Prime Minister sets out 'ten point offer' on Brexit deal in statement to MPs

22 May 2019

The Prime Minister followed yesterday's statement to the media with a speech in the Commons setting out her plans for the Withdrawal Agreement Bill.

Theresa May hopes to secure support for her Government's Brexit deal and deliver a 'managed Brexit' before the expiration of Article 50 on 31 October 2019. The deal has been defeated three times in 'meaningful votes', with a number of Conservative MPs and the DUP voting against the deal.

The EU Withdrawal Agreement Bill is expected to be debated at the beginning of June, with its publication expected shortly.

Speaking to MPs after Prime Minister's Questions on 22 May 2019, the Prime Minister said;

"We need to see Brexit through, to honour the result of the referendum and to deliver the change the British so clearly demanded. I sincerely believe that most members of this House feel the same; that for all our division and disagreement, we believe in democracy, that we want to make good on the promise we made to the British people when we asked them to decide on our EU membership."

She then set out what she called a "ten point offer" to members across the House relating to the Brexit deal.

In response, Leader of the Opposition Jeremy Corbyn said;

"It's now clear that the bold new deal the Prime Minister promised is little more than a repackaged version of her three times rejected deal. The rhetoric may have changed, but the deal has not."

He went on to say,

"No matter what the Prime Minister offers, it's clear no compromise would survive the upcoming Tory leadership contest."

Image: PC - Mark Duffy

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