Incontinence: Children and Young People :Written question - 33587

Q
(Easington)
Asked on: 12 April 2016
Department of Health
Incontinence: Children and Young People
Commons
To ask the Secretary of State for Health, how many emergency admissions there were for bladder and bowel problems amongst children and young people in each of the last five years.
A
Answered by: Jane Ellison
Answered on: 20 April 2016

Information on nocturnal enuresis and daytime urinary incontinence in England is not available in the format requested. Such information available on hospital episodes is shown in the tables below.

Table 1: Count of emergency finished admission episodes (FAEs) with a primary diagnosis of (a) incontinence and (b) constipation, where the patient age was 19 years and under, 2010-11 to 2014-15

Incontinence

Year

Nonorganic enuresis

Nonorganic encopresis

Stress incontinence

Other specified urinary incontinence

Faecal incontinence

Unspecified urinary incontinence

Constipation

2010-11

2

0

8

6

16

77

10,469

2011-12

0

0

3

6

23

65

10,315

2012-13

1

2

4

11

16

66

10,534

2013-14

1

0

0

5

21

64

11,043

2014-15

3

2

2

5

15

85

11,501

Table 2: Count of FAEs with a primary diagnosis of faecal incontinence, for patients aged between (a) 4 to 7 years (b) 8 to 10 years and (c) 11 to 16 years, 2014-15

Year

Age 4 – 7

Age 8 – 10

Age 11 – 16

2014-15

45

20

18

Table 3: Count of FAEs with a primary diagnosis of urinary incontinence, for patients aged between (a) 5 to 6 years, (b) 7 to 10 years (c) 11 to 15 years (d) 16 to 18 years and (e) 19 to 24 years, 2014-15

Year

Age 5 – 6

Age 7 – 10

Age 11 – 15

Age 16 – 18

Age 19 – 24

2014-15

350

946

719

141

170

Table 4: Count of FAEs with a primary diagnosis of nonorganic enuresis, for patients aged between (a) 5 to 6 years (b) 7 to 9 years (c) 10 to 15 years and (d) 16 to 19 years, 2014-15

Year

Age 5 – 6

Age 7 – 9

Age 10 – 15

Age 16 – 19

2014-15

0

1

5

0

Notes: Activity in English National Health Service Hospitals and English NHS commissioned activity in the independent sector

A finished admission episode (FAE) is the first period of admitted patient care under one consultant within one healthcare provider. FAEs are counted against the year or month in which the admission episode finishes. Admissions do not represent the number of patients, as a person may have more than one admission within the period.

Source: Hospital Episode Statistics, Health and Social Care Information Centre

Grouped Questions: 33589 | 33588 | 33590

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