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Appendices

Appendix A. Divisions: Instructions to Tellers
Appendix B. Rules for the admission of visitors
Appendix C. Royal Commissions
Entry of Commissioners
Summoning the Commons
Reading the Commission
Departure of the Commons
Departure of Commissioners
Appendix D. Opening of a new Parliament and election of Commons
Speaker
First day
Second day
New Speaker in mid-Parliament
Appendix E. The King’s Speech
First session of a new Parliament
Subsequent Sessions
Appendix F. Royal Assent by Commission
Appendix G. The ceremony of prorogation by Commission
Without Royal Assent
With Royal Assent
Appendix H. Endorsements to bills
Lords bill sent to Commons
Lords bill agreed to by Commons without amendment
Lords bill agreed to by Commons with amendments
Commons amendments to Lords bill agreed to with amendments
Disagreement with the Commons
Commons bill sent to Lords
Commons bill returned with amendments
Supply bill returned to Commons agreed pending Royal Assent by
Commission
Appendix I. Prayers for the Parliament
Appendix J. Introductions
Lords Temporal
Lords Spiritual
Footnotes

Appendix A: Divisions: Instructions to Tellers

Within three minutes from the order to “Clear the Bar”, two Tellers for the Contents and two for the Not-contents must be appointed. Tellers must give their names to the Clerk at the Table, and state whether they are telling for the Contents or Not-contents and in return they receive a wand and a counter.

The Tellers take up their posts in the lobbies and, once they are in place, may start to count members through the lobbies. The Tellers count the Lords as they pass through, the first Lord counted being number three, so as to include automatically the two Tellers on each side.

After three minutes, the Lord on the Woolsack or in the Chair repeats the Question and, if one or more voices from each side shouts “content” and “not-content”, says: “The Contents will go to the right by the Throne, the Not-contents to the left by the Bar”.

If the Lord on the Woolsack or in the Chair does not direct the Contents and Not-contents into the lobbies, the division does not take place, regardless of whether or not the Tellers have started to count members through the lobbies. The Tellers should inform Lords waiting in the lobbies accordingly and return their wands to the Table.

Eight minutes after the Bar is ordered to be cleared, the doors leading into the Chamber from outside are locked, and only those already in the Chamber or in the lobbies can from that moment vote. If the queue extends out of the Chamber, a doorkeeper joins the end of the queue and makes sure no one else joins the queue.

After eight minutes, the Tellers must remain in the lobbies until they are satisfied that all Lords who wish to vote in their lobby have done so. The Tellers then return to the Table. When both sets of Tellers have returned to the Table, the Clerk deactivates the pass-readers. The Clerk imports the voting figures for the pass-readers and for members voting under SO 24A, and adds the votes of any members voting in the Chamber, before handing the result to one of the Tellers for the winning side. That Teller hands this, with a bow, to the Lord on the Woolsack or in the Chair, who announces the figures to the House. The Teller waits by the Woolsack or the Chair until the result is announced.

When the result is announced, the Teller rejoins the other three Tellers who meanwhile have remained at the Table. All four then hand back their wands to the Clerk and disperse.

Appendix B: Rules for the admission of visitors

(a) Under SO 13 Black Rod is responsible for enforcing the House’s rules relating to control of access to the precincts of the House as defined in (b), in respect both of persons and of vehicles, whether or not the House is sitting.

(b) For the purposes of the interpretation of SO 13 and these rules, the “precincts of the House” comprise all that area of the Palace of Westminster control of which was vested by Queen Elizabeth II in the Speaker of the House of Lords, with effect from 26 April 1965, as well as all other areas under the control of the House. Black Rod is solely responsible for access to the King’s Residual Estate, namely the Robing Room, the Royal Gallery and the Chapel of St Mary Undercroft.

(c) Before admission to the galleries of the House, visitors may be required:

(i) to sign an undertaking to abstain from making any form of interruption or disturbance and to obey the rules for the maintenance of good order in the galleries;

(ii) to deposit in the appropriate cloakroom all liquids, cameras, mobile phones and other electronic devices, binoculars, umbrellas and walking sticks, parcels, packages, cases and bags other than small handbags; and

(iii) to open for inspection at the request of Black Rod, or of the staff under their control, any parcel, package, case or bag, including small handbags, which a visitor may bring into the precincts.

