COMMONS

Committee examines barriers to exporting services

23 April 2019

The International Trade Committee continues its inquiry into UK trade in services. MPs will hear from witnesses representing a range of service sectors about current barriers faced when exporting services, and from manufacturers and service providers about the interaction between goods and services exports.

Witnesses

Wednesday 24 April, Committee Room 18, Palace of Westminster

At 10.00am

  • Alastair Evans, Head of Government Policy and Affairs, Lloyd’s of London
  • Alison Hook, Director, Hook Tangaza
  • Stan McCoy, President and Managing Director, Motion Picture Association EMEA

At 11.00am

  • Mike Hulme, Managing Director, Trains and Modernisation, Alstom UK
  • George Riddell, Associate Director, International Trade Policy, Deloitte LLP (representing the Professional and Business Services Council)
  • Dr Richard Torbett, Executive Director, Commercial Policy: UK and International, the Association of British Pharmaceutical Industry

Inquiry

The Committee’s inquiry is looking at the main barriers faced by UK services exporters, and how the UK should seek to liberalise international trade in services, including by negotiating international agreements and the potential domestic policy implications these agreements may have.

Purpose of the session

In the first panel of this session, the Committee will examine barriers faced by UK exporters of services. The UK is the second largest exporter of services behind the US, with the value of exports in 2017 reaching £277 billion, representing 45% of UK total exports.

The Committee is expected to focus on issues including regulatory transparency in services trade, mutual recognition of qualifications, and movement of people. The three witnesses will also be questioned about barriers specific to their sectors: insurance, legal and professional services, and audio-visual. 

In the second panel of the session, the Committee will hear from representatives of the rail transport and pharmaceutical sectors, as well as the Professional and Business Services Council, about the interaction between goods and services, and the implications of linking the two for trade policy.

The Committee is expected to consider the reasons behind increased content of services in manufactured goods, and how restrictions on international trade in services might affect domestic manufacturers and vice-versa.

Further information

Image: Pexels

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