue and a further discussion was held at the Joint Ministerial Council in June. Shortly after the passage of this legislation I visited Anguilla, the Cayman Islands and Montserrat, where I held discussions on this topic. Similarly, in late July I visited the British Virgin Islands and met with representatives of the financial services industry and government of BVI. The Government understands the strength of feeling on this issue and is committed to working collaboratively with affected Territories on implementation.

Asked on: 23 July 2018
Department for International Trade
Trade
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of reports from the recent G20 Summit that global growth may be adversely affected by ongoing trade tensions; and what steps will they take to ensure that the UK is prepared for any escalation in trade tensions after Brexit.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 08 August 2018

The UK remains concerned about the current trade tensions and shares the assessment that global growth could be adversely affected by these tensions. The UK is engaging with partners across the globe to seek a resolution. We are clear that nobody benefits from trade wars.

As the UK prepares for its independent membership of the World Trade Organisation (WTO), we are legislating for the full suite of tools permitted under the WTO in order to tackle injury to UK industry caused by unfair trading practices, such as dumped or subsidised imports, or unforeseen surges in imports.

Q
Asked by Lord Farmer
Asked on: 24 July 2018
Department for International Trade
Overseas Trade
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of whether, under World Trade Organisation rules, novation would enable the UK to continue to trade with countries that currently have free trade agreements with the EU; and on what tariff terms.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 08 August 2018

The Government is committed to ensuring continuity for the effects of the UK’s existing free trade agreements, including preferential tariff terms, as we leave the EU. To achieve this, the UK will enter into new agreements with partner countries in place of the EU free trade agreements in which we participate as a Member State, in line with WTO rules on Regional Trade Agreements. Necessary changes will be made to ensure that these preferential trading arrangements can continue to operate in a bilateral context. Tariff terms vary from treaty to treaty and we intend to replicate the effect of those already agreed with the EU, as far as possible.

Asked on: 24 July 2018
Department for International Trade
EU External Trade: USA
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government what assessment they have made of the effects on the British economy of a trade war between the EU and the United States.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 08 August 2018

Increased tariffs can have damaging impacts on our domestic industries as well as on consumers. Further escalation of trade tensions between the EU and US would be damaging to both the EU and US economies.

The Government has been engaging directly with the US administration, including through 5 Ministerial visits to the US, meetings with senior administration figures and the recent visit of President Trump to the UK.

We welcome the agreement between President Juncker and President Trump to open negotiations to avoid further escalation that would harm businesses and consumers.

Q
Asked on: 24 July 2018
Department for International Trade
Exports
Lords
To ask Her Majesty's Government which markets of interest to the UK’s private sector exporters are restricted by (1) a sanctions regime, or (2) the UK’s foreign policy which limits ministerial support for those exporters.
A
Answered by: Baroness Fairhead
Answered on: 08 August 2018

HMG actively promotes international trade within a rules based international order. Maintaining this sometimes requires the application of sanctions. The UK currently implements multilateral trade sanctions set by the UN, EU, and OSCE relating to:

Afghanistan, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Burma, Central African Republic, China, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Eritrea, Iran, Iraq, Lebanon, Libya, North Korea, Russia, Somalia, South Sudan, Sudan, Syria, Tunisia, Ukraine, Venezuela, Yemen, and Zimbabwe.

These sanctions regimes contain measures which may restrict the activities of UK exporters.

There are no policy restrictions on Ministerial support for exporters to markets not otherwise subject to sanctions.

Expand all answers
Print selected
Showing 1-20 out of 65946
Results per page
Results per page 20 | 50 | 100