(d) In the galleries, visitors are not permitted to read books or papers other than the papers of the House, draw (except in the south-west gallery), stand in or behind the galleries, or make use of cameras, mobile phones and other electronic devices, or binoculars. Any offence against this rule may result in the confiscation of any offending material.

(e) Where committees of the House are sitting in public, the rules governing the admission of visitors to committee rooms are, so far as practicable, the same as those for admission to the galleries of the House. Members of the public are permitted to take notes during committee meetings, and to use electronic devices or tape recorders, as long as they do not cause any disturbance.

(f) Any visitor who is suspected of having committed a criminal offence within the precincts of the House shall be taken into custody and handed over to the police for such further action as may be appropriate under the law. Any such action shall be reported by Black Rod to the Lord Speaker or, in their absence, to the Senior Deputy Speaker.

(g) Any visitor who is suspected of having committed contempt of the House, including the contravention of an order or rule of the House, may, at the discretion of Black Rod, either be ejected from the precincts forthwith, or be detained by them until not later than three hours after the rising of the House, or, on a day on which the House is not sitting, for a period not exceeding three hours, in order to enable inquiries to be made into the circumstances of the contempt. If the contempt is of such a nature that, in the opinion of Black Rod, the House may wish to consider it, they shall report it to the Lord Speaker or, in their absence, to the Senior Deputy Speaker.

(h) Any visitor who is suspected by Black Rod of intending to commit a contempt of the House, including the contravention of an order or rule of the House, may be ejected from the precincts forthwith.

(i) The Lord Speaker or, in their absence, the Senior Deputy Speaker shall communicate to the House any report by Black Rod made in pursuance of these rules.

(j) A vehicle which is causing obstruction, or appears to be endangering security, within the precincts of the House may be removed.

Appendix C: Royal Commissions

A Royal Commission consists of three or more (usually five) Commissioners, who are Privy Counsellors appointed by Letters Patent to perform certain functions on the King’s behalf. These functions include:

  • proceedings at the opening of a new Parliament in connection with the election of a Speaker by the Commons (see appendix D);
  • proceedings at the Opening of Parliament(1) when the King is not present (see appendix E);
  • proceedings in relation to the giving of Royal Assent to bills (see appendix F); and
  • proceedings at the prorogation of Parliament (see appendix G).

A minister of the Crown, of Cabinet rank, normally presides. The Commissioners wear robes and (optionally for female Commissioners) hats.

Proceedings on Royal Commissions differ in their details but share common characteristics, which are described in this appendix. Appendices D–G describe the differences.

Entry of Commissioners

The Lords Commissioners enter the Chamber by the door on the spiritual side near the Throne. They take their seats on a bench placed between the Throne and the Woolsack. The presiding Commissioner sits in the centre; the senior in precedence of the other Lords Commissioners sits on their right and the next senior on their left, the remaining two in order of seniority on the right and left of these respectively.

Summoning the Commons

The presiding Commissioner commands Black Rod:

Let the Commons know that the Lords Commissioners desire their immediate attendance in this House [to hear the Commission read(2)].

Black Rod summons the Commons.

The Commons proceed from their Chamber and advance to the Bar of the House of Lords, bowing three times: the first time at the step, the second time midway between the step and the Bar, and the third time at the Bar. Each bow is acknowledged by the Lords Commissioners. Commissioners who are men raise their hats; Commissioners who are women do not.

Reading the Commission

The Commission is read by the Reading Clerk at the Table. They bow to each Lord Commissioner as they name them, and a Commissioner who is a man responds by raising his hat. Commissioners who are women keep their hats on.

Departure of the Commons

The Commons withdraw, with three bows which are acknowledged as on their arrival.

Departure of Commissioners

The Commissioners, led by the presiding Commissioner, leave the Chamber by the door on the spiritual side near the Throne, and disrobe.

Appendix D: Opening of a new Parliament and election of Commons Speaker

The election of a Speaker of the House of Commons takes place only at the beginning of a new Parliament and not at the beginning of subsequent sessions.

