MPs debate Government's record on the economy and further education

18 November 2015

MPs are to debate the Government's record on the economy in the House of Commons today, 18 November 2015. The debate is the first of two to take place this afternoon on subjects chosen by the Opposition.

Government's record on the economy

Motion for debate

The following motion has been tabled for debate:

"That this House believes that the Government has failed to deliver on its commitment to stand up for working people; notes that the Government's existing plans to cut tax credits will cost more than three million working families an average of £1,300 a year from next April; further notes that 4.1 million children now live in absolute poverty, an increase of 500,000 since 2009-10; notes that in 2014 the UK's current account deficit reached the highest level ever recorded, at 5.1 per cent; notes that 85 per cent of the money saved from tax and benefit changes in the last Parliament came from women; further believes that the Government has failed to deliver the more sustainable economy the country needs; notes that, rather than investing in building new homes to cut housing benefit costs, housing investment has been slashed and housing benefit has risen by over £2 billion a year in real terms; notes that the gap between UK productivity per hour worked and the rest of the G7 grew to 20 percentage points in 2014, the widest productivity gap since 1991; believes that further deep cuts to the budget of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills could damage the Government’s ability to boost innovation and productivity and could restrict opportunities for British businesses and workers to succeed in the global economy; calls on the Government to reverse fully and fairly its plans to cut tax credits from next April; and further calls for the Government to invest in growing a more productive economy with a focus on science, technology and green jobs to equip Britain for the future and share more fairly the proceeds of growth."

The debate is expected to start at approximately 1.30pm following today's Urgent Question on the arrest of a former member of the Parachute Regiment and a Ten Minute Rule Motion on Speed Limits on Roads (Devolved Powers).

Timings are approximate as Parliamentary business is subject to change.

Transcripts of proceedings in the House of Commons Chamber are available three hours after they happen in Today’s Commons Debates.

Further education

Motion for debate

The following motion has been tabled for debate:

"That this House believes that a 21st century economy cannot be built on falling investment in education; notes that the 16-19 education budget fell by 14 per cent in real terms over the last Parliament, and that many colleges are reporting severe financial difficulties, including no longer offering courses in subjects key for our country’s competitiveness; further notes that over 100 chairs of further education colleges have warned that further cuts to 16-19 funding will tip their colleges over the precipice, and risk the nation’s productivity; believes that, given that the participation age has now risen to 18 years old, it makes no sense for the post-16 education budget to be treated with less importance than the 5-16 schools budget; further believes there should be a joined-up approach to education across departments; and calls on this Government to protect the education budget in real terms, from the early years through to 19 years old."

The debate is expected to start following the above debate on the Government's record on the economy.

Timings are approximate as Parliamentary business is subject to change.

Transcripts of proceedings in the House of Commons Chamber are available three hours after they happen in Today’s Commons Debates.

Related information

About Opposition day debates

Opposition days are days allocated in the House of Commons in each session for the discussion of subjects chosen by the Opposition.

Seventeen days are at the disposal of the Leader of the Opposition, the leader of the largest opposition party, to decide which matters are debated. Three days are usually divided between the other opposition parties.

The Opposition generally use them to raise questions of policy and administration. Frequently, two separate subjects are debated on an opposition day.

Watching Opposition day debates from the public gallery

UK residents and overseas visitors can watch proceedings in the House of Commons by visiting the public gallery.

Image: iStock

This article was produced by the Commons Digital Outreach Team. Follow the @HouseofCommons on Twitter for updates on the UK House of Commons Chamber.

More news on: Parliament, government and politics, Parliament, Economy and finance, Education, Further education, Economic policy, Commons news

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