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Draft Investigatory Powers Bill Committee publishes written evidence


Over 120 pieces of written evidence which have been submitted to the Joint Committee on the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill, have been published today.

Over 120 pieces of written evidence which have been submitted to the Joint Committee on the Draft Investigatory Powers Bill, have been published today.

The evidence includes submissions from individuals, multinational companies, non-governmental organisations and oversight and law enforcement bodies, as well as detailed evidence from the Home Office.

Chairman of the Joint Committee, Lord Murphy of Torfaen, said:

“The Committee is grateful to the wide range of people and organisations who have taken the time and effort to submit evidence to the inquiry.

“We are aware that the short time available to the Committee for its investigation has been a cause of concern for people who have their own concerns and questions about the draft Bill. Our timetable, set by the two Houses, is certainly a challenging one. However, our witnesses' willingness to work with us to this tight deadline, and the range and quality of the written evidence that has been submitted, is something the Committee acknowledges gratefully. The written evidence, together with that which we have heard in oral evidence sessions, will be vital to our further work.”

The Draft Investigatory Powers Bill would provide a framework for the use of investigatory powers by law enforcement and security and intelligence agencies, as well as other public authorities, and includes provisions for the interception of communications, the retention and acquisition of communications data, the use of equipment interference, and the acquisition of bulk data for analysis.

The Joint Committee is required to report by 11 February this year.

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