First day

On the day appointed, the Lord Speaker, in their black gown, preceded by the Mace, enters the House by the Bar and takes their seat on the Woolsack. No prayers are said at this stage. The Leader of the House or another Government minister rises and says:

“My Lords,

It not being convenient for His Majesty to be personally present here this day, He has been pleased to cause a Commission under the Great Seal to be prepared in order to the holding of this Parliament.”

The Lord Speaker then leaves the Chamber by the door on the spiritual side near the Throne, the Mace remaining on the Woolsack. The Lords Commissioners enter, and the Commons are summoned (see appendix C).

Black Rod summons the Commons with the following words:

“Members of the House of Commons,

The Lords who are authorised by virtue of His Majesty’s Commission to declare the Opening of Parliament, desire the presence of this Honourable House in the House of Peers to hear the Commission read.”

The presiding Commissioner says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

We are commanded by His Majesty to let you know that, it not being convenient for Him to be present here this day in His Royal Person, he has thought fit by Letters Patent under the Great Seal to empower several Lords therein named to do all things in His Majesty’s Name which are to be done on His Majesty’s Part in this Parliament, as by the Letters Patent will more fully appear.”

The Commission is read (see appendix C).

Then the presiding Commissioner says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

We have it in command from His Majesty to let you know that, as soon as the Members of both Houses shall be sworn, the causes of His Majesty calling this Parliament will be declared to you: and, it being necessary that a Speaker of the House of Commons should be first chosen, it is His Majesty’s Pleasure that you, Members of the House of Commons, repair to the place where you are to sit, and there proceed to the choice of some proper person to be your Speaker, and that you present such person whom you shall so choose here [tomorrow] for His Majesty’s Royal Approbation.”

The Commons and the Commissioners depart (see appendix C).

The Lords Commissioners disrobe. The Lord Speaker returns, and prayers are read.

The Lord Speaker first takes the oath.

After the Lord Speaker, the archbishops, the party leaders, the Senior Deputy Speaker and the occupants of the front benches, including those used by ex-ministers nearest the Bar, may take the oath, followed by the remaining Lords present.

Second day

On the second day of the Parliament, the sitting opens with prayers.

The first business is the confirmation, by the Lords Commissioners, of the election of the Speaker of the House of Commons.

After prayers, the House adjourns during pleasure to allow the Commissioners to robe.

The Lords Commissioners enter, and the Commons are summoned.

Black Rod summons the Commons with these words:

“Mr/Madam Speaker-Elect and Members of the House of Commons, the Lords who are authorised by virtue of His Majesty’s Commission to declare His Royal Approval to the election of a Speaker, desire the presence of this Honourable House in the House of Peers to hear the Commission read.”

The Commons arrive, preceded by their Speaker-elect. The Speaker-elect makes a speech to this effect:

“My Lords,

I have to acquaint your Lordships that in obedience to the Royal Command, His Majesty’s most faithful Commons have, in the exercise of their undoubted rights and privileges, proceeded to the election of a Speaker, and that their choice has fallen upon me. I now present myself at your Lordships’ Bar, and submit myself with all humility for His Majesty’s gracious Approbation.”

The presiding Commissioner then says:

“Mr/Mrs/Miss [and then surname of Speaker-elect]

We are commanded to assure you that His Majesty is so fully sensible of your zeal in the public service, and of your ample sufficiency to execute the arduous duties which His faithful Commons have selected you to discharge, that His Majesty does most readily approve and confirm you as their Speaker.”

The Speaker then addresses the Lords Commissioners to the following effect:

“My Lords,

I submit myself with all humility and gratitude to His Majesty’s gracious Commands. It is now my duty, in the name and on behalf of the Commons of the United Kingdom, to lay claim, by humble petition to His Majesty, to all their ancient and undoubted rights and privileges, especially to freedom of speech in debate, to freedom from arrest, and to free access to His Majesty whenever occasion shall require, and that the most favourable construction shall be put upon all their proceedings. With regard to myself I pray that, if in the discharge of my duties I shall inadvertently fall into any error, it may be imputed to myself alone and not to His Majesty’s most faithful Commons.”

The presiding Commissioner then says:

“Mr [Madam] Speaker,

We have it further in command to inform you that His Majesty does most readily confirm all the rights and privileges which have ever been granted to or conferred upon the Commons by His Majesty or any of His Royal Predecessors.

