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Inquiry on facilitating future UK–EU trade in manufactured goods launched

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26 May 2020

The House of Lords EU Goods Sub-Committee today invites written contributions to its new inquiry "Beyond tariffs: facilitating future UKEU trade in manufactured goods".

The House of Lords EU Goods Sub-Committee today invites written contributions to its new inquiry "Beyond tariffs: facilitating future UKEU trade in manufactured goods".

Background

While both the UK and the EU agree that there should be no tariffs or quotas in the future UKEU trade agreement, manufactured goods face new non-tariff barriers, which could prove costly if left unaddressed. Examples of non-tariff barriers include complex rules of origin or regulatory requirements. 

This inquiry will consider the impact that non-tariff barriers may have on future UKEU trade in manufactured goods and how any adverse effects could be minimised, particularly through the UKEU trade agreement.

Areas of interest

The areas the Committee is seeking evidence on include:

  • The main technical barriers to trade, such as regulations, standards and conformity assessment procedures, and how their impact can be mitigated
  • The form of regulatory cooperation that may be needed
  • Lessons that can be learnt from other trade agreements and agreements on mutual recognition
  • The arrangements on rules of origin and options for maximising the take-up of trade preferences
  • Customs and trade facilitation measures that could support the flow of goods across borders
  • The impact on UK businesses if there is no UKEU trade agreement at the end of the transition period

The Committee invites interested individuals and organisations to submit written evidence as soon as possible and no later than 28 June 2020. The Committee will be taking oral evidence throughout June and July, with the aim of reporting in the autumn.

Further information

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