COMMONS

Legal practitioners, industry and union representatives questioned

12 March 2018

The International Trade Committee holds an evidence session for its inquiry examining the UK Trade Remedies Authority (TRA).

Witnesses

Wednesday 14 March, Wilson Room, Portcullis House

At 10.00am

  • George Peretz QC, Barrister at Monckton Chambers, London
  • Bernard O'Connor, Managing Partner, Nctm, Brussels
  • Daniel Moulis, Founder and Principal of Moulis Legal, Australia

At 11.00am

  • Laura Cohen, Chief Executive, British Ceramic Confederation
  • Cliff Stevenson, Consultant to Trade Remedies Alliance
  • Rosa Crawford, Policy Officer, EU International Relations, TUC

Purpose of the session

Having heard from the Minister of State for Trade Policy, this session will look at the structure and operation of trade remedies authorities in other jurisdictions, and what industry wants from the Trade Remedies Authority, drawing on its experience of the EU’s trade remedies system.

The TRA is part of the framework for the UK’s future trade remedies regime and was announced in the Trade Bill in November 2017. The TRA will both advise and support the Secretary of State to perform certain functions and conduct trade remedies investigations – a function that the UK has not had to perform since its accession to the then EEC in 1973.

First panel

In the first panel of the session, featuring legal practitioners, the Committee will examine key principles underpinning trade defence – measures that, under WTO rules, member states can take to protect domestic industries from disruptive trade flows.

It is also expected to scrutinise the proposed structure and functions of the TRA, including whether the TRA possesses the requisite independence from the Secretary of State and how an appeals mechanism and trade defence tribunal could be structured.

Second panel

The second panel will feature industry and union bodies discussing their practical experiences of the EU’s trade defence system, and what lessons can be drawn from this by the Government.

The Committee is expected to focus on how business concerns are raised and dealt with by the European Commission, and what further regulations may be required to ensure the TRA operates effectively.

Further information

Image: iStockphoto

More news on: Parliament, government and politics, Parliament, Business, industry and consumers, Economy and finance, International trade, International trade, House of Commons news, Commons news, Committee news

Share this page