With respect to yourself, Sir [Madam], though His Majesty is sensible that you stand in no need of such assurance, His Majesty will ever place the most favourable construction upon your words and actions.”

Upon this the Commons and the Commissioners depart (see appendix C). The House adjourns for the Commissioners to disrobe, and afterwards resumes to enable Lords to be introduced or to take the oath.

New Speaker in mid-Parliament

If, during the course of a Parliament, there is a vacancy in the office of Speaker, the Commons receive a direction from the Sovereign, signified by a minister of the Crown. A Commission is then issued, and the Lords Commissioners assemble in the House of Lords in the usual way, and summon the Commons, who come with their Speaker-elect. The Speaker-elect makes the usual speech, and the presiding Commissioner declares the Approbation of His Majesty as follows, but the further exchanges claiming the confirming privileges, made at the commencement of a Parliament, are omitted:

“Mr/Mrs/Miss [and then surname of Speaker-elect]

We have it in command from His Majesty to declare His Majesty’s entire confidence in your talents, diligence and sufficiency to fulfil the important duties of the high office of Speaker of the House of Commons to which you have been chosen by that House, and in obedience to the Commission which has been read and by virtue of the authority therein contained, we do declare His Majesty’s royal allowance and confirmation of you, Sir [Madam], as Speaker of the House of Commons.”

Appendix E: The King’s Speech

First session of a new Parliament

By the King in Person(3)

The State Opening of Parliament usually takes place in the morning. The Lords are attired in their Parliament robes or such other dress as may be approved by the Earl Marshal on behalf of the King. Certain members of the Royal Family and spouses or partners of members of the House who are successful in the ballot for places are seated on the floor of the House. An enclosure is reserved for the Diplomatic Corps. Judges are seated on the Woolsacks in their robes.

The King is met at the Sovereign’s Entrance by the Lord Great Chamberlain and enters the Palace of Westminster preceded by the Earl Marshal, Lord Great Chamberlain, Lord Chancellor (with the Purse containing the King’s Speech), Lord Speaker and Lord Privy Seal. They proceed to the Robing Room where the King robes and puts on the Crown and regalia. A procession is formed, marshalled by the Earl Marshal, and proceeds through the Royal Gallery and the Prince’s Chamber to the Chamber of the House of Lords. When His Majesty has taken his seat on the Throne, the Lord Speaker and Lord Chancellor stand on his right at the foot of the steps of the Throne. The King is attended by the Officers of State. The King then commands Black Rod, through the Lord Great Chamberlain, to summon the Commons, which they do in these words:

“Mr/Madam Speaker,

The King commands this honourable House to attend His Majesty immediately in the House of Peers.”

The Commons come from their Chamber and advance to the Bar with their Speaker, bowing once only at the Bar.

His Majesty then delivers his Speech from the Throne.

It is also possible for the King’s Speech to be read by the Lord Chancellor, standing on one of the lower steps of the Throne in the presence of the Sovereign. This was done during the reign of George I and in the later years of Queen Victoria.

The King then retires. The Commons withdraw, bowing once.

By Royal Commission

If the King is not present, there is no State Opening. The King’s Speech is delivered by the presiding Commissioner, or by one of the other Lords Commissioners, by virtue of the Royal Commission for opening Parliament.

At the hour appointed, usually in the morning, the Lords Commissioners enter the Chamber, and the Commons are summoned (see appendix C).

The Presiding Commissioner says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

We are commanded to deliver to you His Majesty’s Speech in His Majesty’s own words.”

The Presiding Commissioner, remaining seated and with their hat on, then delivers the Speech.

Then the Commons and the Commissioners depart (see appendix C).

A further opportunity may then be given for Lords to take the oath. The Lord Speaker takes their seat on the Woolsack and prayers are read. After the Lords present have taken the oath, or at a time previously fixed, the House is adjourned during pleasure until the time fixed for the meeting in the afternoon.

Subsequent Sessions

By the King in Person

If the King opens subsequent sessions in person, the ceremony is similar to that described above for the delivery of the King’s Speech at the beginning of a new Parliament.

By Royal Commission

When the King is not present, his functions are performed by Lords Commissioners.

The Lords Commissioners enter the Chamber, and the Commons are summoned (see appendix C).

The Presiding Commissioner says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

We are commanded by His Majesty to let you know that, it not being convenient for Him to be present here this day in His Royal Person, He has thought fit by Letters Patent under the Great Seal to empower several Lords therein named to do all things in His Majesty’s Name which are to be done on His Majesty’s part in this Parliament, as by the Letters Patent will more fully appear.”

The Commission is read (see appendix C).

The Presiding Commissioner then says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

We are commanded to deliver to you His Majesty’s Speech in His Majesty’s own words.”

The Presiding Commissioner, remaining seated and covered, then delivers the Speech.

Then the Commons and the Lords Commissioners depart (see appendix C). The Lord Speaker then takes their seat on the Woolsack, and the House adjourns during pleasure until the meeting of the House in the afternoon.

Appendix F: Royal Assent by Commission

At the time appointed for the Royal Assent, if the House is sitting, the House adjourns during pleasure to enable the Lords Commissioners to robe. The Lords Commissioners enter the Chamber, and the Commons are summoned (see appendix C). They arrive with their Speaker. Any supply bills that may be ready for Royal Assent are brought up by the Clerk of the House of Commons, to whom they have been previously returned. The Clerk of the Parliaments receives them from the Speaker at the Bar, and brings them to the Table, bowing to the Lords Commissioners. The presiding Commissioner, remaining seated and covered, then says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

His Majesty, not thinking fit to be personally present here at this time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and thereby given His Royal Assent to certain Acts [and Measures] which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles whereof are particularly mentioned, and by the said Commission has commanded us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said Acts [and Measures] in the presence of you, the Lords and Commons assembled for that purpose, which Commission you will now hear read.”

The Commission is read (see appendix C).

When this has been done, the presiding Commissioner says:

“In obedience to His Majesty’s Commands, and by virtue of the Commission which has been now read, we do declare and notify to you, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal and Commons, in Parliament assembled, that His Majesty has given His Royal Assent to the Acts [and Measures] in the Commission mentioned, and the Clerks are required to pass the same in the usual form and words.”

The Clerk of the Parliaments and the Clerk of the Crown then rise and stand at the Despatch Boxes on either side of the Table, bowing to the Lords Commissioners as they reach their places. From the temporal side, the Clerk of the Crown reads out the short title of each bill in turn. As soon as each title has been read, both Clerks bow to the Lords Commissioners.
The Clerk of the Parliaments then turns towards the Bar, where the Commons are assembled, and pronounces the appropriate formula in Norman French, namely, for a supply bill:

“Le Roi remercie ses bons sujets, accepte leur benevolence, et ainsi le veult.”

For each other public or private bill and Measure:

“Le Roi le veult.”

For a personal bill:

“Soit fait comme il est désiré.”

When all the bills have been thus disposed of, the Clerk of the Parliaments and the Clerk of the Crown bow to the Lords Commissioners and return to their places at the Table. The Commons and the Lords Commissioners then retire (see appendix C).

Appendix G: The ceremony of prorogation by Commission

Without Royal Assent

At the time appointed, the Lords Commissioners enter the Chamber, and the Commons are summoned (see appendix C) as follows:

“Mr Speaker, the Lords who are authorised by virtue of His Majesty’s commission to declare His Royal Assent to Acts [and Measures] passed by both Houses [and to an Act passed in accordance with the provisions of the Parliament Acts 1911 and 1949], and also to declare the prorogation of Parliament, desire the presence of this honourable House in the House of Peers.”

The presiding Commissioner says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

His Majesty, not thinking fit to be personally present here at this time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, for proroguing this present Parliament; and we are commanded to deliver to you His Majesty’s Speech in His Majesty’s own words.”

The presiding Commissioner then reads the King’s Speech.

The Commission for proroguing Parliament is then read (see appendix C), after which the presiding Commissioner, still seated and covered, says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

By virtue of His Majesty’s Commission under the Great Seal to us and other Lords directed and now read, we do in His Majesty’s Name, and in obedience to His Majesty’s Commands, prorogue this Parliament to … the … day of … to be then here holden, and this Parliament is accordingly prorogued to … the … day of ….”

The Commons then withdraw (see appendix C).

As soon as the Commons have withdrawn, the Commissioners rise and bow to the House. The Lord Speaker, if they are a member of the Commission, moves to stand in front of the Woolsack. The Deputy Serjeant at Arms (the Yeoman Usher) takes up the Mace from the Woolsack, and the Lord Speaker leaves the House by the Bar. As soon as the Lord Speaker has left the House, the remaining Commissioners turn right and are led by the presiding Commissioner out of the House through the door on the spiritual side near the Throne.

With Royal Assent

If, at the time of prorogation, there are bills ready for Royal Assent, they must be dealt with before Parliament can be prorogued. One Commission is issued for both Royal Assent and prorogation. When the Commons have arrived, the presiding Commissioner, remaining seated and covered, says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

His Majesty, not thinking fit to be personally present here at this time, has been pleased to cause a Commission to be issued under the Great Seal, and thereby given His Royal Assent to divers Acts which have been agreed upon by both Houses of Parliament, the Titles whereof are particularly mentioned, and by the said Commission has commanded us to declare and notify His Royal Assent to the said several Acts, in the presence of you the Lords and Commons assembled for that purpose; and has also assigned to us and other Lords directed full power and authority in His Majesty’s Name to prorogue this present Parliament. Which Commission you will now hear read.”

The Commission is read (see appendix C) and Royal Assent signified (see appendix F).

Then the presiding Commissioner says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

We are commanded to deliver to you His Majesty’s Speech in His Majesty’s own words.”

The presiding Commissioner reads the speech and then says:

“My Lords and Members of the House of Commons,

By virtue of His Majesty’s Commission which has been now read, we do, in His Majesty’s Name, and in obedience to His Majesty’s Commands, prorogue this Parliament to … the… day of … to be then here holden, and this Parliament is accordingly prorogued to … the … day of ….”

The Commons then withdraw, and the Commissioners leave the House, in the manner described for prorogation by Commission without Royal Assent.

Appendix H: Endorsements to bills

Lords bill sent to Commons

The Clerk of the Parliaments(4) signs the bill and writes on it “Soit baillé aux Communes.”

Lords bill agreed to by Commons without amendment

The Clerk of the House of Commons writes on the bill “A ceste Bille les Communes sont assentus.”

Lords bill agreed to by Commons with amendments

The Clerk of the House of Commons writes on the bill “A ceste Bille avecque des Amendemens (or avecque une Amendement) les Communes sont assentus.”

Commons amendments to Lords bill agreed to with amendments

The Clerk of the Parliaments writes on the bill “A ceste Amendement (or ces Amendemens) avecque une Amendement (or des Amendemens) les Seigneurs sont assentus.”

Disagreement with the Commons

The Clerk of the Parliaments writes on the bill “Ceste Bille est remise aux Communes avecque des Raisons (or une Raison).”

Commons bill sent to Lords

The Clerk of the House of Commons signs the bill and writes on it “Soit baillé aux Seigneurs.”

Commons bill returned with amendments

The Clerk of the Parliaments writes on the bill “A ceste Bille avecque des Amendemens (or une Amendement) les Seigneurs sont assentus.”

Supply bill returned to Commons agreed pending Royal Assent by Commission

The Clerk of the Parliaments writes on the bill “A ceste Bille les Seigneurs sont assentus.”

Appendix I: Prayers for the Parliament

One of the following:(5)

Psalms 1, 15, 24, 34 (vv. 1–8), 46, 66 (vv. 1–14, 18), 67, 93, 95 (vv. 1–7), 100, 111, 112 (vv. 1–6), 119 (vv. 33–40), 121, 145 (vv. 1–6 and 21).

The Lord be with you.

And with thy Spirit.

Let us pray.

Lord, have mercy upon us.

Christ, have mercy upon us.

Lord, have mercy upon us.

Our Father, which art in Heaven, Hallowed be Thy Name. Thy Kingdom come. Thy will be done, in earth as it is in Heaven. Give us this day our daily bread. And forgive us our trespasses, as we forgive them that trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation; but deliver us from evil. For thine is the kingdom, the power, and the glory, for ever and ever. Amen.

O Lord our heavenly Father, high and mighty, King of kings, Lord of lords, the only Ruler of princes, who dost from thy throne behold all the dwellers upon earth; most heartily we beseech thee with thy favour to behold our most Gracious Sovereign Lord King Charles; and so replenish him with the grace of thy Holy Spirit, that he may always incline to thy will, and walk in thy way: Endue him plenteously with heavenly gifts; grant him in health and wealth long to live; strengthen him that he may vanquish and overcome all his enemies; and finally after this life he may attain everlasting joy and felicity, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty God, the Fountain of all Goodness, We humbly beseech thee to bless Camilla the Queen Consort, William Prince of Wales, the Princess of Wales, and all the Royal Family: Endue them with thy Holy Spirit; enrich them with thy Heavenly Grace; prosper them with all happiness; and bring them to thine everlasting kingdom, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen.

Almighty God, by whom alone Kings reign, and Princes decree justice; and from whom alone cometh all counsel, wisdom, and understanding; we thine unworthy servants, here gathered together in thy Name, do most humbly beseech thee to send down thy Heavenly Wisdom from above, to direct and guide us in all our consultations; and grant that, we having thy fear always before our eyes, and laying aside all private interests, prejudices, and partial affections, the result of all our counsels may be to the glory of thy blessed Name, the maintenance of true Religion and Justice, the safety, honour, and happiness of the King, the publick wealth, peace and tranquillity of the Realm, and the uniting and knitting together of the hearts of all persons and estates within the same, in true Christian Love and Charity one towards another, through Jesus Christ our Lord and Saviour. Amen.

One of the following:(6)

Almighty God, give us grace that we may cast away the works of darkness, and put upon us the armour of light, now in the time of this mortal life, in which thy Son Jesus Christ came to visit us in great humility; that in the last day, when he shall come again in his glorious Majesty, to judge both the quick and the dead, we may rise to the life immortal; through him who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, now and ever. Amen. (Advent)

Almighty God, who hast given us thy only-begotten Son to take our nature upon him, and as at this time to be born of a pure Virgin: Grant that we being regenerate, and made thy children by adoption and grace, may daily be renewed by thy Holy Spirit; through the same our Lord Jesus Christ, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the same Spirit, ever one God, world without end. Amen. (Christmas)

Almighty and everlasting God, who hatest nothing that thou hast made, and dost forgive the sins of all them that are penitent: Create and make in us new and contrite hearts, that we worthily lamenting our sins, and acknowledging our wretchedness, may obtain of thee, the God of all mercy, perfect remission and forgiveness; through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. (Lent)

Almighty God, who through thine only-begotten Son Jesus Christ hast overcome death, and opened unto us the gate of everlasting life: We humbly beseech thee, that as by thy special grace preventing us thou dost put into our minds good desires, so by thy continual help we may bring the same to good effect; through Jesus Christ our Lord, who liveth and reigneth with thee and the Holy Ghost, ever one God, world without end. Amen. (Easter)

God, who of old time didst teach the hearts of thy faithful people, by the sending to them the light of thy Holy Spirit; Grant us by the same Spirit to have a right judgement in all things, and evermore to rejoice in his holy comfort; through the merits of Christ Jesus our Saviour, who liveth and reigneth with thee, in the unity of the same Spirit, one God, world without end. Amen. (Pentecost and general)

Prevent us, O Lord, in all our doings, with thy most gracious favour, and further us with thy continual help, that in all our works begun, continued, and ended in thee, we may glorify thy Holy Name, and finally by thy mercy obtain everlasting Life, through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. (General)

The Grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Ghost, be with us all evermore. Amen.

Appendix J: Introductions

Lords Temporal

The Lord Speaker sits on the Woolsack, wearing court dress and a black gown. In the absence of the Lord Speaker, a Deputy Speaker occupies the Woolsack.

The newly created peer and two supporters, all in their Parliament robes,(7) with Garter Principal King of Arms(8) and Black Rod, assemble in Peers’ Lobby. Garter and Black Rod are sometimes represented by deputies. A procession is formed, which enters the Chamber in the following order:

1 Black Rod

2 Garter, carrying the peer’s Letters Patent

3 junior supporter

4 new peer, carrying their writ of summons

5 senior supporter(9)

At the Bar, each member of the procession bows in turn to the Cloth of Estate. Each person then turns to their right and enters the House on the temporal side, except the junior supporter who turns to their left and enters the House on the spiritual side.

Black Rod passes in front of the crossbenches, goes behind the clerks’ seats and stands on the spiritual side. Garter hands the new peer’s Letters Patent to the Reading Clerk who has taken up a position by the first gangway on the temporal side. Garter then proceeds behind the clerks’ seats and stands next to Black Rod.

The junior supporter moves to stand in front of the crossbenches on the spiritual side. The new peer processes to the Table of the House, and hands their writ of summons to the Reading Clerk. The senior supporter moves to stand in front of the crossbenches on the temporal side.

From the Despatch Box, the Reading Clerk reads the Letters Patent and administers the oath of allegiance or the solemn affirmation to the new peer. The new peer then signs the Test Roll and undertaking to abide by the House of Lords Code of Conduct.

The new peer moves round the Table to stand in front of the crossbenches and turns to face the Woolsack, with the senior supporter just behind them on the spiritual side, and the junior supporter just behind them on the temporal side. Meanwhile, Black Rod and Garter have moved to the spiritual side of the House between the Table and the Government front bench, facing the three peers. Together, the new peer and the supporters bow to the Cloth of Estate.

The procession then moves up the spiritual side of the House towards the Woolsack, with Black Rod leading, followed by Garter, the new peer, the junior supporter and the senior supporter. On reaching the Woolsack, the new peer shakes hands with the Lord Speaker. The procession passes into the Prince’s Chamber through the door on the spiritual side of the House.

The new peer and the two supporters, without robes, then return to the Chamber, and the new peer sits for the first time in that part of the House where they intend to sit in the future.

Lords Spiritual

The ceremony of introduction of an archbishop or bishop is broadly the same as for Lords Temporal, but Lords Spiritual are not preceded by Garter or Black Rod and have no Letters Patent to present.

The new bishop, in their episcopal robes (white rochet with black wrist bands, black chimere and scarf) and carrying their writ of summons, enters the Chamber, preceded and followed by a supporting bishop, the junior in front and the senior(10) behind, likewise in their robes.

At the Bar, the three bishops bow in turn to the Cloth of Estate. They then enter the House, the junior supporter on the spiritual side, and the new bishop and senior supporter on the temporal side. The junior bishop moves to stand in front of the crossbenches on the spiritual side. The new bishop processes to the Table, and hands their writ to the Reading Clerk. The senior bishop moves to stand in front of the crossbenches on the temporal side.

From the Despatch Box, the Reading Clerk reads the writ and administers the oath of allegiance to the new bishop, who then signs the Test Roll upon the Table. The new bishop then signs the Test Roll and undertaking to abide by the House of Lords Code of Conduct.

The new bishop moves round the Table to stand in front of the crossbenches and turns to face the Woolsack, with the senior bishop just behind them on the spiritual side and the junior bishop just behind them on the temporal side. Together, they bow to the Cloth of Estate.

The three bishops then move up the spiritual side of the House towards the Woolsack, with the new bishop in the lead. On reaching the Woolsack, the new bishop shakes hands with the Lord Speaker. The three bishops then immediately(11) take their seats on the appropriate bench, led by the junior bishop.

Footnotes

1 Either a new Parliament or a new session.

2 These words are added on the first day of a new Parliament, or if Parliament is to be prorogued.

3 SO 1.

4 In the absence of the Clerk of the Parliaments, the Clerk Assistant or any other Table clerk may endorse or sign a bill on their behalf.

5 Offices 3rd Rpt 1979–80.

6 Procedure 3rd Rpt 2012–13.

7 Knights of Orders also wear their collars.

8 Under SO 4, the Heralds may not charge a Lord any fee upon their introduction into the House.

9 The seniority of supporters is determined by the House of Lords Precedence Act 1539. Members of the House holding offices which give them special precedence under the House of Lords Precedence Act 1539, such as the Lord Chancellor, the Lord President and the Lord Privy Seal, may act as supporters for new Lords; their precedence as office holders determines their seniority as supporters (Procedure 2nd Rpt 1992–93).

10 The order of seniority of the Lords Spiritual is: Archbishop of Canterbury, Archbishop of York, Bishop of London, Bishop of Durham, Bishop of Winchester followed by the remaining 21 bishops in order of their receipt of first writ of summons to attend the House.

11 Unlike new Lords Temporal, who exit the Chamber, disrobe and then return to take their seat upon the appropriate bench.